Center for Africana Studies

http://krieger.jhu.edu/africana/

The Center for Africana Studies (CAS) offers a rigorous focus on African-descended peoples and their cultures across the globe.  Over the past millennium, the contribution, traditions, and values of African, African-American, and African Diaspora cultures helped create the modern and pre-modern world.  Africana Studies, as a field of study, grew from the activist and scholarly traditions of Black Studies and the blending of peoples and ideas between Europe, Africa, and the America.  It therefore offers a broad, multidisciplinary approach to history and culture centered on the interests, conditions, philosophies, conceptual schemes, and value systems of African-descended people everywhere.  Our courses focus on the human experience in the context of social, political, demographic, cultural, religious, and economic systems.  They also offer a unique perspective on racism, colonialism, capitalism, and geography that properly situates the importance of people of color to the making of the modern world.

Africana Studies offers a multidisciplinary curriculum that expands the scope and range of traditional academic disciplines to the presence, roles, cultural contributions, experiences, and particular interests of African peoples and their descendants.      

Requirements for a B.A. Degree

Also see Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree.

Students who choose to major in Africana Studies must complete at least 33 credit hours of course work in three areas of African Studies - African and African Diaspora Studies, African American Studies, and Urban Studies.  All course must be taken for a letter grade and be completed with a grade of C- or better. 

Core Courses (Select three of the following)9
AS.362.104Introduction to the African Diaspora
or AS.362.111 Introduction to African American Studies
or AS.362.122 History of Africa (since 1880)
or AS.100.121 History of Africa to 1880
or AS.100.122 Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880)
Electives
Twelve credits of 300-level or higher Africana Studies courses 12
Twelve credits at any level of Africana Studies courses 12
Total Credits33

Sample Program of Study

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Core course #13Core course #23
  3  3
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Core course #33Africana studies course at any level3
Africana studies course at any level3Africana studies course at any level3
  6  6
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Africana studies course at 300-level or higher3Africana course at any level 3
Africana studies course at 300-level or higher3 
  6  3
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Africana studies course at 300-level or higher3Africana studies course at 300-level or higher3
  3  3
Total Credits: 33

Honors

Students who wish to do honors in Africana Studies are required to take a two-semester research seminar, in which they will prepare an honors thesis in consultation with a faculty advisor in the student’s particular area of interest and the faculty coordinator of the undergraduate research seminar. The research seminar will provide guidance on research design, methodology, and analysis and presentation of findings, and give students an opportunity to discuss one another’s projects, share experiences, and receive constructive comments from their peers as well as the faculty coordinator.

In selecting research topics and collecting materials, students are encouraged to explore resources outside those immediately available on campus. With its rich collection of museums and archives, large and historic African-American communities, and growing populations of recent migrants from Africa, the Baltimore-Washington area offers many opportunities for research in Africana Studies. Students who wish to undertake research in Africa or in African American or African diasporic communities beyond the local area will be encouraged to take advantage of summer research grants and/or study abroad opportunities available at Hopkins. The center will work with other departments and programs at Hopkins on behalf of students who wish to combine their research in Africana Studies with work in another field or ongoing program, such as the joint Minority Health Program recently established by the School of Public Health and Morgan State University.

Undergraduate Minor Requirements

Students who wish to minor in Africana Studies must complete a minimum of 18 credits, including two core courses and electives. Three of the electives must be upper-level courses. All course must be taken for a letter grade and be completed with a grade of C- or better.

Core Courses (Select two of the following)6
AS.362.104Introduction to the African Diaspora
or AS.362.111 Introduction to African American Studies
or AS.362.122 History of Africa (since 1880)
or AS.100.121 History of Africa to 1880
or AS.100.122 Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880)
Electives
Three credits at any level of Africana Studies courses3
Nine credits of 300-level or higher Africana Studies courses9
Total Credits18

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.362.104. Introduction to the African Diaspora. 3.00 Credits.

This course will begin in Africa before Atlantic slave trade, move to cover that trade into Brazil, the Caribbean and South Carolina. Comparisons of slave systems with Africa, Brazil, some parts of the Caribbean and Carolina (later South Carolina).
Instructor(s): P. Romero
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.105. Reading Seminar: Black Society in the Americas. 3.00 Credits.

Jointly offered with Moira Hinderer, based on themes developed from the archives of the Afro-American Newspaper and selected readings of African American Societies from across the hemisphere of the Americas.
Instructor(s): F. Knight; M. Hinderer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.109. Introduction to African American Literature- Part II. 3.00 Credits.

This course will offer students an introduction to the central novels, plays, short stories, essays and poetry that have constituted African American Literature from 1930-1980. By focusing on representative works that span each of the major periods from the Harlem Renaissance to the Black Arts Movement, we will continue to consider the question of race and representation. How does one represent the race? And, for whom should black authors write – a white audience in order to change their minds about black people, or to black people for their pleasure and edification? Over the course of the semester, we will trace the various ways early- to late- 20th century black writers sometimes borrowed from earlier literary traditions and, at other times, developed new ones. In addition, we will hone in on the major debates and central texts that have come to define African American Literature and explore how it has long served as a creative, political, and intellectual enterprise.
Instructor(s): S. Mott
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.362.110. Colonial Encounters: Artistic Responses. 3.00 Credits.

This course disrupts conventional ways of seeing, reading, and examining artistic texts. When we read a novel or study a work of art, especially that produced by white people, we tend to treat it as representative of the nation, talk about its aesthetic genius, or discuss it as reflecting its social/historical moment. Black artistic production, on the other hand, is most often treated as “protest,” as that which simply responds to a national narrative. But what would happen if we treated the experience of black people and other people of color as universal? What would happen if we treated colonialism as the dominant social and intellectual problem of our age?
Instructor(s): S. Mott
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.362.111. Introduction to African American Studies. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to Africana Studies is designed to introduce you to the core concepts, theories, and thinkers of the black diaspora by means of a “keyword” approach. Each week we will focus on one keyword and the way it both shapes and is shaped by the African diaspora from the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the middle of the twentieth century. I argue that much of the modern project, the assembly of instituitions, ideas, interests, and identities, is a product of the brutal encounter between Europe, the Americas, and Africa. It is my hope that by the end of this course we will know more about how this encounter helped to construct modernity, and we will also know a bit more about how this encounter helped shape responses to it.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.362.112. Introduction to Africana Studies. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to Africana Studies is designed to introduce you to the core concepts, theories, and thinkers of the black diaspora by means of a keyword approach. Each week we will focus on one keyword and the way it both shapes and is shaped by the African diaspora from the Trans- Atlantic Slave Trade to the middle of the twentieth century. I argue that much of the modern project, the assembly of instituitions, ideas, interests, and identities, is a product of the brutal encounter between Europe, the Americas, and Africa. It is my hope that by the end of this course we will know more about how this encounter helped to construct modernity, and we will also know a bit more about how this encounter helped shape responses to it.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.362.122. History of Africa (since 1880). 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the African past since 1880.
Prerequisites: Students are not allow to take both 100.122 and 362.122.
Instructor(s): K. Gallon
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.123. Introduction to African American Literature. 3.00 Credits.

This course surveys African American literature and considers the ways the course readings constitute or challenge the idea of an African American literary tradition. Beginning in the 18th century with poetry and freedom narratives and ending in the 1960s, we will look at traditional literature and more polemical writings as both art and sites of struggle over representation. While literary texts will ground the course, students will also engage literary criticism and theory in order to make sense of and better appreciate African American literary form and its place in American literature more broadly.
Instructor(s): S. Mott
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.175. Freshman Seminar: Remembering the Black Power Movement. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores trends, developments, contradictions, and dilemmas related to the Black Power Movement. The objective of studying this historical movement is not to engage in nostalgia, but to think through and learn the lessons of this historic social movement. An active participant in the Black Power Movement as a university undergraduate and graduate student, I do not approach this subject merely as a set of interesting intellectual issues and dynamics that can be explored with complete dispassion and objectivity. Rather, I seek to examine critically some of the contradictions and dilemmas that I, too, was caught up in, seeking to come to grips with and clarify my own participation and activities. We study these historical events with the expectation of making a positive contribution to the future.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.180. History of Black Americans. 3.00 Credits.

This survey course addresses the making and historical experiences of African Americans from the emancipation of slaves in the later nineteenth century to the conclusion of the twentieth century.
Instructor(s): J. Ashton
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.202. Colonial Encounters and Literary Responses. 3.00 Credits.

This course considers how black writers of the diaspora engaged the history and realities of colonialism and imperialism. While some novelists wrote specifically about the colonial encounter and its consequences, others chose to critique the enterprise by rewriting – from the perspective of the colonized – the literary tradition of the colonizing nation. Focusing on works by African, Caribbean, and American writers alongside the British tradition to which they respond, we will look at how diasporic writers thought about and constructed ideas about the world, the self, and the racial Other.
Instructor(s): S. Mott
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.362.204. Women in African History. 3.00 Credits.

Selected readings written by or about notable African women from the 17th century to the present. Themes explored include slavery, power and religion, economics, health and politics.
Instructor(s): P. Romero
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.206. Research Seminar: Baltimore History from the AFRO Newspaper Archives-Community Based Learning. 3.00 Credits.

This small, project-oriented class will introduce you to methods in historical research while exploring major topics in twentieth century Baltimore history. We will use the rich reporting of Baltimore’s Afro-American Newspapers, to explore Baltimore’s place in the larger history of Black urban experience. Students will analyze images and exhibits related to African-American history, as well as research and curate small online exhibits of primary source materials including photographs, newspaper clippings, correspondence, pamphlets, flyers, and maps. We will be among the first scholars to work in the Afro’s rich archival collections, which include over a million images.
Instructor(s): M. Hinderer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.208. From Nok to Nsukka: Approaches to the Art of Nigeria. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to art traditions within Nigeria’s borders; it also explores historiography and the impact of modern nation-building on art history and the development of museum exhibitions.
Instructor(s): K. Gunsch
Area: Humanities.

AS.362.210. African American Women's History. 3.00 Credits.

This course will explore the diversity of African-American women’s lives and the development of women, work, and culture from the colonial era through the late twentieth century. Using primary and secondary sources the class will explore the social, political, religious, and economic factors that produced change and transformation in the lives of African American women.
Instructor(s): A. Coleman
Area: Humanities.

AS.362.220. America, Post-Civil Rights. 3.00 Credits.

This course will explore the role of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and mid-twentieth century reform movements in transforming American politics, economy, and culture since the late 1960s.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.221. African American Poetry and Poetics. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar explores the literary and political influences of poetry written and published by African Americans from the 18th century to the present (from Phyllis Wheatley to Terrance Hayes).
Instructor(s): H. Robbins
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.241. Seeing the Unspeakable: Baltimore, #BLM, and Kara Walker. 3.00 Credits.

The advents of smartphone technology, social media platforms, and the 24-hour cable news cycle has made violent images of Black death and dying ubiquitous. The public consumes these images unremittingly and social movements have used these images to highlight the vulnerable character of Black life globally. However, questions remain as to whether these images work as tools of populist politicization or as sources of entertainment for viewers unsympathetic to the various politics expressed by the Black Lives Matter movement. This course seeks to explore this uncomfortable reality through the artistic renderings of Kara Walker, an acclaimed mixed media artist whose provocative explorations of race, sexuality, and violence offer one lens by which explore this political phenomenon. Additionally, students will spend the semester creating multimedia archival projects that explore these images and their political impact on Baltimore. In doing so, students will explore the politics bound within, pressed upon, and interpreted from the Black body.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.362.304. Reading and Writing Black Poetry. 3.00 Credits.

This course is an exploration of twentieth and twenty-first century black poetry and poetics. Readings include Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, Lucille Clifton, Rita Dove, Natasha Trethewey, Terrance Hayes, Claudia Rankine, and Danez Smith. Texts will be mined for theme as well as formal technique as a basis for poetic experimentation.
Instructor(s): A. Gunn
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.305. Black Code Studies: Black History and Digital Media. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores doing histories of people of African descent in an age of digital and social media. The focus will be on African-descended communities in the United States, but content will range across time space. Examples include: West African digital art communities; the use of slave trade databases to write Caribbean history; and the use of social media in social justice organizing from Paris to Baltimore. Students will explore questions of blackness, race, ethnicity, sex and sexuality, violence and justice while creating digital content using platforms like Wordpress, Omeka, Twitter, and Tumblr. Students will be evaluated on their acquisition of African American and Afrx-Diasporic history; their knowledge of digital and social media platforms; and their ability to creatively and accurately relate the histories of blackness and black people to their representation and discussion online.
Instructor(s): J. Johnson.

AS.362.325. The Role of Place in Racial Ethnic Health Disparities. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to racial/ethnic health disparities, the need to examine the role of “place”, give different definitions of “place”, how the characteristics of where people live affects individual’s health, and how this leads to racial/ethnic health disparities. The course will first examine large-scale measures of place, then down to smaller scale measures. Students will discuss various theories generally associated with racial/ethnic health disparities, as well as, the extension of “place” theories to this topic. Students will apply this knowledge through various assignments and activities about racial/ethnic health disparities of interest. These activities include class discussions, group assignments and development of interventions and solution-focused policy recommendations. This course is being offered for sophomores, juniors and seniors who have completed a statistic course or who have received permission from the instuctor.
Prerequisites: Students may receive credit for AS.280.411 or AS.362.325, but not both.
Instructor(s): C. Bell
Area: Humanities.

AS.362.332. #Digital Blackness. 3.00 Credits.

#BlackLivesMatter, #SayHerName, #ICantBreathe #IfIDieInPoliceCustody #BlackOutDay are just some of the many hashtags that black people have recently created and used on Twitter to protest police brutality and proclaim their full humanity. Over the past two decades Black people have utilized a variety of digital spaces and media to reconfigure the terms and terrain of debates and discussions on what it means to be Black in the United States and larger world. This course is an interdisciplinary investigation into the relationship between historical and contemporary cultural, social and political expressions of Blackness and the digital. More specifically, lectures, readings and class discussions will deconstruct the cultural, political economy and social construction of Blackness in the digital in an effort to uncover the ways that meanings of race more broadly and Blackness more narrowly influences and shapes Black Americans’ present social status and struggles for social justice. This course is designed to provide a “hybrid” experience, including both face-to-face (F2F) and online class meetings.
Instructor(s): K. Gallon
Area: Humanities.

AS.362.340. Power and Racism. 3.00 Credits.

This course investigates the impact of white supremacy and anti-black racism, as a global system of power, on the political development of the United States of America.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.344. Education Politics in Urban America. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar analyzes trends, developments, and future challenges related to the politics of urban public schooling with a concentration on community political dynamics and the struggle for equal educational opportunity and quality education. The course emphasizes the impact of socioeconomic class inequality, racial/ethnic conflict, and gender politics on the changing character of public school reform since the 1954 Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education. Cross-listed with Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.371. Public Health Crisis in Africa. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the historical and current public heath crises in Africa. Topics covered include infectious diseases and viral outbreaks, water and food access, sanitation, education, behavioral health, gender equality, health care and health care access, as well as the link between culture, economics and health. Introduction to Epidemiology is recommended but not required.
Instructor(s): M. Smart
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.362.374. Black Cinema. 3.00 Credits.

Close examination of films directed by African American filmmakers as well as a focus on historical and cultural representation of African Americans in American film.
Instructor(s): H. Robbins; L. DeLibero
Area: Humanities.

AS.362.401. Comparative Slavery in the Americas. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the development of slavery and racial thought in Latin America and the Atlantic World from the fifteenth century until its demise in the middle and late nineteenth century. Readings in social and cultural history are intended to focus on the life and labor of slaves, while readings from economic and legal history evaluate slavery as an institution. Intellectual histories are also assigned in an attempt to map the development of slavery as an institution typified by racial caste. The primary goal of this course is to give students a background in the major historical debates that have shaped the production of the history of slavery, including questions of identity (creolization vs. African survivals), slave agency and control, and economic vs. racial causes of slavery and the slave trade. All of these topics will be examined through the overarching theme of the course, which is the Tannenbaum thesis: namely, to what extent slavery was experienced differently in Latin America, Anglo-America, and in Africa itself.
Instructor(s): J. Clark
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.414. Jim Crow in America. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the cultural, economic, legal, and political factors that led to the establishment and maintenance of racial apartheid in the United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.416. Black Nationalism and its Critics. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar will pursue an in-depth, critical analysis of the history and philosophy of black nationalism and its relationship to other trends in black political thought. Readings from Alexander Crummell, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, James Baldwin, and others.
Instructor(s): A. Culver
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.362.440. Oppression and Revolt. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar examines the history, theory, and practice of oppression and rebellion in Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States of America. The seminar will focus on popular struggles for liberation against systems of slavery, colonialism, sexism, and racism.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.450. Critical Thinking in Africana Studies. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar examines various ideas, theories, and practices of thinkers, writers, and activists whose work and practices have constitued an Africana Studies intellectual tradition. The purpose of this seminar is to teach stdents to read, think, and write critically about questions relative to the formation and history of Africana thought and its intellectual tradition, in particular, and the genealogy of thought and intellectual traditions, in general. We will also think about vrious fields of knowledge that have shaped Africana Studies. The seminar therefore will work through the different meanings of intellectual work and critical thought and theory in Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.501. Independent Study. 0.00 - 3.00 Credits.

This course is available to students who wish to pursue selected, special work that may not be included in the Center's other courses.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes; F. Knight; M. Shell-Weiss; S. Berry.

AS.362.510. Directed Research in Africana Studies. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): F. Hayes; F. Knight; P. Romero
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.590. Independent Study for Africana Studies. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.595. Summer Internship. 1.00 Credit.

Cross Listed Courses

History of Art

AS.010.254. Art and Architecture of Early Christian and Medieval North Africa. 3.00 Credits.

Survey of Early Christian and medieval art and architecture in North Africa, with an emphasis on indigenous developments and cultural exchange in the Mediterranean world, 4th to 13th century. Dean’s Teaching Fellowship course.
Instructor(s): N. Dennis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.305. Global Modern Art: Africa, Asia, the Pacific and the Americas. 3.00 Credits.

Artists around the world grappled with the modern, working through local concerns and struggles but continually engaged with counterparts in Europe, North America, and across the “global South.” This course will introduce art, artists, movements, and institutions of modernism from approximately 1880 to the present and from outside of the northern Atlantic while critically examining the very notion of “global modernism.”
Instructor(s): R. Brown
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

English

AS.060.129. Writing Africa Now. 3.00 Credits.

This course surveys post-2000 literary and cultural production from sub-Saharan Africa. Topics will include debates over genre and fiction’s relevance to African experience, legacies of canonical writing about independence, urban Africa as violent or “tragic” landscape, and problems of scale and geographical context. Readings by authors such as Adichie, Wainaina, Duiker, and Vladislavic, and students will be introduced to the main print and online arteries of African intellectual discussion. This class is for non-majors and does not count towards the English major or minor.
Instructor(s): J. Jackson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.060.340. The Literature of Atlantic Slavery. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar will trace the historical development of the slavery debate in the Atlantic world through examination of key texts from a host of genres and locations—Quaker religious tracts, political documents like the Haitian Declaration of Independence, Cuban antislavery novels, slave narratives, and “classics” of American literature like Melville’s Benito Cereno. We will consider how the institution of Atlantic slavery was variously represented, justified, and criticized, discovering in the process the deep structures of modern slavery discourse. Texts may include: Aphra Behn, Oroonoko; John Woolman's Journal; Robert Wedderburn, The Horrors of Slavery and Other Writings; Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, Sab; Frederick Douglass, My Bondage and My Freedom; Herman Melville, Benito Cereno; Harriet Beecher Stowe, Dred; Antonio Castro Alves, The Slaves.
Instructor(s): J. Hickman
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.060.349. Clint Eastwood, Race, and the American Western. 3.00 Credits.

Drawing from the body of work reflecting the Hollywood gunfighter and outlaw folk-hero Clint Eastwood, the course will investigate American cinematic representations of slavery (and more specifically its absence), the Civil War and racial formation along the United States’ southwestern frontier in films produced from the 1950s through the contemporary period. A focus on the cultural icon Clint Eastwood enables a close examination of American cinematic fantasies of the frontier, frontier violence and the desire to escape or erase the tensions of race and slavery that have deeply permeated the American cultural consciousness, particularly the creation of American masculine ideals. The course will also take decided note of the national shift from liberal “Great Society Programs” of the 1960s to the conservative “neoliberal” social and cultural ideals in the 1980s and 1990s. Our purpose is to consider the organization and reformation of hegemonic power by way of the complex morality play the western film evokes, typically considering the interstitial geographies between civilization and savagery, belonging and alienation, and metropolitan and colonial outpost. We will privilege in our discussions the contested frontiers of racial dominion. The curriculum is complicated by several significant points of departure from the traditional category of the Hollywood-based American western: a film to frame the question of colonialism and resistance, as well as examples of black cinematic efforts re-drawing boundaries of the racial frontier. (Are they formed at the Caribbean, the easternmost littoral? The postindustrial city? Do they correspond to the romance of organized crime and its fantasy of empire?)
Instructor(s): L. Jackson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.060.353. World Literature in Theory and Practice. 3.00 Credits.

This course takes stock of how the current hot topic of “world literature” has evolved from Immanuel Wallerstein’s work on world-systems theory over the course of the last three decades. We will read work by a wide range of literary critics engaged with the topic of world literature, including Franco Moretti, Pascale Casanova, David Damrosch, Emily Apter, and Alex Beecroft, as well as major “world” novels by Herman Melville, Amitav Ghosh, and Chimamanda Adichie. Students will also be introduced to critical approaches that offer a conceptual alternative to the world literature framework, for example, Edward Said’s ideas on worldliness and contrapuntalism, Gaston Bachelard’s phenomenology of the home, Fredric Jameson’s concept of cognitive mapping, and Eric Hayot’s work on literary “world-creation.” We will ask just how broadly the field can be defined before it loses its critical cohesion. In other words, does world literature exist?
Instructor(s): J. Jackson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.060.356. Gordimer and Coetzee: Politics and Form. 3.00 Credits.

A comparative study of major works by the South African Nobel Laureates Nadine Gordimer and J.M. Coetzee. Special attention to critical essays by both writers about each other, as well as about issues of shared historical and literary concern. Topics will include the role of the public intellectual in apartheid-era South Africa, competing scales of literary reception and evaluation (e.g. national, international, and universal), and the relationship between politics, form, and genre.
Instructor(s): J. Jackson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.060.366. Ellison. 3.00 Credits.

After his landmark novel Invisible Man appeared in 1952 and won the National Book Award, Ralph Ellison was one of the most highly regarded and influential American writers. Although his writing—beginning with the powerful short stories and criticism that he published in the 1930s and 40s—was steeped in African American history, literature, music, and folklore, he also thought of himself as part of the great tradition of American, European, and classical literature, from Homer through Joyce. He quickly set to work on a second novel dealing with the assassination of a racist senator during the height of the Civil Rights movement, but he came to the end of his life in 1994 without having completed the novel to his own satisfaction. This massive book, which appeared posthumously in a very abbreviated form as Juneteenth and more recently in the much longer Three Days before the Shooting, reveals the work of a master while at the same time it leaves critics and readers with an exceptional puzzle: What would his final intention have been? Why was he unable to complete the novel? How does it speak to the key issues of African American identity, freedom, and the American ideal that Ellison grappled with all his life? At the same time that he worked on his second novel, Ellison became one of the most prolific and important essayists of the twentieth century, and wrote brilliantly about American race relations from the era of segregation through the twentieth century. Even as he was celebrated by the literary establishment, however, Ellison at times found himself as odds with younger black writers and thinkers who felt that public activism, not just artistic greatness, was required of the African American writer. Using Ellison as a lens through which to see the course of American race relations from slavery to the present, the course will include study of all of Ellison’s major work: the short stories collected in Flying Home; Invisible Man; the essays collected in Shadow and Act and Going to the Territory, as well as others; and Three Days before the Shooting.
Instructor(s): E. Sundquist
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Film and Media Studies

AS.061.328. Gangster Films. 3.00 Credits.

The bad guy as hero from Little Caesar to Goodfellas. Film screenings Th 7:30-10:00 PM, Sun 7:00-9:30 PM. Lab fee: $40.
Instructor(s): L. Bucknell
Area: Humanities.

AS.061.369. The 1930s in Jazz, Film, and Poetry. 3.00 Credits.

The 1930s in Jazz, Film, and Poetry will focus on three art forms, jazz, film, and poetry, both separately and in conversation with each other during a decade of political, economic, technological, and cultural upheaval. A decade after the invention of amplifiers and public address systems, advances in sound recording and synchronized sound revolutionized film and recording arts. Jazz musicians, filmmakers, and poets collaborated on innovative and radical projects, often funded by the New Deal Federal Writers Project. Team-taught by faculty in Film and Media Studies, the Department of Jazz (Peabody), and the Center for Africana Studies, this course will bring together students from Peabody and the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences to engage with issues of art, culture, and politics during a turbulent decade.
Prerequisites: AS.061.140 OR AS.061.141
Instructor(s): H. Robbins
Area: Humanities.

Anthropology

AS.070.103. Community Based Learning - Africa & The Museum. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to Africa, artistic creativity, collection and exhibition: as African history, as anthropology of art and objects, and as public controversy in our national institutions. Works with the Baltimore Museum of Art. Cross-listed with Africana Studies and Programs in Museums and Society.
Instructor(s): J. Guyer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.202. Economic Anthropology. 3.00 Credits.

How do the abstract principles of economics play out in a diversity of times and places? This course surveys anthropological research on the social organization of labor, the political institutions that underlie wealth and property, and the cultural meanings of money and commodities. Through these topics, we will look at enduring debates about the rationality of markets and the nature of capitalism.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.222. Africa in the 21st Century. 3.00 Credits.

Rapid urbanization has created new needs, occupations, entertainments, etc.., outside the “formal sector”. We use anthropological studies, African literature, film and the press on-line to understand making a living.
Instructor(s): J. Guyer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.233. Africa as Laboratory. 3.00 Credits.

Africa, as anthropologists have noted, has long been a “laboratory of the future.” By tracing the intersections of technology and politics, this class considers the various experiments in oppression and liberation that have unfolded within it. Following a broad historical arc, we begin with colonial medicine, racial science, and urban planning; move to national infrastructures and postcolonial resource extractions; and finally consider contemporary African engagements with consumer technology.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.241. African Cities. 3.00 Credits.

Over the past two decades, African cities have absorbed rapid population increase without accompanying economic growth. Students will review the major challenges of this mode of urbanization and explore the vibrant ways residents have sought to meet them. Following anthropology’s commitment to lived experience, we will track these issues through the twists and turns of everyday life, and consider what they may say about urbanity more broadly in the 21st century. Topics include livelihood, the built environment, conflict and membership, and popular culture.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.294. Political Anthropology of Africa. 3.00 Credits.

The course will explore classical and contemporary ethnographies of the political in Africa, examining how their authors address issues of power, hierarchy and symbol. We will study various articulations of state, ethnicity and community that are analyzed by observing relations between power and resistance or between law, economy and violence through war, custom and ritual. The seminar will also address the way in which Africa has been constituted as a key source of the sub-field of political anthropology through colonial trajectories, postcolonial detours and the political imagination of the past and the future.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.611. Postcolonial Worlds: Law, Violence, Sovereignty.

This seminar will address contemporary questions of state and citizenship in the light of colonial and imperial dynamics at the beginning of the twenty-first century: transnational and national sovereignty in relation to local configurations of law, capital and political violence; processes of subsumption, extraction and financialization.Authors include Negri, Arrighi, Harvey, Chakrabarty, Mbembe, Mamdani, Chatterjee, Coronil, Dussel.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

History

AS.100.109. Making America: Slavery, Violence, and the Coming of the Civil War. 3.00 Credits.

An examination of violence - primarily racial and political - in the decades between the American Revolution and Civil War (1789 to 1861).
Instructor(s): R. Walters
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.121. History of Africa to 1880. 3.00 Credits.

A history of Africa from human evolution to the mid-nineteenth century focusing on key themes in social, economic, and political history.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.122. Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880). 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the African past. First term: to 1880. Second term: to since 1880. Cross-listed with Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): E. Thornberry
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.202. Conflict and Co-Existence: The Early Modern Mediterranean. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the dynamic and fluid world of the early modern Mediterranean (1453-1650), where Christians, Jews, and Muslims met, fought, traded with, and enslaved each other.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.205. Freshman Seminar: Health, Healing, and Medicine in Africa. 3.00 Credits.

A freshman seminar introducing students to the history of health, healing, and forms of medical practice in Africa over the last two centuries.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.206. Freshman Seminar: Law, Society, and Power in America, 1500-1877. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the relationship between law, governance, and social structures in America between the start of European settlement and the era of the Civil War. Topics will include Native American and European land claims, the regulation of family life, economic and commercial disputes, and the legal regimes of race and slavery. Throughout, we will consider both the aims of governing officials and how ordinary men and women maneuvered within the legal system. Freshman only.
Instructor(s): S. Damiano
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.211. Freshman Seminar: American Slavery. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar explores the history of American slavery, tracing developments over time and across space, probing the impact of this iniquitous and dynamic institution on societies and individuals, and examining a variety of sources that historians use to construct their narratives. Freshman only
Instructor(s): P. Morgan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.251. From Columbus to Calypso: The Caribbean and the Wider World. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the history of the Caribbean and how five hundred years of colonization, slavery, piracy, rebellion, and revolution have shaped the politics and culture of the islands today.
Instructor(s): L. MacDonald
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.255. The Haitian Revolution in World History. 3.00 Credits.

This introductory seminar examines the revolution that transformed the slave colony of Saint-Domingue into the first black republic and second independent nation in the Americas, and its repercussions around the world. Non-Majors welcome.
Instructor(s): N. Marvin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.311. National Pastimes: Sports, Culture, and American History. 3.00 Credits.

National Pastimes examines the development of sports in the United States over the course of the 20th century with a particular interest in the relationship between sports and politics as well as issues of race, gender, sexuality and class.
Instructor(s): A. Davis
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.316. American Foreign Policy in the Age of Human Rights. 3.00 Credits.

American Foreign Policy in the Age of Human Rights examines competing narratives about the origins of modern international human rights, and explores how those narratives historically informed American foreign policy from the American Revolution up to the present, with an emphasis on the twentieth century.
Instructor(s): K. Sohasky
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.320. Writing U.S. Empire. 3.00 Credits.

Attends to the composition and interpretive problems raised by studying the history of American imperialism, 1880s-1930s.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.321. From Ferguson to Cape Town: The Global Black Freedom Struggle since Slavery. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar underscores the global and historical dimensions of the black freedom struggle through a series of case studies spanning North America, Africa and Latin America. Major themes addresses include race, diaspora, and movement(s) from slavery to the present.
Instructor(s): J. Levy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.343. Diaspora, Nation, Race, and Politics. 3.00 Credits.

For millions of people across the globe, political fate in the 20th century was defined at the intersection of diaspora, race, and nation — and this may be true in the 21st century as well. This course, a collaborative effort involving a historian and a political scientist, explores the parallels and divergences in the deployment of these terms in nationalist and transnational mobilization, literature and aesthetics, and group identity formation in Eastern Europe, Africa and the New World of the Americas. Set against the backdrop of the fall of significant empires in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, we will explore themes of migration, human rights, the nation-state system, and racism through history, political sociology, and political and social theory. We will pay particular attention to the theoretically exemplary Jewish and Black experiences of diaspora, race, and nation, engaging both with how those experiences were specially shaped by the imposition of national and racial logics and with Black and Jewish politics and thought in relation to those categories. Readings include Max Weber, W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Theodor Herzl, Hannah Arendt, Benedict Anderson, Rogers Brubaker, Andrew Zimmerman, Michele Mitchell, David Scott.
Instructor(s): K. Moss; M. Hanchard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.385. Mobility and Encounter in the Medieval Indian Ocean. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar discusses forms of mobility and exchange- trade and travel, conquest and religious transformation, diasporas and migration, the spread of practices and technologies- across the Indian Ocean from the 8th to 16th centuries.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.399. Decolonization and Citizenship in Africa, 1945-2015. 3.00 Credits.

Critically explores issues of decolonization and citizenship in Africa from WWII to the present. Emphasis on political inclusion and exclusion, and violence, fostered by nationalist movements and postcolonial African governments.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.411. Readings in the History of Public Health in the 20th and 21st Centuries. 3.00 Credits.

The students will read major and some minor works in the history of global public health and will each develop their own concept of how and why the major institutions, professions, and practices associated with public health have evolved over the past long century. To help the students focus on their ideas, they will write three essays on particular aspects of the history.
Instructor(s): L. Galambos
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.439. Cuban Revolution and the Contemporary Caribbean. 3.00 Credits.

A lecture course dealing with the development of the Cuban Revolution and the tortuous history of the Caribbean during the 19th and 20th centuries.
Instructor(s): F. Knight
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.440. The Revolutionary Experience in Latin America. 3.00 Credits.

Comparative examinations of revolutionary political changes in Haiti, Mexico, Bolivia, and Cuba. Cross-listed with Latin American Studies
Instructor(s): F. Knight
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.445. African Fiction as History. 3.00 Credits.

An exploration of Modern African history through the African historical novel.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.486. Jim Crow in America. 3.00 Credits.

Explores the history of legalized racial segregation in the United States from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.709. Modern Latin America.

This course will examine selected themes in Modern Latin American history such as legacies of the colonial administrations, the plural societies, political cultures, slavery, and other forms of servitude; religious impact, independence movements, globalization and narco trafficking. Reading knowledge of Spanish required.Reading knowledge of Spanish. Graduate Students only
Instructor(s): F. Knight.

Near Eastern Studies

AS.130.203. Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of Civilizations. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines Africa’s ancient past from the emergence of biologically modern humans, ancient hunter-gatherers, the earliest animal herding and farming populations, to cities and civilizations. While Egypt plays an undeniably central role in world history, this course concentrates in particular on ancient geographies other than Egypt.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.400. Introduction to Middle Egyptian. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650 B.C.). In the second semester, literary texts and royal inscriptions will be read. Course meets with AS.133.600.
Instructor(s): M. Escolano Poveda
Area: Humanities.

AS.131.613. Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of Civilizations.

This course examines Africa’s ancient past from the emergence of biologically modern humans, ancient hunter-gatherers, the earliest animal herding and farming populations, to cities and civilizations. While Egypt plays an undeniably central role in world history, this course concentrates in particular on ancient geographies other than Egypt.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.611. Middle Egyptian Texts.

In this course we read a variety of Middle Egyptian hieroglyphic compositions and documents. Knowledge of Middle Egyptian Required.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan; R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

History of Science & Technology

AS.140.163. Jungle Doctors: Medical Missions in Africa from David Livingstone to Paul Farmer. 3.00 Credits.

Freshman seminar using a variety of primary and secondary sources, students will explore the motivations and activities of expatriates practicing medicine in Africa from the 19th century to the present.
Instructor(s): J. Cummiskey
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.379. Health and the City: Urban Public Health In Historical Perspective. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the history of cities as spaces of public health concern since the nineteenth century, and seeks to understand how social, political, and economic contexts have shaped urban public health interventions.
Instructor(s): E. Anders
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Economics

AS.180.252. Economics of Discrimination. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines labor market discrimination by gender, race and ethnicity in the United States. What does the empirical evidence show, and how can we explain it? How much of the difference in observed outcomes is driven by differences in productivity characteristics and how much is due to discrimination? How have economists theorized about discrimination and what methodologies can be employed to test those theories? What has been the impact of public policy in this area; how do large corporations and educational institutions respond; and what can we learn from landmark lawsuits? The course will reinforce skills relevant to all fields of applied economics, including critical evaluation of the theoretical and empirical literature, the reasoned application of statistical techniques, and analysis of current policy issues.
Prerequisites: AS.180.102
Instructor(s): B. Morgan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.180.355. Economics of Poverty/Inequality. 3.00 Credits.

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.
Prerequisites: AS.180.301
Instructor(s): R. Moffitt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Political Science

AS.190.311. Disposable People: Race, Immigration and Biopolitics. 3.00 Credits.

This course will explore theories and practices of race and immigration in order to illuminate the proliferation of populations regarded as disposable in contemporary politics. We will pay special attention to the contestable criteria used to determine eligibility for membership in the human race. We shall also examine how political power influences the relays between citizenship status and those whose lives are worthy of protection, and those who should be allowed to die.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.339. American Racial Politics. 3.00 Credits.

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.214
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.340. Black Politics I. 3.00 Credits.

This course is a survey of the bases and substance of politics among black Americans and the relation of black politics to the American political system up to the end of Jim Crow. The intention is both to provide a general sense of pertinent issues and relations over this period as a way of helping to make sense of the present and to develop criteria for evaluating political scientists' and others' claims regarding the status and characteristics of black American political activity.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.342. Black Politics II. 3.00 Credits.

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.340.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.360. Power and Democracy in the American City. 3.00 Credits.

How do race and class intersect to shape how democracy works in American cities? In this innovative course students will learn about urban citizenship, authority, and activism using Baltimore as a case. The class, co-taught with Baltimore organizers, will use a community based learning approach.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.365. Black Politics: Black Lives Matter. 3.00 Credits.

Over the past two years the #blacklivesmatter movement has transformed the discussion about policing in American cities. In this course we will examine the broad movement against police brutality through the lens of black politics.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.380. The American Welfare State. 3.00 Credits.

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Obama. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Prerequisites: AS.360.380
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.384. Urban Politics & Policy. 3.00 Credits.

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross-listed with Africana Studies
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.391. Time to Kill: Race, Punishment, Death and Desire. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the role of race in determining who deserves to be punished, the timing and occasions of punitive action and how long punishment should endure. Key to our inquiry is how racialized presumptions about human desire might justify punitive logics of power. The class explores inequalities in the distribution of punishment and death in order to illuminate how race shapes questions of whose time is more valuable, who lives and who dies, and ultimately whose lives count as human.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.395. Crime and Society. 3.00 Credits.

Contrary to the image most Americans have of their country, the United States is a tough nation with respect to crime. The U.S. has constructed a considerably more harsh criminal justice regime than any of its advanced industrial counterparts. In recent years, America’s prisons and jails have held more than one percent of the nation’s adults--2.3 million people–with many more on parole, probation or temporarily free on bail awaiting trial. In Western Europe, by contrast, fewer than two-tenths of one percent of the adult populace is behind bars. This enormous discrepancy in incarceration rates is more a function of the relative severity of America’s criminal laws than differences between Europe and the U.S. in the actual incidence of serious crime. And, of course, while Western European nations no longer execute convicted criminals, the U.S. remains committed to the use of capital punishment. We will explore these and related issues of crime and punishment in the U.S.
Instructor(s): B. Ginsberg
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.337. Mass Incarceration and American Politics. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines why the United States quintupled its incarceration rate over the last 40 years to become the world’s leading jailer and explores the consequences for American politics.
Instructor(s): D. Dagan de Picciotto
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.340. Education Politics in Urban America. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar analyzes trends, developments, and future challenges related to the politics of urban public schooling with a concentration on community political dynamics and the struggle for equal educational opportunity and quality education. The course emphasizes the impact of socioeconomic class inequality, racial/ethnic conflict, and gender politics on the changing character of public school reform since the 1954 Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education. Cross-listed with Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Public Policy

AS.195.609. Policy Analysis in the Real World.

Perm. Req’d. This course teaches students to think analytically and to apply analytic thinking to policy problems. Students work through several real-world problems primarily in social, urban, and health policy, to master the essential steps of any policy analysis: identifying the problem, assessing the available evidence, specifying goals and constraints, and examining policy alternatives. Course goals also include understanding some of the major policy debates of the day, and communicating in a simple, clear, and direct way.
Instructor(s): S. Newman
Writing Intensive.

AS.195.685. Adolescents, Crime, and Justice.

Instructor(s): D. Altschuler.

German & Romance Languages & Literatures

AS.210.391. Advanced Portuguese Language & Literature I. 3.00 Credits.

This third-year course focuses on reading, writing, and oral expression. Under the supervision of the instructor, students will read two complete works by major Brazilian, Portuguese, and/or Afro-Portuguese writers each semester, followed by intense writing and oral discussion on the topics covered. Grammar will be reviewed as necessary. All classes are conducted in Portuguese. Permission required
Prerequisites: AS.210.278 or placement test.
Instructor(s): V. Rodrigues
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.211.319. ¡Salsa! The Afro-Antillean song. 3.00 Credits.

¡Salsa! The Afro-Antillean song surveys Caribbean music in an international Spanish-speaking context. As a language course, it reviews grammar and instils vocabulary acquisition through the close analysis of the biggest hits of salsa from the past one hundred years. On completion of this course the student will have developed the ability to read and critically discuss music and its history in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean and will have examined cultural roots, market dominance, and media crossovers in the musical universe of the Spanish-speaking archipelago of the Antilles. In completing the course’s final project students will apply, synthesize, and reflect on what has been covered in the class by creating a professional dossier individualized to their own personal musical interests. Concepts learned in this course will be directly applicable to careers linked to intercultural and international relations while also apply to multiple careers in media, music industry and dance. There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Not open to native speakers of Spanish. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.
Instructor(s): M. Ramos
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.341. Power and Resistance: Approaches to French Political Thought.. 3.00 Credits.

Even as a coherent, rational conception of state power emerged in France in as early as the Renaissance, French thinkers never stopped challenging the ways by which power justified itself in order to foster obedience and consensus. In so doing, they focused critically as much on the claims of sovereignty issuing from the top as on the willingness of the governed to submit to them. The course will examine the dialectic between the legitimation and delegitimation of power, from the Renaissance wars of religion to the Revolution and beyond: the haunting fear of the corruption and death of the political body; the notion of permanent crisis; the right to revoke the social contract; the reach of power in shaping minds and bodies. Readings may include works by La Boétie, Bodin, Bayle, Rousseau, Sade, Saint-Just, Constant, Maistre, Tocqueville, Foucault, Lefort and Rancière. Readings and discussion in English.
Instructor(s): E. Russo; W. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.394. Brazilian Culture & Civilization. 3.00 Credits.

This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)
Instructor(s): F. De Azeredo Cerqueira
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.215.458. Cuba and its Culture Since the Revolution. 3.00 Credits.

We will study the visual and textual arts, cinema, political culture, and blogosphere; reaching back to the first phases in the building of the revolutionary state apparatus and its sovereign mandate. Taught in Spanish.
Prerequisites: AS.210.312[C]
Instructor(s): E. Gonzalez
Area: Humanities.

AS.215.658. Whose Caribbean? Colonialism and its Legacies.

Readings from colonial times to the present from three cultural legacies, Hispanic, English and French. Centered on slavery and its sequels.
Instructor(s): E. Gonzalez.

Writing Seminars

AS.220.438. Readings in Poetry: Of Late: Poetry & Social Justice. 3.00 Credits.

In this Community-Based Learning course, students will explore poetry of social and political engagement in partnership with high-school age writers from Writers in Baltimore Schools. Participants will put learning into practice by organizing community conversation, reflection, and collaboration. Participation in some events outside of class time will be required.
Instructor(s): D. Malech
Area: Humanities.

AS.220.439. Readings in Fiction: Caribbean Voices. 3.00 Credits.

Caribbean history is reflected in the literature of emigration and collapse of empire. We'll study novels by Naipaul, Rhys, and other 20th century authors.
Instructor(s): W. Biddle
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Sociology

AS.230.205. Introduction to Social Statistics. 4.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.
Prerequisites: Statistics Sequence restriction: students who have completed any of these courses may not register: EN.550.211 OR EN.550.230 OR EN.550.310 OR EN.550.311 OR EN.550.413 OR EN.550.420 OR EN.550.420 OR EN.550.420 OR EN.560.435 OR AS.280.345 OR AS.200.314 OR AS.200.315 OR EN.560.348;Statistics Sequence Restriction: Students who have completed EN.550.111 OR EN.550.113 may not enroll.
Instructor(s): S. Karatasli
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.208. Introduction to Race and Ethnicity. 3.00 Credits.

This course offers an historical overview of race and ethnicity in American society, and the processes that have led to ethnic and racial boundaries. We explore the social dynamics of racial/ethnic hostility and racial/ethnic protest movements. In addition, we examine how race and ethnicity have been used to justify segregation, domination and genocide, but also to create a sense of community, shared responsibility and belonging. Cross-listed with Africana Studies
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.244. Race and Ethnicity in American Society. 3.00 Credits.

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.265. Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students
Instructor(s): M. Kang
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.313. Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public Housing. 3.00 Credits.

Is a neighborhood just a grouping of individuals living in the same place, or do neighborhoods have collective meanings and impacts on children and families? We will capitalize on research methodologies used to define and describe neighborhoods and their effects on economic and educational outcomes. These include case studies, census data, surveys, quasi/experimental data. Focus is on how research measures neighborhood effects and incorporates community level processes into models of social causation (e.g., social capital/control, community efficacy, civic engagement). Also examined: patterns in residential mobility, segregation, and preferences within black and white populations; development of housing policy in the U.S.; programs to determine how neighborhoods affect issues of social importance. Statistics and public policy background is helpful but not required.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.316. African American Family. 3.00 Credits.

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.332. Race, Racism & Racial Privilege. 3.00 Credits.

This course will examine the concepts of race, racism, racial privilege in contemporary America, and the West in general. Examples from other countries will be integrated as well. Historical contexts such as the colonialism, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, and the post Civil Rights era will help to provide an understanding of the social, political, economic, and cultural forces processes that have constructed and shaped the concepts of race and the racialized subject over time.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.356. Contemporary African Social Movements. 3.00 Credits.

This course is a survey of contemporary social movements in sub-Saharan Africa. The course will begin with an introduction to social movement theory. Subsequent weeks will each focus on a different type of movement (e.g. independence movements, labor movements, women's movements, environmental movements, etc.) The limited coverage of African issues in the US media tends to focus on either catastrophes or on development projects that are driven by international NGOs and the governments of northern countries. Through this course, students will gain a clear understanding of the broad range of actions that African civil society is using to address social problems throughout the continent. Materials used will include academic analysis of movements, writings by movement participants themselves, and films. The course will also introduce students to the most widely used social movement theories. Because these theories have been largely developed by social scientists in northern countries, the students will be asked to assess their applicability to African movements. Through this critical application of social theory, students will investigate the specific possibilities and constraints facing social and political actors in contemporary Africa. Cross listed with Dean’s Teaching Fellowship, International Studies (CP) and Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): B. Scully
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.357. Baltimore and Beyond. 3.00 Credits.

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Prerequisites: Students that took AS.360.357 may not take AS.230.357
Instructor(s): S. Deluca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.374. Poverty and Public Policy. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the causes and consequences of U.S. urban poverty, it's implications for health and wellbeing, and explores strategies for addressing it. We cover the major theoretical explanations scholars have advanced to explain the persistence of urban poverty including labor markets, residential segregation, welfare policy, family structure, and the criminal justice system. Within each topic area, students are introduced to a range of interventions aimed at alleviating urban poverty. Students will conduct a formal policy analysis of 20 pages and participate in a mock congressional hearing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Prerequisites: Students that took AS.360.372 may not take AS.230.374.
Instructor(s): K. Edin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.377. Colonialism and Anti-Colonialism. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism and anti-colonial movements. It focuses on the establishment of the colonial division of labor, comparative colonialism, identity formation, and nationalism as well as anti-colonial movement.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.381. Sociology of the Middle East and North Africa. 3.00 Credits.

This course takes a sociological approach to the contemporary Middle East and North Africa. Topics include urbanization and demographic change; rentier welfare states and the global political economy of oil; women in higher education and the labor force; the 2011 Arab Spring; conflict in Syria, Libya, and Yemen; Amazigh (Berber) identity in northwest Africa; Israel-Palestine; “Dubai, Inc.” and the sociology of migrant labor; neoliberal Islamic politics in Turkey; cinema and everyday life in Iran; conservative monarchy in Morocco and Saudi Arabia; and the role of the United States in the MENA region. Students will give presentations, write memos, and submit two papers. One aim of the course is to turn students into clear, polished academic writers and thinkers.
Instructor(s): R. Calder
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.383. Courts, Housing, and the City: A Research Seminar on Social Justice in Baltimore. 3.00 Credits.

This course will join an existing survey of the Housing Court in Baltimore City by the Public Justice Center (PJC) of Maryland to examine the role and process of evictions in the Baltimore civil litigation system. The course will examine the history of housing in Baltimore and the changing role of the courts in housing rights and law from the mid-20th century to the present. Working with the PJC’s Human Right to Housing Project, students will be expected to participate in the survey collection process by attending Rent Court and participating in the data collection process, followed by cleaning and analysis of the data. Counts as American Politics/Sociology of the United States for GSCD Track.
Prerequisites: AS.230.205 AND AS.230.265 or permission of instructor
Instructor(s): D. Pasciuti
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.385. Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America. 3.00 Credits.

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.
Instructor(s): S. Morgan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Public Health Studies

AS.280.120. Lectures on Public Health and Wellbeing in Baltimore. 1.00 Credit.

An introduction to Urban Health with Baltimore as a case study: wellbeing, nutrition, education, violence and city-wide geographic variation. Lectures by JH Faculty, local government/service providers and advocates.
Instructor(s): P. Leaf
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Humanities Center

AS.300.327. Introduction to Comparative American Cultures: Obama and Philosophy. 3.00 Credits.

This course will investigate the philosophical as well as theological, juridical and political, and rhetorical and literary backgrounds that have informed and shaped Barack Obama's writings, speeches, and policy strategies leading up to and during his presidency. While paying minute attention to a few selected controversial debates in domestic and international governance and relations, and while discussing the question of Obama's legacy in and after the upcoming elections, our primary focus will be on understanding the curious blend of Christian realism, influenced by the theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, the tradition of American civic republicanism and pragmatism, and Obama's specific brand of post-Civil Rights, if not necessarily post-racial, politics. All these tenets coalesce in a vision and politics that may well be described as one of deep pragmatism. Attention will be paid to Obama's early appeal to simple ideas and small miracles, each of them yielding the Biblical and sobered injunction of a hope against hope. But extensive consideration of his thought and impact in the assessment of biographers and intellectual historians, legal scholars and political theorists, cultural critics and pundits will add to our attempt to understand and take stock of the Obama phenomenon as well.
Instructor(s): H. de Vries
Area: Humanities.

East Asian Studies

AS.310.308. The Frontier in Late Imperial China. 3.00 Credits.

The tremendous expansion of Chinese frontiers during the late imperial period forced the state and those who lived within it to grapple with complex problems of governance, ethnicity, and the geographic extent of China. Issues and concerns associated with the massive Chinese frontiers have extended into the present; hence, no one can appreciate the current problems plaguing China's northwestern, southwestern, or coastal regions without an understanding of its historical antecedents. This seminar is designed to introduce major scholarly works and theoretical frameworks on the Chinese frontier.
Instructor(s): J. Bandy
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Interdepartmental

AS.360.372. Poverty and Public Policy. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the causes and consequences of U.S. urban poverty, it's implications for health and wellbeing, and explores strategies for addressing it. We cover the major theoretical explanations scholars have advanced to explain the persistence of urban poverty including labor markets, residential segregation, welfare policy, family structure, and the criminal justice system. Within each topic area, students are introduced to a range of interventions aimed at alleviating urban poverty. Students will conduct a formal policy analysis of 20 pages and participate in a mock congressional hearing. Permission of instructor required.
Instructor(s): K. Edin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Program in Latin American Studies

AS.361.207. Afro-Latin American Biography. 3.00 Credits.

In this course, we will examine biographical accounts of men and women of African descent in Latin America and in the broader Black Atlantic. These individuals include conquistadors and slaves, saints and sinners, revolutionaries and ordinary people. In their life stories, we will not only examine questions of race, gender, and religiosity that were central to the construction of identity in the early modern Atlantic world, but also the nature of the sources that allow us to tell their stories.
Instructor(s): J. Clark
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.361.350. Mestizaje and Race in Latin America. 3.00 Credits.

The course problematizes how race and mestizaje became socio-political realities and forms of lived experience in Latin America, shaping such things as governmental practices, spatial configurations, interpersonal relations, and political mobiliations. PLAS Teaching Fellowship.
Instructor(s): A. Reyes Kipp
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality

AS.363.417. Internship/Practicum: Critical Theory and the Possibility of Social Justice. 4.00 Credits.

This course combines a weekly seminar with 4 hours per week in a Baltimore social justice organization, coordinated by the JHU Center for Social Concern. Class discussions draw on readings in ethnography and feminist, queer and critical race studies to address topics such as; race, class and gender inequality, neoliberal development, health, institutional violence and politically engaged research.
Instructor(s): A. Krauss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Program in Museums and Society

AS.389.378. Collections Remix: Black at Hopkins. 3.00 Credits.

We turn a critical eye on our university's material culture and memory under the guidance of local experts on collecting and interpreting materials that represent the African-American experience. Students will develop a strategic plan to guide future collecting on campus and will stage creative interventions with or around objects to reveal hidden stories and rethink existing interpretation. M&S Practicum. CBL course.
Instructor(s): J. Kingsley
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://krieger.jhu.edu/africana/directory/index.html

Faculty

Director

Hollis Robbins
Director, Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies

Co-Coordinator of Undergraduate Studies

Floyd W. Hayes III

Faculty

Katrina Bell McDonald
Department of Sociology

James Calvin
Carey Business School

Nathan Connolly
Department of History

Jane Guyer
George Armstrong Kelly Professor, Department of Anthropology

Michael Hanchard
Department of Political Science

Floyd W. Hayes, III
Center for Africana Studies

Hollis Robbins
Chair, Department of Humanities, Peabody Institute

Lester Spence
Department of Political Science

Debra Furr-Holden
Department of Mental Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health

Professor Emeritus

Sara Berry
Department of History

Affiliated Faculty

Kim Gallon
Center for Africana Studies

Pier Larson
Department of History

Ron Walters
Department of History

Philip Morgan
Harry C. Black Professor, Department of History

Niloofar Haeri
Chair, Department of Anthropology