Anthropology

http://anthropology.jhu.edu/

The Anthropology Department specializes in socio-cultural anthropology: the study of social and cultural forms of human life using ethnographic, historical, and comparative methods. Faculty in our department are engaged in research that addresses topics considered traditional such as the study of ethnicity, language, religion, family and kinship, or medical pluralism, and also new and emergent issues such as those relating to childhood, technological imaginaries, biomedicine, ecology, state, violence, and popular economies. In all cases, the acute awareness of shifting contexts in which institutions are embedded and the impact of global, regional, and national politics on social life is built into the methodology and the theory engaged by faculty and students. Faculty in our department have research expertise in the Americas, South Asia, the Middle East, and sub-Saharan Africa. Our research is oriented toward the investigation of a number of cross-cutting themes of trans-regional concern rather than a comprehensive coverage of global cultural areas.

The department’s distinctive orientation to anthropology can be characterized in terms of its orientation to non-European anthropological and philosophical traditions, alongside the dominant anthropologies which have been seen as definitive of the discipline in the past. In terms of specific topics, faculty in our department are engaged in research on violence, social suffering and theories of everyday life; the material and moral force of the state; money and value; environments; new kinship; anthropology of religion and secularism; anthropology of medicine; media and visual anthropology; health and well-being; and anthropology of language.

The department offers a B.A. program and a Ph.D. program. The B.A. prepares students either to continue to various employment opportunities or degree in anthropology (and related fields) or to develop anthropological skills and imagination as complementary to pre-professional training, such as medicine, engineering, and international relations. Undergraduate course work offers an introduction to the basic methodologies and theories of contemporary anthropology through discussion and directed research on these and other topical issues. Student advising helps interested students to develop concentrations, through sequences of complementary courses tailored to their own interests, including electives outside the department. In addition, majors have the option to pursue an honors program.

Undergraduate majors in anthropology are required to do ten courses, four of which are required courses and an additional four must be taken at 300-level or higher, in addition to a language requirement. Students wishing to write an honors thesis are also required to do two additional courses in which they work on their dissertation topics. Minors are required to take seven courses, four of which are required courses.

The core curriculum for majors develops a step-wise sequence from the freshman seminar to the senior honors option. We offer an elective 100-level Freshman Seminar that introduces anthropological approaches to a broad range of contemporary issues. Here, we hope to develop curiosity in anthropology as a way of knowing the world, and to encourage critical reflection by students on their own life experiences. Our 100-level introductory course, Invitation to Anthropology, is geared toward freshmen and sophomores. The objective of this course is twofold: to offer anthropological knowledge and analytic skills to a broad range of students, and to prepare potential majors for further training in social theory and fieldwork methods. Following from this introductory course, our 200-level Ethnographies course furthers student understanding of essential themes through close attention to classic and contemporary ethnographic works in the discipline. The 300-level Methods course is an additional requirement for majors, deepening students’ capacity to link theory and method, preparing students to carry out field research, and guiding students in the writing up and presentation of original research. Building on these foundations, the 400-level Logic of Anthropological Inquiry course, also required of majors, is a thematic capstone course that demands an extended engagement with classic debates and encourages integrative thinking across the range of anthropology courses taken. Majors in anthropology may decide to pursue an honors thesis based on an extended research project. They should discuss their interest in writing a thesis with their faculty advisor in their sophomore year and before the summer of their junior year. Drawing from their previous course preparation and working closely with a faculty advisor, such students spend one summer conducting field research, one semester conducting secondary literature review, and the final semester writing their honors thesis.

Outside of the core curriculum, both majors and minors may take a wide variety of courses. Thematic courses are highly varied and reflect faculty interests, usually including (in any one year) courses in religion and philosophy; medical, legal, economic and linguistic anthropology; and study of diverse areas of the world. Courses on the state, law, and money offer a critical and comparative approach for students aiming toward political, economic, and legal careers. Courses in medical anthropology serve pre-med and public health students. Philosophical and theoretical courses are attractive to humanities students. We see teaching and research as integrally linked, and invite undergraduate students to envisage research as they take introductory and advanced courses in anthropology.

The training of graduate students focuses on providing students with a vocabulary and grammar to engage in anthropological reasoning in socio-cultural anthropology and with skills in research methods. The department emphasizes training in anthropological theory in relation to new developments in other disciplines within the social sciences; understanding of regions in terms of cross-cutting questions rather than geographical questions alone; and the capability to place a problem within a broad history of anthropology that is engaged through multiple national and regional traditions.

Our faculty brings into the classroom an extraordinary range of personal and professional experiences. We are proud to have one of the most diverse faculties in the discipline worldwide, both in terms of gender and ethnic or national origins. Their collective fieldwork experience spans the world, including the Americas, the Middle East, sub-Saharan Africa, and South Asia.
 

Facilities

In addition to the regular departmental colloquium where invited speakers from Hopkins and other campuses around the world present their ongoing research, the department holds one or two special symposia every year, including one organized by graduate students. The department also invites a distinguished scholar each year to present the Sidney W. Mintz Lecture. The purpose of the Mintz lectures is to integrate scholarly and social concerns, focusing on questions of political and economic inequality, racism, gender, and ethnic differences from an interdisciplinary perspective. Previous lectures have subsequently been published in Current Anthropology.

The Baltimore-Washington area is unusually rich in library, archival, and museum resources relating to anthropology. In addition to the excellent collection in the Milton S. Eisenhower Library, the William H. Welch Medical Library, and other libraries at Johns Hopkins, major anthropological holdings are available at the Smithsonian Institution, the Library of Congress, and the other specialized libraries and museums in nearby Washington, D.C. Students can use the Smithsonian Institution’s ethnological and library collection through a cooperative arrangement.

Financial Aid

Undergraduate majors and non-majors are eligible to apply for a Provost’s Undergraduate Research Award to support special research and write-up projects in their senior year.

Graduate fellowships and teaching assistantships are available, and most students admitted receive support. Stipends are currently offered at $28,500 per year plus fellowships that cover tuition. Some additional funds are usually available on a competitive basis for summer field research (including travel grants from the Institute for Global Studies, the Program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, and the Program for Latin American Studies), for special language-learning needs, and for dissertation write-up; the award of an Owen Fellowship in Arts and Sciences provides an additional $5,000 per year for three years on a competitive basis. Write-up students may apply for a Dean’s Teaching Fellowship.

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Courses in the department are open to all students in the university, regardless of their majors. Although there are no formal prerequisites, students with no previous courses in Anthropology are encouraged to consider courses at the 100- or 200-level. Freshman seminars are designed to introduce students to different perspectives within anthropology through close examination of a contemporary issue.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

(Also see Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree)

To fulfill B.A. degree requirements with an anthropology major, students must complete a total of 30 credits (10 courses) in Anthropology and foreign language through the intermediate level. Only with permission of the director of undergraduate studies may students use one class taken at another institution towards the major. Students must take completed course materials to the director of undergraduate studies to discuss this exception. Majors must receive a grade of C or better in all major requirements and no major requirements may be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Complete major requirements are:

Required Courses
AS.070.132Invitation to Anthropology3
AS.070.273Ethnographies3
AS.070.317Methods3
AS.070.419Logic of Anthropological Inquiry3
Anthropology Electives *
Two 100-400 level courses in the Anthropology Department6
Four 300- or 400-level courses in the Anthropology Department **12
Foreign Language
Foreign language through the second semester of the intermediate level
*

One cross-listed course taught outside the Anthropology Department may apply towards the major.  With permission, one independent study may apply towards the major.

**

Students pursuing honors in the major may apply the senior essay courses towards their required electives.

Honors Thesis in Anthropology

Students with at least a 3.5 GPA (major GPA) by their junior year are encouraged to write a senior thesis by registering for the two-semester Senior Essay (AS.070.561 Senior Essay-Fall and AS.070.562 Senior Essay - Spring) under the guidance of a faculty advisor.

Sample Program of Study

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.070.132Invitation to Anthropology3Anthropology elective (AS.070.1xx-4xx)3
Foreign language4Foreign language4
  7  7
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Anthropology elective (AS.070.1xx-4xx)3AS.070.273Ethnographies3
Foreign language3Foreign language3
  6  6
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.070.317Methods3AS.070.319Logic of Anthropological Inquiry3
Anthropology elective (AS.070.3xx-4xx)3Anthropology elective (AS.070.3xx-4xx)3
  6  6
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Anthropology elective (AS.070.3xx-4xx)3Anthropology elective (AS.070.3xx-4xx)3
  3  3
Total Credits: 44

Minor in Anthropology

A minor in anthropology is available to undergraduate students in any major. One independent study may apply towards minor requirements. Minors must receive a grade of C or better in all minor requirements and all course must be taken for a letter grade (no satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading). One cross-listed course taught outside the Anthropology Department may apply towards the minor; all other courses must be taken in the department. Only with permission of the director of undergraduate studies may students use one class taken at another institution towards the minor. Students must take completed course materials to the director of undergraduate studies to discuss this exception. If one of these is accepted, the student may not take a cross-listed course.

Requirements for the minor are:

Required Courses
AS.070.132Invitation to Anthropology3
AS.070.273Ethnographies (new course name Ethnographies)3
AS.070.317Methods (new course name Methods)3
AS.070.419Logic of Anthropological Inquiry (new course name The Logic of Anthropological Inquiry)3
Anthropology Electives *
One 100-400 level course in the Anthropology Department3
Two 300- or 400-level courses in the Anthropology Department6

Ph.D. in Anthropology

The graduate program in anthropology leads to the Ph.D. degree. By admitting a small cohort each year, the Department of Anthropology encourages close working relationships between students and faculty and the opportunity for students to develop their anthropological interests in ways that are uniquely suited to them to become researchers, scholars, and teachers. We also encourage and help develop students wishing to pursue non-academic research careers in keeping with the needs of the contemporary world.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students will usually spend three years in residence, one year or more conducting field research, and a final year completing the dissertation. Requirements include:

  • A total of ten courses to be completed in the first three years. The first of these courses is Proseminar and is a requirement for incoming students.
  • Students will sit a three-hour exam near the end of their first year. Incoming graduate students will be provided with a reading list at the start of the summer before the academic year to initiate their self-directed growth as anthropologists and to help them prepare for the exam.
  • Students are expected to conduct exploratory fieldwork during the first summer. They are to write a proposal for this fieldwork and discuss their work upon return in a departmental methodology workshop. This workshop accompanies the Methods course, which is a requirement for students in their second year.
  • For the comprehensive exams, students are required to write two essays (one conceptual and one on their study area). These essays will ideally also help develop their dissertation research proposal. The essays should preferably be completed by the end of the second year. A course called Regions has been developed to assist students in writing the essays.
  • Students are also encouraged to take the Proposal Writing course offered and to apply for fieldwork grants from external agencies.
  • A student should be able to demonstrate a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language relevant to his/her field of study before completing the comprehensive exams
  • A Post-Field course will be offered to those returning from the field to help them begin writing their dissertation, along with relevant professionalization workshops as needed. Post-field students are required to give a seminar on their research in the departmental colloquia series.

For further information about graduate study in anthropology, contact the academic program administrator in the Department of Anthropology or visit the departmental website at http://anthropology.jhu.edu.

Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Degrees

Students may petition the department and the graduate board to create joint Ph.D. courses of study. Past cases have included Anthropology/Public Health and Anthropology/Intellectual History (in the Humanities Center).

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.070.103. Community Based Learning - Africa & The Museum. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to Africa, artistic creativity, collection and exhibition: as African history, as anthropology of art and objects, and as public controversy in our national institutions. Works with the Baltimore Museum of Art. Cross-listed with Africana Studies and Programs in Museums and Society.
Instructor(s): J. Guyer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.104. Special Opportunities in Undergraduate Learning: Anthropology of Sound. 1.00 Credit.

This course explores recent discussions on the possibilities of sound to challenge and expand conventional methods used in the humanities, contemporary social research, and the natural sciences. Drawing from a range of philosophical, historical, psychoanalytic, linguistic, anthropological, artistic, and scientific sources; students will discuss the ways sound has been historically experienced, represented, produced, classified, cancelled, and circulated in different parts of the world. These topics will be examined through reading assignments, listening sessions, and weekly sound recording assignments.
Instructor(s): G. Valdivia Corrales
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.106. Brains/Minds: An Anthropological Critique. 3.00 Credits.

Are our minds the products of our physical brains? Can biological mechanisms of the brain explain the diversity of our mental lives? This course will explore the strange ways in which contemporary neurosciences influence and change our conceptions of mind, selfhood and interpersonal relations. We will examine the psychobiological accounts of behavior and their anthropological critique thereby tracking the hopes and anxieties that accompany and surround the contemporary transformation of ideas and techniques in modern psychobiology.
Instructor(s): B. Polat
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.112. Troubling Africa: Bodies, Politics, Experience of the Well-being. 3.00 Credits.

The course seeks to engage students on the question of how well-being is construed in African contexts. By examining well-being through an ethnographic lens, we will explore the construction of “Africa” for the way it gives shape to particular ideas about the body, politics and experience. Well-being as an ethnographic object has a rich history in various African locales, and continues to be an important trope in contemporary life, whether figured as wealth, health, and stability or as loss, disease or disorder. In order to trouble both notions of well-being and the idea of “Africa”, the course will do two things: firstly, we will look for the ways in which the geo-cultural notion of an “African” experience has informed scholarly analysis, political histories, and modes of governance. Reading critically will allow us to de-stabilize the categories of life and well-being that are ascribed to, and claimed by, “Africans”. Secondly, we will examine particular forms of trouble that often attach to the imagination of Africa, with specific reference to forms of mental, physical and social disorder. Rather than arriving at a deconstruction of the idea of Africa, or suggesting a vital form that is essential to Africa, the course relies on ethnographic and historical modes of exposition to ask a series of questions about local lives. While grounded within anthropology the course will read texts that go beyond the borders of the discipline, both scholarly and popular, in order to track the development of specific ideas about well-being in Africa and to examine anthropology’s involvement in these ideas. The course is organized thematically rather than adhering to a chronological or spatial logic. The intention is to place together quite different texts that work in tension to illuminate the particular theme for each week.
Instructor(s): T. Cousins
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.113. Freshman Seminar: Anthropology of Iran. 2.00 Credits.

This course introduces students to contemporary Iran through ethnographies, film, novels and poetry. No background necessary. It is open to Freshmen and to those who want to minor in Islamic Studies.
Instructor(s): N. Haeri
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.122. Climate Change in Everyday Life. 3.00 Credits.

Climate change is the average of weather over long periods of time. It is usually studied by means of global simulation models. More recently human activity affecting the climate has also begun to be studied and with it the effects of climate change on the human body, activity and society. In this course we will draw upon film, scientific reportage, ethnography, literature and philosophy to explore the human embodiment of climate change within everyday life.
Instructor(s): N. Khan; R. Tobias
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.123. Christianities in Cross-Cultural Perspective. 3.00 Credits.

This introduction to the budding field of Anthropology of Christianity will help students learn about the diversity of Christianities that have emerged as Christian religious ideas and practices have been promoted and propelled in various regions of the world. As students, investigators and scholars of religion, how do we make sense of, and describe, the wide array of ideas and experiences that Catholic, Protestant and Pentecostal Christians of various cultural backgrounds hold to be true?
Instructor(s): N. Mahadev
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.129. Introduction to the Anthropology of the Middle East. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces the students to some of the main themes and debates shaping the anthropology of the Middle East. It will begin by critically analyzing the definition of the 'Middle East' and of the 'Orient' and by presenting an overview of the 'zones of theory' which haracterized the discipline at its inception. It will then explore the contemporary re-articulations of such themes and the emergence of new themes and debates, such as the secular/religious divide, the modernity debate, the anthropology of Islam and the ethical turn, gender and feminism, neoliberalism, consumerism, cosmopolitanism, migration and mediation. The objective is to convey the main lines of anthropological inquiry within each theme, and to show their relevance to the understanding of contemporary Middle Eastern societies.
Instructor(s): P. Abenante
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.132. Invitation to Anthropology. 3.00 Credits.

In this course students will be introduced to anthropological modes of asking questions about the changing world through an openness to the new and through returning to classics in the anthropological canon. The specific topics to be explored are: new modes of mapping, visualization and scenario building, the interface between technology and experience, global governance structures, and, the possibility of a new planetary ethos in the face of climate change.
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.133. Studying the HIV/AIDS Epidemic. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the study of the HIV/AIDS epidemic as scholars in the social science and humanities have undertaken it. The readings will include ethnographies of the disease in the non-west and short theoretical readings to complicate notions of health, pleasure, healing and cure. Furthermore, by focusing on the various regions of Africa, the course hopes to demonstrate the manner in which the social and cultural landscape change the experience of the epidemic.
Instructor(s): V. Saria
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.134. Chemical Pollution and Social Life. 3.00 Credits.

The present is marked by a ubiquitous exposure to different sorts of toxic chemicals: from disasters that affect entire communities to the built environments in which we live and work, from the traces of pesticides in our food to the worldwide disrupting effects of oil production. Drawing from social theory, ethnography, environmental history, policy documents, newspaper articles, commercial ads, and documentaries, this course will introduce anthropology as a way of thinking through the interactions between processes of chemical pollution and social worlds.
Instructor(s): J. Moreno Garcia
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.138. Thinking Through Pain. 3.00 Credits.

Despite being a common experience, pain remains a mystery for both medicine and the humanities. Can it be described? Measured? Eliminated? Is it the same for everyone? This course explores some of the ways in which pain is represented, interpreted and addressed in contemporary clinical and social settings, combining ethnographic and testimonial literature with fiction and film to illuminate key ethical and political issues at stake in defining and treating pain.
Instructor(s): P. Madariaga Villegas
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.139. Markets and Morals. 3.00 Credits.

This course studies forms of exchange as they are imagined and experienced across diverse political and religious settings. The aim is to understand the cultural rationalities and moral dimensions of economic ideas and activities, such as gifts, commodities, sacrifice, investment, credit, debt and value.
Instructor(s): A. Saraf
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.144. Anthropology and Visual Media. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the production of visual media within anthropology. We look at the particular ways in which visual media such as film, television, and photography shape anthropological practice.
Instructor(s): C. Venkataramani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.154. Maps and Mapping. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores maps as cultural documents and ethnographic sites. Students will learn how cultural understandings of space, time, and the visible world shape cartographic conventions. Through mapping exercises we will explore how ethnographer can use maps to theorize the nature of political, cultural, and economic life.
Instructor(s): D. Poole; V. Procupez
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.179. Child Adoption and Family Making. 3.00 Credits.

The course takes child adoption as a starting point to critically explore how kinship and family are connected to legal practices, technological innovations, and broader historical, political, and socio-economic processes. Dean’s Prize Freshman Seminar
Instructor(s): A. Reyes Kipp
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.189. Islamic Critique: Ethical and Political Reasoning. 3.00 Credits.

This course investigates the concepts and practices of critique available in contemporary Muslim societies. Focusing on moral and political dimensions of critique, we examine genealogies and exchanges among Islamic traditions and those of the European Enlightenment. Dean’s Prize Freshman Seminar.
Instructor(s): J. Bush
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.202. Economic Anthropology. 3.00 Credits.

How do the abstract principles of economics play out in a diversity of times and places? This course surveys anthropological research on the social organization of labor, the political institutions that underlie wealth and property, and the cultural meanings of money and commodities. Through these topics, we will look at enduring debates about the rationality of markets and the nature of capitalism.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.203. Healing: Politics and Poetics. 3.00 Credits.

Metaphors of health and illness; individual and social. The body in pain and the body politic. Ethnographies of historical memory vis-à-vis medicine, epidemics, sacredness, shamanism, terror, humanitarianism, truth and reconciliation.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.204. An introduction to Islamic Intellectual History. 3.00 Credits.

This course will study the vibrant world of the Seljuks, an Islamic empire that flourished between 1037 and 1157 AD, from Khorasan across Baghdad to Hijaz and Anatolia. As an exploration in intellectual history, we will attempt to understand the social world of the Seljuk Turks through political, religious, and literary texts. We will first read a political treatise, Siyasatnama (The Book of Government), written by Nizam al-Mulk (1018-1092), the formidable minister of the Seljuk Empire, who oversaw the reign of three successive sultans during the second half of the eleventh century and created a strong bureaucratic state for the Seljuks. During his administration, he commissioned the development of madrasas, colleges dedicated to the teaching of Islamic law, theology, literature, and history. The most famous of these madrasas was the Baghdad Nizamiyya where Al-Ghazali (1058-1111) taught from 1190 and 1194. We will read Al-Ghazali’s Deliverance from Error in order to explore the state of religious learning at the peak of the Islamic Golden Age. Having discussed the political and religious foundations of Islamic orthodoxy in the eleventh century, next we turn to the rise of heterodox movements that challenged the authority of the Seljuk state. We will briefly examine the history of the Ismaili branch of Shia Islam, focusing on the politico-religious ideas of its most potent representative, Hassan-i Sabbah (1050s-1124). Finally, we will end our class with the Rubaiyyat of Omar Khayyam (1048-1131), the prominent poet and polymath of the eleventh century.
Instructor(s): B. Polat
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.205. Post-Soviet Russia: An Anthropological Perspective. 3.00 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to anthropology’s contribution to ongoing conversations about Russia’s political and economic system, social life, as well as Russia’s place in the world since the fall of the Soviet Union. Students will be encouraged to think beyond easy distinctions between socialism and post-socialism, Putin’s Russia and the West, often starkly and unreflexively established by commentators and in the media. Topics will include post-socialist transition, memory, violence and war, gender and sexuality.
Instructor(s): G. Hervouet-Zeiber
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.211. The Production of European Culture. 3.00 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of “cultural production” in Europe, from literature and performance to museums and public art.
Instructor(s): A. Brandel
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.222. Africa in the 21st Century. 3.00 Credits.

Rapid urbanization has created new needs, occupations, entertainments, etc.., outside the “formal sector”. We use anthropological studies, African literature, film and the press on-line to understand making a living.
Instructor(s): J. Guyer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.224. Plastic. 3.00 Credits.

Plastic is a ubiquitous substance in the contemporary world. Ideas about the plasticity or malleability of human nature are also pervasive. Drawing on anthropology, history of science, environmental studies, art, design, films and other media, this course will examine the plastic dreams and nightmares that haunt our lives today.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.226. Chemical Pollution and Social Life. 3.00 Credits.

The present is marked by a ubiquitous exposure to different sorts of toxic chemicals: from disasters that affect entire communities to the built environments in which we live and work, from the traces of pesticides in our food to the worldwide disrupting effects of oil production. Drawing from social theory, ethnography, environmental history, policy documents, newspaper articles, commercial ads, and documentaries, this course will introduce anthropology as a way of thinking through the interactions between processes of chemical pollution and social worlds.
Instructor(s): J. Moreno Garcia
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.228. Photography and Writing: Crafting an Anthroplogical Text. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores resonances between photography and anthropological writing. Students will be introduced to basic techniques in photographic composition. How do photography and anthropology share techniques of rendering people, places, and things? Other topics include the role of sensation, reflection, and creativity in depicting a scene, as well as care and ethics. Students will develop an individual project that folds photographic sensibilities into the writing process.
Instructor(s): M. Sehdev
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.230. From Jihad to Revolution: The Political Struggles of Women in the Middle East. 3.00 Credits.

The course explores the role of women as political prisoners, combatants and activists in the modern history of the Middle East using a multidisciplinary approach. It explores the history of women’s engagement in political struggles in the Middle East over the long durée starting with anti-colonial movements in the 20th century up until the recent uprisings known as the “Arab Spring”. The course is geared towards the examination of the ways in which politics, in a broad sense, is gendered in the Middle East by examining how the social and political construction of women as political subjects influence the nature and practice of political life, as well as the ways in which sexual difference has served as a basis for social and political organization.
Instructor(s): F. Halbouni
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.233. Africa as Laboratory. 3.00 Credits.

Africa, as anthropologists have noted, has long been a “laboratory of the future.” By tracing the intersections of technology and politics, this class considers the various experiments in oppression and liberation that have unfolded within it. Following a broad historical arc, we begin with colonial medicine, racial science, and urban planning; move to national infrastructures and postcolonial resource extractions; and finally consider contemporary African engagements with consumer technology.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.241. African Cities. 3.00 Credits.

Over the past two decades, African cities have absorbed rapid population increase without accompanying economic growth. Students will review the major challenges of this mode of urbanization and explore the vibrant ways residents have sought to meet them. Following anthropology’s commitment to lived experience, we will track these issues through the twists and turns of everyday life, and consider what they may say about urbanity more broadly in the 21st century. Topics include livelihood, the built environment, conflict and membership, and popular culture.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.259. Gift and Sacrifice. 3.00 Credits.

How do gifts become the foundation of society? How does the fetish take control over a person? What is the meaning of the ritual sacrifice of living beings and things? The course will explore classical and contemporary anthropological explorations of circulation, exchange, of power, dread and desire.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.262. Cuban Intellectuals, Cinema, and the State. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the relationship between intellectuals and the Cuban state, focusing on how cinema and other arts have been mobilized both as propaganda and as sites for social criticism. Screenings are required for this course and will take place on Tuesdays from 7 pm to 9:30 pm. Cross-list: Film and Media Studies, PLAS, Romance Languages.
Instructor(s): L. Humphreys
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.264. Discover Hopkins: What is Scientific Experimentation?. 2.00 Credits.

How do scientists design and conduct experiments? In what ways experimental results advance our understanding of scientific theories? In this introductory course, we will discuss how experimentation contributes to scientific knowledge making. Reading a number of key articles, we will explore the ways in which an experimental model is developed in behavioral neuroscience. We will discuss how neurobiologists interpret psychological concepts and theories by drawing on animal experimentation.
Instructor(s): B. Polat
Area: Humanities, Natural Sciences.

AS.070.268. Anthropology of Health and Disease. 3.00 Credits.

This course offers a wide-ranging study of the problems of disease and health, including the areas of birth and reproduction, poverty and local ecologies of care, death and dying, and sexuality. Considering these areas across world regions, this course invites students to question the lines of normal and abnormal, the margins of institutions, the measures of success in global health, and the transformation of living and dying in relation to violence, institutional failure, and new technologies.
Instructor(s): C. Han
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.271. Media, Culture, and Publics. 3.00 Credits.

How do media shape local and global publics? This course examines methodological and theoretical accounts of media and its impact on ideologies and practices of nationalism, religion, citizenship, and socialism.
Instructor(s): L. Humphreys
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.273. Ethnographies. 3.00 Credits.

What does it mean to translate the field onto the page? This course explores the craft of ethnography and its relationship to anthropological knowledge. Reading a series of classic and contemporary works, and engaging in our own writing experiments, we attend to the knotty problem of rendering lived experience, attending to narrative, voice, structure, and the relationship between description and analysis.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.275. Reproduction, Kinship, and the State. 3.00 Credits.

What makes a relative? How are reproductive futures made and unmade? This course takes reproduction as site to examine the interplay of kinship relationships and the state. We will take topics including adoption, gay parenting, the medical and social aspects of childbirth, and reproductive technologies to explore how reproductive futures are unevenly distributed, endured, aspired to, and re-made.
Instructor(s): C. Han; C. Sufrin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.277. Contested Indigeneity. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the diversity of indigenous peoples and their situations globally, as well as to their agency and innovation in grappling with challenges across a range of social systems, political contexts, and ecological conditions. Cross-list: PLAS
Instructor(s): E. Cervone
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.279. Ecological Anthropology. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores questions of nature, ecology, and environment from an anthropological perspective, drawing on case studies from around the globe. Topics will include human and animal relations, forest and marine livelihoods, industrial development and activist politics, as well as the urban ecology of Baltimore.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.281. Home and Belonging. 3.00 Credits.

In this course we will examine different conceptions and experiences of home through studies of domesticity, kinship and household in diverse cultural settings. Reading anthropological analysis of urban built environment and locality, we will explore the notions of home and homeland, as realms of care, intimacy and belonging yet also as sites of subjection, discrimination and gender/racial inequality.
Instructor(s): V. Procupez
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.285. Understanding Aid: Anthropological Perspectives for Technology-Based Interventions. 3.00 Credits.

This course combines anthropological perspectives with the discussion and examination of technology–based interventions in the field of development and aid policies, with particular focus on activities related to water resources, sanitation, and hygiene. Readings and discussions analyze some of the theoretical, historically rooted, and practical issues that challenge those who hope to provide effective aid. A key aim of this course is to provide students with better understanding of cultural, social, environmental and economic issues relevant to technical intervention in developing countries.
Instructor(s): E. Cervone; W. Ball
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.286. Crafting Community Development Projects in Baltimore. 3.00 Credits.

Students will craft community development project proposals in the areas of education, health, community building or economic development. This hands-on course will focus on Baltimore City as it introduces students to the theory and practice behind community development projects, and their application to the arts. Students will conduct their work in groups and elaborate their project proposal in the city of Baltimore.
Instructor(s): E. Cervone
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.287. Displaying Race. 3.00 Credits.

Through hands-on archival and museum research, students in this class will develop a proposal for displaying a small collection of plaster busts that were cast in the late 19th century from live indigenous subjects. Readings from the class will explore the ethical, legal and political issues surrounding the public display of anthropological and historical artifacts that were collected as part of now discredited regimes of racial classification. How can displays be used to reveal the distance that separates 19th century racial thought from our modern day understandings of physical and cultural difference? How can we responsibly display likenesses that may have been collected under coercive conditions? How can such objects be used to educate people about the place of indigenous peoples in the museum? What laws and ethical conventions govern the display of such objects? In addition to regular class meetings, students will be expected to carry out archival research and interviews in local archives and museums.
Instructor(s): D. Poole
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.290. Modern South Asia: Bangladesh/Pakistan. 3.00 Credits.

Bangladesh and Pakistan, two major regional players in South Asia, originate in the 1947 Partition of India and shared nationhood between 1947 and 1971, ending with the War of Independence in 1971 in which Bangladesh separated from Pakistan. Since that time the two nation-states have been on different paths that have sometimes mirrored each other. This course brings together contemporary works of national histories, social movements and cultural production to consider the politics of self-differentiation and the points of convergences.
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.293. Anthropology of Material Worlds. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores how anthropologists study material forms and objects in relationship to social, political and cultural life. Topics to be considered include, totemism, art, engineering, garbage, display, collection, and the fetish.
Instructor(s): D. Poole
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.294. Political Anthropology of Africa. 3.00 Credits.

The course will explore classical and contemporary ethnographies of the political in Africa, examining how their authors address issues of power, hierarchy and symbol. We will study various articulations of state, ethnicity and community that are analyzed by observing relations between power and resistance or between law, economy and violence through war, custom and ritual. The seminar will also address the way in which Africa has been constituted as a key source of the sub-field of political anthropology through colonial trajectories, postcolonial detours and the political imagination of the past and the future.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.300. The Global Artwork. 3.00 Credits.

This course is about art practice in a postcolonial context, where the techniques and pictorial concepts formed by a European history of art are confronted by other traditions of representation, beset by different kinds of political struggles, and posed against the background of religious traditions other than that of Christianity. What problems of history, difference and the self arise in this context, and what forms of art practice emerge to address these problems? In what ways do these forms of art practice draw upon religious traditions, and how do we think about the displacement of religious traditions in modern art? In this course, we will explore these questions by examining the modern art of the Middle East, South Asia, and China, in conjunction with readings from anthropology, art history, comparative literature, philosophy and religious studies.
Instructor(s): S. Al-Bahloy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.302. The Social Lives of Global Health Programs. 3.00 Credits.

The course critically examines the techniques, practices, and experiences of global health policies and programs worldwide, and the effects they have on individuals, families, communities, and states. Dean’s Teaching Fellowship Course
Instructor(s): L. Reynolds
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.303. The Romantic Legacy of Anthropology. 3.00 Credits.

The word romantic has long carried negative connotations within anthropology meaning the tendency to idealize, exoticize, or seek out the irrational. Instead, through a focus on the themes of science, nature, art, intuition, systematicity and creativity, we suggest that romantic philosophy has offered and continues to offer much of interest for contemporary anthropology. Drawing on readings in philosophy, anthropology, science and literature, we explore the long suppressed romantic legacy of anthropology.
Instructor(s): A. Brandel; N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.304. Child Adoption and Family Making. 3.00 Credits.

The course takes child adoption as a starting point to critically explore how kinship and family are connected to legal practices, technological innovations, and broader historical, political, and socio-economic processes. Cross List: WGS, PLAS. Dean’s Teaching Fellowship Course.
Instructor(s): A. Reyes Kipp
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.307. Markets and Morals. 3.00 Credits.

This course studies markets across diverse religious and political settings to explore the cultural rationalities and moral dimensions of economic activities such as exchange, circulation, investment, credit, debt and value.
Instructor(s): A. Saraf
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.308. Norms and Emotions: Anthropology of Psychiatric Knowledge. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to anthropological understandings of therapeutic and scientific practices in contemporary psychiatry. Through a selection of seminal readings in anthropology and history, we will explore the integral relationship between psychiatric knowledge and social and economic contexts. The course material will expose students to diverse approaches in the scholarship, which explore the role that psychiatric knowledge plays in the administration of social life and in shaping present cultural understandings of self and interpersonal relationships.
Instructor(s): B. Polat
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.313. The Anthropology of Belief: Religious Experience, Publics, and Personhood. 3.00 Credits.

The aim of this course is to enable you to ask intelligent questions about the ways individuals are called upon as “religious”, and more specifically, to allow to you to engage in a reflection on the publics of which they are a part, and the means by which they come to cultivate a sense of personhood. Closely reading theory, ethnography, and literature in relation to each other, we will try to develop a nuanced understanding of the many ways in which human beings have imagined and conducted themselves as religious persons. How do ideas of imagination, habit, desire, and the senses play into our understanding of cultures of faith?
Instructor(s): M. Wilson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.317. Methods. 3.00 Credits.

This course aims to teach basic fieldwork skills: Choosing and entering a community; establishing contacts; learning to listen and to ask questions and locating archival material that might be relevant. It is a hands-on course that increases student familiarity with various neighborhoods such as the Arts District in Baltimore. Recommended Course Background: two or more prior courses in anthropology (not cross-listed courses). Course is a requirement for anthropology major.
Instructor(s): N. Haeri
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.319. Logic of Anthropological Inquiry. 3.00 Credits.

Anthropology combines theory and methods from the sciences and the humanities. We take a close look at those logics, as shown in ethnography as a mode of inquiry and as a genre of writing. This will count as a required course for Anthropology majors but open to all undergraduates.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.320. Anthropology of Time. 3.00 Credits.

The course is a cross-cultural exploration of ideas of time and temporality found in ethnographic, philosophical and literary sources: Anthropological perspectives on relations among past, present and future; Ritual, imagination and social practice in the contexts of religion, development, finance, catastrophe, crisis, democracy, revolution; Analysis of representations of time and the Other in anthropological works and media reports; the contemporary and the untimely.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.327. Poverty's Life: Anthropology of Health & Economy. 3.00 Credits.

Medicine, economics, and ethics have profoundly shaped debates on poverty. This course analyzes these debates and tracks the relationships between body, economy, and the everyday. How can anthropological reasoning and methods inform approaches to health and economic scarcity and insecurity?
Instructor(s): C. Han
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.331. Anthropology of Poetry and Prayer. 3.00 Credits.

What kind of activity is prayer? Are we talking to God(s), to our ancestors, to ourselves? What do poetry and prayer share? The course will explore these and similar questions with particular attention to questions of repetition, memory, meaning and presence.
Instructor(s): N. Haeri
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.333. Theologies of Political Life. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the relationship between modern political forms and theological traditions. Looking at developments both in the West and the postcolonial world, we will examine the multiple ways in which theological traditions have continued to inform how political life is conceived and pursued. In particular, we will focus on the relation between liberalism and the Christian tradition; the turn to messianism in critical theory; the transformation of the shari?a into a legal form; and its imbrication in anti-colonial politics
Instructor(s): S. Al-Bahloy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.335. Anthropology of Science and Medicine. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to a number of key concepts and methods in anthropology of science and medicine. Providing a general introduction and a systematic survey of the scholarship, the course seeks to shed light on the medico-scientific problems of modern life from the viewpoint of social-scientific inquiry. Through seminal publications within the field, we will explore the effects of scientific research and science-based medicine on human life, social relations, and cultural understandings of self. We will also discuss the ways in which cultural norms and values inform and shape the recent developments in science and medicine.
Instructor(s): B. Polat
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.337. Digital Media, Democracy, and Control. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines how digital technologies enable new publics that circumvent state and social controls as well as how they are mobilized to confirm existing racial, gendered, and political hierarchies.
Instructor(s): L. Humphreys
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.340. The Elementary Forms of American Religous Life. 3.00 Credits.

In the United States, the nation that in its infancy so famously erected a “wall between Church and State,” religion remains a persistent, and insistently public concern today, occupying our literary imagination, filling dockets and riding the national airwaves. Far from dropping out of a rapidly secularizing public sphere, specific forms of religious life have become deeply embedded in America, while the nation has also impressed its own particular institutional character upon religious expression. This course takes an anthropological lens to the particularity of American forms of religious life, asking what claims they make on the liberal subject, and through what enduring institutional forms and channels.
Instructor(s): C. Block
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.344. Muslim Societies and Modern States: Ethnographic Encounters. 3.00 Credits.

Through a close reading of four recent ethnographies, this course explores the diverse ways Muslims encounter the power of modern states in the contemporary world. Topics include: state-led efforts to reform educational discipline and curricula in Yemen, the imaginary topos of dreams as a space of encounter in Egypt, and legal institutions in Egypt and Pakistan. Diverse ethnographic approaches to a common theme raise such questions as: how do legal reforms constrain, enable or express forms of moral striving in everyday life? what forms of knowledge are sanctioned by the state and what forms exceed its limits? what kinds of community become possible in the grip or the margins of modern governance?
Instructor(s): J. Bush
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.346. Cinema and Ethnography. 3.00 Credits.

Films, like ethnographies, stage encounters with foreign worlds. We will investigate this parallel by examining, side-by-side, cinematic and anthropological representations of subjects like environmental conflict, urban poverty, religious pilgrimage and media culture.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.347. Anthropology and Public Action. 3.00 Credits.

Anthropologists have used their expertise in public debates, legal cases, advisory roles and so on, and have studied the “public sphere”. General and case studies, following of our professional association, shows how anthropological knowledge has been mobilized.
Instructor(s): J. Guyer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.348. Anthropology of Mental Illness. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores how the institutions of the family, state, and neighborhood respond to and shape mental illness; how the normal, abnormal, and pathology are experienced and defined; and how disease categories circulate in social worlds.
Instructor(s): C. Han
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.352. Evolution, Ecology, Becoming. 3.00 Credits.

The concept of evolution is central to social theory. Originating in the question of the species, it has moved into questions of human ecology, cultural forms and modes of thought. While it remains a deeply contested, often criticized concept, particularly in its neo-Darwinian manifestation, it orients anthropological thinking in ways that are as yet to be examined. Reaching into the archives of anthropology and other cognate disciplines, this course will examine the writings of Lyell, Darwin, Marx, Morgan, Boas, Steward, Bateson, Ingold among others. Co-listed with AS.070.610
Instructor(s): A. Goodfellow; N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.357. An Anthropology of the City. 3.00 Credits.

Strangers, neighbors, proximities, contagion, segregation. How do these notions track with notions of the city? In this course, we will explore the city through both anthropological literature and primary materials across different world regions. We will focus specifically on themes of dying and death, proximity, and stranger sociability. Particular attention will be paid to studies of poverty.
Instructor(s): C. Han
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.366. Speculative Anthropology. 3.00 Credits.

Anthropology has always been a speculative enterprise, an attempt to think beyond some familiar idea of the human. We will explore this speculative dimension by looking at crossovers between anthropology and contemporary art, science fiction, philosophy, and environmental politics. Working with texts, films, drawings and other media, we will examine the experimental and imaginative nature of anthropology.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.371. Forms of Critique in Islam. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines concepts and practices of critique brought to bear in (and upon) Muslim societies. Readings classic ethnographic monographs along with primary texts of Muslim critics, we focus on forms of reasoning, ethical practices and aesthetic expressions of political critique. Dean’s Teaching Fellowship Course
Instructor(s): J. Bush
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.377. Ethnographic Writing. 3.00 Credits.

We will closely examine the narrative form and force of a few major works of anthropological writing, and pursue experiments of our own in ethnographic description and expression. Co-listed with AS.070.603.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.385. From Sexual Nature to Sexual Politics. 3.00 Credits.

This course traces anthropological concern with questions of sexuality. Students will explore anthropological notions of primitive promiscuity, cultural configurations of the correspondence between sex, procreation, and birth, and ideas about sexual rites of passage. The course will end with a discussion of sexual politics in Euro-America and public concern over HIV/AIDS. The course draws on the work of Freud, Malinowski, Meade, Herdt, Povinelli, Rubin, Bersani and Halperin. Cross-listed with Women Gender Studies
Instructor(s): A. Goodfellow
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.405. Urban Ecologies. 3.00 Credits.

Description: This course will explore the city from the vantage point of nature/culture relations and political imagination. It will engage a range of topics including the built environment, urban infrastructure, (de)industrialization and the ways in which urban space shapes and is shaped by power relations, racial dynamics, housing markets, domesticity and the body. As part of the coursework, students will carry out small guided research projects in Baltimore City.
Instructor(s): V. Procupez
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.407. The Anthropology of Design. 3.00 Credits.

From casinos to canoes, algorithms to animal traps, our worlds are bursting with intentional objects. The word design has come to evoke the prestige of such objects, and their power to shape our collective habits and sensations. This course explores the anthropology of designed artifacts and their complex social trajectories. Beginning with philosophical investigations into the relationship between materials, form, and craft, we will proceed through ethnographic case studies of design as expert discourse and ordinary practice. Ultimately we will consider the affinities between the ethnography and design as open-ended and not entirely predictable engagements with the world.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.414. Kinship at the Core. 3.00 Credits.

It is often said that the study of kinship defines anthropology as a distinct discipline within the social sciences. This course tracks the emergence of kinship as a subject and object of anthropological inquiry, and traces some of the transformations that mark the effort to develop theories of kinship (genealogical method, social contract, structural-functionalism, structuralism, psychoanalysis, etc). A sample of authors to be read include: Morgan, Rivers, Malinowski, Radcliff-Brown, Leach, Levi-Strauss, Pateman, Schneider, Trawick, and Povinelli. Open to Graduate Students.
Instructor(s): A. Goodfellow
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.416. Visual Languages in Medical Knowledge. 3.00 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course will track the mediation of images in the making of medical knowledge and show how sensory knowledge is incorporated or transformed in the process. Open to Graduate Students Co-listed with AS.211.416 and AS.214.616
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.418. The Comparative Tradition in Anthropology. 3.00 Credits.

Anthropology is often imagined as the study of a particular place and people. But comparative methods date back to the beginnings of the discipline, efforts that are echoed in recent works of global and ambitious scope. In this seminar, we examine the theory and practice of comparison in anthropology, drawin in historical as well as contemporary studies on themes such as art, economy, science, and belief
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.419. Logic of Anthropological Inquiry. 3.00 Credits.

Anthropology is an endeavor to think with the empirical richness of the world at hand, a field science with both literary and philosophical pretensions. This course grapples with the nature of anthropological inquiry, reading classic works in the discipline as well as contemporary efforts to reimagine its foundations. Required for anthropology majors.
Prerequisites: Prereqs: AS.070.273 OR AS.070.317
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.420. Anthropology of Death and Dying. 3.00 Credits.

This course is organized around understanding the experience, representation and management of death and dying at different scales of social life connecting individual biographies with institutional settings.
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.422. Infrastructure. 3.00 Credits.

This course surveys ethnographies of built networks such as roads, power grids, and water pipelines as sites of cultural meaning, political struggle, and social interaction. We will consider the kinds of collective existence they make possible today, and their relationship to anthropological thought.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.426. Kinship: Old and New. 3.00 Credits.

We wil track the transformations in kinship theory in relation to wider changes in legal theory, biomedicine, and the relation between state and family. In particular we will ask how the concepts of sovereignty, gift, exchange, human and non-human milieus affect notions of relations. Co-listed with AS.070.639
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.430. Violence and Non-Violence: Anthropological Explorations. 3.00 Credits.

What are the conceptual challenges in thinking about violence and non-violence are categories of thought and practice? We will examine these issues through ethnographies of war, collective violence, and domestic violence.
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.431. Senses of the State. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines ethnographic approaches to the study of state power and organization. How does a “traditional” ethnographic focus on locality and place help us to theorize the scalar qualities of the “global” neoliberal state? How do anthropologists study the temporal, material and sensory domains through which people make sense of the state as a bureaucratic, governmental and sovereign presence in their lives?
Instructor(s): D. Poole
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.445. Health, Disease, Poverty: New Ethnographies from India. 3.00 Credits.

We will study the multiple dimensions of health and disease in the context of poverty and vulnerability in India. The course will focus on institutions and experiences, and ask how the lives of patients and healers connect in local worlds. We will end with some recent controversies on reforming health care in India.
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.503. Independent Study. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.504. Independent Study. 0.00 - 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.505. Directed Research-Fall. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.506. Directed Research. 0.00 - 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): C. Han; J. Obarrio; M. Degani; N. Haeri; V. Das.

AS.070.507. Directed Readings. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.508. Directed Readings. 0.00 - 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.551. Internship-Fall. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): J. Guyer; N. Haeri.

AS.070.552. Internship - Spring. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): D. Poole; J. Guyer; V. Das.

AS.070.561. Senior Essay-Fall. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.562. Senior Essay - Spring. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.594. Internship-Anthropology. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): D. Poole; M. Degani; N. Khan.

AS.070.595. Directed Research. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): J. Obarrio.

AS.070.596. Independent Study. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.601. Ecology and Perception.

We will pursue anthropological openings into the ecology of mind and world, focusing closely on texts by Levi-Strauss, Bateson, Gibson, Ingold, Viveiros de Castro, Descola, and Latour.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.603. Ethnographic Writing.

We will closely examine the narrative form and force of a few major works of anthropological writing, and pursue experiments of our own in ethnographic description and expression. Co-listed with AS.070.377.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.604. The Place of History in Anthropology.

Open to Senior Undergraduate Students with Instructor Permission.
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.605. Anthropology and the Everyday.

Analysis of the everyday groans under the theoretical weight of concepts such “modernity,” “governmentality,” “capitalism,” “globalization” and more recently “security.” What might a sharper focus on the everyday yield in terms of its own analytical frameworks and empirical descriptions? We read some contemporary greats (Foucault, Derrida, Cavell, de Certeau, Lefebvre). Simultaneously we look at how each has been received within ethnography by reading anthropologists in engagement with them (Mahmood, Ivy, Das, Siegel, Harvey). We ask what critical stakes anthropology maintains in relation to the everyday.
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.606. Professionalization.

Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.608. First Year Proposal Writing.

Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.609. Violence and Non-Violence: Anthropological Explorations.

What are the conceptual challenges in thinking about violence and non-violence are categories of thought and practice? We will examine these issues through ethnographies of war, collective violence, and domestic violence.
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.610. Evolution, Ecology, Becoming.

The concept of evolution is central to social theory. Originating in the question of the species, it has moved into questions of human ecology, cultural forms and modes of thought. While it remains a deeply contested, often criticized concept, particularly in its neo-Darwinian manifestation, it orients anthropological thinking in ways that are as yet to be examined. Reaching into the archives of anthropology and other cognate disciplines, this course will examine the writings of Lyell, Darwin, Marx, Morgan, Boas, Steward, Bateson, Ingold among others. Co-listed with AS.070.352
Instructor(s): A. Goodfellow; N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.611. Postcolonial Worlds: Law, Violence, Sovereignty.

This seminar will address contemporary questions of state and citizenship in the light of colonial and imperial dynamics at the beginning of the twenty-first century: transnational and national sovereignty in relation to local configurations of law, capital and political violence; processes of subsumption, extraction and financialization.Authors include Negri, Arrighi, Harvey, Chakrabarty, Mbembe, Mamdani, Chatterjee, Coronil, Dussel.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.612. Self, Narrative, and Autobiography.

This seminar takes insight from the idea that the “I” is not simply a pronoun. We will read texts on the self, the fragment, and narrative in anthropology, along with texts that make available different pictures of the self.
Instructor(s): C. Han
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.615. The Comparative Tradition in Anthropology.

Anthropology is often imagined as the study of a particular place and people. But comparative methods date back to the beginnings of the discipline, efforts that are echoed in recent works of global and ambitious scope. In this seminar, we examin the theory and practice of comparison in anthropology, drawing on historical as well as contemporary studies on themes such as art, economy, science, and belief.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.616. Proseminar.

This course will consist of close reading of anthropological and philosophical texts to trace some important aspects of the underlying presuppositions of social theory. We will try to see how regions generate both data and theory; and also see how some abiding concerns around the relation between structural formations and formations of subjects are expressed in classical and current anthropological thought.
Instructor(s): D. Yatromanolakis; V. Das.

AS.070.617. Methods.

The seminar will offer a forum for students to reflect on preliminary field research and think further about problems of ethnographic method. We will proceed in the manner of a workshop for ongoing projects. Open to anthropology graduate students only.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian.

AS.070.619. Ethnography and Literature.

We will look at ethnography as a particular genre of narration and ask how we might analyze the relation between ethnography and literature at the level of imagination, techniques of narration, and the place of the rest in wording the world.
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.620. Space and Place.

This course explores how concepts of emplacement, location, space, place, and belonging shape--and are shaped by--cultural formations and political imaginations. Readings and class discussions include ethnographies and theoretical texts on planning and struggles over territory, aspirations regarding land and the environment, nature/culture distinctions, housing and the right to the city by authors such as Lefebvre, Massey, Harvey, Foucault, Ingold, Virilio, Bachelard, Tsing, Escobar, and others
Instructor(s): V. Procupez.

AS.070.621. An Ontological Turn?.

Recent years have seen a number of ambitious and controversial efforts to find, in ontology, a means of surpassing the inherited humanism, culturalism, and essentialism of anthropology. This course will critically examine this proposition of a fundamental “turn” in our thinking, juxtaposing recent work on matters of perspectivism, materialism, relationality, and divinity with earlier attempts in anthropology to grasp being and becoming otherwise.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian.

AS.070.622. Infrastructure.

This course surveys ethnographies of built networks such as roads, power grids, and water pipelines as sites of cultural meaning, political struggle, and social interaction. We will consider the kinds of collective existence they make possible today, and their relationship to anthropological thought.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.630. Senses of the State.

This course examines how anthropologists study the temporal, material and sensory domains through which people make sense of the state as a bureaucratic, governmental and sovereign presence in their lives.
Instructor(s): D. Poole.

AS.070.634. The End of Nature?.

The End of Nature? We have been hearing critiques of the concept of nature as too pristine since at least Donna Haraway's Cyborg Manifesto and Bruno Latour's We Have Never Been Modern. The call has been for a mode of ecological thinking without the encumbrance of nature. Through an examination of some of the tracks that nature has left within the anthropological archives and kindred debates within philosophy, this course attempts a revivification of nature for our present. Readings include Mauss, Rappaport, Levi-Strauss, Bateson, Emerson and Whitehead.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.639. Kinship: Old and New.

We will track the transformations in kinship theory in relation to wider changes in legal theory, biomedicine, and the relation between state and family. In particular, we will ask how the concepts of sovereignty, gift, exchange, human and non-human milieus affect notions of relations. Open to undergraduate anthropology majors with instructors approval.. Co-listed with AS.070.426
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.642. Anthropology of Design.

From casinos to canoes, algorithms to animal traps, our worlds are bursting with intentional objects. The word design has come to evoke the prestige of such objects, and their power to shape our collective habits and sensations. This course explores the anthropology of designed artifacts and their complex social trajectories. Beginning with philosophical investigations into the relationship between materials, form, and craft, we will proceed through ethnographic case studies of design as expert discourse and ordinary practice. Ultimately we will consider the affinities between the ethnography and design as open-ended and not entirely predictable engagements with the world.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.650. Post-fieldwork.

Open to Anthropology graduate students only.
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.659. Proposal Writing.

The seminar will offer a forum for students to discuss research projects, prepare grant proposals and think further about issues of ethnographic methodology and writing. Open to Athropology graduate students only.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio.

AS.070.671. Political Anthropology.

This course explores anthropological debates regarding politics and the political. Through readings drawn from both recent and classic ethnographies of the political, we will trace how anthropologist have engaged issues of hierarchy, differentiation, power, suasion, command, collectivity, and voice in their accounts of social and cultural worlds.
Instructor(s): D. Poole
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.675. Before the Law.

Foundations of law and the political in classical political anthropology and postmodern philosophy. Kinship, custom, magic, sacrifice and war as prepolitical realms. State of nature, exception, and force of law; biopolitics, micropolitics and segmentarity. Readings: Africanist ethnography,Clastres, Sahlins, Deleuze, Derrida, Agamben, Benjamin, Kafka.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.677. Anthropology of Death and Dying.

This course is organized around understanding the experience, representation and management of death and dying at different scales of social life connecting individual biographies with institutional settings.
Instructor(s): V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.680. Reading Course in the History of Anthropology: Revolutions and Recuperations.

Organized around chronological units: The Unknown in the Present; Library and Field; The Primacy of Experience; The Idea of Logic; Defying Logic; Contingency and Emergence. Requests can be entertained.
Instructor(s): J. Guyer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.681. Energopolitics : Cultures of Energy.

How do different ways of harnessing energy shape life and environment? This course delves into the social, political, even philosophical properties of oil, coal, sunlight sugar, and other sources that fuel human activity. Through these topics, we will consider the cultural meaning of concepts such as charge and expenditure, work and waste.
Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.685. About Time.

This seminar will explore conceptions of temporality in ethnographic, philosophical and literary sources. It will review the status of the 'ethnographic present', the contemporary, the future and the untimely. Relations between temporality, economy and the political: remains of time, surplus value, antagonism. Theologies of time. Time and the Real. Time and the Other. Social processes of development, finance, democracy and revolution.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.698. Defining Region.

This course is open to anthropology graduate students only and is to be run on a workshop model. It is to help those students writing their regional essay for the comprehensive exams to acquire expertise in regional debates and literature relevant to their field research. Our understanding of regions is one of cross-cutting concepts and questions rather than geographical framings alone. After identifying a concept or question, each student will create an annotated bibliography, trace the shape of arguments as they emerge within the readings, create an outline and work toward a draft of the final essay.
Instructor(s): D. Poole; V. Das
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.701. Colloquia Series.

In this year-long course, students will be introduced to the formative influences and major writings of visitors in advance of their coming to give talks in the Department of Anthropology’s Colloquia Series. The students will also undertake interviews of visitors to be edited and posted online at the department website to build an archive. This is required course for incoming graduate students. Open to Anthropology Graduate Students Only.
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.702. Colloquia Series.

The Colloquia Series is a seminar in which graduate students engage the work of invited speakers. Graduate students learn to develop questions and craft responses in relation to work-in-progress through engagement with the author and in relation to specific debates or tensions in which the author’s work emerges. Required for first year graduate students. Open to anthropology graduate students only.
Instructor(s): C. Han
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.710. Law and Political Theology.

The course will explore relations between law and sacredness in political theory and anthropology, regarding both Islam and Christianity. Colonial subjection and subjectivity. Benjamin, Kafka, Agamben, Nancy, Asad and recent anthropology of legal regimes and religion.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio.

AS.070.712. Risk.

This class explores ecologies of risk as they play out in law, environmental governance, and the fiscal and regulatory regimes that govern politics and life in neoliberal societies.
Instructor(s): D. Poole.

AS.070.715. The Machine in Nature.

The picture of nature as machine-like or systematic in its organization was once dominant in ecological anthropology and cognate disciplines but fell out of favor in the 1970s and 80s. More recently it is enjoying a revival in efforts to conceptualize anthropogenic climate change. In this course we will read classical and newer writings to understand the promise and problems with this mode of viewing nature. Readings include Pierre Hadot, Karl August Wittfogel, Roy Rappaport, Phillipe Descola, Gregory Bateson, Clifford Geertz, Stephen Lansing, Anna Tsing and Stefan Helmreich.
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.718. Suspicious Interlocutors: Psychoanalysis and Anthropology.

The conversation between anthropology and psychoanalysis is long standing and often proves to be as contentious as it is complementary. This course investigates the dialogue between the two disciplines by tacking back and forth between the ethnographic materials inspired and informed by psychoanalytic insights, and the use of ethnographic sources and anthropological materials in psychoanalytic writings. Students will engage works from such scholars as Freud, Malinowski, Lacan, Levi-Struass, Trawick, Cohen, Bose, Sachs.
Instructor(s): A. Goodfellow
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.719. Suspicious Interlocutors Part II: Psychoanalysis and Anthropology.

This course is a continuation of Anthropology AS.070.718, offered in Spring 2013. Students will continue the previously begun investigation of the conversation between anthropology and psychoanalysis, which proves long-standing and often as contentious as it is complementary. The course will tack back and forth between ethnographic materials inspired and informed by psychoanalytic insights, and the use of ethnographic sources and anthropological materials in psychoanalytic writings. Students will engage works from such scholars as Freud, Lacan, Cavell, Klein, Derrida, Siegel, Das, Reynolds, Levi-Strauss, Seremetakis.
Instructor(s): A. Goodfellow
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.720. Science and Technology Studies: Error, Experiment, Translation in Science and Medicine.

This seminar will closely engage key works in science and technology studies and the anthropology of science and medicine, focusing specifically on complexity, experiment, error, and translation. We will pay particular attention to how anthropological questions can be brought to bear on science and medicine by fostering close discussion between graduate student research and course readings.
Instructor(s): C. Han.

AS.070.801. Dissertation Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.802. Dissertation Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.070.808. Directed Readings on Space and Territory.

Through close readings of theoretical and ethnographic texts, this class explores the concepts of space and territory that animate anthropological understandings of context, potentiality, environment, and emergence.
Instructor(s): D. Poole
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.821. Nature in Romantic Thought.

Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.866. Directed Readings and Research.

Instructor(s): A. Pandian.

AS.070.867. Directed Reading and Research.

Instructor(s): C. Han; N. Khan.

AS.070.869. Directed Reading and Research.

Instructor(s): A. Pandian.

AS.070.870. Directed Readings and Research.

Instructor(s): M. Degani
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.871. Directed Reading and Research.

Instructor(s): V. Das.

AS.070.872. Directed Readings and Research.

Instructor(s): V. Das.

AS.070.874. Directed Readings and Research.

Instructor(s): N. Haeri.

AS.070.879. Directed Reading and Research.

Instructor(s): J. Guyer.

AS.070.880. Directed Readings and Research.

Instructor(s): J. Guyer.

AS.070.883. Directed Reading and Research.

Instructor(s): N. Haeri.

AS.070.884. Directed Readings and Research.

Instructor(s): J. Obarrio.

AS.070.885. Directed Reading and Research.

Instructor(s): D. Poole.

AS.070.886. Directed Readings and Research.

Instructor(s): D. Poole.

AS.070.892. Directed Readings and Research.

Instructor(s): N. Khan.

AS.070.893. Directed Reading and Research.

Instructor(s): J. Obarrio.

AS.070.897. Dir Reading & Research.

Instructor(s): S. Berry.

Cross Listed Courses

History of Art

AS.010.254. Art and Architecture of Early Christian and Medieval North Africa. 3.00 Credits.

Survey of Early Christian and medieval art and architecture in North Africa, with an emphasis on indigenous developments and cultural exchange in the Mediterranean world, 4th to 13th century. Dean’s Teaching Fellowship course.
Instructor(s): N. Dennis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.309. Gifts and Thefts in the Middle Ages. 3.00 Credits.

Why were some medieval objects valued as gifts, others appropriated as spolia, and still others taken by force? How does transferring objects from one cultural context into another change their meaning? Western, Byzantine, and Islamic art, 6th-13th centuries.
Instructor(s): R. Danford
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.327. The Harem and the Veil: Space and Gender in the Islamic World. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the constructed imagery of the harem and the veil in relation to politics and visual culture in the Middle East, North Africa, India, and Euro-America. Topics will include: Ottoman palace architecture, Orientalist painting, mandating/banning the veil, Islamic feminisms. We will address visual culture broadly, including advertising, architecture, contemporary art, film, news media.
Instructor(s): R. Brown
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.382. The Politics of Display in South Asia. 3.00 Credits.

Through examining collecting, patronage, colonial exhibitions, and museums, this course examines how South Asia has been constructed in practices of display. Themes: politics of representation, spectacle, ethnography, and economies of desire related to colonialism and the rise of modernity. Cross-list with Anthropology, Museums and Society and Political Science.
Instructor(s): R. Brown
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.603. The Active Body: On Display and in Performance.

An examination of two recent developments in art history and museum studies: the recognition of the object as active and agentic and a growing critical engagement with the body of the artist and performance art. The seminar will unsettle these two themes with the history of living humans on display, from nineteenth-century exhibitions to present-day craftspeople, thinking through bodies, objects, and performance through disciplinary engagements from anthropology, political theory, art history, and museum studies. Open to motivated undergraduates.
Instructor(s): R. Brown
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.607. The Epistemology of Photography.

This seminar will ask how photography produces ways of knowing: how does photography’s reality-effect shape its dissemination and absorption? Is photography’s emergence during the colonial era coincidental or catalytic? How is memory (re)constituted in a photography-saturated world? What kinds of histories does photography encourage and discourage? Is a photograph an object? We will read across disciplines (literature, anthropology, history, history of art, political science, theory) to investigate the epistemology of photography and the photograph.
Instructor(s): R. Brown.

History

AS.100.355. Islam between History and Anthropology. 3.00 Credits.

Co-taught by an anthropologist and a historian, this course will explore recent scholarly debates about--and critiques of--the representations of Islam and Muslim societies.
Instructor(s): N. Khan; T. Shepard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.365. Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages. 3.00 Credits.

This course will treat the flourishing of culture and society in the High Middle Ages (11-14th centuries). Topics covered include the emergence of feudal society and literature, the economic, social and cultural revival of Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries, the Renaissance of the twelfth century and the growth of scholasticism and the University, and the development of feudal monarchies in England and France..
Instructor(s): G. Spiegel
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Near Eastern Studies

AS.130.376. Ancient Ritual. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the vast body of rituals that were practiced and performed in antiquity, with a particular emphasis on rituals from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Hebrew Bible. In addition to examining rituals from a comparative perspective, anthropological and sociological studies of ritual will be read and discussed to shed light on the social, cultural, and political significance of ritual in the ancient world and beyond.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero
Area: Humanities.

AS.131.635. Seminar: Near East Archaeology.

Topic varies but can include the archaeology of Mesopotamia, Syria, or Palestine, or thematic discussions (e.g., on ideology, state collapse, etc.).
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz
Area: Humanities.

History of Science & Technology

AS.140.346. History of Chinese Medicine. 3.00 Credits.

Students will study the most recent anthropological, philosophical, and historical scholarship on medicine in traditional and modern Chinese society. They will approach the topic from several angles including medical pluralism, the range of healers, domestic and literate medicine, gender, emergence of new disciplines, public health and the history of disease. The course relies on secondary sources and primary sources in English translation. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies.
Instructor(s): M. Hanson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.425. Individualized Medicine from Antiquity to the Genome Age. 3.00 Credits.

A seminar for graduate students and advanced undergraduates. We will explore the notion of the individual in medicine over 25 centuries, from the Hippocratics to the invention of the case study during the Renaissance to the genetic, biochemical, and immunological individual in recent biomedicine. Recommended Course Background: AS.140.105, AS.140.106
Instructor(s): G. Pomata; N. Comfort
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

German & Romance Languages & Literatures

AS.211.174. Media of Propaganda. 3.00 Credits.

Today, promoting a particular political or personal point of view is not viewed as propaganda, but rather as building a community of equally minded people. But where do we draw the line, and when does the use of a medium in service of a certain message become intrusive and misleading? What role do democracy and cultural values play in this use or abuse of media? In this class the term propaganda will be evaluated carefully and applied to such historical media case studies as the informational use of the radio in World War One, Leni Riefenstahl's Nazi propaganda films, the legendary success of advertisement campaigns in the 1950s and 1960s, the AIDS movement and other mobilization strategies from the 1980s to the 1990s, and the new values of friendship and propaganda in our current facebook nation.
Instructor(s): B. Wegenstein
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.237. Literature and Medicine. 3.00 Credits.

Taught in English. The course will analyze literary representations of illness as well as explore interfaces between literary and medical knowledge in more general ways. Both literature and medicine can be considered semiotics as they deal with the study of signs; further, both are invested in interpretation. We will analyze the relation between literature and madness, explore “illness as metaphor” (Susan Sontag) and discuss case studies in relation to literary genres (for example, Freud is surprised to notice that his studies on hysteria read like novellas). As prominently depicted in Thomas Bernhard’s In the Cold and theoretically analyzed by Michel Foucault, the course will further address the nexus between medical institutions and power. Readings will include: Antonin Artaud, Thomas Bernhard, Georg Büchner, Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Henry James, Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, Daniel Paul Schreber, Susan Sontag, etc. Films: Philadelphia (Jonathan Demme, 1993), Melancholia (Lars von Trier, 2011).
Instructor(s): E. Strowick
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.385. Documentary Production Practicum: Community Based Learning: Raqs Media Artists in Residence. 3.00 Credits.

This course accompanies the New Delhi based media art collective raqs, consisting of 3 artists, during their first residency in Baltimore during Spring 2013. Students will be helping prepare the media artists' solo exhibition opening at the BMA on February 20, and be involved in a production workshop offered through the JHU Digital Media Center.
Instructor(s): B. Wegenstein
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.237. Literature and Medicine. 3.00 Credits.

Taught in English. The course will analyze literary representations of illness as well as explore interfaces between literary and medical knowledge in more general ways. Both literature and medicine can be considered semiotics as they deal with the study of signs; further, both are invested in interpretation. We will analyze the relation between literature and madness, explore “illness as metaphor” (Susan Sontag) and discuss case studies in relation to literary genres (for example, Freud is surprised to notice that his studies on hysteria read like novellas). As prominently depicted in Thomas Bernhard’s In the Cold and theoretically analyzed by Michel Foucault, the course will further address the nexus between medical institutions and power. Readings will include: Antonin Artaud, Thomas Bernhard, Georg Büchner, Michel Foucault, Sigmund Freud, Henry James, Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, Daniel Paul Schreber, Susan Sontag, etc. Films: Philadelphia (Jonathan Demme, 1993), Melancholia (Lars von Trier, 2011).
Instructor(s): E. Strowick
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.635. Anthropology and Modernism.

This course will examine the reciprocal relationship between modernism and anthropology in Western and Central Europe, including examples from French, German, and Yiddish contexts. We will focus on the presence of anthropological and ethnographic discourses within various registers of modernist thought, literature, and visual culture, with special attention to visual and literary primitivism. We will also consider attempts by ethnographers to shape their practice in a modernist mold. Our central concerns will include the attempt to create a modernist poetics grounded in ethnography and the relationship between anthropological theory and ethnographic praxis in the modernist understanding of “culture.”
Instructor(s): S. Spinner
Area: Humanities.

AS.215.311. Radicalism, Film & Literature in Modern Latin America-Community Based Learning. 3.00 Credits.

This course will explore the cultural symbiosis of radical politics, film, and literature in modem Latin America. Beginning with Cuban revolutionary Jose Marti and the definitive end of the Spanish Empire and concluding with current socialist movements in South America, we will analyze key radical texts by the likes of Friedrich Engels and Ernesto Che Guevara, classic films like The Battle of Chile by Patricio Guzman, and important works of literature by authors such as Pablo Neruda and Rigoberta Menchu. Note: Class will be conducted in English and all assigned texts will also be in English in order to encourage interdisciplinary enrollment and participation.
Instructor(s): M. Strayer
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.215.777. The Invention of Fiction.

Rather than understand fiction as a constant in human history, this course will consider it a historically specific form of cultural expression. We will examine and compare theories of the fictional from an array of historical moments in order to better understand what fiction is, how it differs from premodern notions of history and poetry, and how it both informs and depends on modern notions of knowledge and subjective agency.
Instructor(s): W. Egginton
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Sociology

AS.230.367. Islamic Finance. 3.00 Credits.

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $2 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on riba in the Quran and hadith, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.
Instructor(s): R. Calder
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Humanities Center

AS.300.330. Trauma in Theory, Film, and Fiction. 3.00 Credits.

An examination of the representation of trauma in literary theory, psychiatry, survivor literature, films, novels, and comics. Works by Sebald (The Emigrants), Lanzmann (Shoah), Spiegelman (In the Shadow of No Towers), McCarthy (Remainder), and others.
Instructor(s): M. Fried
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

East Asian Studies

AS.310.104. Pacific Crossings: East Asia and the US from the 19th Century to the Present. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the connections between US and East Asian history from the 19th century to the present day. We will explore how cultural exchange and confrontation shaped humanitarian, nationalist, and socialist projects in the US, China, Korea, and Japan. Readings include memoirs, travelogues, essays, and novels that provide a window into transpacific history.
Instructor(s): A. Bronson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.108. Introduction to Chinese Fiction and Drama. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce Chinese fiction and drama from the Tang dynasty (618-906) to the early Republican period (1911-1949), such as the romantic dramas of Tang Xianzu and the uncanny tales of Pu Songling. Students will draw connection between these vibrant literary genres and the cultural and socio-historical events that shaped imperial China. Key topics include story-telling, romance, urban culture, gender, reincarnation, and many more. Students will acquire skills in how to read, analyze and discuss the rich legacy of Chinese fiction and drama in translation and to think critically about these writings. Reading materials are all in English.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.207. Mapping Migrations in East Asia. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar introduces students to the phenomenon of migration in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan from theoretical, empirical, and comparative perspectives. The objectives of the course are to understand the 1) historical context behind present-day migrations in East Asia; 2) different patterns of migration flows and their consequences on receiving countries; 3) various theoretical frameworks for migration. The course is divided into three parts. In the first part, the course will examine theoretical approaches to migration, structured around the question of whether East Asia as a region represents a distinct model of migration. In the second, students will explore the empirical cases in greater detail by comparing and contrasting the different types of migrations. The third part addresses the responses to migration by host governments and societies and the implications of migration on citizenship and identity. Recommended Course Background: any class related to the history or politics of Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and/or China.
Instructor(s): D. Kim
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.221. Introduction to Eastern Religious Traditions. 3.00 Credits.

This course serves as an introduction to Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. Successful completion of this course will provide students with a critical understanding of these six traditions.
Instructor(s): J. Valentine
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.303. A World Upturned: Cultures of Catastrophe in Japan. 3.00 Credits.

Focusing on earthquake science and earthquake lore, radioactive mutation and nuclear decimation, this course will consider the relationship between technological culture and large-scale cataclysm. In addition to treating a broad array of written, graphic, and filmic representations of Japan's past and potential catastrophes, we will also be keeping a close and careful eye on present developments in Japan's 2011 earthquake/tsunami/nuclear disaster.
Instructor(s): R. Sayre
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.304. The Architectonics of Tokyo: The Anthropology of City Life in Japan and Abroad. 3.00 Credits.

In this advanced undergraduate seminar on urban life and the anthropology of aesthetics, we will develop tools with which to think and write about city life in Japan and abroad. 'Architectonic' is a philosophical term referring to the ability to pull otherwise autonomous ideas together into a single coherent whole. In this course we will employ methodologies culled from class readings, lectures, web-based resources, and class discussions to collectively construct a digital patchwork of writings and images that will serve as the classes' own quasi-coherent whole, or 'architectonic' of city life in Tokyo.
Instructor(s): R. Sayre
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Program in Latin American Studies

AS.361.331. Drug wars, violence and illicit lifeworlds in Latin America. 3.00 Credits.

Drawing on ethnographic and historical sources, this course will introduce anthropology as an invitation for students to re-conceptualize and deepen their understanding of the so-called “War on Drugs” as a cultural, social and political formation in Latin America.
Instructor(s): J. Moreno Garcia
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.361.350. Mestizaje and Race in Latin America. 3.00 Credits.

The course problematizes how race and mestizaje became socio-political realities and forms of lived experience in Latin America, shaping such things as governmental practices, spatial configurations, interpersonal relations, and political mobiliations. PLAS Teaching Fellowship.
Instructor(s): A. Reyes Kipp
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality

AS.363.300. Thirty Years of AIDS: Fatigue, Failure and Fantasies. 3.00 Credits.

This course is designed to study the emergence of the concept of AIDS Fatigue that is being used to describe the current moment of this epidemic. Cross-listed with Anthropology
Instructor(s): V. Saria
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.350. Gender, Sexuality, and Religion: Muslim (In)Visibilities. 3.00 Credits.

“Muslim (In)Visibilities” focuses on gender and sexuality through Orientalism. It considers representations of Muslim bodies within popular Western discourses and what such (in)visibilities are productive of.
Instructor(s): M. Banahi
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.417. Internship/Practicum: Critical Theory and the Possibility of Social Justice. 4.00 Credits.

This course combines a weekly seminar with 4 hours per week in a Baltimore social justice organization, coordinated by the JHU Center for Social Concern. Class discussions draw on readings in ethnography and feminist, queer and critical race studies to address topics such as; race, class and gender inequality, neoliberal development, health, institutional violence and politically engaged research.
Instructor(s): A. Krauss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Program in Museums and Society

AS.389.302. The Virtual Museum. 3.00 Credits.

Course draws on both classic readings in material culture and emerging theories of the digital to consider how the internet has changed objects and the institutions that collect, preserve, display and interpret them. Students will contribute to an established virtual museum and create their own.
Instructor(s): J. Kingsley
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.335. Recreating Ancient Greek Ceramics. 4.00 Credits.

This hands-on course in experimental archaeology brings together undergraduate and graduate students across disciplines to study the making of Athenian vases. Students work closely with expert ceramic artists, and in consultation with art historians, archaeologists, art conservators, and materials scientists to recreate Greek manufacturing processes.
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.385. Global Perspectives on the Museum. 3.00 Credits.

Course examines practices of collecting, display and preservation beyond the western museum tradition, focusing on how these practices reflect and construct political, historical, ethnic and nationalist narratives. Counts towards the international studies major. Cross-listed with Anthropology.
Instructor(s): E. Rodini; S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.389.440. Who Owns Culture?. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar explores the complicated, often explosive concept of cultural property, including questions surrounding the ownership, preservation, and interpretation of artifacts, monuments, heritage sites, and living traditions. Cross-listed with Anthropology and History of Art.
Instructor(s): E. Rodini
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.389.450. Readings in Material Culture. 3.00 Credits.

Objects, things, stuff- this seminar will pursue classic texts and emerging methodologies to explore the myriad ways materials and materiality have been theorized across disciplines. For graduate/advanced undergraduate students.
Instructor(s): E. Rodini; R. Brown
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.650. Readings in Material Culture.

Objects, things, stuff- this seminar will pursue classic texts and emerging methodologies to explore the myriad ways materials and materiality have been theorized across disciplines. For graduate/advanced undergraduate students.
Instructor(s): E. Rodini; R. Brown
Area: Humanities.

Geography & Environmental Engineering

EN.570.285. Understanding Aid: Anthropological Perspectives for Technology-Based Interventions. 3.00 Credits.

This course combines anthropological perspectives with the discussion and examination of technology–based interventions in the field of development and aid policies, with particular focus on activities related to water resources, sanitation, and hygiene. Readings and discussions analyze some of the theoretical, historically rooted, and practical issues that challenge those who hope to provide effective aid. A key aim of this course is to provide students with better understanding of cultural, social, environmental and economic issues relevant to technical intervention in developing countries.
Instructor(s): E. Cervone; W. Ball
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://anthropology.jhu.edu/faculty.html

Faculty

Chair

Deborah Poole
Professor and Chair: visuality and representation; race and ethnicity; violence, liberalism, and the state; law and judicial reform; Latin America (Peru, Mexico).

Professors

Veena Das
Krieger-Eisenhower Professor: Feminist movements, gender studies, sectarian violence, Medical Anthropology, post-Colonial and post-Structural theory; South Asia, Europe

Niloofar Haeri
Professor: Islamic prayers and experiences of religiosity, gender, ritual and language, public appearance and notions of modesty among Jews, Christians and Muslims, social history of moral values in Iran since early 20th century; language ideology, vernacularization and modernity. Egypt, Iran and the Middle East

Associate Professors

Clara Han
Associate Professor: Anthropologies of health, well-being, and care; violence; poverty; moral community; subjectivity; law, specifically in relation to incarceration; kinship; and science and technology; Latin America, specifically Chile, and the United States

Naveeda Khan
Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies: Bangladesh: riparian society, engineered landscapes and the theology of ecological consciousness and climate change; Pakistan: Islam and everyday life; urban anthropology; religion and theology; law and literature; techniques and technologies of perception; US and South Asia: temporality and emergent rationalities.

Juan Obarrio
Assistant Professor: political, law and temporality, theology in relation to state and the economy, memory and subjectivity, magic, violence, value, experimental writing. Southern Africa, Latin America.

Anand Pandian
Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies: philosophical anthropology / postcolonial and posthumanist ecology / sensory ethnography / experimental writing / anthropological methods / Baltimore / India / Earth

Assistant Professor

Michael Degani
Assistant Professor: Africa, Economic Anthropology, Energy, Infrastructure, Urbanism

Professor Emeritus

Jane I. Guyer
Social and economic anthropology, money and culture, household and gender; West Africa

Joint Appointments

Erica Schoenberger
Professor (Geography and Environmental Engineering): Economic Geography, Regional Development

Dimitrios Yatromanolakis
Associate Professor (Department of Classics): research centers upon both technical and more cross-disciplinary fields: archaic and classical Greek literature and performance cultures, sociocultural history, vase-painting and vase-inscriptions; Greek papyrology and epigraphy; and historical and comparative anthropology.