Archaeology

http://krieger.jhu.edu/archaeology/

The major in archaeology is an interdepartmental program that introduces students to archaeological theory, the analysis of archaeological materials, and the results of archaeological research in prehistoric and early historic periods in the Old and New Worlds. Archaeology studies human societies through examination of their material culture (physical remains), considering such issues as human subsistence, interaction with climate and physical environment, patterns of settlement, political and economic organization, and religious activity and thought. The field allows for the study of the entirety of human experience from its beginnings to the present day, in every region of the world and across all social strata.

Students in the major will have the opportunity to study and conduct research on materials stored in The Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum, which consists of a diverse and extensive assemblage of artifacts from ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Palestine, and Mesoamerica. Opportunities may also be available to study materials in the Classical, Egyptian, and Near Eastern collections in the Walters Art Museum.

 

 

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Requirements for the major include 13 courses (39 credits). These can be selected from a diversity of offerings available from different departments. In addition, students must take a core of three courses consisting of Introduction to Archaeology, World Prehistory, and Archaeological Method and Theory.  Except for some field experiences, majors must complete all courses required for the major for a letter grade and receive a grade of C- or higher. 

Core Courses
AS.136.101Introduction To Archaeology3
AS.130.177World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective3
AS.130.354/AS.131.654Archaeological Method and Theory3
Any Anthropology course numbered AS.070.1xx-4xx3
Six archaeology courses, both regionally specific and/or methodologically/theoretically advanced (POS-Tag ARCH-ARCH)18
Three additional related courses, to be decided in conjunction with the student’s advisor, pertinent to the archaeological issues the student has focused on. (POS-Tag ARCH-RELATE)9
Significant archaeological field experience (consult faculty advisor)
Total Credits39

Sample Program of Study

In addition to the example plan as shown below, students are required to complete significant archaeological field experience.  This is commonly done during the summer(s) after sophomore and/or junior year(s).

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.136.101Introduction To Archaeology3AS.130.177World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective3
  3  3
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Any Anthropology course numbered AS.070.1xx-4xx3AS.130.354Archaeological Method and Theory3
Archaeology course #13Archaeology course #23
  6  6
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Archaeology course #33Archaeology course #43
Additional related course #13Additional related course #23
  6  6
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Archaeology course #53Archaeology course #63
Additional related course #33 
  6  3
Total Credits: 39

Honors Program

Archaeology majors have the option of writing an honors thesis under the supervision of a faculty member. The thesis is based on an original research problem developed in conjunction with that faculty member. Successful completion of the thesis (B+ or higher) will result in the conferring of a BA with honors.

Students entering Fall 2014 and later must pass 6 credits (2 semesters: 130.510 and 130.511) of honors thesis to earn honors in the Archaeology Major. These credits are in addition to and exceed the number of credits needed for the major.

Students who are interested in pursuing an honors thesis should begin to discuss possibilities with a faculty advisor as early as possible and no later than during the second semester of Junior year. A proposal for the thesis must be approved by the faculty advisor before the student registers for the courses and no later than the end of the second semester of the Junior year.

The student will work closely with the faculty advisor, setting a timeline for completing research and submitting drafts of the thesis. A full draft of the thesis is due by the end of March of the Senior year, if the student wants to be listed as receiving honors on the commencement program. The final version of the thesis must be handed in by the last day of classes.

Program Learning Goals for the Archaeology Major

1.  Acquire the basic skills for understanding theory, interpretation, and methods in archaeology.

2.  Develop an ability to analyze archaeological data through the reading and interpretation of archaeological publications and study of primary data.

3.  Conduct analyses and interpretations of material culture in precise, well-organized, and persuasive language, both orally and in writing.

4.  Acquire interdisciplinary knowledge of different past human cultures.

5.  Gain significant knowledge of the material culture of at least one region or thematic issue.

6.  Acquire on-site experience and expertise in archaeological method through fieldwork.

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.136.101. Introduction To Archaeology. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Cross Listed Courses

History of Art

AS.010.105. Art of the Ancient Americas. 3.0 Credits.

This course provides a basis for the study of ancient Americas art and architecture and a broad exposure to the issues relevant to its study. Select visual arts within the primary regions of Mexico and Central America will be emphasized. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) and the JHU Archaeological Museum (JHAM), students will participate in on-site study of the collections.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.236. Palaces, Temples and Tombs in Mesopotamia. 3.0 Credits.

Mesopotamia, the “land between the rivers,” is considered the cradle of civilization. Its earliest urban centers appeared by 3500 BCE in the region of modern-day Iraq, Iran, and Syria. Along with urbanism came the emergence of temples and palaces as large-scale elite institutions (along with written records). Their arts manifest some of the earliest complex representations and follow a vibrant course for several millennia. The first empires marshaled large armies and amassed fabulous riches. Complex religious and ritual ideologies were expressed in the art and architecture. And all has been revealed by the archaeologist’s spade. This class explores the art and architecture of Mesopotamia (ancient Sumer, Babylonia and Assyria) from 3500 to 330 BCE. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the arts and ancient society in order to enable students to acquire the skills for accessing and appreciating ancient civilizations.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.315. Art of the Assyrian Empire, 1000-600 BCE. 3.0 Credits.

The Assyrian Empire dominated the ancient world from 1000-612 BCE, stretching from Iran to Egypt and laying the foundation for the later Persian and Macedonian empires. With imperial expansion came an explosion of artistic production ranging from palace wall reliefs to small-scale luxury objects. This course provides an integrated picture of the imperial arts of this first great empire, situating it within the broader social and political contexts of the first millennium BCE.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.365. Art of the Ancient Andes. 3.0 Credits.

The ancient visual arts of Andean South America and their respective cultural contexts form the basis of this course. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum students will have access to collections for study.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.366. Native American Art. 3.0 Credits.

The works of Native American artists are examined and discussed in their respective social and historical contexts. Such works include Hopewell stone sculpture, Mimbres pictorial painting, and Tlingit guardian figures. We examine the concept of sacred landscape through analysis of monumental earthworks and effigy mounds, Anasazi architecture, and rock art. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA), and Johns Hopkins Special Collections, students will have access to collections for study.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.389. The Stone and the Thread. 3.0 Credits.

Inka architecture in its social, historical and cultural contexts forms the basis of this course. Shared forms and ideas implicit in the fiber arts offer comparative points for analysis and discussion.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.407. Ancient Americas Metallurgy. 3.0 Credits.

Centering on a series of case studies, this course addresses the technology, aesthetics, and social significance of metals. We trace the development of metals from 1500 BCE in Chile and Peru, to the 16th century in Colombia and central Mexico, pausing to examine its forms and meanings in various cultural contexts, and the ideas that inform its value. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA), the Walters Art Museum (WAM), and the Johns Hopkins Archaeology Museum (JHUAM), students will have access to ancient metal works for study.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.421. Creating Sacred Space in the Ancient and Medieval World. 3.0 Credits.

What makes a space sacred? How is it different from other spaces? This seminar explores the various means - visual, artifactual, architectural, and performative - of creating sacred space in the ancient and medieval worlds of the Near East and Mediterranean. Possible cases for study include early Sumerian temples, state-sponsored Assyrian temples, votive deposits, Greek sanctuaries, sanctuaries and landscape, early medieval Jewish, Christian, and Islamic cult buildings, cave sanctuaries, pilgrim sites, icons and sacred space.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.470. Power and Politics in Assyrian Art. 3.0 Credits.

Assyria, centered in northern Iraq, created one of the world’s first great empires that dominated the ancient Near Eastern world from around 900 to 612 BCE. In concert with imperial expansion came an explosion of artistic production ranging from palace wall reliefs to small-scale luxury objects. This seminar examines the close relationship between the arts and politics in the Assyrian empire. Some themes that will be explored are: historical narrative, text and image, portable luxury arts and gender, politics and religion. The course will engage in close visual analysis of the ancient materials and readings of critical scholarship.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Biology

AS.020.365. Intro To Human Skeleton. 3.0 Credits.

This course will provide a basic understanding of human skeletal biology, including bone composition and bone growth, recognition of skeletal elements, functional anatomy of different skeletal systems, comparative anatomy, and forensic anthropology (sexing and aging, body size reconstruction, bone pathology). Lectures will be combined with hands-on experience with bone models and real bone specimens.
Instructor(s): C. Ruff
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.020.379. Evolution. 3.0 Credits.

This course takes a broad look at the impact of natural selection and other evolutionary forces on evolution. Emphasis is placed on what we can learn from genome sequences about the history of life, as well as current evolutionary pressures. Recommended Course Background: AS.020.306, AS.020.330, or permission required
Instructor(s): C. Norris
Area: Natural Sciences.

Classics

AS.040.111. Ancient Greek Civilization. 3.0 Credits.

The course will introduce students to major aspects of the ancient Greek civilization, with special emphasis placed upon culture, society, archaeology, literature, and philosophy.
Instructor(s): J. Smith
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.137. Freshman Seminar: Archaeology at the Crossroads: The Ancient Eastern Mediterranean through Objects in the JHU Archaeological Museum. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar investigates the Eastern Mediterranean as a space of intense cultural interaction in the Late Bronze Age, exploring how people, ideas, and things not only came into contact but deeply influenced one another through maritime trade, art, politics, etc. In addition to class discussion, we will work hands-on with artifacts from the JHU Archaeological Museum, focusing on material from Cyprus.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.140. Gender and Sexuality in Early Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will explore evidence and interpretations of gender and sexuality in the region of the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean during the third and second millennia BCE. Material investigated will include the “snake goddess” figures from Minoan Crete, anthropomorphic figurines from the Cyclades and Cyprus, wall paintings, etc. In each case we will consider the history of interpretation as well as investigate the objects’ archaeological and sociocultural contexts. Discussion topics will include representational ambiguity, the specific materialities of objects, and their possible roles in activities construing gender. The course will incorporate material from the JHU Archaeological Museum.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.150. Island Archeology: Land and Sea in Ancient Crete, Cyprus and the Cyclades. 3.0 Credits.

Islands present highly distinctive contexts for social life. We examine three island worlds of the ancient eastern Mediterranean. These are places where water had a unique and powerful meaning and boat travel was part of daily life, where palaces flourished and contact with other societies implied voyages of great distance. Class combines close study of material and visual culture with consideration of island-specific interpretive paradigms; trips to Archaeological Museum.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.218. Celebration and Performance in Early Greece. 3.0 Credits.

Surviving imagery suggests that persons in Minoan and Mycenaean societies engaged in various celebratory performances, including processions, feasts, and ecstatic dance. This course explores archaeological evidence of such celebrations, focusing on sociocultural roles, bodily experience, and interpretive challenges.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.221. Art and Archaeology of Early Greece. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the origins and rise of Greek civilization from the Early Bronze Age to the Persian Wars (ca. 3100-480 B.C.), focusing on major archaeological sites, sanctuaries, material culture, and artistic production.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.348. Worlds of Homer. 3.0 Credits.

Through texts, art, and archaeological remains, this course examines the various worlds of Homer--those recalled in the Iliad and Odyssey, those within which the epics were composed, and those born of the poet's unique creative work. Class will make museum visits. Ancient texts read in translation..
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.366. The Archaeology of Ancient Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU Museum. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the visual and material worlds of ancient Cyprus from the earliest human evidence through the Iron Age. Course topics will include the island's unique position between the Aegean and Near East and how this has impacted both Cyprus' ancient past and the way in which it has been conceived in the modern world. Class involves regular analysis of artifacts based in the Archaeological Museum.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.373. Propaganda and the Art of Visual Politics during the Roman Empire. 3.0 Credits.

We will examine visual expressions of propaganda in the city of Rome, considering how emperors used public art to promote their political agendas and their ideological vision of power. Dean's Teaching Fellowship course
Instructor(s): A. Tabeling
Area: Humanities.

Anthropology

AS.070.132. Invitation to Anthropology. 3.0 Credits.

Click. The screen that brings you last night’s Instagrams and celebrity gossip also flashes glimpses of melting icecaps and burning rubble. These are complex times for human beings, both exciting and unsettling. This course introduces anthropology as a way of reflecting on the challenges of contemporary life around the globe, focusing on themes such as migration, warfare, ecology, inequality, and addiction.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.419. Logic of Anthropological Inquiry. 3.0 Credits.

Anthropology is an endeavor to think with the empirical richness of the world at hand, a field science with both literary and philosophical pretensions. This course grapples with the nature of anthropological inquiry, reading classic works in the discipline as well as contemporary efforts to reimagine its foundations. Required for anthropology majors.
Prerequisites: Prereqs: AS.070.273 OR AS.070.317
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Near Eastern Studies

AS.130.101. Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations. 3.0 Credits.

Review of important issues in ancient Near Eastern history and culture from the Neolithic era to the Persian period. Included will be an examination of the Neolithic agricultural revolution, the emergence of cities, states and writing, and formation of empires. Cultures such as Sumer and Akkad, Egypt, the Hittites, Israelites, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians will be discussed.
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.102. From the Neanderthals to the Neolithic. 3.0 Credits.

Emphasizing theories about human biological and cultural development, this course consists of an in-depth survey of Neanderthal morphology and culture, a brief discussion of evolutionary theory and our fossil ancestors, and concludes with an exploration of the mechanisms and results of the shift from hunting and gathering to farming. (Course formerly known as Introduction: Human Prehistory.) Cross-listed with Anthropology.
Instructor(s): S. McCarter
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.109. Freshman Seminar: Ancient Homes and Houses. 3.0 Credits.

What will your bedroom tell future archaeologists? What can ancient houses tell archaeologists of past societies? This course explores methods/theories of Household Archaeology in the Near East and beyond.
Instructor(s): J. Swerida
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.110. Introduction To Archaeology. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.122. Freshman Seminar: The Archaeology of Death, Burial, and the Human Skeleton. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the archaeological investigation of past human populations through their mortuary and physical human remains. To this end, major theories and methodologies will be introduced, along with pertinent case studies for discussion.
Instructor(s): C. Brinker
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.126. Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt. 3.0 Credits.

To provide a basic introduction to Egyptian Religion, with a special focus on the nature of the gods and how humans interact with them. We will devote particular time to the Book of the Dead and to the "magical" aspects of religion designed for protective purposes.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.135. Pyramids, Temples and Tombs. 3.0 Credits.

Introduction to the monuments and culture of Egypt from 3500 B.C. to 100 A.D. From the pyramids at Giza to Hellenistic Alexandria, this course surveys in slide illustrated lectures the remains of one of the world’s greatest early cultures.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.177. World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective. 3.0 Credits.

How and why did our nomadic hunting and gathering ancestors become farmers? What led agricultural societies to build cities, develop writing, religious institutions, wage war, and trade for exotic goods? This course surveys prehistory and ancient history from the origins of human culture to the emergence civilization. Although prehistory and ancient history yield evidence of tremendous cultural diversity this course emphasizes common elements of past human experience, culture, and culture change. These include the origins of modern humans and their adjustment to a variety of post-ice age environments, shifts from hunting and gathering to agricultural lifeways, and the initial development of the world’s earliest cities and civilizations.
Instructor(s): R. Wanner
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.203. Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of Civilizations. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines Africa’s ancient past from the emergence of biologically modern humans, ancient hunter-gatherers, the earliest animal herding and farming populations, to cities and civilizations. While Egypt plays an undeniably central role in world history, this course concentrates in particular on ancient geographies other than Egypt.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.213. Introduction to Ancient Egyptian Art. 3.0 Credits.

This class is a combination of illustrated lecture and discussion, punctuated with visits to museums with Egyptian collections. Participants must be able to join at least one overnight trip to New York and/or Boston (weekend) and be available for two half day visits to Philadelphia and Washington, D.C . or elsewhere (TBA as best for participants) , in addition to visiting Baltimore institutions with the class as part of the course. Discussion of sculpture will take place in front of the objects, so attendance is important for the visits.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.333. Ancient Egypt and Her Neighbors. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to ancient Egypt's portrayals of and interactions with foreign lands and peoples, including Syria-Palestine to the east and Nubia to the south. Topics include trade, travel, warfare and diplomacy. Textual, iconographical and archaeological sources will be considered.
Instructor(s): A. Arico
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.334. Egyptian Funerary Arts in the Archaeological Museum. 3.0 Credits.

This class will aim to cover the production and choice of funerary objects for Egyptian elite tombs in several eras of antiquity: the Middle and New Kingdoms, the Third Intermediate Period, and the Late Periods. Students will work with specific objects after learning generally about them, and they will carry out analyses of materials, pigments, construction methods, and erosion and degradation effects. They will create a virtual exhibition for the Museum's website and present their results for inclusion in the museum cataloguing project.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan; S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.351. The Emergence of Civilization: A Cross-Cultural Examination. 3.0 Credits.

A comparative study of the origins of urban, literate civilizations in five culture areas: Mesopotamia, China, the Indus Valley, Egypt, and Mesoamerica. For each area, we will review the physical setting, the archaeological and textual evidence for the development of states and urban civilization, and theories advanced to explain the rise (and eventual collapse) of these complex societies.
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.353. Space Archaeology: An Introduction to Satellite Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces technologies archaeologists use to map ancient landscapes. These include Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping software, advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, and various types of satellite imagery. Taught together with AS.131.653.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.354. Archaeological Method and Theory. 3.0 Credits.

Climate change, population growth, war - what questions do archaeologists ask about the ancient past, how do they collect relevant evidence, and how do they arrive at satisfying answers to their questions? This course will review major theoretical currents in archaeology including evolutionary, cultural-historical, processual and post-processual approaches and discuss the future of archaeology as a scientific and humanistic discipline. Basic techniques for analyzing major categories of artifacts such as lithics, ceramics, archaeobotanical, and zooarchaeological materials will also be introduced.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.357. Geographic Information Systems in Archaeology. 3.0 Credits.

Applications of GIS in archaeology have recently expanded dramatically and GIS has now become an indispensible tool for archaeological research worldwide. This course will introduce the major applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in archaeology. These include the history of GIS in archaeology, air photography and satellite imagery, predictive modeling, hydrological modeling, viewsheds, and least-cost routes. It will grapple with theoretical issues manifest in archaeological GIS including conflicts between environment and social understandings of the ancient past, and will foster discussion of issues that affect outcomes of analyses including spatial scale and boundary delineation choices that can dramatically influence results. Students will learn the basics of ESRI’s ArcGIS software. Taught with AS.131.657.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Natural Sciences.

AS.130.368. Nomads, Tyrants and Kings: Water in the Ancient Near East. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores economic and social histories of water in the ancient Near East. It examines water’s diverse roles in ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Levantine and South Arabian agriculture, politics, ritual and religion, including water’s interconnected significance in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Taught jointly with AS.131.615.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.376. Ancient Magic and Ritual. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the vast body of rituals that were practiced and performed in antiquity, with a particular emphasis on rituals from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Hebrew Bible. In addition to examining rituals from a comparative perspective, anthropological and sociological studies of ritual will be read and discussed to shed light on the social, cultural, and political significance of ritual in the ancient world and beyond.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.377. Creating an Egyptian Temple. 3.0 Credits.

This class will challenge every participant to plan a temple environment for a particular deity. The readings, lectures, and discussions will cover the mythology around specific gods and how it influenced temple architecture, location, ritual, and festivals. It will survey the history of temple building in Egypt, the role of architecture and art -- particularly wall reliefs -- in communicating the functions of particular parts of temples. The aim is to help students understand what requirements an Egyptian temple needed to fulfill. Then each student will plan a temple for a chosen deity and explain to peers how it meets the ancient requirements.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.378. Geoarchaeology: Applications of Earth Science to Archaeology. 3.0 Credits.

Geoarchaeology is a multidisciplinary subfield that applies the tools and techniques of earth science to understand ancient humans and their interactions with environments. This course examines basic topics and concepts, including archaeological site formation, paleo-environmental reconstruction, raw materials and resources, soil science, deposition and erosion of wind and water-borne sediments in different environments such as along rivers, lakes and coastlines, radiocarbon and other chronometric dating methods, and ground-based remote sensing, including ground penetrating radar.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.384. Old Kingdom Art. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore the artistic expression of Egyptian culture from the 3rd through the 6th Dynasties, ca. 2700-2100 B.C. Tombs, temples, statuary, and two-dimensional wall decoration provide a large visual vocabulary of Egyptian concepts. This class will look at these elements, separately and in combination in order to consider the intentions behind the art and evaluate the degree to which religious and ideological symbolism, known from later Egyptian art, should be understood in the early pyramid-building era.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.395. Being_ in Ancient Egypt: Ethnicity, Sexuality, and Gender. 3.0 Credits.

What was it like to live in ancient Egypt? At first this question may seem deceivingly straightforward. But with further thought, its complexity becomes clear. Who are we concerned with? How the king lived? A poor farmer? His wife or children? A foreign immigrant? Moreover, what is our evidence for life in Egypt? Do all of the sources support similar interpretations? This course will begin to tackle these questions by considering the experiences of different people in ancient Egypt.
Instructor(s): T. Prakash
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.420. Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: (Auto)biography in the Ancient Near East. 3.0 Credits.

Just as in our time, the peoples of the ancient Near East were greatly interested in their own pasts. One of the most vibrant manifestations of this interest was the writing of biographies, in which ancient authors told the stories of individual lives. These biographies present an enormous challenge to contemporary historians. On the one hand, they offer a wealth of evidence – sometimes our only evidence – about some of the most famous persons of antiquity. On the other hand, the biographies were seldom written according to what we might consider “proper historical method.” How, as modern historians, do we approach these biographies in studying the ancient past? Using a variety of case studies, students will develop skills in specific research skills such as critical reading, analysis, and interpretation. AS.130.420 is required of NES Majors, but is also open to non-majors who have taken at least one 100-level and one 300-level Near Eastern Civilization course, or with the consent of the instructor.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.133.615. Representation and Identity in Ancient Egypt.

Using artistic, archaeological, and textual data, this course will apply recent anthropological and archaeological theories for understanding identity to ancient Egypt. In order to successfully approach such a broad concept, which could easily encompass many other topics, we will focus specifically on three different types of identity: ethnic (and cultural), gender, and sexual. Throughout the semester, we will explore how scholars identify past identities and the issues associated with this process. We will also consider the ways in which these identities were fluid, socially or culturally restricted, and self-defined.
Instructor(s): T. Prakash
Area: Humanities.

Earth & Planetary Sciences

AS.270.205. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis. 3.0 Credits.

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.
Instructor(s): X. Chen
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

Behavioral Biology

AS.290.101. Human Origins. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the origins of human structure, function and behavior from an evolutionary perspective. It includes study of the evolution, behavior and behavioral ecology of nonhuman primates, hominid evolution (including the paleontological and archaeological records), and the origins of human cognition, social behavior and culture.
Instructor(s): P. Holland
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Program in Museums and Society

AS.389.201. Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present. 3.0 Credits.

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Cross-listed with History and History of Art.
Instructor(s): J. Kingsley
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.389.205. Examining Archaeological Objects. 3.0 Credits.

This course considers the role of materials in the production, study and interpretation of objects by examining artifacts from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Students will consider materials such as ceramics, stone, metal, glass, wood and textiles, and visit artists' studios to gain an understanding of historical manufacturing processes. M&S practicum course. Cross-listed with Archaeology, Near Eastern Studies, Classics, and History of Art.
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.250. Conservation of Material Culture: Art, Artifacts and Heritage Sites. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the field of art conservation through the study of paintings, paper, books, objects, contemporary sculpture and historic preservation. Topics covered will include: methods of manufacture, agents of deterioration, preservation initiatives, conservation treatment and ethics, and conservation science. Cross-listed with History of Art. Class usually meets at 1:30 - 3:50 PM, except for days with field trips.
Instructor(s): L. Trusheim
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.315. Ancient Color: The Technologies and Meanings of Color in Antiquity. 3.0 Credits.

What role did the colorful surfaces of sculptures, vessels and textiles play in the ancient world? We examine historical texts and recent scholarly and scientific publications on the technologies and meanings of color in antiquity, and use imaging and analytical techniques to study polychromed objects from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.389.336. Heritage at Work. 3.0 Credits.

Working with the Catoctin Furnace historic site, students will gain hands-on experience connecting archaeology with interpretive exhibitions, public outreach, and community engagement. Several field trips to Catoctin required. M&S practicum course.
Instructor(s): E. Comer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.389.340. Critical Issues in Art Conservation. 3.0 Credits.

The course examines recent controversies in the conservation of major global art works and sites, raising questions concerning the basic theoretical assumptions, practical methods and ethical implications of art conservation. Cross-Listed with History of Art and Anthropology
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.349. Art, Museums and the Law. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce and examine the legal systems that structure and guide museums’ management of collections and relationships with artists, employees, the public, the state, and the international community.
Instructor(s): W. Levandusky
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.440. Who Owns Culture?. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores the complicated, often explosive concept of cultural property, including questions surrounding the ownership, preservation, and interpretation of artifacts, monuments, heritage sites, and living traditions. Cross-listed with Anthropology and History of Art.
Instructor(s): E. Rodini
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Environmental Health and Engineering

EN.570.205. Ecology. 3.0 Credits.

Introduction to processes governing the organization of individual organisms into populations, communities, and ecosystems. Interactions between individual organisms, groups of organisms, and the environment, including adaptation, natural selection, competition.
Instructor(s): G. Brush
Area: Natural Sciences.

EN.570.406. Environmental History. 3.0 Credits.

Environmental history explores the interactions between social change and environmental transformation, or the ways in which societies modify landscapes and are themselves affected by geological, climatological and changing ecological conditions. Topics include the relationship between climate change and human evolution, the environmental impacts of market-based commodity production and regional economic specialization; the relationship between urbanization and environmental change; how warfare affects and is affected by environmental conditions.
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://krieger.jhu.edu/archaeology/faculty-directory/

Faculty

Director

Glenn Schwartz
Whiting Professor of Archaeology (Near Eastern Studies): Near Eastern archaeology, archaeological method and theory.

Professors

Betsy Bryan
Alexander Badawy Chair in Egyptian Art and Archaeology (Near Eastern Studies): Egyptian archaeology and art.

Marian Feldman
(History of Art and Near Eastern Studies):ancient Near East and Eastern Mediterranean art

Lisa de Leonardis
Austen-Stokes Professor (History of Art): art and archaeology of the ancient Americas.

Matthew Roller
(Classics): Roman material culture and history.

Assistant Professors

Michael Harrower
(Near Eastern Studies): archaeology.

Pier-Luigi Tucci
(History of Art): Roman art and archaeology.

Senior Lecturer

Emily S.K. Anderson
(Classics and History of Art)