Archaeology

http://krieger.jhu.edu/archaeology/

The major in archaeology is an interdepartmental program that introduces students to archaeological theory, the analysis of archaeological materials, and the results of archaeological research in prehistoric and early historic periods in the Old and New Worlds. Archaeology studies human societies through examination of their material culture (physical remains), considering such issues as human subsistence, interaction with climate and physical environment, patterns of settlement, political and economic organization, and religious activity and thought. The field allows for the study of the entirety of human experience from its beginnings to the present day, in every region of the world and across all social strata.

Students in the major will have the opportunity to study and conduct research on materials stored in The Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum, which consists of a diverse and extensive assemblage of artifacts from ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Palestine, and Mesoamerica. Opportunities may also be available to study materials in the Classical, Egyptian, and Near Eastern collections in the Walters Art Museum.

 

 

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Requirements for the major include 13 courses (39 credits). These can be selected from a diversity of offerings available from different departments. In addition, students must take a core of three courses consisting of Introduction to Archaeology, World Prehistory, and Archaeological Method and Theory.  Except for some field experiences, majors must complete all courses required for the major for a letter grade and receive a grade of C- or higher. 

Core Courses
AS.130.110Introduction To Archaeology3.00
AS.130.177World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective3.00
AS.130.354/AS.131.654Archaeological Method and Theory3.00
AS.070.132Invitation to Anthropology3.00
Six archaeology courses, both regionally specific and/or methodologically/theoretically advanced18
Three courses, to be decided in conjunction with the student’s advisor, pertinent to the archaeological issues the student has focused on. 9
Significant archaeological field experience (consult faculty advisor)
Total Credits39

Sample Program of Study

In addition to the example plan as shown below, students are required to complete significant archaeological field experience.  This is commonly done during the summer(s) after sophomore and/or junior year(s).

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.130.110Introduction To Archaeology3AS.130.177World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective3
  3  3
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.070.132Invitation to Anthropology3AS.130.354Archaeological Method and Theory3
Archaeology elective #13Archaeology elective #23
  6  6
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Archaeology elective #33Archaeology elective #43
Additional course #13Additional course #23
  6  6
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Archaeology elective #53Archaeology elective #63
Additional course #33 
  6  3
Total Credits: 39

Honors Program

Archaeology majors have the option of writing an honors thesis under the supervision of a faculty member. The thesis is based on an original research problem developed in conjunction with that faculty member. Successful completion of the thesis (B+ or higher) will result in the conferring of a BA with honors.

Students entering Fall 2014 and later must pass 6 credits (2 semesters: 130.510 and 130.511) of honors thesis to earn honors in the Archaeology Major. These credits are in addition to and exceed the number of credits needed for the major.

Students who are interested in pursuing an honors thesis should begin to discuss possibilities with a faculty advisor as early as possible and no later than during the second semester of Junior year. A proposal for the thesis must be approved by the faculty advisor before the student registers for the courses and no later than the end of the second semester of the Junior year.

The student will work closely with the faculty advisor, setting a timeline for completing research and submitting drafts of the thesis. A full draft of the thesis is due by the end of March of the Senior year, if the student wants to be listed as receiving honors on the commencement program. The final version of the thesis must be handed in by the last day of classes.

Program Learning Goals for the Archaeology Major

1.  Acquire the basic skills for understanding theory, interpretation, and methods in archaeology.

2.  Develop an ability to analyze archaeological data through the reading and interpretation of archaeological publications and study of primary data.

3.  Conduct analyses and interpretations of material culture in precise, well-organized, and persuasive language, both orally and in writing.

4.  Acquire interdisciplinary knowledge of different past human cultures.

5.  Gain significant knowledge of the material culture of at least one region or thematic issue.

6.  Acquire on-site experience and expertise in archaeological method through fieldwork.

For current course information and registration go to https://isis.jhu.edu/classes/

Anthropology

AS.070.132. Invitation to Anthropology. 3.00 Credits.

In this course students will be introduced to anthropological modes of asking questions about the changing world through an openness to the new and through returning to classics in the anthropological canon. The specific topics to be explored are: new modes of mapping, visualization and scenario building, the interface between technology and experience, global governance structures, and, the possibility of a new planetary ethos in the face of climate change.
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Classics

AS.040.111. Ancient Greek Civilization: Society, Archaeology, Literature, Philosophy. 3.00 Credits.

The course will introduce students to major aspects of the ancient Greek civilization, with special emphasis placed upon culture, society, archaeology, literature, and philosophy.
Instructor(s): J. Smith
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.119. The World of Pompeii. 3.00 Credits.

This course will focus on the history and archaeology of Pompeii. Close attention will also be paid to the reception of Pompeian materials in European and American culture. Cross-listed with History of Art and the Program in Museums and Society.
Instructor(s): H. Valladares
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.218. Celebration and Performance in Early Greece. 3.00 Credits.

Surviving imagery suggests that persons in Minoan and Mycenaean societies engaged in various celebratory performances, including processions, feasts, and ecstatic dance. This course explores archaeological evidence of such celebrations, focusing on sociocultural roles, bodily experience, and interpretive challenges.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.221. Art and Archaeology of Early Greece. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the origins and rise of Greek civilization from the Early Bronze Age to the Persian Wars (ca. 3100-480 B.C.), focusing on major archaeological sites, sanctuaries, material culture, and artistic production.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.320. Myth In Classical Art. 3.00 Credits.

This course traces the representation of the principal gods and heroes of Greek myth in the visual arts (sculpture and vase-painting), as well as later reflections in Roman painting.
Instructor(s): A. Shapiro
Area: Humanities.

 

Geography and Environmental Engineering

EN.570.406. Environmental History. 3.00 Credits.

Environmental history explores the interactions between social change and environmental transformation, or the ways in which societies modify landscapes and are themselves affected by geological, climatological and changing ecological conditions. Topics include the relationship between climate change and human evolution, the environmental impacts of market-based commodity production and regional economic specialization; the relationship between urbanization and environmental change; how warfare affects and is affected by environmental conditions.
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.423. Principles of Geomorphology. 4.00 Credits.

Analysis of the factors responsible for the form of the landscape. The concept of the cycle of erosion is discussed primarily in terms of the principles that govern the processes of erosion. Climate, conditions of soil formation, and the distribution of vegetation are considered as they relate to the development of landforms. Recommended Course Background: AS.270.220 or permission required.
Instructor(s): P. Wilcock
Area: Natural Sciences.

History

AS.100.470. Monuments and Memory In Asian History. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

History of Art

AS.010.105. Art of the Ancient Americas. 3.00 Credits.

Surveys the art of Olmec, West Mexico, Teotihuacan, Maya, and Aztec.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.334. Problems in Ancient American Art. 3.00 Credits.

Selected topics which may include collecting the pre-Columbian past and connoisseurship, the formation of national museums, post-Columbian appropriations. Collections study in museums. May also be used toward credit for the Archaeology major. Cross-listed with PLAS and Program in Museum and Society
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.365. Art of the Ancient Andes. 3.00 Credits.

The ancient visual arts of Andean South America and their respective cultural contexts form the basis of this course. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art and the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum students will have access to collections for study.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.398. Tombs for the Living. 3.00 Credits.

Centering on the tomb as the unit of analysis, this course examines the cultural and material aspects of death and funerary ritual. Draws on case studies from North America, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Collections study in museums.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.407. Ancient Americas Metallurgy. 3.00 Credits.

Centering on a series of case studies, this course addresses the technology, aesthetics, and social significance of metals. We trace the development of metals from 1500 BCE in Chile and Peru, to the 16th century in Colombia and central Mexico, pausing to examine its forms and meanings in various cultural contexts, and the ideas that inform its value. In conjunction with the Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA), the Walters Art Museum (WAM), and the Johns Hopkins Archaeology Museum (JHUAM), students will have access to ancient metal works for study.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

Near Eastern Studies

AS.130.101. Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations. 3.00 Credits.

Review of important issues in ancient Near Eastern history and culture from the Neolithic era to the Persian period. Included will be an examination of the Neolithic agricultural revolution, the emergence of cities, states and writing, and formation of empires. Cultures such as Sumer and Akkad, Egypt, the Hittites, Israelites, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians will be discussed.
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.102. From the Neanderthals to the Neolithic. 3.00 Credits.

Emphasizing theories about human biological and cultural development, this course consists of an in-depth survey of Neanderthal morphology and culture, a brief discussion of evolutionary theory and our fossil ancestors, and concludes with an exploration of the mechanisms and results of the shift from hunting and gathering to farming. (Course formerly known as Introduction: Human Prehistory.) Cross-listed with Anthropology.
Instructor(s): S. McCarter
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.110. Introduction To Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.
Instructor(s): C. Brinker
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.135. Pyramids, Temples and Tombs. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to the monuments and culture of Egypt from 3500 B.C. to 100 A.D. From the pyramids at Giza to Hellenistic Alexandria, this course surveys in slide illustrated lectures the remains of one of the world’s greatest early cultures.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.177. World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective. 3.00 Credits.

How and why did our nomadic hunting and gathering ancestors become farmers? What led agricultural societies to build cities, develop writing, religious institutions, wage war, and trade for exotic goods? This course surveys prehistory and ancient history from the origins of human culture to the emergence civilization. Although prehistory and ancient history yield evidence of tremendous cultural diversity this course emphasizes common elements of past human experience, culture, and culture change. These include the origins of modern humans and their adjustment to a variety of post-ice age environments, shifts from hunting and gathering to agricultural lifeways, and the initial development of the world’s earliest cities and civilizations.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.251. Made for the Gods: Votive Eqyptian Objects in the Archaeological Museum. 3.00 Credits.

This course investigates Egyptian votive objects made as gifts to the Gods. Students will learn about Egyptian religious practices and study groups of objects in the Archaeological Museum to learn to identify how they were produced, when, and for what functions. Physical analyses of the objects will be part of the class and facilitated by museum staff.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.328. Ancient Egypt /Africa. 3.00 Credits.

Recent excavation and research have shed light on several ancient cultures of the Nile and its tributaries. We will look at the available archaeological and textual (all Egyptian) evidence for these societies and their interactions with Egypt between 3500 and 300 B.C. We will also discuss research aims and methods employed now and in the past in Egypt and the Sudan.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.329. Ancient Egyptian Art and Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of Egyptian art as seen in the temples, tombs, funerary, and minor arts of Egypt between 3000 and 100 B.C. Slide lectures will provide a survey of art from the Pyramids to Augustus Caesar and will focus on such topics as the principles of Egyptian art; can the term art apply to early Egypt? How were artisans trained and what techniques and materials were utilized in their work? Co-listed (meets with) AS.133.750.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.334. Egyptian Funerary Arts in the Archaeological Museum. 3.00 Credits.

This class will aim to cover the production and choice of funerary objects for Egyptian elite tombs in several eras of antiquity: the Middle and New Kingdoms, the Third Intermediate Period, and the Late Periods. Students will work with specific objects after learning generally about them, and they will carry out analyses of materials, pigments, construction methods, and erosion and degradation effects. They will create a virtual exhibition for the Museum's website and present their results for inclusion in the museum cataloguing project.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan; S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.353. Space Archaeology: An Introduction to Satellite Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces technologies archaeologists use to map ancient landscapes. These include Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping software, advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, and various types of satellite imagery. Taught together with AS.131.653.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.354. Archaeological Method and Theory. 3.00 Credits.

Climate change, population growth, war - what questions do archaeologists ask about the ancient past, how do they collect relevant evidence, and how do they arrive at satisfying answers to their questions? This course will review major theoretical currents in archaeology including evolutionary, cultural-historical, processual and post-processual approaches and discuss the future of archaeology as a scientific and humanistic discipline. Basic techniques for analyzing major categories of artifacts such as lithics, ceramics, archaeobotanical, and zooarchaeological materials will also be introduced.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.357. Geographic Information Systems in Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

Applications of GIS in archaeology have recently expanded dramatically and GIS has now become an indispensible tool for archaeological research worldwide. This course will introduce the major applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in archaeology. These include the history of GIS in archaeology, air photography and satellite imagery, predictive modeling, hydrological modeling, viewsheds, and least-cost routes. It will grapple with theoretical issues manifest in archaeological GIS including conflicts between environment and social understandings of the ancient past, and will foster discussion of issues that affect outcomes of analyses including spatial scale and boundary delineation choices that can dramatically influence results. Students will learn the basics of ESRI’s ArcGIS software. Taught with AS.131.657.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Natural Sciences.

AS.131.800. Readings & Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.389.205. Examining Archaeological Objects. 3.00 Credits.

This course considers the role of materials in the production, study and interpretation of objects by examining artifacts from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Students will consider materials such as ceramics, stone, metal, glass, wood and textiles, and visit artists' studios to gain an understanding of historical manufacturing processes. M&S practicum course. Cross-listed with Archaeology, Near Eastern Studies, Classics, and History of Art.
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.340. Critical Issues in Art Conservation. 3.00 Credits.

The course examines recent controversies in the conservation of major global art works and sites, raising questions concerning the basic theoretical assumptions, practical methods and ethical implications of art conservation. Cross-Listed with History of Art and Anthropology
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

Graduate Courses that may be taken with permission of the instructor:

AS.131.634. Seminar: Near Eastern Archaeology.

Topic varies but can include the archaeology of Mesopotamia, Syria, or Palestine, or thematic discussions (e.g., on ideology, state collapse, etc.).
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz.

AS.131.635. Seminar: Near East Archaeology.

Topic varies but can include the archaeology of Mesopotamia, Syria, or Palestine, or thematic discussions (e.g., on ideology, state collapse, etc.).
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz
Area: Humanities.

AS.131.654. Advanced Archaeological Method and Theory.

Climate change, population growth, war - what questions do archaeologists ask about the ancient past, how do they collect relevant evidence, and how do they arrive at satisfying answers to their questions? This course will review major theoretical currents in archaeology including evolutionary, cultural-historical, processual and post-processual approaches and discuss the future of archaeology as a scientific and humanistic discipline. Basic techniques for analyzing major categories of artifacts such as lithics, ceramics, archaeobotanical, and zooarchaeological materials will also be introduced.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.131.657. Geographic Information Systems in Archaeology.

Applications of GIS in archaeology have recently expanded dramatically and GIS has now become an indispensible tool for archaeological research worldwide. This course will introduce the major applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in archaeology. These include the history of GIS in archaeology, air photography and satellite imagery, predictive modeling, hydrological modeling, viewsheds, and least-cost routes. It will grapple with theoretical issues manifest in archaeological GIS including conflicts between environment and social understandings of the ancient past, and will foster discussion of issues that affect outcomes of analyses including spatial scale and boundary delineation choices that can dramatically influence results. Students will learn the basics of ESRI’s ArcGIS software. Taught with AS.130.357.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Natural Sciences.

AS.133.750. Seminar in Egyptian Art and Archaeology.

The theme for this course will be archaeology of the Mut precinct in Luxor where Johns Hopkins is excavating. Study of the comparative materials from other sites will be central with the publication of the work approaching.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan.

AS.133.751. Seminar in Egyptian Art and Archaeology: Old Kingdom Art.

This course will explore the artistic expression of Egyptian culture from the 3rd through the 6th Dynasties, ca. 2700-2100 B.C. Tombs, temples, statuary, and two-dimensional wall decoration provide a large visual vocabulary of Egyptian concepts. This class will look at these elements, separately and in combination in order to consider the intentions behind the art and evaluate the degree to which religious and ideological symbolism, known from later Egyptian art, should be understood in the early pyramid-building era.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan.

AS.389.205. Examining Archaeological Objects. 3.00 Credits.

This course considers the role of materials in the production, study and interpretation of objects by examining artifacts from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Students will consider materials such as ceramics, stone, metal, glass, wood and textiles, and visit artists' studios to gain an understanding of historical manufacturing processes. M&S practicum course. Cross-listed with Archaeology, Near Eastern Studies, Classics, and History of Art.
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://krieger.jhu.edu/archaeology/faculty-directory/

Faculty

Co-Director

Glenn Schwartz
Whiting Professor of Archaeology (Near Eastern Studies): Near Eastern archaeology, archaeological method and theory.

H. Alan Shapiro
W. H. Collins Vickers Professor of Archaeology (Classics): Greek and Roman art and archaeology.

Professors

Betsy Bryan
Alexander Badawy Chair in Egyptian Art and Archaeology (Near Eastern Studies): Egyptian archaeology and art.

Lisa de Leonardis
Austen-Stokes Professor (History of Art): art and archaeology of the ancient Americas.

Matthew Roller
(Classics): Roman material culture and history.

Assistant Professors

Michael Harrower
(Near Eastern Studies): archaeology.

Pier-Luigi Tucci
(History of Art): Roman art and archaeology.