Classics

http://classics.jhu.edu

Classics has long been at the heart of humanistic studies at Johns Hopkins University: the very first person appointed to the faculty of the newly founded University in 1876 was Basil L. Gildersleeve, a professor of Greek. Gildersleeve adopted the most effective model of scholarship at the time—the German seminar, which combined teaching with research—as the basis for training students at Hopkins. This revolutionary structure was central to the new model of the “research university” that Johns Hopkins University pioneered.

Today, the Department of Classics at Johns Hopkins seeks to maintain and enhance this tradition of leadership and innovation. Members of the current faculty are highly interdisciplinary. We combine philological, historical, iconographical, and comparative methods in our investigations of the cultures, broadly conceived, of ancient Greece and Rome, with additional expertise in Reception Studies (aka “The Classical Tradition”) and in the post-classical use of Greek and Latin.

The graduate program reflects these characteristics. It is founded upon intensive study of ancient Greek and Latin language and literature, but also requires rigorous work in such fields as ancient history, art, archaeology, and philosophy, while allowing considerable flexibility to accommodate individual interests. The program aims to produce broad, versatile scholars who have a holistic view of the ancient cultures and of the evidence by which those cultures are comprehended.

The classics department enjoys close ties with several local and regional institutions whose missions include the study of the ancient world, including the Walters Art Museum, with its world-class collection of antiquities and manuscripts; the Baltimore Museum of Art, with its Roman mosaics; and the Center for Hellenic Studies in Washington, D.C. Internationally, it is a member of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, the American Academy in Rome, and the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome.

The department’s main scholarly resource is the Milton S. Eisenhower Library, which has broad and deep holdings in the various fields of classical antiquity. The department also has a significant collection of Greek, Roman, and Etruscan antiquities, housed in the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Collection (shared with the Department of Near Eastern Studies), and a small reference library in its Gilman Hall seminar room.

The department offers undergraduate courses in Greek and Latin languages and literature, ancient history, classical art and archaeology, Greek and Roman civilizations, history of sexuality and gender, ancient philosophy, mythology, and anthropological approaches to the classics. These courses are open to all students in the university, regardless of their academic year or major field of interest.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

(See also Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree.)

The B.A. program in classics is highly flexible, accommodating a variety of interests in and approaches to the ancient world.  Possible areas of emphasis include language and literature, ancient philosophy, art and archaeology, and ancient history.

Classics Major

Certain courses taken in other departments may count toward the major, with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies (DUS). Advanced undergraduates may participate in graduate seminars, with the approval of the DUS and the professor.  With assistance from their faculty advisors, students are required to build an intellectually substantial and coherent curriculum and must take all courses for a letter grade and earn a C or better in major requirements. Students are strongly encouraged to complete a course in ancient Greek civilization (usually AS.040.111) and a course in Roman civilization (usually AS.040.112 or AS.040.104).

Major Requirements
Greek or Latin Language Courses
Two Greek or Latin language courses at any level6-8
Two Greek or Latin language courses at the 200-level or above6-8
Language Proficiency in French, German, or Italian
Proficiency demonstrated through the second semester of intermediate level via course completion or waiver by exam
Classics Courses
Eight courses offered through the Classics Department or cross-listed in Classics24

A student with previous Latin or Greek experience may begin at the intermediate or advanced level if approved by the faculty member overseeing the course in which the student wishes to enroll.  In such cases, the normal prerequisites are waived.  (NB: The student must still take four language courses according to the requirements given above, but a maximum of two waived courses may be counted toward the eight “Classics courses,” making it possible for students with experience in Latin or Greek to meet requirements more quickly.)

Sample Program

A typical program might include the following sequence of courses:

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.040.107Elementary Latin^^3.5AS.040.108Elementary Latin^^3.5
Classics elective #13French, German or Italian language course4
French, German or Italian language course*4 
  10.5  7.5
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.040.207Intermediate Latin^^3AS.040.208Intermediate Latin^^3
Classics elective #23French, German or Italian language course3
French, German or Italian language course3 
  9  6
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
See below regarding study abroad during the junior year^^^ Classics elective #43
Classics elective #33Classics elective #53
  3  6
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Classics elective #63Classics elective #83
Classics elective #73 
  6  3
Total Credits: 51

*     Students with no experience in French, German, or Italian should expect to take 4 courses in one of those languages to satisfy the modern language requirement for the major.

^^   Greek courses may be substituted for Latin courses, and vice versa, according to the interests and goals of the student.  This sample program assumes no previous language experience; students who know some Latin and/or Greek may begin at a higher level with faculty approval.

 ^^^ Many Classics majors study abroad during the junior year; for these students, the four-year plan may vary in shape depending on the courses offered by the study abroad program chosen.

Students intending to pursue graduate study in classics will need to do substantially more work in Greek and Latin than what the major minimally requires: most graduate programs expect successful applicants to have studied one language for at least three years and the other for at least two. Therefore, students interested in graduate work should be engaged in a language-intensive curriculum by the end of the sophomore year.

The Evangelia Davos Prize

The Classics Department awards the Evangelia Davos Prize each year to the classics major or minor whose work in Greek studies is outstanding.

Honors Program in Classics

Classics majors have the opportunity to graduate with honors by writing an honors thesis (15,000-20,000 words) in close consultation with a faculty member. Three credits of “honors thesis research” are awarded in the spring semester of the senior year.  (These credits may not be used to fulfill the basic requirements for the Classics BA, which must be met independently of any honors thesis work.)

Entrance to the Classics Honors program is contingent on outstanding performance in previous Classics courses. Students wishing to pursue an honors thesis are expected to consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies by March 15 of the junior year to allow for adequate advising, planning, and identification of an appropriate honors thesis advisor.

A typical timeline for honors thesis research is as follows: research begins in the summer before the senior year (or earlier); further research and writing continues through the fall, with a draft of the thesis submitted early in the spring semester and a final version submitted in April.

Study Abroad

The Department of Classics is a member of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome and can provide information on other year-long, semester-long, or summer programs in Greece and Italy (e.g., the College Year in Athens and the summer session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens). Interested students, especially classics majors and minors, are encouraged to consider these options for studying overseas.

Classics Minor

The requirements for the minor in classics are extremely flexible.  Courses are selected, in consultation with the DUS, to meet the needs and interests of the student. Minors may wish to pursue the study of one ancient language, or create a curriculum that meshes with their other academic pursuits. All courses must be taken for letter grades and receive a grade of C or higher.

Minor Requirements
Classics Courses
6 courses offered through the Classics Department or cross-listed in Classics18

B.A./M.A. Degree

The department offers a masters degree for current Hopkins undergraduate students.  Details may be found on the Graduate tab.

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Requirements for the B.A./M.A. Degree

Admission to the B.A./M.A. program is restricted to current Johns Hopkins University undergraduate classics majors and is based on outstanding performance in previous classics courses.

Students considering a five-year program are expected to declare their interest during the spring semester of their junior year. Prior to application, students must consult with the director of undergraduate studies, their faculty adviser, and the department administrator. A formal graduate application must be submitted no later than November 15 of the fall semester of the senior year in order for admission to the program in the spring of the senior year, thus meeting the requirement for concurrent status. In the senior (fourth) year, students are to devise a program of study that would best prepare them to do advanced work in their final (fifth) year, in particular addressing any weakness in one or the other classical language. All requirements for the B.A. must be completed by the end of the fourth year.

In the MA (fifth) year, students must complete the following:

Two graduate seminars in the Classics Department
Four semesters (12 credits) of Latin and/or Greek, at least six credits of which must be at the advanced level
A thesis of 20,000 to 25,000 words representing original research. The thesis will be supervised by a member of the Classics Department faculty and graded by the supervisor and a second reader from Classics or an outside department.

Exceptionally well-prepared students may apply for the B.A./M.A. program in the spring of their junior year, with prior approval from the director of undergraduate studies and the department chair. In this case it is possible to complete the bachelor’s/master’s degree in four years, provided all B.A. requirements are fulfilled by the end of the third year. These students are expected to express their interest to the department by the fall term of their junior (third) year; they must then submit an application no later than March 15 in the following semester.

The B.A. and M.A. degrees are conferred concurrently at the end of the M.A. year. Please note that the department does not award degrees during the summer; students are expected to complete the degree requirements in conformance with the university Graduate Board spring deadlines. Specific departmental and Graduate Board deadlines are communicated to the student in due course.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

To receive a Ph.D. in classics from Johns Hopkins University, students must complete successfully a range of seminar work and examinations and then write a substantial dissertation. The Graduate Program in Classics is designed to be completed in five years, of which the first three are dedicated to seminar work and examinations, and the last two to the dissertation. Assuming satisfactory progress toward the Ph.D., all students admitted to the program receive five years of living expenses and tuition remission, in order to make it possible to complete the program in a timely manner. This support takes the form of a fellowship for the first two years, and teaching for at least two of the remaining years. The department may also able to offer teaching opportunities in the summer, as well as funded summer travel for program-related purposes. All students, upon reaching dissertation level, are encouraged to apply for outside funding to spend a year abroad. If outside funding is obtained, the Johns Hopkins fellowship may be held in reserve for an additional year. A detailed outline of the Ph.D. program, including a prospectus of all seminars and exams, can be found on the Classics Department website (http://classics.jhu.edu).

Application information may be obtained from the Graduate Admissions website or by contacting the department chair, Department of Classics, Johns Hopkins University, 113 Gilman Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218. Telephone: 410-516-7556; Fax: 410-516-4848; email: classics@jhu.edu. The application deadline is on or about January 15. For the precise date, please refer to the Graduate Admissions website (http://grad.jhu.edu).

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.040.103. The Roman Empire. 3.0 Credits.

This introductory course examines the history, society, and culture of the Roman state in the Imperial age (ca. 31 BCE-ca. 500 CE), during which it underwent a traumatic transition from an oligarchic to a monarchic form of government, attained its greatest territorial expanse, produced its most famous art, architecture, and literature, experienced vast cultural and religious changes, and finally was transformed into an entirely different ("late antique") form of society. All readings in English.
Instructor(s): M. Roller
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.104. The Roman Republic: History, Culture, and Afterlife. 3.0 Credits.

This introductory level course examines the history, society, and culture of the Roman state in the Republican period (509-31 BCE), during which it expanded from a small city-state to a Mediterranean empire. We also consider the Republic's importance for American revolutionaries in the 18th century. All readings in English.
Instructor(s): M. Roller
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.105. Elementary Ancient Greek. 4.0 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of ancient Greek. During the first semester, the focus will be on morphology and vocabulary. Credit is given only upon completion of a year's work. Cannot be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.
Instructor(s): D. Yatromanolakis.

AS.040.106. Elementary Ancient Greek. 4.0 Credits.

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of ancient Greek. The first semester’s focus is morphology and vocabulary; the second semester’s emphasis is syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory.
Instructor(s): L. Hutchison.

AS.040.107. Elementary Latin. 3.5 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students, as well as a systematic review for those students with a background in Latin. Emphasis during the first semester will be on morphology and vocabulary. Credit is given only upon completion of a year’s work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.
Instructor(s): J. Lenzi; J. Meyer.

AS.040.108. Elementary Latin. 3.5 Credits.

Course provides comprehensive, intensive introduction to the study of Latin for new students as well as systematic review for students with background in Latin. The first semester's emphasis is on morphology and vocabulary; the second semester's focus is on syntax and reading. Credit is given only upon completion of a year's work. Course may not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.
Instructor(s): D. Piana; R. Franklin
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.111. Ancient Greek Civilization. 3.0 Credits.

The course will introduce students to major aspects of the ancient Greek civilization, with special emphasis placed upon culture, society, archaeology, literature, and philosophy.
Instructor(s): J. Smith
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.121. Ancient Greek Mythology: Art, Narratives, and Modern Mythmaking. 3.0 Credits.

This course focuses on major and often intricate myths and mythical patterns of thought as they are reflected in compelling ancient visual and textual narratives. Being one of the greatest treasure troves of the ancient world, these myths will further be considered in light of their rich reception in the medieval and modern world (including their reception in the modern fields of anthropology and philosophy).
Instructor(s): D. Yatromanolakis
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.126. Religion, Music and Society in Ancient Greece. 3.0 Credits.

Emphasis on ancient Greek ritual and mythology; on ancient music, religion, and society; and on cultural institutions such as symposia (drinking parties) and festivals.
Instructor(s): D. Yatromanolakis
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.133. Heroes: the Ancient Greek Way. 3.0 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Ancient Greek literature by reading and discussing its most important and famous texts, from the Iliad and the Odyssey to tragedy to philosophy. Knowledge of Greek is not required.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.134. Love, War, and Glory: The Gods and Heroes of Greek Mythology. 3.0 Credits.

Greek myths fascinate us as adventurous narratives, yet they always sound enigmatic and require interpretation. This course will combine the pleasure of reading stories and the concern for their understanding. Readings in ancient and modern texts. The course may not be taken S/U. This course meets Hopkins’ requirements for a major in classics.
Instructor(s): D. Piana
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.135. The Grandeur That Was Rome. 3.0 Credits.

At the peak of its power, the Roman empire extended from Scotland to Syria, incorporating numerous cultures, attitudes, and lifestyles. This course examines Roman social practices, political institutions, and religion from the empire's humble beginnings through its final period, using a wide variety of materials including drama, poetry, history, and oratory. This course may not be taken S/U and meets the Hopkins requirements for a major in classics.
Instructor(s): M. Mueller
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.137. Freshman Seminar: Archaeology at the Crossroads: The Ancient Eastern Mediterranean through Objects in the JHU Archaeological Museum. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar investigates the Eastern Mediterranean as a space of intense cultural interaction in the Late Bronze Age, exploring how people, ideas, and things not only came into contact but deeply influenced one another through maritime trade, art, politics, etc. In addition to class discussion, we will work hands-on with artifacts from the JHU Archaeological Museum, focusing on material from Cyprus.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.140. Gender and Sexuality in Early Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will explore evidence and interpretations of gender and sexuality in the region of the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean during the third and second millennia BCE. Material investigated will include the “snake goddess” figures from Minoan Crete, anthropomorphic figurines from the Cyclades and Cyprus, wall paintings, etc. In each case we will consider the history of interpretation as well as investigate the objects’ archaeological and sociocultural contexts. Discussion topics will include representational ambiguity, the specific materialities of objects, and their possible roles in activities construing gender. The course will incorporate material from the JHU Archaeological Museum.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.142. Spartacus, Caesar, and Cleopatra: Notorious Characters from Roman History and Hollywood Cinema. 3.0 Credits.

Since the invention of cinema, the ancient world has been an important vehicle for both lavish visual spectacles and the exploration of contemporary social issues. This course analyzes the depiction of the infamous figures of the late republic in both ancient sources and modern media, to examine how ancient Rome and contemporary America have used these characters to contemplate race, class, gender, and imperialism.
Instructor(s): G. Gessert
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.146. Classics and Comics: Ancient Writers and Modern Visual Culture. 3.0 Credits.

Course analyzing the adaptation of ancient Greek and Roman literature and visual culture in modern comic books, graphic novels, and manga.
Instructor(s): G. Gessert
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.148. Ancient Israel and Ancient Greece in Opera and on Film. 3.0 Credits.

Some of the most breathtaking (early and later) operas and films have been in intense dialogue with ancient societies, narratives, and cultural concepts. Contemporary hit movies center on diverse aspects of ancient narratives: the beginning of the world, violent wars, politics, erotic themes, and intricate existential questions. The course will introduce students to a comparative examination of the variety of approaches to ancient Israel and ancient Greece in the spectacular worlds of opera and cinema. The course will focus on major texts and archaeological material related to antiquity; works of world cinema will be analyzed.
Instructor(s): D. Yatromanolakis
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.150. Island Archeology: Land and Sea in Ancient Crete, Cyprus and the Cyclades. 3.0 Credits.

Islands present highly distinctive contexts for social life. We examine three island worlds of the ancient eastern Mediterranean. These are places where water had a unique and powerful meaning and boat travel was part of daily life, where palaces flourished and contact with other societies implied voyages of great distance. Class combines close study of material and visual culture with consideration of island-specific interpretive paradigms; trips to Archaeological Museum.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.152. Medical Terminology. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates the Greek and Latin roots of modern medical terminology, with addtional focus on the history of ancient medicine and its role in the development of that terminology.
Instructor(s): J. Smith
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.160. Special Opportunities in Undergraduate Learning: Constructing an Empire: An Introduction to the Art & Archaeology of Ancient Rome. 1.0 Credit.

Have you ever imagined what it would be like to stroll down the colonnaded streets of ancient Rome, visiting the monuments, palaces and temples of the ancient gods? Have you ever wondered what the luxurious villas looked like from within, or what it would be like to attend a play in an ancient theatre or the gladiatorial games in the Colosseum? This course is designed to introduce students to the material culture of the ancient Roman world by exploring the architecture, sculpture, painting, and mosaics of Rome and its environs. We will also take a field trip to the gallery of Roman art in the Walters Art Museum in order to better understand the Roman Empire through the visual arts.
Instructor(s): A. Tabeling.

AS.040.201. Digging Up the Gods: The Archaeology of Roman Sanctuaries. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore the major sites of Ancient Italy, such as Rome, Ostia, and Pompeii, from temples to dedications, and their role in religion and society. Cross-listed with History of Art.
Instructor(s): G. Gessert
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.205. Intermediate Ancient Greek. 3.0 Credits.

Reading ability in classical Greek is developed through a study of various authors.
Prerequisites: AS.040.105 AND AS.040.106 OR Equivalent
Instructor(s): J. Smith
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.206. Intermediate Ancient Greek. 3.0 Credits.

Reading ability in classical Greek is developed through a study of various authors, primarily Plato (fall) and Homer (spring).
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.207. Intermediate Latin. 3.0 Credits.

Although emphasis is still placed on development of rapid comprehension, readings and discussions introduce student to study of Latin literature, principally through texts of various authors.
Prerequisites: AS.040.107 AND AS.040.108 OR Equivalent
Instructor(s): M. Asuni; T. Smith
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.208. Intermediate Latin. 3.0 Credits.

Reading ability in Latin is developed through the study of various authors, primarily Cicero (fall) and Vergil (spring).
Instructor(s): J. Meyer
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.218. Celebration and Performance in Early Greece. 3.0 Credits.

Surviving imagery suggests that persons in Minoan and Mycenaean societies engaged in various celebratory performances, including processions, feasts, and ecstatic dance. This course explores archaeological evidence of such celebrations, focusing on sociocultural roles, bodily experience, and interpretive challenges.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.221. Art and Archaeology of Early Greece. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the origins and rise of Greek civilization from the Early Bronze Age to the Persian Wars (ca. 3100-480 B.C.), focusing on major archaeological sites, sanctuaries, material culture, and artistic production.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.233. The Ancient Greek and Roman Novels. 3.0 Credits.

The ancient Greeks are credited with inventing democracy, philosophy, drama, and science. They also invented the novel. In this class, we will read a large sample of Greek and Roman novels: stories of love, adventures, and magic.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.235. Past is Present: Cultural Heritage and Global Interactions. 3.0 Credits.

The uncovering, collection and valuation of the archaeological past is deeply embroiled in global interactions - diplomatic, economic, cultural. We examine the complex role of cultural heritage through consideration of case studies and analytic approaches. Frequent visits to area museums.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.236. From Apollo to Dionysus: Ritual, Performance, and the Genesis of Tragedy. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the origins and development of what is often regarded as the most exemplary form of western art–Classical Athenian Tragedy. Focusing on the ritual, performative, and civic contexts of Greek song culture, it ultimately seeks to pose the question ‘what makes Athens unique?’. To this end, the courses is centered on an examination of texts in tandem with material culture (monumental architecture, temples, dedications, statuary, vase painting). Issues of identity, religion, politics, and athletics will be discussed. Dean's Teaching Fellowship course.
Prerequisites: Prereq: AS.040.111
Instructor(s): T. Smith
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.237. Myth and Metamorphosis. 3.0 Credits.

Beginning with close study of the poem itself, this course will examine the unequaled influence of Ovid's Metamorphoses on subsequent literature and art, including theater and film.
Instructor(s): M. Butler
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.238. Freshman Seminar: Magic and Miracles from Antiquity to the Renaissance. 3.0 Credits.

This freshman seminar will explore concepts of magic and miracles and their different forms from ancient Greece and Rome and early Christianity through the Middle Ages up to the Renaissance. Dean's Prize Teaching Fellowship Course.
Instructor(s): M. Mueller
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.305. Advanced Ancient Greek. 3.0 Credits.

Reading of prose or verse authors, depending on the needs of students. Co-listed with AS.040.705.
Prerequisites: AS.040.205 AND AS.040.206 OR Equivalent
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.306. Advanced Ancient Greek. 3.0 Credits.

Reading of prose or verse authors, depending on the needs of students. Co-listed with AS.040.702.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.307. Advanced Latin Prose. 3.0 Credits.

This course aims to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the Latin language. Intensive reading of Latin texts, with attention to grammar, idiom, translation, etc. Specific offerings vary. Co-listed with AS.040.707.
Instructor(s): M. Butler
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.308. Advanced Latin Poetry. 3.0 Credits.

The aim of this course is to increase proficiency and improve comprehension of the Latin language. Intensive reading of Latin texts, with close attention to matters of grammar, idiom, and translation. Co-listed with AS.040.710.
Prerequisites: AS.040.207 AND AS.040.208 OR Equivalent
Instructor(s): M. Butler
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.320. Myth In Classical Art. 3.0 Credits.

This course traces the representation of the principal gods and heroes of Greek myth in the visual arts (sculpture and vase-painting), as well as later reflections in Roman painting.
Instructor(s): A. Shapiro
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.348. Worlds of Homer. 3.0 Credits.

Through texts, art, and archaeological remains, this course examines the various worlds of Homer--those recalled in the Iliad and Odyssey, those within which the epics were composed, and those born of the poet's unique creative work. Class will make museum visits. Ancient texts read in translation..
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.363. Craft and Craftpersons of the Ancient World: Status, Creativity and Tradition. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the dynamic work and social roles of craftpersons in early Greece, the eastern Mediterranean and Near East. Readings and discussion will query the identities and contributions of these people—travelers, captives, lauded masters, and even children—through topics including gender, class, and ethnicity. Special focus on late third-early first millennia BCE; local field trips.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.366. The Archaeology of Ancient Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU Museum. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the visual and material worlds of ancient Cyprus from the earliest human evidence through the Iron Age. Course topics will include the island's unique position between the Aegean and Near East and how this has impacted both Cyprus' ancient past and the way in which it has been conceived in the modern world. Class involves regular analysis of artifacts based in the Archaeological Museum.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.367. Memory and Oblivion: Rewriting the Past in Ancient Rome. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines concepts of memory and forgetting through Roman memory sanctions, which aimed to revise or even erase the past. Textual, archaeological, and iconographical sources will be considered. Dean’s Teaching Fellowship course.
Instructor(s): L. Garofalo
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.369. The Battle for the 5th Century BC: Athens, Persia, Sparta. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the achievements and conflicting interactions of Athens, Persia, and Sparta during the 5th century BC, a period whose cultural richness lies at the roots of Western Civilization.
Instructor(s): J. Lamont
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.370. Ovid and the Consequences. 3.0 Credits.

Beginning with close study of the poem itself, this course will examine the unequaled influence of Ovid’s Metamorphoses on subsequent literature and art, including theater and film.
Instructor(s): M. Butler
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.373. Propaganda and the Art of Visual Politics during the Roman Empire. 3.0 Credits.

We will examine visual expressions of propaganda in the city of Rome, considering how emperors used public art to promote their political agendas and their ideological vision of power. Dean's Teaching Fellowship course
Instructor(s): A. Tabeling
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.407. Survey of Latin Literature I: Beginnings to the Augustan Age. 3.0 Credits.

This intensive Latin survey is designed for very advanced undergraduate students--normally those who have completed two semesters of Advanced Latin (AS.040.307/308)--and PhD students preparing for their Latin translation exam. In this course, the first half of a year-long sequence, we will read substantial texts of major Republican and some Augustan authors. The weekly pace is designed to inculcate greater speed and accuracy in Latin reading, and provide significant coverage of various kinds of texts. Recommended background: AS.040.307-308 or equivalent
Prerequisites: AS.040.307 AND AS.040.308 or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): M. Roller
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.410. Junior-Senior Capstone: Food and Dining in the Ancient World. 3.0 Credits.

This junior-senior capstone course examines the culture of food and drink, and its associated social practices and values, in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. The evidence examined will include texts, images, and archaeological remains.
Instructor(s): M. Roller
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.412. Junior-Senior Capstone: The Ancient Senses. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers immersion in the rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field of sense studies, with an emphasis on the questions posed thereby to classicists and the humanities generally. It should be useful both to students of antiquity with an interest in the senses and to others who want to explore the role of antiquity in shaping sensory theories.
Instructor(s): M. Butler
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.414. Junior-Senior Seminar: The Art of Ancient Tragedy. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores the form and function of tragedy in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds by investigating the dramatic texts themselves, ancient and modern discussions about tragedy, and archaeological remains. As a Junior-Senior Seminar, this course includes instruction in core research methods within Classics and culminates in an individualized research project. Classics majors only
Instructor(s): J. Smith
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.501. Independent Study. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.040.502. Independent Study. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.040.519. Honors Research. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.040.520. Honors Research. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.040.599. Independent Study. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): C. Celenza; M. Roller.

AS.040.601. Italian Renaissance Humanism and Modern Humanities.

This course will reflect on certain key moments in the development of Latinate and Italian Renaissance humanism and will also include reading and discussion of certain recent landmark contributions to the history of the modern humanities.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza.

AS.040.602. Heliodorus.

We shall read and discuss the writing of Heliodorus in the original Greek.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio.

AS.040.604. Heliodorus II.

We will read the second half of Heliodorus' Aethiopica in the original Greek and integrate the reading with secondary literature.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio.

AS.040.606. Topics in Classical Reception.

An exploration of recurring themes and recent trends in the reception of classical antiquity.
Instructor(s): M. Butler.

AS.040.615. Ovid's Metamorphoses.

In this seminar, we will study Ovid's Metamorphoses, paying special attention to the text's generic playfulness and the author's poetics of illusion. We will also survey recent critical trends in Ovidian studies.
Instructor(s): M. Butler.

AS.040.616. Latin Literature Beyond Hermeneutics.

This seminar will examine various works from the perspective of recent efforts to move beyond language and interpretation, including histories and theories of material texts, sensation, and aesthetic pleasure.
Instructor(s): M. Butler.

AS.040.618. Around the Gracchi: Current Views on Late Republican Culture, Politics, and Economics.

This seminar explores and appraises the recent revolution in our understanding of the culture, politics, and economics of the late Roman Republic, with a thematic focus on how we now understand the Gracchi as historical actors and as cultural phenomena.
Instructor(s): M. Roller.

AS.040.621. Proseminar to Classical Archaeology.

An introduction to research methods and current topics of discussion in the scholarship on Greek and Roman art and archaeology.
Instructor(s): A. Shapiro.

AS.040.638. Ancient Literary Criticism.

This course covers essential Greek and Latin texts (e.g. Plato, Aristotle, Horace, Plutarch) and the commentary tradition (e.g. scholia to Homer and other important authors). Focus is on poetic texts, with some prose.
Instructor(s): J. Smith.

AS.040.653. Ovid, Maker of Images.

In this seminar, we will read excerpts from Ovid’s “Metamorphoses” and consider the reception of these episodes in the visual arts from antiquity to the 21st century.
Instructor(s): H. Valladares.

AS.040.655. Attic Hero Cults.

This seminar will combine the evidence of literary and epigraphical sources with archaeological material (votive reliefs, vase iconography) to explore the central role of hero cult in the religious life of ancient Athens. Cross-listed with History of Art
Instructor(s): A. Shapiro.

AS.040.657. Apollonius of Rhodes.

We shall read and discuss significant portions of Apollonius of Rhodes’ Argonautica in the original Greek.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio.

AS.040.661. Musaeus’ Hero and Leander in Its Context.

We shall read Musaeus’ “Hero and Leander” and collateral texts, including Ovid’s two letters “authored” by the two protagonists and several sections from the ancient novels, which have influenced Musaeus. If students are interested and time allows, we will read some modern re-writings of this wonderful love story.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio.

AS.040.665. Survey of Greek Literature.

An intensive survey of Greek poetic and prose texts, which emphasizes reading for comprehension and speed. Texts range from Homer to Lucian.
Instructor(s): J. Smith
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.669. Hesiod: Texts, Contexts, and Religion.

This seminar focuses on early Greek hexameter poetry, especially Hesiod, in the context of ancient Greek performance culture and ancient reception. Students will be introduced to current research on comparative mythology and religion.
Instructor(s): D. Yatromanolakis.

AS.040.671. Greek Portraiture and Society.

This seminar will explore the development of Greek portrait sculpture from the Early Classical through the Hellenistic periods and the contexts of its display in Greek cities.
Instructor(s): A. Shapiro.

AS.040.687. Proseminar in Classical Philology.

An overview of research areas in Classics, with a focus on such disciplines as epigraphy, papyrology, palaeography, as well as various forms of critical theory.
Instructor(s): D. Yatromanolakis.

AS.040.691. Roman Reciprocities.

This seminar investigates Roman reciprocity and social exchange with a focus on the early empire, in light of both classical anthropological theory and recent work on reciprocity by Classicists and others. Substantial Latin readings from Seneca's De Beneficiis and such poetic praise texts as the Laus Pisonis and Panegyricus Messalae.
Instructor(s): M. Roller.

AS.040.693. The Pre-Socratics and Early Plato.

This seminar will focus on the earliest phases of European philosophy. Topics that will be examined include: scholarly approaches to the fragments of major thinkers such as Herakleitos and Empedokles; the concept of "fragment;" the transition from the pre-Socratics to early Plato; the later reception of Herakleitos and Pythagoras in European thought.
Instructor(s): D. Yatromanolakis
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.696. Apuleius, “The Golden Ass”.

We shall read and discuss significant portions of Apuleius' The Golden Ass in the original Greek.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio.

AS.040.702. Reading Ancient Greek Poetry.

This reading seminar is intended to train graduate students in direct and critical work on primary sources. Co-listed with AS.040.306.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio.

AS.040.705. Reading Ancient Greek Prose.

This reading seminar is intended to train graduate students in direct and critical work on primary sources. Co-listed with AS.040.305. Recommended Course Background: AS.040.205-AS.040.206.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.707. Reading Latin Prose.

This reading seminar is intended to train graduate students in direct and critical work on primary sources. Co-listed with AS.040.307.
Instructor(s): M. Butler.

AS.040.710. Reading Latin Poetry.

This reading seminar is intended to train graduate students in direct and critical work on primary sources. Co-listed with AS.040.308. Recommended Course Background: AS.040.207-AS.040.208.
Instructor(s): M. Butler
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.714. Survey of Latin Literature.

This seminar surveys Latin authors and texts represented on the Ph.D. reading list. Intensive, accelerated reading aims to familiarize students with the different authors and their styles, to improve reading speed and accuracy, and prepare students to tackle the remaining works on the reading list by themselves.
Instructor(s): M. Roller.

AS.040.716. Petrarch (1304-74) and the Beginnings of Renaissance Latin.

This course will provide close readings of certain Latin texts by Petrarch, with attention to his letters and to other prose works.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza.

AS.040.801. Independent Study.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.040.802. Independent Study.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.040.806. Master's Thesis Research.

Instructor(s): D. Yatromanolakis.

AS.040.809. Exam Preparation.

Study in preparation for a comprehensive oral exam, required to become a PhD candidate, and consisting of three fields in classics and related areas.
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio.

AS.040.810. Exam Preparation.

Study in preparation for a comprehensive oral exam, required to become a PhD candidate, and consisting of three fields in classics and related areas
Instructor(s): S. Montiglio.

AS.040.814. Dissertation Research.

No Audits.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.040.815. Dissertation Research.

No Audits.
Instructor(s): Staff.

Cross Listed Courses

History of Art

AS.010.205. The Painted Worlds of Early Greece: Fantasy, Form and Action. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the creation and role of early Aegean wall painting. Found primarily in palaces, villas and ritual spaces, these paintings interacted with architecture to create micro-worlds for social activities taking place in their midst. Their subjects range—from mythological to documentary, from ornamental to instructive. They depict dance and battle, fantastical beasts and daily life. We examine their complex relationship to lived reality as well as the activities that surrounded them, from their crafting, to performance of rituals, to their role in “international” relations.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.208. The Disappearing Wall: Roman Frescoes in Context. 3.0 Credits.

The course introduces ancient Roman wall painting from Pompeii and Rome as images painted on “disappearing walls.” We will analyze these and other murals in historical, archaeological and museum contexts.
Instructor(s): S. O'Connell
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.222. At the Crossroads of the Mediterranean: The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Sicily. 3.0 Credits.

Sicily, with its natural resources and strategic position in the Mediterranean Sea, was a place of intense cultural exchange in the ancient world. For over a millennium the successive Phoenician, Carthaginian, Athenian, and Roman Empires fought for control of the island. This course will examine the history, art, and archaeology of Sicily from the Iron Age through Late Antiquity, in order to understand the ways in which the local inhabitants sought to articulate identities for themselves within this complex situation. There will be a particular focus on the Classical Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman periods of Sicily in order to better understand how these different cultures interacted within the larger Mediterranean. We will draw on methods and readings from the History of Art, Classics, and Archaeology. This course will take advantage of Baltimore’s museums and together we will visit the collections of ancient art at the Johns Hopkins University Archaeology Museum (JHUAM), the Walters Art Museum, and The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA). There will be a final paper.
Instructor(s): N. Berlin
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.300. Houses of the Ancient Mediterranean. 3.0 Credits.

In the ancient world the house was not merely a private space for interacting with family and close friends, but the setting for a diverse array of social rituals and activities. This course will examine the houses of the ancient Mediterranean, from the Bronze Age through Late Antiquity, in order to better understand how they acted as medium through which culture is passed down and transformed. There will be a particular focus on the architecture and décor of such residences and we will draw on methods and readings from the History of Art, Classics, and Archaeology. This course will take advantage of Baltimore’s museums and together we will visit the collections of ancient art at the Johns Hopkins Archaeology Museum, the Walters Art Museum, and The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA). We will also visit the BMA’s current installation, “Imagining Home,” whose exploration of home as a universal theme is directly related to the goals of this course. There will be a final paper.
Instructor(s): N. Berlin
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.303. Flavian Art, AD 69-96. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates Roman art and architecture during the Flavian age, in Rome and in the provinces of the empire. With the Flavians, the capital of the empire enjoyed a period of intense building activity: the great projects of Vespasian and Domitian radically transformed its image. Methodologically the focus will be on the integration of diverse sources (archaeological evidence, architecture, sculpture, mosaic, painting, epigraphy and literary sources) to reconstruct the built environment of Rome and other towns (Pompeii, Herculaneum, etc).
Instructor(s): P. Tucci
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.308. Art and Architecture in Republican Rome. 3.0 Credits.

The course investigates the influence of the Hellenistic world on Roman artists, architects and patrons during the Republican age (509-31 BC).
Instructor(s): P. Tucci
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.313. The Archaeology of the City of Rome. 3.0 Credits.

The course covers many aspects of the archaeology of Rome relying on recent research and employing the latest methodologies. The classes are organized thematically and cover art and architecture from the foundation of the city to late antiquity. There will be a final paper.
Instructor(s): P. Tucci
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.321. Pompeii: The Art and Architecture of a Roman Town. 3.0 Credits.

Pompeii, buried by the eruption of Mons Vesuvius in AD 79, offers the best evidence of everyday life in the Roman world. The course examines its public buildings and houses, as well as the main villas outside the city walls. A final paper will be required.
Instructor(s): P. Tucci
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.323. Art of the Roman Empire. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores Roman art and architecture in the imperial age (late 1st century BC - 4th century AD) with an emphasis on individual monuments and their decorative elements.
Instructor(s): P. Tucci
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.324. Art and Architecture in the Augustan Age. 3.0 Credits.

Investigates Roman art and architecture during the Augustan age (31 BC – AD 14). Augustus’ cultural program influenced many aspects of Roman life, leading to the creation of a new visual language that transformed Roman society. Methodologically, the focus will be on the integration of diverse sources to reconstruct and discuss the images and the built environment of the Augustan age.
Instructor(s): P. Tucci
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.412. Houses, villas, and towns in Latium and Campania. 3.0 Credits.

The course combines an analysis of Roman houses and villas with a discussion of cultural, social and environtmental factors, along with the wider political and social meanings of urban planning. There will be a final paper.
Instructor(s): P. Tucci
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.421. Creating Sacred Space in the Ancient and Medieval World. 3.0 Credits.

What makes a space sacred? How is it different from other spaces? This seminar explores the various means - visual, artifactual, architectural, and performative - of creating sacred space in the ancient and medieval worlds of the Near East and Mediterranean. Possible cases for study include early Sumerian temples, state-sponsored Assyrian temples, votive deposits, Greek sanctuaries, sanctuaries and landscape, early medieval Jewish, Christian, and Islamic cult buildings, cave sanctuaries, pilgrim sites, icons and sacred space.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.471. Roman Painting and Sculpture. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores Roman wall painting and sculpture tracing their origins, chronological development, subjects, social context, and techniques, and highlighting their influence on European artists from the Middle Ages to the Neoclassical period.
Instructor(s): P. Tucci
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.602. The Forma Urbis: Art and Architecture in Septimius Severus' Rome.

The course explores the significance of the Severan marble plan of Rome and its potential to shed new light on the building program of Septimius Severus and Caracalla.
Instructor(s): P. Tucci.

AS.010.655. Religion in Roman Art.

This course explores the relationships between Roman art and religion through a survey of key topics and issues, from the archaic period to late antiquity, providing an introduction into how to use both textual and material evidence as sources for understanding Roman art and society.
Instructor(s): P. Tucci.

Near Eastern Studies

AS.130.110. Introduction To Archaeology. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.258. Ceramic Analysis in Archaeology. 3.0 Credits.

At archaeological sites following the invention of pottery roughly 10,000 BCE, ceramics are the single most frequent and ubiquitous class of artefact that archaeologists uncover. This class, which will be conducted in the Hopkins Archaeological Museum as a combination of lectures, discussions, and hands-on interactions with ancient and modern ceramics, surveys the methods and interpretive techniques that archaeologists use when studying this important category of material culture. Specific topics include manufacturing techniques, craft specialization, typology and chronology, production and exchange, scientific analyses, stylistic and functional analysis, and socio-political organization.
Instructor(s): J. Osborne
Area: Humanities.

Medicine, Science and the Humanities

AS.145.101. Death and Dying in Art, Literature, and Philosophy: Introduction to Medical Humanities. 3.0 Credits.

This team-taught course offers an introduction to the new concentration in medicine, science, and humanities by approaching the topic of death and dying from historical, anthropological, philosophical, theological, literary and art historical perspectives.
Instructor(s): B. Wegenstein; C. Wiener; E. Ender; J. Smith
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Philosophy

AS.150.134. Freshman Seminar: Socrates in Context. 3.0 Credits.

A study of Socrates as portrayed by his contemporaries, and of intellectual and political trends to which he may have been reacting. Authors will include Plato, Xenophon and Aristophanes. Freshmen Only.
Instructor(s): R. Bett
Area: Humanities.

AS.150.201. Introduction To Greek Philosophy. 3.0 Credits.

A survey of the earlier phase of Greek philosophy. Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle will be discussed, as well as two groups of thinkers who preceded them, usually known as the pre-Socratics and the Sophists.
Instructor(s): R. Bett
Area: Humanities.

AS.150.401. Greek Philosophy: Plato and His Predecessors. 3.0 Credits.

A study of pre-Socratic philosophers, especially those to whom Plato reacted; also an examination of major dialogues of Plato with emphasis upon his principal theses and characteristic methods.Cross-listed with Classics.
Instructor(s): R. Bett
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.150.402. Aristotle. 3.0 Credits.

A study of major selected texts of Aristotle.
Instructor(s): R. Bett
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.150.403. Hellenistic Philosophy. 3.0 Credits.

A study of later Greek philosophy, stretching roughly from the death of Aristotle to the Roman imperial period. Epicureans, Stoics, and Skeptics will be the main philosophical schools examined.
Instructor(s): R. Bett
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

German & Romance Languages & Literatures

AS.211.475. Inside the Writer's Laboratory. 3.0 Credits.

How do books come to life? Behind every masterpiece is a tale of hard work, dialogue with other texts, and constant negotiations with social and material circumstances that evolve over time. This course opens up the "laboratory" of figures of the European Renaissance like Erasmus, Machiavelli, and Montaigne to explore the world of writerly culture in its manifold expressions, including authorial revision, self-translation, controversy, censorship, intertextuality, and forgery. Our own laboratory will be the Department of the Special Collections, where we will spend a good deal of our time handling manuscripts and early printed books. Course may be used to satisfy major requirements in both French and Italian sections.
Instructor(s): S. Miglietti
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.347. Petrarch and the Beginnings of the Renaissance. 3.0 Credits.

This course will focus on the life, work, and thought of Francesco Petrarca, or "Petrarch." Though known today primarily as the author of Italian love poetry, Petrarch considered his Latin work more lasting. We will explore both sides of his work, the vernacular and Latin (in English translation) to come to an understanding of his place in medieval intellectual history, the history of philosophy, and the history of literature.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.377. Gendered Voices. 3.0 Credits.

The course will explore the notion of ‘voice’ in order to show how poetry, literature, philosophy, and music have been dealing with it throughout the ages. In particular, by focusing on classical figures such as the Sirens, Circe and Echo, as well as by considering the seminal discussions of the 'voice' in Plato and Aristotle, the course will address the gendered nature of the voice as a tool to seduce and manipulate the human mind. More specifically, the course will discuss the ways in which male and female voices embody different functions. Examples to be analyzed include texts by Dante, Petrarch, Ariosto, and Tasso. The course will also consider later rewritings of myths concerned with the voice such as Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s The Siren and Italo Calvino's A King Listens.
Instructor(s): E. Refini
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.390. Machiavelli: A Renaissance Master. 3.0 Credits.

Who was Niccolò Machiavelli? The author of the Italian Renaissance's most famous book, The Prince, he also wrote histories, commentaries, comedies, and letters. And he had a career as a prominent Florentine diplomat, which ended tragically but informed everything he wrote. This course is intended to offer students an introduction to Machiavelli's major works and to the intellectual, social, and political contexts that shaped his thinking.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.437. The Intellectual World of the Italian Renaissance. 3.0 Credits.

This course is intended to familiarize students with the intellectual world of Renaissance Italy, or more specifically, the “lost” Italian Renaissance of the long fifteenth century, from the time when Petrarch (1304-74) was in full maturity to the 1520s. During this period, most Italian intellectuals wrote the majority of their work in Latin – not the Medieval Latin of the Church and the universities but in what they saw as a more authentic Latin, like that used in ancient Rome, in the time of Cicero, Virgil, Quintilian, and others. These Renaissance “humanists,” inspiring by the example of Roman, and eventually Greek, antiquity, believed that they were carrying out a cultural revival. Who were these humanists? Why then did they choose Latin (and a reformed Latin at that) instead of their “native” tongue as the language in which to effect this renewal? What did this choice afford them in terms of literature and philosophy? Why was this phase of literary and philosophical history undervalued in the evolution of modern scholarship? By the end of this course, you should be able to formulate answers to those questions.Some of the works of these authors still await editions, lying in manuscript libraries or difficult-to-access early printed editions. Many have now had their Latin texts edited, and a number have recently been translated into English. Students therefore have the chance to explore work in a field that is new and growing. A separate Renaissance Latin reading group will accompany the course for those who have studied Latin.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.445. Boccaccio’s Decameron and the Multiplicity of Story-Telling. 3.0 Credits.

Boccaccio’s Decameron (1352), a collection of 100 short stories, ranges from the bawdy through the cynical to the romantic and even fantastic. It has inspired numerous writers, artists, musicians and film-makers. We will read Boccaccio’s masterpiece on its own terms and in relation to the development of story-telling, from gossipy “news” (novelle) to artistic short story, theatrical adaptation, literary fairy-tale, and the fantastic. The Decameron will be compared with its forerunners in saints’ lives, bawdy fabliaux, and moral exempla, and with its literary, theatrical, and filmic imitators in Italy and Europe. Italian graduate students and undergraduate majors will attend an extra weekly meeting conducted in Italian. Those students should enroll in section 2 which will be awarded 4 credits.
Instructor(s): W. Stephens
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.477. Magic, Marvel, and Monstrosity in the Renaissance. 3.0 Credits.

Magic, Monstrosity,and Marvels or Wonders call into question what we see and experience: what is reality, what is illusion; what’s natural and what’s supernatural? What’s human and what’s more, or less, than human? During the Renaissance, ideas about the nature of reality were bound up with questions and issues very different from those of our time. With the exact sciences still being invented, the nature of the world was much less hard and fast for Renaissance people than it is for the modern educated person. The literary masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance provide vivid illustrations of the early modern sense of wonder. Foremost among these are the theatrical comedies which Italian authors revived in imitation of the ancients, and the romances, especially Ariosto’s Orlando furioso (1532) and Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata (1581). These and other works influenced ideas about magical and marvelous phenomena across Europe for centuries to come. Works will be read and discussed in English. Italian majors and graduate students (who should enroll in section 2) will attend a weekly supplemental discussion in Italian and compose their written work in Italian.
Instructor(s): W. Stephens
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.637. The Intellectual World of the Italian Renaissance.

This course is intended to familiarize students with the intellectual world of Renaissance Italy, or more specifically, the “lost” Italian Renaissance of the long fifteenth century, from the time when Petrarch (1304-74) was in full maturity to the 1520s. During this period, most Italian intellectuals wrote the majority of their work in Latin – not the Medieval Latin of the Church and the universities but in what they saw as a more authentic Latin, like that used in ancient Rome, in the time of Cicero, Virgil, Quintilian, and others. These Renaissance “humanists,” inspiring by the example of Roman, and eventually Greek, antiquity, believed that they were carrying out a cultural revival. Who were these humanists? Why then did they choose Latin (and a reformed Latin at that) instead of their “native” tongue as the language in which to effect this renewal? What did this choice afford them in terms of literature and philosophy? Why was this phase of literary and philosophical history undervalued in the evolution of modern scholarship? By the end of this course, you should be able to formulate answers to those questions.Some of the works of these authors still await editions, lying in manuscript libraries or difficult-to-access early printed editions. Many have now had their Latin texts edited, and a number have recently been translated into English. Students therefore have the chance to explore work in a field that is new and growing. A separate Renaissance Latin reading group will accompany the course for those who have studied Latin.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.639. The Sound of Poetry: Early Modern Approaches to Poetics, Rhetoric, and Music.

Although naturally and historically intertwined, music and poetry tended to be described in the early modern period as competing rather than interacting. By looking at both literary and theoretical texts, the seminar aims to explore the ways in which this controversial relation is revealed by the interplay of poetics, rhetoric, and music theory. Reading materials will include classical sources (e.g. Plato, Aristotle, Ps.-Longinus, Quintilian) and their early modern interpretations. Special attention will be given to Torquato Tasso, Giambattista Marino, and Giambattista Doni, whose works will be also discussed in the light of the contemporary development of musical genres (e.g. madrigals, opera). No musical skills required.
Instructor(s): E. Refini
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.655. Translating Knowledge: Brunetto's Tresor and Dante's Convivio.

By focusing on Brunetto Latini’s Tresor and Dante Alighieri’s Convivio, the seminar will examine the notion of “encyclopedic knowledge” in the Middle Ages. The two works – both examples of “translation” – call traditional ideas of knowledge into question. The seminar will study the Convivio as a response to the Tresor and will situate Dante’s project within a wider discussion of vernacular translation as a key tool for the dissemination of the classical tradition in the Middle Ages.
Instructor(s): E. Refini
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.684. The Commentary Tradition and the Birth of Literary Scholarship.

The practice of commenting on texts lies at the foundations of what we call today “literary criticism.” From the Bible to Dante’s Divine Comedy, from Greek and Latin poetry to medieval and Renaissance literary writings, the many questions posed by the commentators have contributed widely to the shaping of the modern notions of reading and interpretation. What do we look for when we read a text? How do we approach it? How does our reading interact with the author’s intention? To what extent is the commentator appropriating the author’s prerogatives? By exploring a wide range of case studies, the seminar aims to reassess the role of the commentary tradition within the development of literary scholarship and as a genre per se. Some sessions will take place at the Hopkins Special Collections and at the Walters Art Museum, where students will have the opportunity to work on both manuscripts and early prints, and select materials for their presentations.
Instructor(s): E. Refini
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.716. Translation and Vernacular Readership in Italy, 1250-1500.

Translation is usually acknowledged as instrumental to the rise of vernacular readership in medieval and early modern Europe. By reconsidering seminal contributions such as Erich Auebarch's, this seminar will explore the textual and cultural implications of the translative process that played a major role in the medieval reception of antiquity. Special attention will be given to translation theory and its history.
Instructor(s): E. Refini
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.748. Vico and the Old Science.

Giambattista Vico’s Principi di scienza nuova d’intorno alla comune natura delle nazioni (1725, 1730, 1744) was intended to found an “ideal” and “eternal” model of human development, valid for all societies. Vico considered his project both philology and philosophy, and tried to revolutionize thinking about human history as practiced between about 1550 and 1700, by exposing misconceptions behind attempts to square “sacred history” (the presumed historical accuracy of the Bible) with “profane” or non Judeo-Christian concepts of history, both ancient and modern. The culture shock underlying this “old science” stimulated Vico to base philosophical and historical knowledge of mythology on a conception of narration. Recommended Course background: Italian and Latin
Instructor(s): W. Stephens
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Interdepartmental

AS.360.133. Freshman Seminar: Great Books at Hopkins. 3.0 Credits.

Freshman Seminar: Students attend lectures by an interdepartmental group of Hopkins faculty and meet for discussion in smaller seminar groups; each of these seminars is led by one of the course faculty. In lectures, panels, multimedia presentations, and curatorial sessions among the University's rare book holdings, we will explore some of the greatest works of the literary and philosophical traditions in Europe and the Americas. Close reading and intensive writing instruction are hallmarks of this course; authors for Fall 2016 include Homer, Plato, Boccaccio, Diderot, Shelley, Nietzsche, Nabokov, Douglass, and Woolf.
Instructor(s): A. Daniel; E. Patton; S. Weiss; W. Egginton
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.360.134. Great Books at Hopkins II: The Sciences. 3.0 Credits.

Greart Books at Hopkins II: The Sciences will combine readings from philosophy and literature with foundational texts from several scientific disciplines. Readings for this spring will explore links between traditional theories of economics and genetics in the context of literary developments, and will include: Xenophon's Oeconimicus, Mendel's "Experiments on Plant Hybridization," Marx's Communist Manifesto, Darwin's Voyage of the Beagle, Swift's A Modest Proposal, Wharton's House of Mirth, and Joyce's Finnegan's Wake.
Instructor(s): E. Patton; M. Roller
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality

AS.363.410. Worshiped Goddesses, Worshiping Women: Femininity, Religion, and Mythology in Ancient Greece. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the Greek goddesses and heroines and the ways in which women worshipped them in antiquity, using an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating literary, iconographical, and archaeological evidence.
Instructor(s): S. Stern.

Program in Museums and Society

AS.389.205. Examining Archaeological Objects. 3.0 Credits.

This course considers the role of materials in the production, study and interpretation of objects by examining artifacts from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Students will consider materials such as ceramics, stone, metal, glass, wood and textiles, and visit artists' studios to gain an understanding of historical manufacturing processes. M&S practicum course. Cross-listed with Archaeology, Near Eastern Studies, Classics, and History of Art.
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.335. Recreating Ancient Greek Ceramics. 4.0 Credits.

This hands-on course in experimental archaeology brings together undergraduate and graduate students across disciplines to study the making of Athenian vases. Students work closely with expert ceramic artists, and in consultation with art historians, archaeologists, art conservators, and materials scientists to recreate Greek manufacturing processes.
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://classics.jhu.edu/people/

Faculty

Chair

Shane Butler
Professor of Classics and Nancy H. and Robert E. Hall Professor in the Humanities: Latin Literature (Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance), media history and theory, classical reception

Professors

Richard Bett
Professor (Philosophy and Classics): ancient philosophy, ethics

Silvia Montiglio
Basil L. Gildersleeve Professor of Classics (Director of Graduate Studies): Greek literature and culture, the ancient novel and narrative, philosophy

Matthew Roller
Professor: Latin literature, Roman social and cultural history, Roman material culture, Graeco-Roman philosophy

Associate Professor

Dimitrios Yatromanolakis
Associate Professor: Greek literature, Greek social and cultural history, theory and anthropology of Greek music, papyrology, epigraphy, performance cultures of Greece and Rome

Assistant Professors

Emily Anderson
Assistant Professor: Aegean Bronze Age art and archaeology, material culture, sociocultural interaction, identity, glyptic

Joshua M. Smith
Assistant Professor (Director of Undergraduate Studies): Greek language and literature, ancient scholarship, history of literary criticism

Affiliated Faculty

Sanchita Balachandran
Curator, JHU Archaeological Collection, and Lecturer (Near Eastern Studies): Art and archaeological conservation

Richard Jasnow
Professor (Near Eastern Studies): Egyptology

Eugenio Refini
Assistant Professor of Italian Studies (German and Romance Languages and Literatures): Renaissance poetics, rhetoric, and drama; the Classical tradition; Latin and vernacular humanism; the intersections of music and literature

Professors Emeriti

Marcel Detienne
Basil L. Gildersleeve Professor of Classics Emeritus: Greek, social history, cultural history, mythology, anthropology and classics

H. Alan Shapiro
Academy Professor and W. H. Collins Vickers Professor of Archaeology Emeritus: Greek and Roman art and archaeology, Greek mythology and religion