Morton K. Blaustein Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

http://eps.jhu.edu/

The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences offers programs of study and research in a wide range of disciplines including the atmosphere, biosphere, oceans, geochemistry, geology and geophysics, and planets. The undergraduate program in Earth and Planetary Sciences is flexible and lets the student, in consultation with a faculty advisor, devise a program that is challenging, individual, and rigorous. The graduate program develops skills in research through independent investigation under the general guidance of one or more members of the faculty, backed up by relevant course work. The department gives particular emphasis to the integration of experimental investigation, theoretical calculation, and quantitative field observations.

The Department also offers an interdepartmental undergraduate program in Global Environmental Change and Sustainability. This program introduces students to the science of the Earth and its living and nonliving systems as well as how humans interact with Earth and its natural systems and how humans can use a variety of tools, such as policy, communication, individual and societal behavior change, and law to harm or help those systems. Students are exposed to theory, research, and the practical applications of both throughout their course work.

Facilities

The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences is housed in Olin Hall, a modern building dedicated to the Earth sciences, nestled on a wooded knoll on the western edge of campus. Its facilities include state-of-the-art instrumentation, a departmental library, and modern computer equipment. There are laboratories for crystallography, evolutionary biology/ecology, stable isotope geochemistry, materials science, and fluid and solid mechanics. Olin Hall also contains equipment for modern petrographic work (including a computer-controlled image analysis system), darkroom facilities, and a laboratory for sectioning rocks. There is also a substantial collection of rocks, minerals, and fossils. Facilities are available for a wide spectrum of fluid mechanical experiments, including thermal convection and solidification.

A JEOL 8600 electron microprobe in Olin Hall is available to all members of the department. Crystallographic facilities include a modern specimen preparation laboratory for transmission electron microscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The transmission electron microscopy laboratory houses state-of-the-art instruments capable of both high-resolution imaging at the atomic scale and microanalysis at the nanometer scale.

The department contains several computer laboratories containing clusters of workstations and personal computers, together with printers and scanners. These computers are used for numerical simulations, graphics applications, data manipulation, and word processing.

Field studies and excursions form an integral part of the program of instruction and research in geology and are closely integrated with the laboratory and course work. Situated at the fall line between the Coastal Plain and the Piedmont and only an hour’s ride from the Blue Ridge and Appalachians, Baltimore is an excellent location for a department with a field-oriented program in geology. The department has a permanent field station for geological research, Camp Singewald, in the Bear Pond Mountains of Washington County, Maryland, and a vehicle for field use.

Supporting facilities on campus include the Milton S. Eisenhower Library, the Space Telescope Science Institute, and the Homewood High-Performance Computing Center. In addition, the JHU Applied Physics Laboratory, the facilities of the Smithsonian Institution and the Geophysical Laboratory and the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington are available by special arrangement for students qualified to use them. For students whose research requires substantial computation, special arrangements can be made to use the supercomputers at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

 

The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences offers programs of study for majors, joint majors, and minors in Earth and Planetary sciences (EPS) and in Global Environmental Change and Sustainability (GECS). The EPS major focuses on the study of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that shape the Earth and the other planets. It is designed primarily for scientists who wish to have careers researching the science of the Earth and planets, although it is also suitable for students planning careers in the health professions. The GECS major is an interdepartmental program introducing students to the science of the Earth and its living and nonliving systems, as well as how humans interact with Earth and its natural systems, and how humans can use a variety of tools, such as policy, communication, individual and societal behavior change, and law to harm or help those systems.

In addition to major requirements, students are required to complete the university requirements for the B.A. degree. See Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree.

Earth and Planetary Sciences (EPS) Major

The EPS major is for undergraduates interested in the study of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that shape the Earth and the other planets, drawing on the disciplines of geology, geochemistry, hydrology, ecology, geobiology, oceanography, and atmospheric science.

The student can design a specific plan of appropriate courses in consultation with the coordinator for undergraduate programs in the department. Depending on the student’s background, it may be appropriate initially to take a freshman seminar or 100-level course designed for the non-major. Those who wish to be majors may proceed directly to courses at the 200- and, in many cases, the 300-level. Our courses provide a broad educational base in the Earth and planetary, and the environmental earth sciences, and enable exploration of a set of electives at the 300-level, depending on the area of interest.

The department required a total of 9 credits at the 100- or 200-levels and a total of 12 credits at the 300-level within the department. All courses must be taken for a letter grade and students must receive a grade of C- or better to apply the course towards the major. Courses should be selected to reflect an Earth and Planetary Sciences emphasis and require the following:

Core EPS Courses
AS.270.224Oceans & Atmospheres3
AS.270.220The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology3
AS.270.221The Dynamic Earth Laboratory2
Required Math & Science Courses
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3
AS.110.106Calculus I (Biology and Social Sciences)4
or AS.110.108 Calculus I
AS.110.107Calculus II (For Biological and Social Science)4
or AS.110.109 Calculus II (For Physical Sciences and Engineering)
or AS.110.113 Honors Single Variable Calculus
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4
or AS.171.103 General Physics I for Biological Science Majors
or AS.171.107 General Physics for Physical Sciences Majors (AL)
AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Majors II4
or AS.171.104 General Physics/Biology Majors II
or AS.171.108 General Physics for Physical Science Majors (AL)
EPS Required Elective Courses *
Additional course at the 100- or 200-level (higher level may be substituted)1-3
Four courses at the 300- or 400-level (at least 3 credits each)12
Total Credits40-42
*

 Only one course numbered AS.271.xxx may apply towards the EPS major.

Courses recommended to enrich the educational background of the major:

EN.500.200Computing for Engineers and Scientists4
EN.550.291Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
EN.570.108Introduction Environmental Engineering3
EN.570.239Emerging Environmental Issues3
EN.600.107Introductory Programming in Java3

Honors in EPS Major

To receive honors in Earth and Planetary Sciences, students must meet the following criteria:

  • Have taken a challenging set of courses during the four years of study
  • Have a GPA in your major requirements of a 3.5 or higher.
  • Complete a senior thesis (AS.270.495 Senior Thesis and AS.270.496 Senior Thesis) at a level judged to be sufficiently high by the faculty of the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.
  • Present the results of the thesis orally in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.

Sample Program of Study

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3AS.110.109Calculus II (For Physical Sciences and Engineering)4
AS.110.108Calculus I4AS.270.1xx 3
  7  7
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.270.220The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology3AS.270.224Oceans Atmospheres3
AS.270.221The Dynamic Earth Laboratory2AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Majors II4
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4 
  9  7
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.270.3xx-4xx3AS.270.3xx-4xx3
  3  3
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.270.3xx-4xx3AS.270.3xx-4xx3
  3  3
Total Credits: 42

Minor in EPS

The Earth and Planetary Sciences minor is for science undergraduates interested in applying their major discipline to Earth’s environment through geology, geochemistry, ecology, geobiology, oceanography, and atmospheric science. Students are expected to have at least 16 credits in Natural Sciences, Quantitative Studies, or Engineering courses. Students will take 12 credits in the department, at least six of which are at the 300-level. All courses must be taken for a letter grade and students must receive a grade of C- or better to apply the course towards the minor.

Minor requirements:

AS.270.220The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology3
or AS.270.224 Oceans & Atmospheres
Three credits at any level of EPS courses3
Six credits at the 300- or 400-level of EPS courses6
Sixteen credits of natural, quantitative, or engineering courses *16
Total Credits28
*

Preferably biology, chemistry, physics, math. Additional AS.270.xxx courses may not apply here. No AS.271.xxx courses may apply towards this minor.

Global Environmental Change and Sustainability (GECS) Major

The major in GECS is an interdepartmental program designed to provide students with a solid knowledge base of the science of the Earth and its living and nonliving systems, as well as how humans interact with Earth and its natural systems, including social science tools of change, such as policy, communication, individual and social behavior change, and law. Students will be exposed to theory, research, and the practical applications of both throughout their course work. Requirements for the major include a total of 24 courses (81 credits) if the Science concentration is chosen and 25 courses (78 credits) for the Social Science concentration. 

All GECS majors must complete 13 “core” courses listed in Table 1 below. Additionally, students will choose either the Science concentration or the Social Science concentration to determine their additional course requirements. For the Science concentration, majors complete the additional science core courses and requirements listed in Table 2a. For the Social Science concentration, majors complete the additional requirements as listed in Table 2b. All courses must be taken for a letter grade and students must receive a grade of C- or better to apply the course towards the major.

The GECS Senior Capstone Experience involves the research, planning and execution of a tangible sustainability project on or off-campus.  While working in groups (the size of which will depend on the nature and scale of the project), GECS Seniors will research, design and create/implement a sustainability project or initiative on campus or in Baltimore.  All GECS Seniors enroll in the Capstone Seminar both in the fall and in the spring. The seminars are designed to facilitate measured progress on the capstone projects and ensure that the final product is meaningful and exceptional. All majors will make a presentation of their capstone experience to involved faculty, advisors, and fellow students at the end of their Senior year.

Table 1: Required Courses for all GECS Majors

AS.270.103Introduction to Global Environmental Change3
AS.271.107Introduction to Sustainability3
AS.271.506GECS Senior Capstone Seminar Part I (GECS Senior Capstone Seminar, Part I, Fall)3
AS.271.505GECS Senior Capstone Seminar - Part II (Part II, Spring)3
AS.110.106Calculus I (Biology and Social Sciences)4
or AS.110.108 Calculus I
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I1
AS.180.102Elements of Microeconomics3
Select one of the following:
Statistical Analysis I
Statistics Through Case Study
Public Health Biostatistics
Introduction to Social Statistics
Select two of the following (Political science required):
Introduction To Comparative Politics
Contemporary International Politics
Global Governance
Global Environmental Politics
Select two of the following (Environmental science required):
Energy Resources in the Modern World
Population/Community Ecology
Climate Change: Science & Policy
The Environment and Your Health
Select one of the following (Communications required):
Environmental Ethics (oral communication)
Environmental Photojournalism (visual communication)
Nature, Baltimore and a Sense of Place (written communication)
Science (see Table 2a) or Social Science (see Table 2b) Concentration Requirements

Table 2a: Science Concentration Requirements

(Students complete either Table 2a (science concentration) OR 2b (social science concentration); pick one)

AS.110.107Calculus II (For Biological and Social Science)4
or AS.110.109 Calculus II (For Physical Sciences and Engineering)
AS.030.102
AS.030.106
Introductory Chemistry II
and Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II
4
or AS.030.103 Applied Chemical Equilibrium and Reactivity w/lab
AS.250.205Introduction to Computing3
or AS.270.205 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
or AS.270.307 Geoscience Modelling
or AS.270.318 Remote Sensing of the Environment
Select one year of either Physics or Biology:
General Physics:Physical Science Major I
and General Physics: Physical Science Majors II
and General Physics Laboratory I
and General Physics Laboratory II *
General Biology I
and General Biology Laboratory I
and General Biology II
and General Biology Lab II (General Biology I)
Two 300-level or above courses in Earth and environment sciences as listed in Table 3
Two courses at any level in social sciences as listed in Table 4
Two 300-level or higher course in social sciences as listed in Table 4
*

Students may substitute alternative, but equivalent, Physics courses. AS.171.101. 103, 105, or 107 may be used as Physics I and AS.171.102, 104, 106, or 108 may be used as Physics II.


Table 2b: Social Science Concentration Requirements

(Students complete either Table 2a (science concentration) OR 2b (social science concentration); pick one)

One course at any level in Earth and environmental sciences as listed in Table 3
One 300-level or higher course in Earth and environmental sciences as listed in Table 3
Four courses at any level in the social sciences as listed in Table 4
Six courses at the 300-level or higher in the social sciences as listed in Table 4

Table 3: GECS Electives in Earth and Environmental Science**

AS.250.205Introduction to Computing3
AS.270.224Oceans & Atmospheres3
AS.270.205Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis3
AS.270.210Environmental Field Methods3
AS.270.220The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology3
AS.270.221The Dynamic Earth Laboratory2
AS.270.305Energy Resources in the Modern World3
AS.270.307Geoscience Modelling4
AS.270.308Population/Community Ecology3
AS.270.311Geobiology3
AS.270.315Natural Catastrophes3
AS.270.318Remote Sensing of the Environment4
AS.270.332Soil Ecology3.00
AS.270.369Geochem Earth/Environmen3.00
AS.270.377Climates Of The Past3
AS.270.378Present & Future Climate3
AS.270.405Modeling the Hydrological Cycle3
AS.271.360Climate Change: Science & Policy3
AS.280.335The Environment and Your Health3
EN.570.108Introduction Environmental Engineering3
EN.570.239Emerging Environmental Issues3
EN.570.328Geography & Ecology of Plants3
EN.570.353Hydrology3
EN.570.395Principles of Estuarine Environment: Chesapeake Bay3
EN.570.205Ecology3
or EN.570.403 Ecology
EN.570.411Engineering Microbiology4
EN.570.420Air Pollution3
EN.570.443Aquatic and Biofluid Chemistry3

Table 4: GECS Electives in Social Sciences**

AS.070.132Invitation to Anthropology3
AS.070.279/EN.570.285Ecological Anthropology3
AS.070.285Understanding Aid: Anthropological Perspectives for Technology-Based Interventions3
AS.070.327Poverty's Life: Anthropology of Health & Economy3.00
AS.130.177World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective3
AS.140.302Rise of Modern Science3
AS.140.311Ecology, Health, and the Environment3
AS.180.101Elements of Macroeconomics3
AS.180.215Game Theory and the Social Sciences3
AS.180.228Economic Development3
AS.180.241International Trade3
AS.180.252Economics of Discrimination3
AS.180.266Financial Markets and Institutions3
AS.180.301Microeconomic Theory4
AS.180.302Macroeconomic Theory4
AS.180.355Economics of Poverty/Inequality3
AS.190.102Introduction To Comparative Politics3
AS.190.209Contemporary International Politics3
AS.190.220Global Security Politics3
AS.190.226Global Governance3
AS.190.227U.S. Foreign Policy (U.S. Foreign Policy)3
AS.190.280Political Persuasion3
AS.190.281Virtue, Labor, and Power (Classics of Political Thought II)3
AS.190.301Global Political Economy3
AS.190.320Politics Of East Asia3
AS.190.396Capitalism and Ecology3
AS.190.405Food Politics3
AS.190.411Environment and Development in the Third World3
AS.190.412Political Violence3
AS.190.426Science and Expertise in Global Politics3
AS.190.491Game Theory in the Social Sciences (Game Theory in the Social Sciences)3
AS.200.101Introduction to Psychology3
AS.200.133Introduction to Social Psychology3.00
AS.200.222Positive Psychology3
AS.220.206Writing about Science I: Daily News Journalism3
AS.220.210Introduction to Non-Fiction: Science as a Social Activity3
AS.220.317Writing about Science II3
AS.230.101Introduction Sociology3
AS.230.150Issues in International Development3
AS.230.213Social Theory3
AS.230.221Global Social Change (Global Social Change)3
AS.230.265Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences3
AS.230.313Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public Housing3
AS.230.325Global Social Change and Development Practicum3
AS.230.359Research Seminar on Global Social Protest3
AS.230.373Urban Sociology3
AS.230.396Politics and Society3
AS.230.460Research Seminar on Stratification in the Modern World Economy: 1600-20143
AS.271.120Environmental Photojournalism3
AS.271.301Climate Change Adaptation in the Developing World3
AS.271.302Nature, Baltimore and a Sense of Place3
AS.271.304Sustainable Food Systems (Sustainable Food Systems)4
AS.271.309Designing Sustainable Wellness3
AS.271.401Environmental Ethics3
AS.271.402Water, Energy, and Food (Water, Energy and Food)3.00
AS.271.403Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis3
AS.280.215Understanding Behavior Change: Theory and Application3
AS.280.225Population, Health and Development3
AS.280.329The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Scientific Writing in Public Health (The Good, the Bad and the Ugly: Scientific Literature)3
AS.280.380Global Health Principles and Practices3
AS.360.247Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond3
EN.570.110Introduction to Engineering for Sustainable Development3
EN.570.130Climate, Environment and Society3
EN.570.222Environment and Society3
EN.570.334Engineering Microeconomics3
EN.570.406Environmental History3
EN.570.428Problems in Applied Economics3
EN.570.493Economic Foundations for Environmental Engineering and Policy Design3
EN.570.495Optimization Foundations for Environmental Engineering and Policy Design (Organizational Foundations for Environmental Engineering and Policy Design)3
EN.570.496Urban and Environmental Systems3
EN.570.497Risk and Decision Analysis3
**

The lists of acceptable Earth and Environmental Science and Social Science Electives will be reviewed and updated annually by the Director, with guidance from the Advisory Committee. Courses no longer taught will be removed, although credit earned for courses that are removed will still count toward GECS major requirements as long as the course was on the list when it was taken, and new courses will be added. Relevant courses not included in the elective list may be able to be substituted for an elective with approval of the Director. Students wishing to make such a substitution should follow the procedure outlined on the major’s website.

Honors in GECS Major

To receive honors in GECS, you must have met the following criteria:

  • Have a GPA of a 3.5 or higher in GECS courses.
  • Receive an A on your capstone project.

Sample Program of Study for GECS Major (with a Social Science Concentration)

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3AS.271.107Introduction to Sustainability3
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I1.00AS.180.102Elements of Microeconomics3
AS.270.103Introduction to Global Environmental Change3EN.550.111Statistical Analysis I4
AS.110.106Calculus I (Biology and Social Sciences)4 
  11  10
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Political science course from required list3Political science course from required list3
Environmental science course from required list3Environmental Science course from required list3
Social science elective at any level3Social science elective at any level3
  9  9
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Communications course3Environmental science elective at 300+ level3
Environmental science elective at any level3Social science elective at any level3
Social science elective at any level3Social science elective at 300+ level3
  9  9
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.271.506GECS Senior Capstone Seminar Part I3AS.271.505GECS Senior Capstone Seminar - Part II3
Social science elective at 300+ level3Science science elective at 300+ level3
Social science elective at 300+ level3Social science elective at 300+ level3
Social science elective at 300+ level3 
  12  9
Total Credits: 78

Minor in GECS

The GECS minor consists of seven courses. All minors are required to take two core courses: Intro to Global Environmental Change provides the necessary content about the science of the Earth and its environments and Intro to Sustainability covers a thorough overview of the interactions between humans and the Earth’s systems and how those interactions could become sustainable. Students then have a choice of one of four other science courses that further explore a subset of interactions of humans with Earth’s living and nonliving systems, depending on the student’s area of interest. Students must choose two more courses from the list of Earth and Environmental Science Electives (Table 3) and two more courses from the list of Social Science Electives (Table 4). At least one course from each elective list must be upper level. A total of five Earth and Environmental Science courses provide the science basis of the minor, which is then rounded out with two relevant Social Science courses. Because students will be acquiring the methodological tools of their major discipline, this curriculum removes the science methodology required in the GECS major, while keeping the most important core content. All courses must be taken for a letter grade and students must receive a grade of C- or better to apply the course towards the minor.

Check the GECS major/minor web pages for latest information.

Introductory Courses
AS.270.103Introduction to Global Environmental Change3
AS.271.107Introduction to Sustainability3
Select one of the following:3
Energy Resources in the Modern World
Population/Community Ecology
Climate Change: Science & Policy
The Environment and Your Health
Earth and Environment Science Electives
One course at any level in Earth and environmental sciences as listed in Table 33
One course at the 300-level or higher in the social sciences as listed in Table 33
Social Science Electives
One course at any level in the social sciences as listed in Table 43
One course at the 300-level or higher in the social sciences as listed in Table 43
Total Credits21

B.A./M.S. Option for Johns Hopkins GECS Majors

Undergraduates majoring in Global Environmental Change and Sustainability (GECS) may apply for accelerated status toward an M.S. in Environmental Science and Policy (ESP). These students should declare their intention to pursue the M.S. during their junior year or early in their senior year of undergraduate study by contacting either the undergraduate GECS Director, Cindy Parker (ciparker@jhsph.edu) or the Director of the ESP Program, Antoinette Winklerprins (antoinette@jhu.edu). GECS students may apply up to three courses taken as undergraduates toward the M.S. in Environmental Science and Policy thereby leaving only seven more courses to complete the M.S. following receipt of their B.A.

Application

GECS students may apply for the B.A./M.S. anytime during the senior year or up to one year following the conferral of their B.A. The application procedure is the same as that of other AAP applicants and details are found online at: http://advanced.jhu.edu/admissions/index.html. Students admitted to the B.A./M.S. program will be assigned a graduate advisor, but will continue to be advised by their GECS advisor for all matters concerning the B.A. degree.

Course Requirements For B.A./M.S.

GECS students will receive two separate degrees and so the requirements of both degrees must be fulfilled. Students may not earn the M.S. degree without completion of the B.A., however, students who do not complete the M.S. retain their B.A. GECS B.A./M.S. students must complete all the requirements of the M.S. in ESP and may opt for either the general ESP degree or a concentration. Up to three courses completed while an undergraduate can count toward the ten courses required for the M.S. Specifically, up to two of the following courses can be used to satisfy the corresponding core course requirements for the M.S. in Environmental Science and Policy.

AS.270.224Oceans & Atmospheres3
AS.270.308Population/Community Ecology3
AS.271.403Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis3

(Note that the Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis course will be a combined GECS undergraduate and ESP masters class.)

If a student wishes to apply a third course to both their GECS B.A. and their ESP M.S., the course must be approved by the graduate advisor and must be at the 300- to 600- level with content germane to environmental science and policy.

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Requirements for Admission

Applicants must submit transcripts, Graduate Record Examination scores (aptitude exam only), and supporting letters to show their ability to do advanced study. The applicant should have his/her GRE scores, verbal and quantitative aptitude, sent to the department before the January 15 deadline for filing applications for admission.

The department expects applicants for advanced degrees to have completed undergraduate training in the basic sciences and mathematics. Normally this includes mathematics through at least integral calculus and a year’s course each in physics, chemistry, and biology. Further undergraduate study in one or more of these subjects or in mathematics is highly desirable for all programs in the Earth sciences; additional mathematics is essential for geophysics, atmospheric sciences, and dynamical oceanography. Extensive undergraduate work in Earth sciences is not a requirement for admission. If students lack formal training in this area or have deficiencies in the other related sciences, they may be admitted but will have to allow additional time in the graduate program to make up for deficiencies in their preparation.

Requirements for Advanced Degrees

Candidates for the Ph.D. must take courses and meet requirements specified by their advisory committee; must pass a comprehensive examination before a departmental committee and an oral examination administered by the Graduate Board of the university; and must submit an acceptable dissertation involving significant original research. A minimum of two consecutive terms registered as a full-time student is required.

The department rarely accepts candidates for the M.A. degree alone, but Ph.D. students can, with the consent of their advisors, complete a program that will qualify them for the M.A. degree at the end of the second year. Candidates for this degree must pass a comprehensive examination before a departmental committee, and must satisfy the residency requirement specified above for the Ph.D. degree. A student’s advisor may require an essay demonstrating research capability.

For further information about graduate study in the Earth and planetary sciences contact the Chair, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.

Fields of Graduate Study and Research

The department offers numerous graduate fields: sedimentology, geochemistry and petrology, paleobiology, solid Earth geophysics, oceanography, atmospheric sciences, and planetary astrophysics. Descriptions of these fields and their various programs are given below.

Petrology

Modern research in petrology requires a flexible approach combining multiple techniques in geochemistry, geochronology and experimental petrology, thermodynamics and diffusion, and careful petrographic and field observation.  The Department offers courses that provide a thorough background in these areas and a detailed review of research to date.  In addition to the facilities available on campus, those at the Geophysical Laboratory and the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, the Smithsonian Institution, the University of Maryland, and the U.S. Geological Survey in Reston are available to students and faculty through cooperative agreement.

The program in mineral igneous-petrology is concerned with the chemistry and physics of the origin and evolution of magma. All aspects of the generation, extraction, ascension, cooling, kinetics of crystallization, convection, differentiation, eruption, and flow are considered in detail. The results of high temperature melting experiments as well as detailed chemical analysis are applied to these problems. A nontraditional approach to petrological problems is emphasized through an analytical treatment of volcanological field work. Students are encouraged to take thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer.

The program in metamorphic petrology emphasizes linkages between petrogenesis and its drivers, considering the full range of time and length scales for metamorphism.  Learning begins in the field and follows on to the microscope and laboratory, applying concepts in equilibrium mechanics and thermodynamics, geochemistry, geochronology and diffusion geospeedometry to quantify conditions and durations for metamorphism.  Petrological observations and interpretations are placed in the context of Earth processes, from mineral to mountain belt and seismic cycle to supercontinent cycle.

Geochemistry

The program in geochemistry at Johns Hopkins includes isotope geochemistry - including radiogenic and stable isotope geochemistry - as well as aqueous geochemistry.  Stable isotope geochemistry (C, O, Sr) is integrated with biostratigraphy, sedimentology, and geochronology to reconstruct ancient oceans and to address the coevolution of life and the environment.  Complementing this, radiogenic isotope geochemistry (U/Pb dating on zircon) is used to construct age models, constrain rates of change in sedimentary sequences, and to study changing sedimentary provinces.  Collaborations with other stable isotope and geochronology laboratories allows for the broad application of different geochemical techniques and systems to address Earth history questions.

Aqueous geochemistry focuses on the role of water in the evolution of Earth through deep time, particularly the linkages between water in the deep Earth and the near-surface environment.  It involves quantitative geochemical modeling of the chemistry of water-rock interactions from Earth's surface into the upper mantle.  Students participate in research involving the interpretation of experimental studies of water-rock interactions in terms of fundamental properties of aqueous inorganic and organic species over extreme ranges of pressure and temperature.  Developing a thermodynamic characterization of the behavior of fluids at elevated pressures and temperatures enables exciting research into topics such as the origins of diamonds, the development and evolution of the continents and the potential roles of abiogenic hydrocarbons in Earth's deep carbon cycle.  Collaborations with experimental laboratories enable a wide range of training in combined theoretical and experimental studies of the role of fluids in the history of Earth and other planets.

Sedimentology Systems

The teaching and research program in sedimentary systems is dedicated to understanding interactions between sediments, organisms, climate and tectonics in the Earth’s past. This program combines sedimentology, paleontology, geochronology, and geochemistry to study Earth history from sedimentary archives. Field and laboratory observations are equally essential to this kind of research, and students are expected to become proficient in both. Through course work and research students should develop literacy in a combination of disciplines, which may include but are not limited to stratigraphy, geochemistry, paleontology, ecology, geomorphology, geochronology, soil science, and meteorology. Interdisciplinary interactions are encouraged within the Earth and Planetary Science department and with members of other departments at Hopkins, such as the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering in the School of Engineering and the Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution in the Medical School.

Geobiology and Paleoclimatology

Research emphases within this discipline include soil ecology, soil formation, biohydrology, plant-soil-animal interactions, biogeochemical cycling, paleoecology, and paleoclimatology. Methods of stable isotope geochemistry are used to investigate changes in the cycling of C, H, N, and O through Earth history. Students are invited to participate in ongoing collaborations with the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (Long-Term Ecological Research Site), Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, or to design an original research project under the advisement of our faculty. Instrumentation in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences includes stable isotope mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, microprobe and transmission electron microscopy; fieldwork is ongoing at several international sites.

All Ph.D. students are expected to have a background of physics, chemistry, calculus, general biology, and sedimentary geology. Deficiencies can be made up in the first semesters at Hopkins. Students take a core program of statistics, Earth history, stable isotope geochemistry, and ecology. In conjunction with the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences offers course work opportunities in Aquatic Chemistry, Plant and Animal Ecology, Geobiology, Analytical Environmental Chemistry, and Sedimentary Geochemistry.

Oceans, Atmospheres, and Climate Dynamics

The oceans, atmospheres, and climate dynamics program focuses on the study of physical processes in the oceans and atmosphere, the interaction between the ocean, atmosphere and land surface, and their role in climate. The philosophy underlying the department’s program is a rigorous and thorough background in the physics of fluids and radiation, and their applications to climate and environmental problems, applied mathematics, laboratory experiments, and observations. Problems in radiative transfer and the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans are attacked by theory, laboratory or numerical experiments, and field observations. Johns Hopkins is a member of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.

The best preparation for graduate study in this program is an undergraduate degree in physics, applied mathematics, mechanical engineering, or another parent science such as chemistry or geology/geophysics. Prior course work in fluid dynamics, while highly desirable, is not mandatory to pursue graduate study in this area. It is essential to have a broad background in the parent sciences, specialization in one of them, and at least three years of undergraduate mathematics.

Research in physical oceanography focuses on the processes that maintain the global ocean circulation and the oceans’ role in climate and global biogeochemical cycling. In particular, attention is on the role of waves, eddies, and small-scale mixing in controlling the oceans’ part in Earth’s heat balance. We also study advection, stirring, and mixing processes in the interior ocean and their roles in dispersing atmospheric trace gases and nutrients.

Research in atmospheric dynamics focuses on large-scale dynamics, the transport of trace constituents, and understanding the composition of the global atmosphere (e.g., distributions of stratospheric ozone and tropospheric water vapor). Current interests include stratospheric vortex dynamics, troposphere-stratosphere couplings, transport and mixing processes, and global modeling of chemical constituents.

Research on climate and radiation includes study of the global climate system and its response to radiative forcing due to changes in green-house gases and solar luminosity, the feedback effects of water vapor and clouds, and the radiative and hydrological effects of aerosols. These studies involve global and regional scale modeling, and the analysis and interpretation of satellite observations.

Research on climate also includes studies on the interplay between atmospheric variability and surface processes, including hydrological states and fluxes, human modification of the landscape, and ecosystem activities. This research employs satellite image analysis, numerical modeling, and field observation to build a process-based understanding of the ways in which climate shapes landscape and vice versa. Particular emphasis is devoted to the impact of climate variability on fresh water resources.

A new program of research, combining physical oceanography and atmospheric science, focuses on the role of ocean-atmosphere interactions in the climate of the North Atlantic region. The task is to isolate and understand the predictable mechanisms that govern mid-latitude climate oscillations lasting several years.

A new program of research in global biogeochemical cycling, focuses on applying and developing large-scale computational models that can be combined with observations remotely sensed data to characterize cycling of key elements (including carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen) in the earth system. Opportunities exist to link this work to the observational geochemistry work done in the department as well as to stimulate key periods and transitions in Earth History.

Solid Earth Geophysics

Solid Earth geophysics is the study of our planet’s interior. Our overarching goals are to understand the formation, structure, composition, and dynamics of the Earth as a whole, and their relationship to geological and surface environmental processes today, in the past, and in the future.

Modern geophysics requires an integrated approach that combines geology, solid and fluid mechanics, seismology, gravity, magnetism, and planetology. Students following the geophysics program are therefore encouraged to take advanced mathematics (including numerical modeling), classical physics, solid and fluid mechanics, as well as a broad range of EPS course work that includes geology, geochemistry, geophysics, and planetary science.

Some examples of broad-based geophysics research topics in EPS include study of Earth’s magnetic field, the surface expression of Earth’s “geodynamo,” which is powered by fluid flow in the Earth’s metallic core. Similarly, earthquakes arise from tectonic forces that are ultimately produced by large-scale motions of the Earth’s rocky interior, which moves at rates of a few cm per year. Much of earth’s surface topography, the presence of Earth’s ocean basins, and several physical and geochemical aspects of Earth’s surface environment, are a direct consequence of plate tectonics, which governs the internal dynamics of our planet. Volcanism and magma dynamics are other examples of fundamental processes that shape the Earth and its environment, a study that integrates geology, solid and fluid mechanics, and geochemistry.

Professors Olson and Marsh specialize in study of Earth’s interior and its influence on the surface environment, and Professor Strobel specializes in the study of the other planets, with emphasis on their atmospheres and magnetospheres.

Planetary Science

The program in Planetary Science emphasizes the study of atmospheres, solid surfaces, and interiors of planetary bodies in a broader context. This includes a range of fundamental problems in atmospheric chemistry, dynamics, physics, radiation and geology and their role in the origin, evolution, and present state of planets and small bodies.  The properties of these objects are investigated using a combination of observation (ground-based telescopes and robotic spacecraft), laboratory experimentation, theoretical modelling, and Earth-analog field studies.  The program requires an interdisciplinary focus, drawing from a wide variety of fields including astronomy, geology, physics and chemistry.  Research often includes data from active planetary exploration missions.  EPS faculty include members of the Cassini mission to the Saturn system, New Horizons mission to the Pluto system, and Mars Science Laboratory Rover teams, along with a number of proposed future missions to Europa, Venus, and other bodies. 


Students are encouraged to take courses in astrophysics, chemistry, physics, applied mathematics, computer science, and engineering to gain the comprehensive background necessary for interdisciplinary research. The best undergraduate preparation is a broad background in physics, applied mathematics, chemistry, or earth science. Advanced undergraduate courses in these fields (including differential equations, linear algebra, classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, organic, and physical chemistry) are strongly recommended.  The EPS Planetary Science research program is closely coordinated with the Space Department of the JHU Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), and students may be co-advised by APL researchers. Students in the department additionally benefit from the local availability of outside institutions including the Space Telescope Science Institute (co-located on the JHU campus), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the Carnegie Institution for Science, and the Smithsonian Institution.
 

Financial Aid

The university makes available to the department a number of Gilman Fellowships, which provide for complete payment of tuition, together with Johns Hopkins’ fellowships and graduate assistantships that carry a nine-month stipend. Graduate assistantships cannot require more than 10 hours a week of service to the department, and all recipients of financial aid carry a full program of study. In addition, a number of special and endowed fellowships pay as much or more. In many areas of study, summer support is also available.

Applications for admission to graduate study and financial aid (including all supporting documents and GRE scores) should be submitted to the department before January 15.

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For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.270.102. Freshman Seminar: Conversations with the Earth. 3.00 Credits.

A discussion of topics on Earth's origin, evolution, and habitability. Students will be introduced to the role that scientific thinking and process play in research and our understanding of Earth systems. We will cover a broad foundation of knowledge of Earth sciences, including solid earth, atmospheric, and oceanic systems, as well as topics concerning the origin of life, evolution, ecosystems, and mass extinctions. And we will discuss the relation of these systems to societal concerns such as climate change, energy resources, mineral and ore needs in industry, and nuclear waste storage and risk assessment. We are returning to the original seminar format for this class, with a limit of 15 students. We are looking for students who are willing to engage in frequent class discussion with instructors and classmates to ensure they acquire a broad understanding of the subject matter. This will be a 3 credit course with homework to be completed each week and a term paper submitted at the end of the semester.
Instructor(s): A. Charrier
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.103. Introduction to Global Environmental Change. 3.00 Credits.

A broad survey of the Earth as a planet, with emphasis on the processes that control global changes. Topics include: the structure, formation, and evolution of the Earth, the atmosphere, oceans, continents, and biosphere. Special attention is given to present-day issues, such as global climate change, natural hazards, air pollution, resource depletion, human population growth, habitat destruction, and loss of biodiversity. Open to all undergraduates.
Instructor(s): D. Waugh; K. Szlavecz
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.107. Introduction to Sustainability. 3.00 Credits.

Will introduce interactions between global environment and humans, discuss meaning of sustainability, and introduce use of tools to attain sustainability such as policy, law, communication, marketing, research, advocacy, international treaties.
Instructor(s): C. Parker
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.110. Freshman Seminar: Sustainable + Non-Sustainable Resources. 1.00 Credit.

An introduction to the important resources involved in the origin and production of oil, natural gas, coal, cement, metals and geothermal fluids.
Instructor(s): D. Sverjensky
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.113. Freshman Seminar: Environmental Poisons. 1.00 Credit.

An exploration of the occurrence and potential effects of poisons in the environment, from naturally occurring ones such as arsenic to those that may be introduced by mankind such as nuclear waste.
Instructor(s): D. Sverjensky
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.114. Guided Tour: The Planets. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to planetary science and planetary exploration primarily for non-science majors. A survey of concepts from astronomy, chemistry, geology, and physics applied to the study of the solar system.
Instructor(s): K. Lewis; S. Stanley
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.115. Environmental Photojounalism and Filmmaking in the Era of New Media. 3.00 Credits.

Students will review critical literature focusing on new media, visual representation theory, the relationship between images and social change, the history and typology of environmental photography and film, and an overview of modern environmental history, sustainability issues and environmental problems. Over the course of the semester, students will blend these conceptual frameworks with new media production. Based in Baltimore, students will identify an environmental narrative, document their particular story through photography or film, develop a new media platform through which to communicate that narrative effectively, and write a final paper analyzing their images, narrative and communication strategies using the theoretical frameworks covered throughout the course. The course is designed with an emphasis on independent research and practice, interdisciplinary analysis and application. One hour class time, plus two hours per week of independent field work and media production (times TBD by student groups)
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.116. Freshman Seminar: An Introduction to Climate Change. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces the main physical components of the Earth’s climate systems and their documented and forecasted changes. The first part of the course presents evidences of climate change in Earth’s history, and introduces the main natural and anthropogenic drivers of climate change. The second part of the course focuses on future climates, and includes modules about climate modeling, building of emission scenarios, geoengineering, emission reductions and adaptability. The course is highly interdisciplinary, exploring the relationships among climate science, policy, ecology, economy and ethics. Freshmen Only. No prerequisites required.
Instructor(s): V. Aquila
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.201. Dinosaurs. 3.00 Credits.

This course covers all of the major groups of dinosaurs, from Triceratops to T. Rex and their relatives living, today birds. It will also cover the origins of the group, their near demise 65 million years ago, their behavior, growth and development, and a history of their study.
Instructor(s): D. Weishampel
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.205. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis. 3.00 Credits.

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.
Instructor(s): X. Chen
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

AS.270.210. Environmental Field Methods. 3.00 Credits.

This course is designed to introduce students to field based environmental research with a focus on the ecology and geochemistry of the surface and sub-surface environment. Field activities will center around soils and the carbon cycle in the riparian ecosystem adjacent to the Homewood campus and on the urban ecology of the greater Baltimore region. Students will build skills in data collection, analysis and synthesis. Outdoor fieldwork is an essential part of the course.
Prerequisites: AS.270.103 OR AS.270.220.
Instructor(s): K. Szlavecz; N. Levin
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.220. The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology. 3.00 Credits.

Basic concepts in geology, including plate tectonics; Earth’s internal structure; geologic time; minerals; formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; development of faults, folds and earthquakes; geomagnetism. Corequisite (for EPS Majors): AS.270.221; optional for others.
Prerequisites: Prerequisite or Corequisite: AS.030.101 OR ( AS.171.101 AND AS.171.102 ) or equivalent. AS.270.221 is a corequisite for E&PS majors.
Instructor(s): A. Charrier
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.221. The Dynamic Earth Laboratory. 2.00 Credits.

This course is a hands-on learning experience for introductory geological concepts and techniques using geological tools, such as mineral/rock samples, microscopes, and maps. Field trips are its essential part.
Prerequisites: Corequisite: AS.270.220;Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.
Instructor(s): A. Charrier
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.222. Earth Materials. 4.00 Credits.

An introduction to the properties, occurrence, and origin of the basic constituents of the Earth, including minerals and rocks. Introductory training in the recognition of minerals and rocks in the laboratory and the field.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.
Instructor(s): A. Charrier
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.224. Oceans & Atmospheres. 3.00 Credits.

A broad survey of the Earth’s oceans and atmospheres, and their role in the environment and climate. Topics covered include waves, tides, ocean and atmosphere circulation, weather systems, tornadoes and hurricanes, El Niño, and climate change. For science and engineering majors
Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan; T. Haine
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.301. Geochemical Thermodynamics. 3.00 Credits.

Principles of chemical thermodynamics. Concept of and criteria for equilibrium. Properties of real fluids and solids. Applications to geologic processes. Recommended Course Background: AS.270.341
Prerequisites: AS.270.222 or equivalent or permission of instructor
Instructor(s): J. Ferry
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.302. Aqueous Geochemistry. 4.50 Credits.

Thermodynamic basis for calculation of equilibria involving minerals and aqueous species at both low and high temperatures and pressures. Theoretical calculation of surface geochemical processes including adsorption and dissolution kinetics.
Instructor(s): D. Sverjensky
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.305. Energy Resources in the Modern World. 3.00 Credits.

This in-depth survey will inform students on the non-renewable and renewable energy resources of the world and the future prospects. Topics include petroleum, natural gas, coal, nuclear, hydroelectric, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and ocean energy. Global production, distribution, usage, and impacts of these resources will be discussed.
Instructor(s): J. Burgess
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.307. Geoscience Modelling. 4.00 Credits.

An introduction to modern ways to interpret observations in the context of a conceptual model. Topics include model building, hypothesis testing, and inverse methods. Practical examples from geophysics, engineering, and medical physics will be featured.
Instructor(s): T. Haine
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.308. Population/Community Ecology. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the distribution and abundance of organisms and their interactions. Topics include dynamics and regulation of populations, population interactions (competition, predation, mutualism, parasitism, herbivory), biodiversity, organization of equilibrium and non-equilibrium communities, energy flow, and nutrient cycles in ecosystems. Field trip included. Permission of instructor.
Prerequisites: AS.270.103 or permission of instructor
Instructor(s): K. Szlavecz
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.309. Designing Sustainable Wellness. 3.00 Credits.

Limited to juniors, seniors and graduate students. Otherwise permission of instructor. This project-based course will explore and re-imagine interdisciplinary conceptual frameworks aimed at promoting sustainable wellness (the convergence of social and ecological sustainability) within the built environment (the space, structures and systems humans generate for living, working and playing). Beginning with a conceptual overview of sustainability, the science of happiness, and design/planning principles, students will review relevant case studies and complete a final, hands-on, community-based studio project.
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis; C. Parker
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.270.311. Geobiology. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of the interactions between geological and biological processes at and near the Earth’s surface, covering topics such as biogeochemistry and nutrient cycles, soil chemistry, biomarkers, archives of paleobiology, and the evolution of life, with an emphasis on terrestrial systems. Recommended Course Background: AS.270.220
Instructor(s): N. Levin
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.312. Mammalian Evolution. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the evolutionary history and diversity of mammals, with emphasis on the first half of the Cenozoic - the beginning of the Age of Mammals. The course will focus primarily on the adaptive radiation of mammals (including our own order primates) that followed the extinction of the dinosaurs, exploring the origins and relationships of the major groups of mammals as well as the anatomical and ecological reasons for their success. Lectures will be supplemented with relevant fossils and recent specimens.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.313. Isotope Geochemistry. 3.00 Credits.

Principles of equilibrium and kinetic isotope fractionation in fluid, solid and heterogeneous systems. Stable isotopes in the biosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere. Reconstruction of past climatic and ecological settings. Stable isotopes in igneous and metamorphic systems. Introduction to radiogenic isotopes, geochronology, thermochronology, cosmogenic isotopes and “clumped” isotopes.
Instructor(s): B. Passey
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.314. Planetary Tectonics and Geodynamics. 3.00 Credits.

Fundamental physical processes relevant to interiors of terrestrial planets and icy satellites. Topics include: stress and strain; elasticity and flexure; rheology; internal structure; thermal evolution; fluid mechanics; tectonics; and faulting. Recommended Course Background: AS.110.108-AS.110.109 or equivalent; AS.171.101 or AS.171.105 or equivalent; AS.110.202 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): J. Roberts; O. Barnouin
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.315. Natural Catastrophes. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of naturally occurring catastrophic phenomena, with emphasis on the underlying physical processes. Topics include hurricanes, tornadoes, lightning, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, and volcanic eruptions and climate change. Intended for students in science and engineering.
Instructor(s): A. Charrier
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.316. Planets. 3.00 Credits.

This course will serve as an introduction to planetary science at a more advanced level than AS.270.114. Topics covered will include formation of the solar system, planetary interiors, surfaces and atmospheres, solar system exploration, and extrasolar planets. Receommended Course Background: AS.270.220 and AS.270.224.
Instructor(s): S. Horst
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.317. Conservation Biology. 3.00 Credits.

In this course, students examine the meaning and implications of biodiversity with a focus on disciplines associated with conservation biology, wildlife conservation and wildlife management, including taxonomy, genetics, small population biology, chemical and restoration ecology, and marine biology. This includes exploring how conservation biology differs from other natural sciences in theory and in application. Students learn the major threats to biodiversity and what natural and social science methods and alternatives are used to mitigate, stop, or reverse these threats. The course also includes the economic and cultural tradeoffs associated with each conservation measure at the global, national, regional, and local levels. One required field trip.
Instructor(s): J. Burgess
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.318. Remote Sensing of the Environment. 4.00 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the use of remote sensing technology to study Earth’s physical and biochemical processes. Topics covered include remote sensing of the atmosphere, land and oceans, as well as remote sensing as a tool for policy makers. Also offered as 270.618
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik; K. Lewis
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.320. Seminar in Planetary Science. 1.00 Credit.

Major problems of current interest in planetary science are critically discussed in depth.
Instructor(s): S. Horst
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.323. Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles. 3.00 Credits.

This course will examine the cycling of trace chemicals in the ocean, consider what we can learn from the distributions of these chemicals about the ocean circulation, and ocean ecosystems. Topics covered will include oceanic biological productivity, open water cycling of nutrients and oxygen, ocean acidification and sediment cycling.
Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.325. Introductory Oceanography. 3.00 Credits.

This class is an introduction to a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena in the world’s oceans. Underlying basic principles are exposed wherever possible. Topics covered include: seawater, waves, tides, ocean circulation, chemical oceanography, biogeochemical ocean processes, and remote sensing of the oceans. Recommended Course Background: freshman Physics, Chemistry, Calculus through ordinary differential equations.
Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.330. Atmospheric Chemistry. 3.00 Credits.

This course will examine the structure and composition of the atmosphere and the processes that determine how the composition has changed in the past and might change in the future. Emphasis will be on the chemistry of the stratospheric ozone layer. The chemistry of the troposphere and air pollution will also be covered. Prerequisites: AS.110.106 Calculus I and AS.110.109 Calculus II
Instructor(s): R. Stolarski
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.332. Soil Ecology. 3.00 Credits.

The course introduces basic aspects of cycles and flows in the soil ecosystem, and provides students with an overview of the higher groups of soil organisms. Laboratory and field surveying methods are also covered.
Instructor(s): K. Szlavecz
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.336. Freshwater Systems. 3.00 Credits.

A study of streams, lakes, and groundwater with a focus on aspects of water quality, hydrology, geomorphology, and aquatic ecology that are relevant to human impacts on freshwater systems. US environmental policies and water resource management agencies will also be examined in the context of issues such as dams, cattle grazing, climate change, and water allocation.
Prerequisites: AS.270.103 or permission of the instructor.
Instructor(s): R. Kelly
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.350. Sedimentary Geology. 4.00 Credits.

Introduction to sedimentary processes and sedimentary rocks. Focus is placed on linking physical observations to earth surface processes. Fundamental tools for interpreting the sedimentary rock record, such as depositional models, geochronology, and chemostratigraphy are reviewed. Weekend field trips. Graduate and advanced undergraduate level. Recommended Course Background: AS.270.220 or instructor permission.
Instructor(s): K. Lewis; N. Bridges
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.360. Climate Change: Science & Policy. 3.00 Credits.

This course will investigate the policy and scientific debate over global warming. It will review the current state of scientific knowledge about climate change, examine the potential impacts and implications of climate change, explore our options for responding to climate change, and discuss the present political debate over global warming.
Prerequisites: AS.270.103 or permission
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.366. Spacecraft Instrumentation Project. 3.00 Credits.

Co-Listed with EN.530.366
Instructor(s): S. Horst
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

AS.270.369. Geochem Earth/Environmen. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to all aspects of Geochemistry: theoretical, experimental, and observational, including the application of geochemistry to issues such as the migration of toxic metals and nuclear waste.
Instructor(s): D. Sverjensky
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.377. Climates Of The Past. 3.00 Credits.

Earth’s climate history through study of forcing mechanisms, climate proxies, and paleoclimate modeling. Presentation of climate-sensitive archives will be followed by discussion of geochemical principles, climates through time, recent advances and emerging problems. For upper-level undergraduate and graduate students in the natural sciences. Recommended Coures Background: AS.270.220 or instructor permission.
Instructor(s): L. Hinnov
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.378. Present & Future Climate. 3.00 Credits.

Intended for majors who are interested in the science that underlies the current debate on global warming, the focus is on recent observations one can glean from model simulations. Meets with AS.270.641. Recommended Course Background: AS.110.108-AS.110.109 and AS.171.101-AS.171.102
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik; D. Waugh
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.395. Planetary Physics and Chemistry. 3.00 Credits.

The fundamental principles governing the dynamic processes within and around the planets are treated in some detail. Core equations are developed and used to analyze nebula condensation, planetary accretion, convection in mantles and atmospheres, radiative and conductive heat transport, seismic waves, hurricanes, volcanism, and meteorite impacts, among others. Emphasis is on fundamentals and problem solving.
Prerequisites: AS.030.101; AS.171.101-102 or 103-104 or 105-106.
Instructor(s): D. Strobel
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.396. Special Topics in Planetary Exploration. 3.00 Credits.

A selection of planetary research topics investigated by Prof. Strobel spanning the past 45 years covering the progress that has been made and remaining problems that still need to be addressed. The majority of topics will involve the outer solar system and the science discoveries made by the Voyager, Cassini-Huygens, and New Horizons Missions as well as observations by Earth orbiting satellites – IUE, HUT, HST, FUSE.
Instructor(s): D. Strobel
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.401. Metamorphic Geology. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to metamorphic geology and the concepts on which it is built. Ideas and techniques that underpin metamorphic petrology are introduced in the context of the development and evolution of metamorphic geology as a discipline. Focus is on utility of metamorphic geology in understanding crustal processes and the nature of plate tectonics. One-day, weekend field trips to explore the Baltimore Gneiss Domes. Recommended course background: AS.270.220 and AS.270.221, or instructor permission.
Prerequisites: AS.270.220 AND AS.270.221
Instructor(s): D. Viete
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.404. Planetary Interiors. 3.00 Credits.

This course investigates the physical processes occurring in planetary interiors. Topics include formation and differentiation of planetary bodies, planetary structure, thermal evolution, convection, and dynamo generation of magnetic fields. Standard remote sensing methods used to investigate planetary interiors and results from recent planetary satellite missions will also be discussed. Recommended: Knowledge of vector calculus, PDEs and introductory physics.
Instructor(s): S. Stanley
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.405. Modeling the Hydrological Cycle. 3.00 Credits.

Survey of modeling techniques for hydrological monitoring, analysis and prediction, including applied exercises with commonly used models. Topics include the terrestrial water balance, rivers and floods, groundwater, atmospheric transport, and precipitation processes. Focus is on numerical methods applicable at the large watershed to global scale.
Instructor(s): A. Dezfuli; B. Zaitchik.

AS.270.410. Planetary Surface Processes. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores processes that influence the evolution of planetary surfaces, including impact cratering, tectonics, volcanism, weathering, and sediment transport. These processes manifest themselves as structural deformation of planetary crusts due to loading by volcanoes, formation of craters by asteroid impacts, modification of surfaces by flowing landslides, rivers and glaciers, and the accumulation and transport of sand in dune fields on various planets. Emphasis is on the relationship to similar Earth processes, and the integrated geologic histories of the terrestrial planets, satellites, and asteroids. The focus will be on developing a physical understanding of these processes to interpret the surface characteristics and evolution of planets, satellites, asteroids, and comets from both qualitative assessments and quantitative measurements obtained from spacecraft data. A key component of the class will be the interpretation of these observations from recent and current planetary missions to the Moon, Mars, and other terrestrial bodies. Recommended Course Background: A sound knowledge of Calculus and Introductory Physics, and some prior knowledge of Earth and/or Planetary Science.
Instructor(s): K. Lewis
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.423. Planetary Atmospheres. 3.00 Credits.

Fundamental concepts and basic principles of chemistry and physics applied to the study of planetary atmospheres. Vertical structure of planetary atmospheres. Atmospheric radiation, thermodynamics, and transport. Principles of photochemistry. Planetary spectroscopy and remote sensing. Upper atmospheres and ionospheres. Evolution and stability of planetary atmospheres. Recommended Course Background: basic physics, chemistry and calculus
Instructor(s): S. Horst
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.425. Earth & Planetary Fluids. 3.00 Credits.

An introductory course on the properties, flow, and transport characteristics of fluids throughout the Earth and planets. Topics covered include: constitutive relationships, fluid rheology, hydrostatics, dimensional analysis, low Reynolds number flow, porous media, waves, stratified and rotating fluids, plus heat, mass, and tracer transport. Illustrative examples and problems are drawn from the atmosphere, ocean, crust, mantle, and core of the Earth and other Planets. Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Recommended Course Background: Basic Physics, Calculus, and familiarity with ordinary differential equations.
Instructor(s): P. Olson
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.495. Senior Thesis. 3.00 Credits.

Preparation of a substantial thesis based upon independent student research, supervised by at least one faculty member in Earth and Planetary Sciences. Open to Sr. departmental majors only. Required for department honors.
Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan
Area: Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.270.496. Senior Thesis. 4.00 Credits.

Preparation of a substantial thesis based upon independent student research, supervised by at least one faculty member in Earth and Planetary Sciences. Open to Sr. departmental majors only. Required for department honors.
Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan; B. Passey; T. Haine
Writing Intensive.

AS.270.501. Independent Study. 3.00 Credits.

An independent course of study may be pursued under the direction of an adviser on those topics not specifically listed in the form of regular courses.
Instructor(s): B. Marsh; B. Zaitchik; C. Parker; K. Szlavecz.

AS.270.502. Independent Study. 0.00 - 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.270.503. Independent Research. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan; B. Marsh; G. Ball; K. Lewis.

AS.270.504. Independent Research. 0.00 - 3.00 Credits.

Research under the direction of members of the Earth & Planetary Sciences Faculty.
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik.

AS.270.505. GECS Senior Capstone Seminar. 3.00 Credits.

The GECS Senior Capstone Seminar will provide the intellectual time and space to bring together the knowledge and tools acquired during the four years of interdisciplinary work on the GECS curriculum into a coherent framework in preparation for careers, and/or graduate work. In addition to the culmination of the capstone project, final paper, and presentations, students will look at relevant current events through the lenses of science, social science and the humanities, and engage in in-depth readings and discussion of these issues.
Instructor(s): C. Parker.

AS.270.507. Internship. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): C. Parker.

AS.270.595. Internship. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): C. Parker; D. Sverjensky; D. Veblen; D. Waugh.

AS.270.599. Independent Study. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): A. Monopolis; B. Marsh; D. Sverjensky; K. Szlavecz; S. Stanley.

AS.270.603. Geochemistry Seminar.

A variety of topics of current interest involving mineral-fluid interactions will be reviewed.
Instructor(s): D. Sverjensky.

AS.270.605. EPS Colloquium.

A weekly seminar series in which graduate students present their latest research results and attend Departmental seminars. This course is required for all graduate students in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.
Instructor(s): T. Wright.

AS.270.606. EPS Colloquium.

A weekly seminar series in which graduate students present their latest research results and attend Departmental seminars. This course is required for all graduate students in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences.
Instructor(s): T. Wright.

AS.270.610. Climate Modeling and Analysis.

Instructor(s): A. Arking
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.611. Global Atmospheric Dynamics.

This course will examine the fluid dynamics that determine large-scale atmospheric circulation and variability using Ian James’ “Introduction to Circulating Atmospheres.” Topics covered will include the dynamics of Hadley cells, mid-latitude jets, baroclinic instability, monsoon circulations, and low-frequency variability of the circulation.
Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan.

AS.270.612. Scientific Survival Skills.

Transitioning from graduate school to a postdoc to a “permanent” job in the natural sciences requires a set of essential skills that are not covered as a formal component of most Ph.D. programs. This seminar will be a weekly discussion of career issues relevant to new scientists. Topics will include elements of good presentations, conferences, scientific writing and peer-review, employment trends, job interviews, and grant proposals. The class will conclude with a mock grant proposal review panel, conducted by the students. This seminar is aimed at graduate and advanced undergraduate students in the natural sciences planning careers in academia or industry.
Instructor(s): J. Roberts.

AS.270.615. Inversion Modeling & Data Assimilation.

This graduate class will introduce modern inverse modeling and data assimilation techniques. These powerful methods are used in atmospheric science, oceanography, and geophysics and are growing more widespread. Topics will include: singular value decomposition, Green’s function inversions, Kalman filtering, and variational data assimilation. The class will include lectures on concepts and theory, and practical experience in the computer laboratory. Permission of Instructor Required
Instructor(s): T. Haine.

AS.270.616. Geodesy, Gravity, and Tides.

Introduces physical geodesy problems, and the interpretation of geoid and gravity anomalies on Earth and other planets. Covers potential theory, measurement techniques from surface and spacecraft, planetary rotation, and tides. Recommended: AS.110.301 or EN.550.291 (or equivalent)
Prerequisites: ( AS.110.202 OR AS.110.211 or equivalent) AND ( AS.171.101 OR AS.171.105 or equivalent)
Instructor(s): J. Roberts
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.618. Remote Sensing of the Environment.

Also offered as 270.318
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik; K. Lewis
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.619. Regional Climate Analysis.

This seminar style course will address advanced topics in regional climate, including dynamic mesoscale models, climate change downscaling, seasonal forecasts, and statistical methods. Students will review relevant literature and collaborate to address modeling and analysis challenges.
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.620. Seminar in Geophysical Turbulence and Transport.

Turbulence plays an important role in setting the structure of both atmospheres and oceans by transporting heat and momentum. It also plays a key role in mobilizing chemical species such as nutrients and aerosols that play key roles in the Earth System. This seminar will cover how we measure and model turbulence and its effects. For the Fall of 2015 the course will center around Planetary Boundary Layers, including topics such as scaling theories, large eddies in boundary layers and their simulation, and interactions with small-scale topographic features.
Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan.

AS.270.621. TEM: Practice and Applications.

A lab and lecture course covering the practical aspects of transmission electron microscopy. Electron diffraction, image formation, and analytical techniques are explained, and students are given an opportunity to gain hands-on microscopy experience. The detailed theory for these experiments is developed in 270.622.
Instructor(s): D. Veblen; K. Hemker.

AS.270.624. Advanced Seminar on Remote Sensing.

Discussion of the physical principles that underlie earth remote sensing. Topics to include radiative transfer in Earth’s atmosphere, operating principles of active and passive remote sensing systems, and advanced methods for image analysis.
Prerequisites: AS.270.318 OR AS.270.618 or permission of instructors.
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik; C. Del Castillo.

AS.270.625. Seminar in Biogeochemistry.

In-depth exploration of emerging topics in biogeochemistry, including themes relevant to the evolution of Earth’s biogeochemical cycles, global change, paleoecology, and paleoclimate.
Instructor(s): B. Passey
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.626. Ocean General Circulation.

The aim of this course is to achieve conceptual understanding of the large scale low frequency ocean general circulation. The role of the ocean circulation in earth's climate is emphasized throughout.
Instructor(s): T. Haine.

AS.270.627. Seminar in Soil Ecology.

Discussion of current research topics in soil ecology and biogeochemistry.
Instructor(s): K. Szlavecz.

AS.270.628. Field Seminar.

Weekend field trip to explore regional geology. Students are required to prepare short presentations on field trip stops in advance of weekend trip. Attendance at organizational meetings is required. Open to E & PS graduate students and upper level E & PS undergraduate majors and minors. Two meetings to be scheduled prior to trip. Trip dates are 4/15-4/17/2016. Consult instructors for details.
Instructor(s): K. Lewis.

AS.270.629. Tracer Transport in Geophysical Flows.

This course examines the transport of substances in geophysical flows. Topics covered include fundamental transport processes, transport in simple flows, and use of chemical tracers to infer transport properties. These concepts will be illustrated by case studies in a variety of geophysical flows, including the flow in atmospheres, oceans, lakes, and groundwater.
Instructor(s): D. Waugh.

AS.270.630. Physics and Chemistry of Aerosols.

This course will cover fundamentals of aerosol physics and chemistry. Topics covered will include aerodynamics and diffusion of aerosol particles, condensation and evaporation, particle size distributions, optics of small particles, characterization of particle composition, and the diversity of aerosols found in planetary atmospheres. Recommended Course Background: Basic Physics and Chemistry. Calculus.
Instructor(s): S. Horst.

AS.270.633. Advanced Topics in Isotopic Geochemistry.

Consent of instructor required In depth exploration of selected systems in stable isotope geochemistry, and examination of the physical basis of stable isotope fractionation. Topics vary annually.
Instructor(s): N. Levin
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.641. Present and Future Climate.

Meets with AS.270.378.
Prerequisites: ( AS.110.108 AND AS.110.109) AND (AS.171.101 AND AS.171.102)
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik; D. Waugh
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.642. Surface Geochemistry.

Instructor(s): D. Sverjensky.

AS.270.644. Physics of Climate Variability.

This course is an advanced-level review of the ways in which climate varies on time scales of seasons to decades, including El Nino, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, the Indian Ocean Dipole Mode, the North Atlantic Oscillation and others. Topics covered will include, depending on class’s interest: 1) Methods for isolating climate modes. (2) Key dynamic and thermodynamic processes involved in causing such fluctuations, including atmospheric and oceanic wave propagation, air-sea interaction and changes in the thermohaline circulation. (3) Impacts of climate modes on biogeochemical cycling, including some that are used by paleoclimatologists to reconstruct past variability. Geophysical understanding and links to fundamental mechanisms are emphasized. Format will consist of a mix of lectures and paper discussions.
Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.645. Earth System Modeling.

Introduces students to using comprehensive Earth System Models. Students will learn about how such models are structured and configure experiments with such a model, based on their interests.
Instructor(s): A. Gnanadesikan.

AS.270.647. Earth's Interior.

Mechanical processes in Earth's core and mantle with applications to plate tectonics, the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth, and generation of Earth's magnetic field.
Instructor(s): P. Olson.

AS.270.653. Earth and Planetary Fluids II.

A sequel to AS.270.425 concentrating on planetary-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Physical understanding of the underlying fluid dynamics will be emphasized.
Instructor(s): N. Paldor.

AS.270.661. Planetary Fluid Dynamics.

Recommended Course Background: AS.270.646 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): D. Strobel
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.662. Seminar in Planetary Science.

Instructor(s): S. Horst.

AS.270.667. Seminar in Soil Ecology.

Instructor(s): K. Szlavecz
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.680. Seminar in Regional Field Geology.

Introduction to the regional geology and geological history of Maryland and surrounding areas. Key papers on regional bedrock geology and Phanerozoic tectonics are reviewed in weekly seminar classes during Weeks 1–8. Two three-day field trips are then made on weekends of April 7–9 and April 21–23. Fieldwork will be designed—with student input—to test ideas and models from the literature. Techniques in sedimentary, metamorphic and structural field geology are introduced and developed in the field. Recommended course background: AS.270.220 and AS.270.221, or instructor permission.
Instructor(s): K. Lewis
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.696. Special Topics in Planetary Exploration.

A selection of planetary research topics investigated by Prof. Strobel spanning the past 45 years covering the progress that has been made and remaining problems that still need to be addressed. The majority of topics will involve the outer solar system and the science discoveries made by the Voyager, Cassini-Huygens, and New Horizons Missions as well as observations by Earth orbiting satellites – IUE, HUT, HST, FUSE.
Instructor(s): D. Strobel
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.270.807. Research.

Instructor(s): T. Haine.

AS.270.808. Research.

Instructor(s): T. Haine.

AS.271.107. Introduction to Sustainability. 3.00 Credits.

Will introduce interactions between global environment and humans, discuss meaning of sustainability, and introduce use of tools to attain sustainability such as policy, law, communication, marketing, research, advocacy, international treaties.
Instructor(s): R. Kelly.

AS.271.120. Environmental Photojournalism. 3.00 Credits.

Environmental cognition, consciousness and communication are produced, reproduced, interpreted and remembered with the support of visual representations and, in particular, photography. Images increasingly structure our experience of nature, environmental problems, human-environmental relations, and ecological awareness. Students will review critical literature focusing on visual representation theory, the relationship between images and social change, and the history and typology of environmental photography. An understanding of modern environmental history, environmental issues and sustainability is required. Students will identify and investigate environmental issues facing Baltimore, participate in photographic critiques, and develop a final documentary project focusing on a specific environmental narrative. The class is designed with an emphasis on independent research and practice, interdisciplinary analysis, and application.
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.271.301. Climate Change Adaptation in the Developing World. 3.00 Credits.

This course considers the way in which people and their livelihoods are adapting to climate change in sensitive regions of the developing world. The course will include an overview of climate systems and climate change science, although it will emphasize vulnerability assessment from an ecosystem and livelihood perspective. Using a case-study approach, the focus will be on key economic sectors of agriculture, water resources, forest systems and tourism. A focus of the course is how to develop an informed approach to climate change adaptation that can drive both national policy and international development and donor efforts to create sustainable responses that serve both the local country and global needs. Students will consider adaptive capacity in specific countries, evaluating the feasibility and sustainability of current adaptation strategies, differentiate national and international efforts and effects of adaptation; learn key tools for climate change assessment, review and critique climate data sources for developing countries, and compare climate change adaptation to the developed world. GECS Majors Only. Prerequisites: Intro to Sustainability, Intro to Global Environmental Change, or Climate Change: Science and Policy.
Prerequisites: AS.270.107 OR AS.271.107
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis; C. Parker
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.271.302. Nature, Baltimore and a Sense of Place. 3.00 Credits.

This course integrates environmental literature, outdoor excursions, nature writing, and ecocriticism. Students will survey a range of authors that have written about nature, environmental issues and sustainability. These include, among others, Aldo Leopold, Henry David Thoreau, Lao Tzu, Edward Abbey, Vandana Shiva, Bill Bryson, Terry Tempest Williams and Michael Pollan. Students will define and explore the concepts of nature, sustainability, and a sense of place. Weekly field trips to Baltimore's parks and green spaces will encourage students to discover their own sense of place and environmental worldview through careful exploration, observation and reflection. Throughout the course, using a journal, students will write short, ecocritical essays and reflect on their experiences, perspectives, and insights.
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.271.304. Sustainable Food Systems. 4.00 Credits.

This course will critically examine the crucial role food systems have played in shaping human history and global environmental change. Of particular interest will be the mutually impactful relationships between food and climate change, population growth, and urbanization. The sustainability of these systems and relationships will be assessed through a lifecycle analysis of food system processes: cultivation, distribution, trade, preparation, consumption, and disposal. The theoretical dimension of this course will be complimented by an experiential learning component involving relevant and related field excursions and on-campus labs.
Instructor(s): R. Kelly
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.271.309. Designing Sustainable Wellness. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the convergence of social and environmental sustainability within the built environment. The built environment refers to the space, structures and systems humans generate for living, working and playing. This includes everything from homes and office buildings, to neighborhoods and cities, to green spaces and parks. It also includes hard infrastructure, such as energy, transportation and water systems, and soft infrastructure, such as formal human services (e.g. health, education, recreation). More recently, the term has expanded to include conditions related to public health, such as walkability, bikability, and access to healthy foods. This course will examine the conceptual frameworks that support the creation of built environments, assess their impact on environmental and social well-being, and re-imagine methodologies and designs that may better promote “sustainable wellness” or, socio-ecological sustainability, in the future. Through case studies and a final design-based project, students will learn and apply the fundamental principles behind socio-ecologically sustainable design. The course is designed with an emphasis on interdisciplinary analysis and systems thinking. The course is geared towards GECS majors, in addition to students interested in psychology, design, architecture and urban planning.
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis
Area: Engineering, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.271.360. Climate Change: Science & Policy. 3.00 Credits.

Prereq: 270.103 or permission of instructor. This course will investigate the policy and scientific debate over global warming. It will review the current state of scientific knowledge about climate change, examine the potential impacts and implications of climate change, explore our options for responding to climate change, and discuss the present political debate over global warming.
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik; D. Waugh
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.271.401. Environmental Ethics. 3.00 Credits.

Environmental Ethics is a philosophical discipline that examines the moral relationship between humans and the natural environment. For individuals and societies, it can help structure our experience of nature, environmental problems, human-environmental relations, and ecological awareness. Beginning with a comprehensive analysis of their own values, students will explore complex ethical questions, philosophical paradigms and real-life case studies through readings, films and seminar discussions. Traditional ethical theories, including consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics will be examined and applied. Environmental moral worldviews, ranging from anthropocentric to ecocentric perspectives, will be critically evaluated. Organized debates will help students strengthen their ability to deconstruct and assess ethical arguments and to communicate viewpoints rooted in ethical principles. Students will apply ethical reasoning skills to an examination of contemporary environmental issues including, among others, biodiversity conservation, environmental justice, climate change, and overpopulation. Students will also develop, defend and apply their own personal environmental ethical framework. A basic understanding of modern environmental history and contemporary environmental issues is required. Prior experience with philosophy and ethics is not required.
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.271.402. Water, Energy, and Food. 3.00 Credits.

The water, energy and food (WEF) nexus is a topic of growing interest in the research and policy communities. This course will survey WEF concepts and principles, introduce tools of analysis, and engage students in case studies of critical WEF issues in the United States and internationally.
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik.

AS.271.403. Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to US environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA, RCRA, and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of this course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the proper perspective. This course is taught in conjunction with an identical graduate course. All students will be expected to perform at a graduate level.
Instructor(s): H. Serassio; R. Solomon
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.271.404. GIS Workshop. 1.00 Credit.

An accompaniment to the GECS Senior Capstone Seminar for students whose research project involves a GIS component. Designed to enable beginner to advanced GIS users to acquire the data and skills needed to accomplish their research goals.
Corequisites : AS.271.506
Instructor(s): R. Kelly
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.271.501. Independent Study. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): A. Monopolis.

AS.271.502. Independent Study. 1.00 - 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): A. Monopolis.

AS.271.505. GECS Senior Capstone Seminar - Part II. 3.00 Credits.

The GECS Senior Capstone Seminar will provide the intellectual time and space to bring together the knowledge and tools acquired during the four years of interdisciplinary work on the GECS curriculum into a coherent framework in preparation for careers, and/or graduate work. In addition to the culmination of the capstone project, final paper, and presentations, students will look at relevant current events through the lenses of science, social science and the humanities, and engage in in-depth readings and discussion of these issues.
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis
Writing Intensive.

AS.271.506. GECS Senior Capstone Seminar Part I. 3.00 Credits.

The GECS Senior Capstone Seminar will provide the intellectual time and space to bring together the knowledge and tools acquired during the four years of interdisciplinary work on the GECS curriculum into a coherent framework in preparation for careers, and/or graduate work. Part I of this module will include the initial, research and planning phase of the capstone project. Part II, during the Spring semester, will involve the application and implementation phase.
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis.

AS.271.507. Internship. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): R. Kelly.

AS.271.508. Internship. 1.00 - 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): C. Parker.

Cross Listed Courses

Near Eastern Studies

AS.130.378. Geoarchaeology: Applications of Earth Science to Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

Geoarchaeology is a multidisciplinary subfield that applies the tools and techniques of earth science to understand ancient humans and their interactions with environments. This course examines basic topics and concepts, including archaeological site formation, paleo-environmental reconstruction, raw materials and resources, soil science, deposition and erosion of wind and water-borne sediments in different environments such as along rivers, lakes and coastlines, radiocarbon and other chronometric dating methods, and ground-based remote sensing, including ground penetrating radar.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.131.678. Geoarchaeology: Applications of Earth Science to Archaeology.

Geoarchaeology is a multidisciplinary subfield that applies the tools and techniques of earth science to understand ancient humans and their interactions with environments. This course examines basic topics and concepts, including archaeological site formation, paleo-environmental reconstruction, raw materials and resources, soil science, deposition and erosion of wind and water-borne sediments in different environments such as along rivers, lakes and coastlines, radiocarbon and other chronometric dating methods, and ground-based remote sensing, including ground penetrating radar.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://eps.jhu.edu/directory/

Faculty

Chair

Thomas W. N. Haine
physical oceanography.

Professors

Peter L. Olson
geophysical fluid dynamics.

Darrell F. Strobel
planetary atmospheres and astrophysics.

Dimitri Sverjensky
molecular surface geochemistry and environmental geochemistry.

Darryn W. Waugh
atmospheric dynamics.

Associate Professor

Anand Gnanadesikan
biogeochemical oceanography, geophysical fluid dynamics.

Assistant Professors

Sarah Horst
atmospheric chemistry, planetary atmospheres.

Kevin Lewis
planetary geology and geophysics.

Emmy Smith
sedimentary geology, biostratigraphy and Earth history.

Daniel Viete
metamorphic petrology, structural geology and tectonics.

Benjamin Zaitchik
climate dynamics, surface hydrology.

Professors Emeriti

John M. Ferry
metamorphic geology.

George W. Fisher
global earth systems and religious ethics.

Bruce D. Marsh
igneous petrology and geophysics.

David R. Veblen
crystallography.

Research/Teaching Faculty

Rebecca Kelly
Associate Teaching Professor: global change and sustainability.

Alexios Monopolis
Senior Lecturer: global change and sustainability.

Richard Stolarski
Research Professor: atmospheric chemistry.

Katalin Szlavecz
Research Professor: soil ecology.

Joint Appointments

Jocelyne DiRuggiero
Associate Research Professor, Biology.

Ciaran Harman
Assistant Professor, Geography and Environmental Engineering.

Michael Harrower
Assistant Professor, Near Eastern Studies.

Kevin J. Hemker
Professor, Mechanical Engineering.

Takeru Igusa
Professor, Civil Engineering.

K.T. Ramesh
Professor, Mechanical Engineering.

Kenneth Rose
Professor, Functional Anatomy and Evolution.