East Asian Studies

http://krieger.jhu.edu/east-asian/

The East Asian Studies major is interdisciplinary and interdepartmental. Its primary purpose is to introduce undergraduates to the knowledge, language skills, and research methods they will need to enter various academic and professional paths relating to China, Japan, and Korea. Majors in East Asian Studies engage in intensive Chinese, Japanese and/or Korean language study through the Center for Language Education and work with faculty on such topics as China in the global economy, nationalism in East Asia, Korean identity and culture, modern Japanese history and politics, Chinese urban history, and women in East Asia. Students are encouraged to pursue original research projects in East Asia with the support of intersession and summer travel grants, stipends for conference presentations, a senior thesis honors option, and seminars that bring together research scholars, faculty, graduate students and undergraduates in a manner that is distinctly Hopkins. Alumni of the program are making their mark around the world in business and finance, academia, law, international development, medicine and public health, engineering, media, public service, and the arts.

Hopkins in Tokyo

In fall 2012, a full-year undergraduate exchange program began with the University of Tokyo, and it is off to a great start. This new study abroad program was designed with Hopkins' East Asian Studies majors and Japanese language students in mind. As with other departmental study abroad programs at Hopkins, students’ credits and grades will be transferred between the two universities.

This is a direct exchange program between our universities, rather than a program run by Hopkins. For each Hopkins student who attends the University of Tokyo, one University of Tokyo student will attend Hopkins. Each Hopkins student has a Japanese student as his/her personal tutor. The tutors assist students in both academic matters and in daily life.

Limited to 1-3 students per year, admission to the University of Tokyo program is competitive. Students must have completed 4 semesters of college-level Japanese or the equivalent, have a term GPA of 3.0 or above, and submit two faculty references, one of which should be from a Japanese language instructor. For more information and application instructions, visit krieger.jhu.edu/east-asian/study-abroad/hopkins-in-tokyo/

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Hopkins Waseda University: Global Leadership Program

The aim of the Global Leadership Program (GLP) is to identify students of promise in multiple fields of study and promote their development as leaders in a world of ever-changing demands and opportunities.  10-15 Fellows from top-ranked U.S. universities will join another 10-15 Waseda Fellows in this U.S.-Japan "Zemi", a unique Japanese-style collaborative seminar and small-group pedagogical method.  Students will take classes and conduct join research projects.  This program is for the academic year and does not require prior knowledge of Japanese language.  Admission to the program is limited to two JHU students per year and is competitive.  For more information and application instructions, visit http://krieger.jhu.edu/east-asian/study-abroad/waseda-university-exchange-program/.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

(See also Requirements of a Bachelor's Degree.)

The curriculum of the East Asian Studies major consists of a balanced mixture of language and area studies.

Students select from among three discipline-based focus areas - history, political science, or sociology - or create an individualized focus area. In addition to solid language training and content courses about the region, EAS majors receive training in the methods and theory of the particular academic discipline they select as a focus area. If they choose, East Asian Studies majors may double major in International Studies, as the requirements of each of the three focus areas overlap with those of International Studies. The individualized focus area requires consultation and approval of the director of undergraduate studies. 

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

One East Asian Survey Course *
AS.100.243China: Neolithic to Song3
or AS.100.347 Early Modern China
or AS.100.348 20th-Century China
Three Additional East Asian Studies Courses
Two East Asian Studies courses at any level6
One East Asian Studies course at the 300- or 400-level3
East Asian Foreign Language
Four courses in an East Asian Language at any level
Two courses in an East Asian Language at the third-year level or higher **
One Focus Area - History, Political Science, Sociology, or History of Science and Technology
History focus area
AS.100.193Undergraduate Seminar In History3
AS.100.194Undergraduate Seminar in History3
One East Asian history course at any level3
One East Asian history course at the 300- or 400-level3
Political Science focus area
Two core courses at the 100- or 200-level; in two of the following subfields - American Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations, or Political Theory.6
One East Asian political science or sociology courses at any level3
One East Asian political science or sociology course at the 300- or 400-level3
Sociology focus area
One East Asian sociology or political science course at any level3
One East Asian sociology or political science course at the 300- or 400-level3
Select two of the following:
AS.230.101Introduction to Sociology3-4
or AS.230.202 Research Methods for the Social Sciences
or AS.230.205 Introduction to Social Statistics
or AS.230.213 Social Theory
History of Science and Technology focus area
Two survey courses from the following list:
AS.140.105History of Medicine3
or AS.140.106 History of Modern Medicine
or AS.140.301 History of Science: Antiquity To Renaissance
or AS.140.302 Rise Of Modern Science
or AS.140.321 Scientific Revolution
Two upper level East Asian courses from the following list:
AS.140.305From the Compass to Androids: History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Asia3
or AS.140.398 Godzilla and Fukushima: Japanese Environment in History and Films
or AS.140.346 History of Chinese Medicine
or AS.140.146 History of Public Health in East Asia
Courses taught by professors Yulia Frumer, Marta Hanson, and Yumi Kim may be applicable even if not coded AS.140, pending permission.
Individualized focus
Requires approval of the EAS director. Focus requirements to be determined in consultation with the director.

Sample Plan of Study

The plan below assumes the student begins language study in Chinese at JHU.

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.373.115First Year Chinese4.5AS.373.116First Year Chinese II4.5
East Asian Studies course at any level3 
  7.5  4.5
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.373.215Second Year Chinese4.5AS.373.216Second Year Chinese II4.5
Focus area requirement3Required survey course3
 Focus area requirement3
  7.5  10.5
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.373.315Third Year Chinese3.5AS.373.316Third Year Chinese II3.5
Focus area requirement3East Asian Studies course at 300-400 level3
  6.5  6.5
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
East Asian Studies course at any level3Focus area requirement3
Additional language study (optional) Additional language study (optional) 
  3  3
Total Credits: 49

Honors

  • Honors in the major may be earned by maintaining a GPA of 3.7 in the major and writing a senior honors thesis by taking a two-semester seminar, AS.310.431 Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies and AS.310.432 Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies. The thesis seminar is a total of six credits and may count toward two of the required EAS courses.

Other Departmental Requirements

No major requirements may be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.  All courses required for the major must be passed with a grade of C- or  higher. The University encourages students enrolled in this program to take advantage of foreign study options. Courses and programs must be pre-approved by the student's East Asian Studies advisor.

Transfer credit policy: Up to six classes may be transferred from study abroad programs or other schools upon approval of the major advisor.

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For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.310.106. Introduction to Korean History and Culture. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers a comprehensive overview of Korean history and culture from ancient times to the modern era. Through primary, secondary, and audio-visual sources, students will become familiar not only with the overall contours of the entirety of Korean history, but also with its cultural and religious legacy. The course combines lectures and class discussions.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.108. Introduction to Chinese Fiction and Drama. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce Chinese fiction and drama from the Tang dynasty (618-906) to the early Republican period (1911-1949), such as the romantic dramas of Tang Xianzu and the uncanny tales of Pu Songling. Students will draw connection between these vibrant literary genres and the cultural and socio-historical events that shaped imperial China. Key topics include story-telling, romance, urban culture, gender, reincarnation, and many more. Students will acquire skills in how to read, analyze and discuss the rich legacy of Chinese fiction and drama in translation and to think critically about these writings. Reading materials are all in English.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.114. Introduction to East Asian Religions. 3.0 Credits.

This survey course explores the ideas and practices of various East Asian religious traditions. It covers not only major religious teachings – Confucianism, Buddhism, Daoism, and Shinto – but also touches upon other folkloric traditions, such as shamanism, in order to understand the rich diversity of East Asian religions. Using a variety of methodologies such as art history, literature, history, and anthropology and materials such as paintings, tales, and historical documents, students will be introduced to the doctrines and practices of major religious traditions, as well as themes relating to family, gender, the nation state building, and imperialism.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.115. Ghost Tales from China and Japan, 14th-19th Centuries. 3.0 Credits.

We cannot express our own experience of death – only imagine life after death. How did people in the past conceptualize the world of the dead? Ghost tales will teach us what we imagine as the experience of dead and life after death. This course aims to introduce students to a variety of ghost stories in Late Imperial China and Tokugawa Japan and connect their literary imagination of the dead to the cultural, socio-historical, and religious context of each society as well as to the broad East Asian tradition of supernatural narratives. While we also touch upon earlier traditions on narrating the dead, most of the stories in class readings are from the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties of China, and the Tokugawa period (1600-1868) of Japan. Key issues include family, gender, sexuality, body, medicine and many more. Although we will also take a look at visual and theatrical representations of the dead, we will primarily focus on literary texts about ghostly phenomena. Film screenings required. All readings are in English.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.117. Love and Illusion in Japanese Literature. 3.0 Credits.

This course aims to introduce students to a variety of literary texts featuring love and illusion from the 12th to the 21st century Japan. We will explore how enchantment and disenchantment play in the literary imagination of romantic love within Japanese literary history. The target texts cover a wide range of literary products from medieval noh drama to the modern novelist Izumi Kyoka’s gothic tales and further to a contemporary Murakami Haruki’s novella. By reading a variety of narrative forms such as diary literature, drama, epic, poetry, and modern fiction, we will examine changing ideas about marriage, love, sexuality, religion, and modernity within the literary discourse.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.118. Japanese Popular Culture. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine Japanese popular culture as a way to discuss contemporary Japanese society. We will investigate a wide range of cultural products – from literature, anime and manga to theater, music, fashion and food – and question how these items are created, circulated, and consumed in Japanese society as well as by individuals. Since many Japanese cultural products also quickly move beyond the national borders in the age of globalization, we will also discuss the global consumption of Japanese popular culture. Topics include gender, sexuality, family, fan community, global capitalism, mass media, race and power. Film screenings and group projects are required. Reading materials are all in English.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.200. Economic Growth and Development in East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

The course offers an overview of the complexities of East Asia’s development experience from a variety of perspectives, and it is divided into three parts to allow students to develop expertise in one or more countries and/or policy arenas, while also cultivating a broad grasp of the region and the distinct challenges of “East Asia fast-paced, sustained economic growth.”. Part I considers the origins of Asian economic development, analyses the common economic variables behind the region’s success, looks at the East Asian financial crisis and its lessons and assesses whether or not East Asian countries have learned them. Part II will focus on the development experiences of individual countries, with an emphasis on the ASEAN economies, NIEs, Japan and China. Part III considers topics of special interest to Asia, including trends toward greater regional economic cooperation, both in the real and financial/monetary sectors, and issues related to poverty, migration, and inclusiveness.
Instructor(s): G. Dore
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.201. Freshman Seminar: Korean History through Film and Literature. 3.0 Credits.

In this course, students will engage with select topics in Korean history from premodern and modern times and examine how the past has been represented through various forms of film and literature. This will be combined with readings of academic articles to allow students to gauge the distance between scholarship and cultural expressions of history. Through this, students will be introduced to the highly contested and often polarizing nature of Korean history and the competition surrounding historical memory.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.205. Music in East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

This survey course focuses on music in modern East Asia. By exploring historical and ethnographic works by scholars in ethnomusicology, history, and anthropology, this course examines traditional, contemporary, and popular musical and theatrical genres. Through case studies, we will discuss major topics—including nationalism, modernity, ethnicity, gender, colonialism, and globalization—of modern East Asia, ranging from Japan, South Korea, North Korea, China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, to Asian diasporas. This course aims to enhance students’ cross-cultural understanding, interdisciplinary approach to performance, and critical thinking on the concepts of “East Asia” and “performance.”
Instructor(s): P. Tse
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.206. Film and Performing Arts in China: 1949–present. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores Chinese film, music, and theater in post-1949 China. Through discussing scholarly works in history, theater, ethnomusicology, and film studies, students will be exposed to interdisciplinary approach to engaging with film, traditional theater (xiqu), instrumental music, and popular music in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Chinese diasporas. We will examine issues including nationalism, cultural hegemony, modernity, invented tradition, cultural policy, class, and gender. Supplemented by case studies, this course is organized around two overarching questions: how does film and performing arts inform us about the social history of China? How is expressive culture utilized in political agendas in the modern China
Instructor(s): P. Tse
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.301. Documentary Photography in a Changing China. 3.0 Credits.

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).
Instructor(s): G. He
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.302. Human Rights in China and U.S. Policy: Advocacy Opportunities and Challenges. 3.0 Credits.

This interactive seminar will explore domestic human rights issues in China and U.S. policy toward China on human rights. In addition to learning about the broader landscape of human rights issues and related challenges in China, students will select a specific human rights issue to focus on during the course. As a practice-oriented seminar, students will develop advocacy skills that will enable them to effectively “make the case” for why the Administration and Congress should press China on the topic they’ve selected.
Instructor(s): A. Worden
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.305. Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy. 3.0 Credits.

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.
Instructor(s): M. Ott
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.306. Domestic Politics of Contemporary China. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to China's contemporary political history and current political system. It helps students develop a critical understanding of China's governance institutions and processes, political economy, and state-society relations. The course focuses primarily on China's domestic politics but also covers China's changing role in Asia and the world.
Instructor(s): Y. Yang
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.307. Governance and Politics in China. 3.0 Credits.

A dramatic rise of popular protests in China today has spurred lively discussions about the causes, dynamics, and impact of these protests. This course will provide students with an opportunity to understand these issues by discussing the social, institutional and cultural background of protests, major forms of protest, social groups involved, government responses, and social implications of various kinds of protests. The first part of the course will explore significant socio-economic changes since 1978 and the effects of these changes on China’s social structure and stratification. This part will also examine changes in governance and political systems in the reform era and review important theories of contentious politics. The second part will examine protests by distinct social groups, including peasants, workers, homeowners, and ethnic minority groups, pro-democratic activists, among others. This part will identify similarities and differences in the demands and actions of different groups, introduce the major forms of popular resistance, and explore how the state deals with them accordingly. The course will conclude with discussion of the outcomes of social protests in China and make a cross-national comparison between protests in China and other authoritarian states. By taking China as an example, this course will enhance students’ knowledge about forms of popular contention and government responses in an authoritarian regime as well as help students develop analytical and critical thinking skills with regard to contentious politics.
Instructor(s): Y. Li
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.308. The Frontier in Late Imperial China. 3.0 Credits.

The tremendous expansion of Chinese frontiers during the late imperial period forced the state and those who lived within it to grapple with complex problems of governance, ethnicity, and the geographic extent of "China". Issues and concerns associated with the massive Chinese frontiers have extended into the present; hence, no one can appreciate the current problems plaguing China's northwestern, southwestern, or coastal regions without an understanding of its historical antecedents. This seminar is designed to introduce major scholarly works and theoretical frameworks on the Chinese frontier.
Instructor(s): J. Bandy
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.309. Monsters, Demons, and Ghosts: Folklore and Festival in Japan. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines popular narratives and festivals from historical through contemporary Japan. Rather than traditional sources (canonical works, philosophical doctrines, and high art), it focuses on non-elite modes of expression: oral histories, epic tales, local legends, stories of the supernatural, music, religious festivals, manga, anime, and film. Through analyses of these mediums, students explore the underlying belief structures that have shaped ideas concerning death and the afterlife, moral ethics, and the spiritual realm in Japan. The course also tackles issues concerning the intellectual construct of the ‘folk’ and folk religion. Who are the folk? How does this concept relate to regional versus national identity, civilized versus so-called primitive populations, premodern versus modern categories? Students will engage these questions through active discussions in the classroom, in-class writing exercises, mini-presentations, and two papers.
Instructor(s): C. Carter
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.310. Shamans, She-Devils, and Pilgrims: Women & Gender in East Asian Religions. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the complexities of gender and the role that women have played in the religions of China, Korea, and Japan. It explores two main types of content: 1) religious discourse on women and gender through doctrines, scriptures, narratives, myths, and legends; and 2) the practices, beliefs, and lives of real women through historical cases, including those of nuns, laity, sovereigns and family members. Organized in chronological order, the course begins with early sources across East Asia and finishes in contemporary times. Readings and assignments emphasize the analysis of primary sources, complemented by secondary works for historical and cultural context. Students will end the course with a research paper focused on a topic of their choice.
Instructor(s): C. Carter
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.312. Masterpieces of Chinese Literature: Song through 20th Century, a Literature-in-Translation class. 3.0 Credits.

In the millennium from the Song Dynasty (960-1280) to the modern era court poets and master storytellers, eccentric misfits and satiric novelists, as well as courtesans and film makers all considered a complex and changing China. We will look at the masterpieces of this millennium, examining both text and cultural context. In examining the texts we will rely on close reading in order to develop sound critical interpretations. We will also place the text in cultural context, considering the multiple forces--political, economic, artistic and religious-- that shaped the lives of these writers and the cultures they observed.
Instructor(s): V. Cass
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.315. First Year Classical Chinese, First Semester. 3.0 Credits.

Readings in prose and poetic texts of the pre-Qin period. Class emphasizes language acquisition, especially grammar and vocabulary memorization. In addition we will read and discuss works in western languages that treat the culture and writers of the Ancient period. Biweekly quizzes included. A final translation project required. Recommended Course Background: 2 years mandarin or the equivalent.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.316. First Year Classical Chinese: Language and Literature of the Ancient Period. 3.0 Credits.

Readings in prose and poetic texts of the Zhou and Han Dynasties. Class emphasizes language acquisition, especially grammar and vocabulary memorization. In addition we will read and discuss works in western languages that treat the culture and writers of the Ancient period. Quizzes and Tests (Midterm and Final) will cover both language and cultural data. A short paper also required.
Instructor(s): V. Cass
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.352. Current Issues in US-Asia Relations: A Practitioner's View. 3.0 Credits.

We will examine how major political events, players, norms and institutions have shaped US-Asia relations in the modern era.
Instructor(s): W. Konishi
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.401. Authoritarianism, Democracy, and Economic Development: Korea, Indonesia, and Myanmar. 3.0 Credits.

The East Asia’s “miracle growth” has not gone hand in hand with a decisive move toward democracy. This seminar explores the reasons why democratization proceeds slowly in East Asia, and seems to be essentially decoupled from the region’s fast-paced economic growth and development, and it is divided into three parts. Part I introduces the specifics of East Asia’s economic development strategies as well as key concepts of democracy, authoritarianism and military rule and the tensions between these theories and the East Asian experience. Part II will focus on the development experiences of Korea, Indonesia and Myanmar in light of what discussed in Part I of the seminar. The, Part III presents lessons emerging from the comparison of Korea’s, Indonesia’s and Myanmar’s developmental trajectories, and explore the role international organizations (e.g. ADB, EU, IMF, WB etc.) played in those choices.
Instructor(s): G. Dore
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.402. Labor Politics in China. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).
Instructor(s): G. He; J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.431. Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies. 3.0 Credits.

Students may earn honors in the East Asian Studies major by maintaining a 3.7 average in the major and completing a senior thesis by taking the year-long AS.310.431 & AS.310.432 Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies. Students are required to secure the mentorship of an adviser among the EAS faculty before asking for permission to enroll in the course.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.432. Senior Thesis Seminar: East Asian Studies. 3.0 Credits.

This course is the continuation of Senior Thesis Course AS.360.431 for students completing their thesis in the East Asian Studies program.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.501. Independent Study - East Asia. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Students carry out an independent research project involving East Asia.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe.

AS.310.592. Summer Internship. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): W. Rowe.

AS.310.600. Advanced Topics in East Asian Studies.

This interdisciplinary seminar gives graduate students in East Asian Studies opportunities to present and receive comments on their dissertation chapters, prospectuses, conference papers, and/or potential publications.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Cross Listed Courses

History of Art

AS.010.103. Introduction to the Art of Asia. 3.0 Credits.

A survey of the art and architecture of Asia, from the ancient world to the present and including the Indian subcontinent, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.211. Monuments of Asia. 3.0 Credits.

An examination of selected architectural monuments from across Asia, including the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and Korea. Ancient to contemporary.
Instructor(s): R. Brown
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.305. Global Modern Art: Africa, Asia, the Pacific and the Americas. 3.0 Credits.

Artists around the world grappled with the modern, working through local concerns and struggles but continually engaged with counterparts in Europe, North America, and across the “global South.” This course will introduce art, artists, movements, and institutions of modernism from approximately 1880 to the present and from outside of the northern Atlantic while critically examining the very notion of “global modernism.”
Instructor(s): R. Brown
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Anthropology

AS.070.359. Korean War. 3.0 Credits.

This course takes the Korean War as a site to both explore: 1) contemporary historical and political transformations in East Asia and globally and 2) the ways in which violence, catastrophic loss, and separation are woven into everyday life. It will explore the Korean War through film, fiction, historiography, and draw on comparative materials in anthropology
Instructor(s): C. Han
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

History

AS.100.219. Chinese Cultural Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to trasform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revoltuion decade and since.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.236. Chinese Cultural Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. Previously offered as AS.100.219.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.243. China: Neolithic to Song. 3.0 Credits.

This class offers a broad overview of changes in China from Neolithic times through the Song Dynasty (roughly from 5000 BCE through the 13th century CE) and will include discussion of art, material culture, and literature as well as politics and society. Close readings of primary sources in discussion sections and extensive use of visual material in lectures will help students gain firsthand perspective on the materials covered. Not open to students who have previously taken AS.100.208. Cross listed with East Asian Studies
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.248. Japan in the World. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.
Instructor(s): H. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.330. National Identity in 20th Century China & Japan. 3.0 Credits.

Using primary sources, including literature and film, we will explore the changing ways in which ideologues, intellectuals, and ordinary citizens defined national identity in 20th century China and Japan.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.347. Early Modern China. 3.0 Credits.

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.348. 20th-Century China. 3.0 Credits.

The history of China from the last years of the Qing Empire to the post-Mao reforms.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.381. Religion, Medicine, and the Mind in Japan. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores the relationship between religion and medicine in treating disorders of the mind and soul throughout Japanese history. We will consider such topics as animal spirit possession, Buddhism, family-based care, psychotherapy, gender, and social withdrawal.
Instructor(s): H. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.385. Mobility and Encounter in the Medieval Indian Ocean. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar discusses forms of mobility and exchange- trade and travel, conquest and religious transformation, diasporas and migration, the spread of practices and technologies- across the Indian Ocean from the 8th to 16th centuries.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.398. Images of Postwar Japan. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores Japan’s changing place in the world in the decades following World War II, with an emphasis on analyzing visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, and comic books. Topics include relations with the U.S. and other countries in East Asia, particularly the two Koreas; the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and the global contexts for an expanding Japanese consumerism in the late 20th century.
Instructor(s): H. Kim.

AS.100.411. Readings in the History of Public Health in the 20th and 21st Centuries. 3.0 Credits.

The students will read major and some minor works in the history of global public health and will each develop their own concept of how and why the major institutions, professions, and practices associated with public health have evolved over the past long century. To help the students focus on their ideas, they will write three essays on particular aspects of the history.
Instructor(s): L. Galambos
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.422. Society & Social Change in 18th Century China. 3.0 Credits.

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.423. Multiethnic Japan. 3.0 Credits.

An advanced undergraduate seminar on the intertwined histories of race, ethnicity, and empire in Japan and its former colonies from the early twentieth century to the present.
Instructor(s): H. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.424. Women & Modern Chinese History. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas. Cross listed with East Asian Studies.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.437. Late Imperial China: History and Fantasy. 3.0 Credits.

Students in this seminar will look at the ways in which Chinese and Western scholars, novelists, film-makers, and artists have represented China’s Late Imperial period. We will look at the way foreigners have imagined China, and the ways in which Chinese writers past and present have fancifully, nostalgically, and inventively rendered their personal and national pasts. The course will explore issues of historical, geographical, and literary imagination. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.482. Historiography Mod China. 3.0 Credits.

A survey of assumptions and approaches in the study of modern Chinese history, as written by Chinese, Japanese, and Western historians.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.613. Modern Japanese and Korean Histories.

A reading seminar on the interconnected histories and historiographies of Japan and Korea in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Instructor(s): H. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.614. Seminar in Modern Chinese History.

A seminar covering major milestones in research on late imperial and modern Chinese history, primarily in English. Open to undergraduates with the permission of the instructor.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.733. Reading Qing Documents.

Open to advanced undergraduates with at least one semester of Classical Chinese. This course has several objectives. First and foremost, it is a hands on document reading class designed to familiarize students with the skills, sources, and reference materials necessary to conduct research in Qing history. To that end, we will spend much of our time reading documents. At the same time, we will engage in problem solving exercises designed to develop and enhance basic research skills. Finally, several important archive-based secondary works in the secondary literature are available on reserve for your reference. These works demonstrate the ways in which historians have recently applied archival skills (and materials).
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong.

AS.100.756. Reading Seminar in Chinese History.

A seminar covering recent work on late imperial and modern Chinese history, primarily in English.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

History of Science & Technology

AS.140.146. History of Public Health in East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the history of disease, epidemics, and public health responses in East Asia from the 17th-20th centuries. This public health history emphasizes the interactions, connections, and comparisons among China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.
Instructor(s): M. Hanson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.147. Chinese Medicine: Tradition and Modernity. 3.0 Credits.

Examine Chinese Medicine’s practical application as a therapy of increasing global popularity. While also examining its theoretical frameworks from antiquity to the present, healing methods such as acupuncture and herbal medicine are highlighted.
Instructor(s): J. Flowers
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.140.176. Public Health in East Asia Through Films & Documentaries. 1.0 Credit.

This course uses contemporary films and documentaries to address issues in public health in East Asia, past & present. Topics covered include medicine in turn-of-the-twentieth century Japan and China, revolutionary medicine, STDS, mental illness, HIV/AIDs in China, industrial pollution, the politics of universal health care insurance, and pandemics in East Asia.
Instructor(s): M. Hanson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.140.305. From the Compass to Androids: History of Science, Technology, and Medicine in Asia. 3.0 Credits.

The course explores the history and cultural context of science, medicine, and technology in East Asia, from the ancient Chinese science to the latest scientific and technological developments in Japan.
Instructor(s): Y. Frumer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.140.346. History of Chinese Medicine. 3.0 Credits.

Students will study the most recent anthropological, philosophical, and historical scholarship on medicine in traditional and modern Chinese society. They will approach the topic from several angles including medical pluralism, the range of healers, domestic and literate medicine, gender, emergence of new disciplines, public health and the history of disease. The course relies on secondary sources and primary sources in English translation. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies.
Instructor(s): M. Hanson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.357. Science Fiction Movies in the East and West. 3.0 Credits.

What is a science fiction (SF) movie? How did SF movies and developments in science and technology influence each other during the twentieth century? What is the use of SF movies for societies? And why are SF movies much more popular in some countries than in others? By watching and analyzing classic and contemporary SF movies from the US, the Soviet Union, Japan, China, and other countries, we will search for answers to these questions. Special emphasis will be given to analyzing how historical, political, and cultural environments in different countries have influenced the production and acceptance of SF movies.
Instructor(s): D. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.398. Godzilla and Fukushima: Japanese Environment in History and Films. 3.0 Credits.

Juxtaposing Japanese environmental history and its reflection in popular media, the course will explore the intersection between technology, environment, and culture. The course will be accompanied by relevant movie screenings.
Instructor(s): Y. Frumer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.665. History of Science and Technology in Asia.

Graduate level discussion of major historiography of science and technology in East Asia.
Instructor(s): Y. Frumer.

Political Science

AS.190.315. Asian American Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines issues of political identity, political incorporation, and political participation of Asian Americans. Themes include Asian American panethnicity, the struggle for immigration and citizenship, Asian American electoral politics, political activism and resistance since the 1960s, and the impact of Asian Americans on the politics of race and ethnicity in the United States.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.320. Politics Of East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

Examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. Topics include state-society relations, late development, nationalism, democratization, political culture, social movements, and globalization.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.330. Japanese Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese politics. Topics include nationalism, electoral politics, civil society, and immigration.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.341. Korean Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to the historical and institutional foundations of modern South Korean politics. Topics include nationalism, political economic development, civil society, globalization, and ROK-DPRK relations. (CP)
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.427. Political Economy of Japan and Korea. 3.0 Credits.

This upper-level seminar examines some of the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese and South Korean political economy. Topics include nationalism, gender politics, civil society, immigration, and US-Japan-South Korea trilateral relations.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.442. Civil Society. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores classic and contemporary debates on the concept of civil society and critically examines its analytical value in light of recent developments. Topics include the relationship between civil society, the state, and markets, the role of civil society in development and democratization, social capital, and global civil society. This course is open to graduate students from any discipline. Advanced undergraduate students must obtain permission from the instructor and are expected to keep up with graduate students during class discussions.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.612. Comparative Citizenship and Immigration Politics.

Graduate students only. Examines the contemporary political dynamics of migration, citizenship, and race concentrating on North America, Europe and East Asia. We will focus on how citizenship and immigration policies shape immigrant political identities, claims, and strategies as well as how immigrants impact public debates and policies in receiving societies.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Sociology

AS.230.166. Chinese Migration in Modern World History 1500's-2000's. 3.0 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course applies theories of economic sociology to examine the effects of Chinese overseas migration on modern world economy from the sixteenth century to the contemporary era. It examines the contribution of overseas Chinese to the development of capitalism in the following junctures: the East-West economic integration in the pre-modern era, China's modern transformation after the Opium War (1839-1842), the making of US national economy in the early twentieth century, as well as the postwar economic miracles in the Pacific Rim, among others. Special Note: Fufills History requirement for GSCD track students.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.175. Chinese Revolutions. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.217. Chinese Overseas in Global History. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the topics of Chinese overseas migration after the long sixteenth century. It investigates the following themes: First, the making of Chinese maritime frontier in the longterm trade and migration across the South China Sea and beyond; Second, economic functions of Chinese overseas networks in the East-West integration from the early modern era to the ongoing wave of globalization; Third, politics of identity and heritage in Chinese overseas communities. Course may not be taken by students that previously took AS.230.166.
Prerequisites: Course may not be taken by students that previously took AS.230.166.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.228. Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies. 3.0 Credits.

This course surveys the impacts of colonialism in East and Southeast Asia. Special attention will be paid to the social and economic development in British Singapore and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Korea and Taiwan. Topics include free-trade imperialism, colonial modernity, anticolonial movements, pan-Asianism, and post-war U.S. hegemony.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.275. Revolution, Reform and Social Inequality in China. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores various aspects of social inequality in China during the Mao Zedong and the post-Mao reform eras. We will examine inequality within villages, the rural/urban divide, urban inequality, education and health policies, and gender and ethnic inequality. Each of these issue areas will be tackled analytically, but the aim is also to understand what it was/is like to live in China during and after the Mao era. Formerly offered as AS.230.321.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.285. Maritime East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the transnational connections among merchants and migrants in the waters of East and Southeast Asia from a historical and comparative perspective. We will explore how diplomatic ties, long-distance trade and migration contributed to the making of cosmopolitan cities such as Quanzhou (Zayton), Malacca, Fort Zeelandia (Formosa), Batavia, Manila, Singapore and Hong Kong in the region from the tenth century onwards. The course will close with an examination of how the transnational connections are relevant to understand inter-state competition in Asia’s long twentieth century. Key subjects to be introduced include tribute trade system, trading diasporas, Euro-Chinese co-colonialism, pan-Asianism, as well as history and historiography of maritime silk road.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.336. Family, Gender and Sexuality in China. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines social changes in China since the beginning of the People’s Republic (1949) through the lenses of family, gender and sexuality. The first half of the course focuses on understanding family institutions, women’s status, gender relations and sexualities in connection with major historical transitions between 1949 and the present. The second half includes readings and discussions around several thematic topics regarding family, gender and sexuality in contemporary China in the broader context of politics, economy, and social norms.
Instructor(s): Y. Dong
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.351. Capitalism, Development and Resistance in South Korea. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the trajectory of capitalist development in South Korea (hereafter, Korea) in the twentieth and the early twenty-first centuries. We will examine debates around the political economy of development in Korea as well as class formation and social and labor protest. This course is designed to help students explore the dynamics of capitalist development and workers’ movements in Korea as a case of late development in the global South. The course also draws on theoretical perspectives and methodological tools from comparative and world-historical sociology to better understand the Korean case.
Instructor(s): M. Kang
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.352. Chinese Diaspora: Networks and Identity. 3.0 Credits.

This course combines lecture and class discussion. It examines the history and historiography of Chinese overseas migration. Major issues include overseas Chinese as “merchants without empire,” Chinese exclusion acts in the age of mass migration, the “Chinese question” in postcolonial Southeast Asia, as well as the making and unmaking of Chinese identity in the current wave of globalization.
Prerequisites: Students may not have completed AS.230.217 previously.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.377. Colonialism and Anti-Colonialism. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism and anti-colonial movements. It focuses on the establishment of the colonial division of labor, comparative colonialism, identity formation, and nationalism as well as anti-colonial movement.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.415. Social Problems in Contemporary China. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will examine contemporary Chinese society, looking at economic development, rural transformation, urbanization and migration, labor relations, changes in class structure and family organization, health care, environmental problems, governance, and popular protest. The course is designed for both graduate and undergraduate students. Undergraduates must have already completed a course about China at Hopkins. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.435. The China Boom. 3.0 Credits.

This course addresses the origins, global impacts, and demise of China’s economic ascendancy as a world economic and political powerhouse at the turn of the twenty-first century. The course will cover the historical origins of the China boom and impacts of the boom on global political economic order. It will also address the social-political imbalances within China that contribute to the global financial crisis and recent slowdown of the Chinese economy. Particular topics include late imperial and Maoist legacies’ relation to contemporary economic growth, stages of China’s capitalist development, China’s outward investment in the developing world, formation and limits of US-China economic symbiosis, and China’s participation in global governance, among others.
Instructor(s): H. Hung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality

AS.363.328. Beyond the Global West: Gender/Sexuality, Post-colonialism & Global Capitalism: Feminist Inquiries from Asian Perspectives. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines gender and sexuality issues in both East and South Asian Societies and situates subject matters in the broader contexts of post-colonialism, state formation, revolution and global capitalism.
Instructor(s): Y. Dong
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Center for Language Education

AS.373.111. First Year Heritage Chinese. 3.5 Credits.

This course is designed for students who were raised in an environment in which Chinese is spoken by parents or guardians at home and for those who are familiar with the language and possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course therefore focuses on reading and writing (including the correct use of grammar). Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Instructor(s): N. Zhao; R. Hsieh.

AS.373.112. First Year Heritage Chinese II. 3.0 Credits.

For students who have significant previously-acquired ability to understand and speak Modern Standard Chinese. Course focuses on reading and writing. Teaching materials are the same as used in AS.373.115-116; however, both traditional and simplified versions of written Chinese characters are used. Lab required. Continuation of AS.373.111. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.111 or permission required.
Prerequisites: AS.373.111 or or instructor permission
Instructor(s): N. Zhao.

AS.373.115. First Year Chinese. 4.5 Credits.

This course is designed primarily for students who have no prior exposure to Chinese. The objective of the course is to help students build a solid foundation of the four basic skills---listening, speaking, reading, and writing in an interactive and communicative learning environment. The emphasis is on correct pronunciation, accurate tones and mastery of basic grammatical structures. Note: Students with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Students may choose to attend either lecture at 12pm or 3pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Instructor(s): J. Chen; N. Zhao; Y. Chen.

AS.373.116. First Year Chinese II. 4.5 Credits.

Introductory course in Modern Standard Chinese. Goals: mastery of elements of pronunciation and control of basic vocabulary of 800-900 words and most basic grammatical patterns. Students work first with Pin-Yin system, then with simplified version of written Chinese characters. Continuation of AS.373.115. Note: Student with existing demonstrable skills in spoken Chinese should take AS.373.111-112. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.115 or permission required.
Prerequisites: AS.373.115 or instructor permission]
Instructor(s): J. Chen; L. Yin; N. Zhao; Y. Chiang.

AS.373.211. Second Year Heritage Chinese. 3.5 Credits.

This course is designed for students who finished AS.373.112 with C+ and above (or equivalent). Students in this course possess native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking. The course focuses on reading and writing. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Prerequisites: AS.373.112 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): A. Chen
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.212. Second Year Heritage Chinese II. 3.0 Credits.

For students who have significant previously-acquired ability to understand and speak Modern Standard Chinese. Course focuses on reading and writing. Teaching materials are the same as used in AS.373.115-116; however, both traditional and simplified versions of written Chinese characters are used. Continuation of AS.373.211. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.211 or permission required.
Prerequisites: AS.373.211 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): A. Chen
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.215. Second Year Chinese. 4.5 Credits.

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Prerequisites: AS.373.116 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): A. Chen; L. Yin
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.216. Second Year Chinese II. 4.5 Credits.

Consolidation of the foundation that students have laid in their first year of study and continued drill and practice in the spoken language, with continued expansion of reading and writing vocabulary and sentence patterns. Students will work with both simplified and traditional characters. Note: Students who have native-like abilities in comprehension and speaking should take AS.373.211-212. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.215 or Permission Required. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Prerequisites: AS.373.215 or instructor permission.
Instructor(s): A. Chen; J. Yin
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.313. Third Year Heritage Chinese. 3.0 Credits.

This course is designed for those who have already taken AS.373.212 or equivalent. Students need to have native-level fluency in speaking and understanding Chinese. The course focuses on reading and writing. In addition to the textbooks, downloaded articles on current affairs may also be introduced on a regular basis. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Prerequisites: Prereq: AS.373.211 AND AS.373.212 or instructor's permission
Instructor(s): L. Yin
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.314. Third Year Heritage Chinese II. 3.0 Credits.

This course is a continuation of AS.373.313. Students need to have native-level fluency in speaking and understanding Chinese. The course focuses on reading and writing. In addition to the textbooks, downloaded articles on current affairs may also be included on a regular basis. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.313 or Permission Required. Lab required.
Prerequisites: AS.373.313 or equivalent
Instructor(s): J. Yin
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.315. Third Year Chinese. 3.5 Credits.

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible and written assignments will be given. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Prerequisites: AS.373.216 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): A. Chen
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.316. Third Year Chinese II. 3.5 Credits.

This two-semester course consolidates and further expands students' knowledge of grammar and vocabulary and further develops reading ability through work with textbook material and selected modern essays and short stories. Class discussions will be in Chinese insofar as feasible, and written assignments will be given. Continuation of AS.373.315. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.315 or permission required.
Prerequisites: AS.373.315 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): A. Chen
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.415. Fourth Year Chinese. 3.0 Credits.

This course is designed for students who finished AS.373.316 with a C+ or above (or equivalent). Readings in modern Chinese prose, including outstanding examples of literature, newspaper articles, etc. Students are supposed to be able to understand most of the readings with the aid of a dictionary, so that class discussion is not focused primarily on detailed explanation of grammar. Discussion, to be conducted in Chinese, will concentrate on the cultural significance of the readings' content. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Prerequisites: AS.373.316 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.416. Fourth Year Chinese II. 3.0 Credits.

Continuation of AS.373.415. Readings in modern Chinese prose, including outstanding examples of literature, newspaper articles, etc. Students should understand most of the readings with the aid of a dictionary, so that class discussion need not focus primarily on detailed explanations of grammar. Discussion, to be conducted in Chinese, will concentrate on the cultural significance of the readings' content. Recommended Course Background: AS.373.415 or Permission Required. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Prerequisites: AS.373.415 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): L. Yin
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.451. Topics in Chinese Media. 3.0 Credits.

The main focus of this course is to expand the student's knowledge of four essential skills in Chinese language and to deepen the student's knowledge of Chinese culture. The course is taught based on various written and visual materials (including newspapers, journals, TV, movies, and short novels) to improve students’ reading comprehension, maintain conversation skills through class discussion, increase understanding of the culture and society of China, and enhance writing ability through short compositions and a writing project. Recommended Course Background: Completion of four years of Chinese language or permission required.
Instructor(s): N. Zhao
Area: Humanities.

AS.373.491. 5th Year Chinese. 3.0 Credits.

Fifth Year Chinese is designed for students who finished fourth year regular or third year heritage Chinese course at JHU or its equivalent and wish to achieve a higher advanced proficiency level in Chinese. The goal of the course is to help students further develop their listening, speaking, reading and writing skills cohesively and to enhance students’ understanding of Chinese culture and society through language learning.
Prerequisites: AS.373.416 or AS.373.314 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): N. Zhao.

AS.378.115. First Year Japanese. 4.5 Credits.

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 150 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in AS.373.215. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Student may choose to attend either lecture at 10:30 am or 12 pm on TTh. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Instructor(s): M. Johnson; S. Katagiri.

AS.378.116. First Year Japanese II. 4.5 Credits.

This course is designed for students who have no background or previous knowledge in Japanese. The course consists of lectures on Tuesday/Thursday and conversation classes on Monday/Wednesdays/Fridays. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as familiarity with aspects of Japanese culture. By the end of the fall term, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar items, reading and writing skills, and a recognition and production of approximately 60 kanji in context. Knowledge of grammar will be expanded significantly in 2nd year Japanese. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115
Prerequisites: Prereq: AS.378.115 or instructor permission.
Instructor(s): M. Johnson; S. Katagiri.

AS.378.215. Second Year Japanese. 4.5 Credits.

Training in spoken and written language, increasing their knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115 and AS.378.116 or equivalent.
Prerequisites: AS.378.116 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): M. Nakao
Area: Humanities.

AS.378.216. Second Year Japanese II. 4.5 Credits.

Continuation of Beginning Japanese and Intermediate Japanese I. Training in spoken and written language, increasing students' knowledge of more complex patterns. At completion, students will have a working knowledge of about 250 Kanji. Lab required. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.215 or equivalent.
Prerequisites: Prereq: AS.378.215 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): M. Nakao
Area: Humanities.

AS.378.315. Third Year Japanese. 3.0 Credits.

Emphasis shifts toward reading, while development of oral-aural skills also continues apace. The course presents graded readings in expository prose and requires students to expand their knowledge of Kanji, grammar, and both spoken and written vocabulary. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Prerequisites: AS.378.215 AND AS.378.216 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): M. Nakao
Area: Humanities.

AS.378.316. Third Year Japanese II. 3.0 Credits.

Emphasis shifts toward reading, while development of oral-aural skills also continues apace. The course presents graded readings in expository prose and requires students to expand their knowledge of Kanji, grammar, and both spoken and written vocabulary. Lab required. Continuation of AS.378.315. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.315 or equivalent.
Prerequisites: AS.378.315 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): M. Nakao
Area: Humanities.

AS.378.396. Fundamentals of Japanese Grammar. 2.0 Credits.

This course is designed for students who have already studied 1st-year Japanese grammar and wish to develop a thorough knowledge of Japanese grammar in order to advance all aspects of language skills to a higher level. It is also appropriate for graduate students who need to be able to read materials written in Japanese. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.115-116 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): M. Johnson
Area: Humanities.

AS.378.415. Fourth Year Japanese. 3.0 Credits.

By using four skills in participatory activities (reading, writing, presentation, and discussion), students will develop reading skills in modern Japanese and deepen and enhance their knowledge on Kanji and Japanese culture. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.315 and AS.378.316 or equivalent.
Prerequisites: AS.378.316 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): M. Nakao; S. Katagiri
Area: Humanities.

AS.378.416. Fourth Year Japanese II. 3.0 Credits.

By using four skills in participatory activities (reading, writing, presentation, and discussion), students will develop reading skills in modern Japanese and deepen and enhance their knowledge on Kanji and Japanese culture. Lab required. Recommended Course Background: AS.378.415
Prerequisites: AS.378.415 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): M. Nakao; S. Katagiri
Area: Humanities.

AS.378.611. Readings in Japanese Studies.

This course is designed for graduate students (in East Asian Studies, Public Health, History of Medicine, History,etc.) and undergraduate students with a strong interest in improving Japanese reading skills. The main goal of the course is to learn strategies for reading and comprehending materials written in Japanese without using a dictionary. Specific strategies and techniques are introduced, followed by practice. Class materials include a broad spectrum of native materials, including novels, newspapers, scholarly articles, essays, historical papers, and so forth. A diverse range of articles and essays are selected to introduce and enforce various ways of reading Japanese effectively. 2 credits for undergraduate students.
Instructor(s): M. Johnson
Area: Humanities.

AS.380.101. First Year Korean. 4.5 Credits.

Introduces the Korean alphabet, hangeul. Covers basic elements of the Korean language, high-frequency words and phrases, including cultural aspects. Focuses on oral fluency reaching Limited Proficiency where one can handle simple daily conversations. No Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Instructor(s): J. Song; S. Lee.

AS.380.102. First Year Korean II. 3.0 Credits.

Focuses on improving speaking fluency to Limited Proficiency so that one can handle simple daily conversations with confidence. It provides basic high-frequency structures and covers Korean holidays. Continuation of AS.380.101. Recommended Course Background: AS.380.101 or permission required.
Prerequisites: AS.380.101 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): J. Song; S. Lee.

AS.380.201. Second Year Korean. 4.0 Credits.

Aims for improving oral proficiency and confident control of grammar with vocabulary building and correct spelling intended. Reading materials of Korean people, places, and societies will enhance cultural understanding and awareness. Project due on Korean cities. Existing demonstrable skills in spoken Korean preferred.
Prerequisites: AS.380.101 AND AS.380.102 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): S. Lee
Area: Humanities.

AS.380.202. Second Year Korean II. 3.0 Credits.

Aims for improving writing skills with correct spelling. Reading materials of Korean people, places, and societies will enhance cultural understanding and awareness, including discussion on family tree. Continuation of AS.380.201. Recommended Course Background: AS.380.201 or equivalent.
Prerequisites: AS.380.201 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): S. Lee
Area: Humanities.

AS.380.301. Third Year Korean. 3.0 Credits.

Emphasizes reading literacy in classic and modern Korean prose, from easy essays to difficult short stories. Vocabulary refinement and native-like grasp of grammar explored. Project due on Korean culture. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Prerequisites: AS.380.202 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): S. Lee
Area: Humanities.

AS.380.302. Third Year Korean II. 3.0 Credits.

Emphasizes reading literacy in classic and modern Korean prose. By reading Korean newspapers and professional articles in one’s major, it enables one to be well-versed and truly literate. Continuation of AS.380.301. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies Prerequisite: AS.380.301 or equivalent.
Prerequisites: AS.380.301 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): S. Lee
Area: Humanities.

AS.380.401. Fourth Year Korean. 2.0 Credits.

This course is designed for those who have finished AS 380.302 or beyond advanced mid level of competency in Korean in four skills. By dealing with various topics on authentic materials including news, articles on websites, short stories, this course aims to help students enhance not only linguistics knowledge and skills, but also current issues in Korea. It is expected that, by the end of the term, students will be able to discuss a variety of topics and express opinions fluently in both spoken and written language.
Prerequisites: AS.380.302 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): S. Lee
Area: Humanities.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://krieger.jhu.edu/east-asian/directory/

Faculty

Director

Tobie Meyer-Fong
(History)

Professors

Lingxin Hao
(Sociology)

William T. Rowe
(History)

Kellee S. Tsai
(Political Science)

Associate Professors

Joel Andreas
(Sociology)

Rebecca M. Brown
(History of Art)

Erin Chung
Associate Professor (Political Science)

Marta Hanson
(History of Medicine)

Ho-Fung Hung
(Sociology)

Assistant Professors

Yulia Frumer
(History of Science and Technology)

Hayang Yumi Kim
(Department of History)

Associated Faculty

Victoria Cass
Visiting Associate Professor (Humanities Center).

Weston Konishi
William Reinsch Visiting Lecturer in East Asian Studies

Marvin Ott
Lecturer, SAIS (Asian Studies)

Yuki Johnson
Teaching Professor and Director (Center for Language Education).

Aiguo Chen
Lecturer (Center for Language Education).

Satoko Katagiri
Lecturer (Center for Language Education).

Makiko Nakao
Lecturer (Center for Language Education).

Yoshimi Nagata
Lecturer, Japanese (Center for Language Education)

Soo Yun Lee
Lecturer, Korean (Center for Language Education)

Jin Yin
Lecturer, Chinese (Center for Language Education)

Lu Yin
Lecturer, Chinese (Center for Language Education)

Nan Zhao
Lecturer (Center for Language Education).

Lecturer

Huei-Ying Kuo
Senior Lecturer (Sociology)