History

http://history.jhu.edu/

The Department of History offers students the opportunity to work intensively in the classroom and with individual faculty to discover the richness and complexity of history. Undergraduates begin with general courses, but progress quickly to courses that explore topics in depth and provide experience in researching, analyzing, and writing about the past. Graduate students work independently and with faculty advisors on reading and research in their fields of interest, while departmental seminars bring them together to discuss their research, forging a collegial intellectual culture. The department emphasizes European history, United States history, and the histories of Africa, Latin America, and China. Faculty and students participate in a variety of interdisciplinary programs, including Africana Studies, East Asian Studies, Latin American Studies, Judaic Studies, Museums and Society, the Program for the Study of Women, Gender & Sexuality, and International Studies.

Facilities

In addition to the Milton S. Eisenhower Library at the university, students in the Department of History can use the collections of the Peabody Institute Library, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the Maryland Historical Society in Baltimore, and of the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the Folger Shakespeare Library, and other specialized libraries in nearby Washington, D.C. There is provision for regular transportation to and from the Library of Congress. Also within easy distance are the holdings of specialized historical libraries and archives in Annapolis, Richmond, Williamsburg, Charlottesville, Wilmington, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Trenton, Princeton, Newark, and New York.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

(Also see Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree.)

The Krieger School classifies history as both a social scientific and humanistic discipline.  This accords very well with the wide range of explanatory and interpretive approaches to the past that now prevail in the discipline of history.  One of the history program’s goals is to introduce students to these varied approaches.  Although the department offers strong preparation for students who seek to specialize in a particular cultural or geographic region, history at Johns Hopkins is primarily issue and topic oriented.  It also puts a premium on developing the capacity to reason comparatively and on deepening the student’s understanding of global connections among cultures in the past and in contemporary life.

The department offers undergraduate courses that range from large introductory classes to small, focused seminars that encourage intensive interaction with individual professors and with other students.  Beyond the introductory level, most of our courses are writing intensive and promote in all students critical reading skills and the ability to formulate effective written arguments. Through its core curriculum, the major also cultivates skills specific to the historian, especially research and writing based upon the systematic analysis of primary documents.

The program’s overall aim is to deepen the critical habits of mind that arise from the study of time and change. These capacities are the hallmarks of liberal learning, but they are also the foundation for success in post-graduate studies and careers of many kinds, including business, law, and public affairs.

Major in History

  • Students must earn a "C-" or higher grade in all courses used to satisfy major requirements, and may not count courses that are graded as satisfactory/unsatisfactory.
  • For students who choose to focus on one geographical area (Europe, United States, Latin America, Africa, Asia), two courses must be taken outside the student's area of focus.
  • Except for courses used to satisfy the foreign language proficiency requirement, no more than four courses offered outside the History department (AS.100.xxx) may be used to satisfy major requirements (e.g.: cross-listed, transfer, and study abroad courses). No more than two of these four courses may be offered outside the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences (usually summer transfer credit and/or study abroad courses).
MAJOR REQUIREMENTS
Introductory Courses (select one option):6
Two introductory history courses (AS.100.1xx)
-or-
One introductory history course (AS.100.1xx) + one "Freshman Seminar" (AS.100.200-229)
Method Requirement (All Majors)
AS.100.193Undergraduate Seminar In History3
AS.100.194Undergraduate Seminar in History3
Elective Courses
Two history courses at any level6
Four 300-level or higher history courses12
Additional Upper-Level Courses (select one option):
Two 300-level or higher history courses6
-or-
AS.100.507Senior Thesis 23
AS.100.508Senior Thesis 23
Foreign Language Requirement
Foreign language proficiency through the intermediate level 10-18
Total Credits42-60

Cognate Courses The History Department encourages interdisciplinary work in cognate fields of learning. History minors are therefore strongly advised to take additional courses in any department, including the History Department, that relate to the student’s major discipline in a historical way.

Sample Program of Study for History Majors

A sample path toward degree completion might include the following sequence of courses. Many alternative paths will also work. Please consult with your department advisor regarding alternative paths.

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.100.1xx "Introductory" Course13AS.100.1xx "Introductory" Course13
-or- AS.100.2xx "Freshman Seminar" Introductory Language Course3
Introductory Language Course3 
  6  6
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.100.193Undergraduate Seminar In History23AS.100.194Undergraduate Seminar in History23
AS.100.xxx History Elective3AS.100.xxx History Elective3
Intermediate Language Course3Intermediate Language Course3
  9  9
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.100.3xx - AS.100.4xx History Elective3AS.100.3xx - AS.100.4xx History Elective (perhaps, study abroad)3
AS.100.3xx - AS.100.4xx History Elective3 
  6  3
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.100.3xx - AS.100.4xx History Elective3AS.100.3xx - AS.100.4xx History Elective3
AS.100.3xx - AS.100.4xx History Elective3 
  6  3
Total Credits: 48


Senior Honors Option: Sample Program of Study

Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.100.507Senior Thesis3AS.100.508Senior Thesis3
AS.100.494Senior Honors Seminar1AS.100.495Senior Honors Seminar1
AS.100.3xx - AS.100.4xx History Elective3 
  7  4
Total Credits: 11

Honors Program in History (BA)

The history department strongly encourages all eligible history majors to pursue the honors track in history.  The track culminates in the senior thesis, a yearlong, “capstone” research project completed under the direct supervision of an individual faculty advisor. Like all capstone projects, the senior thesis is intellectually challenging and its completion almost always brings with it a tremendous sense of accomplishment. It also hones the talented young historian’s capacity to sustain a cogent argument based on primary evidence in the long form essay. These skills and the completion of a sustained independent project are also important practical assets when seeking a job or a post-graduate education.

A general cumulative GPA of 3.25 and a cumulative GPA in history of 3.5 are prerequisites for undertaking the senior thesis, and to obtain honors students will normally be expected to complete the thesis with a grade of A- or better. All thesis writers must also enroll in both the AS.100.507 Senior Thesis (fall, 3 credits) and AS.100.508 Senior Thesis (spring, 3 credits) and AS.100.494 Senior Honors Seminar (fall, 1 credit) and AS.100.495 Senior Honors Seminar (spring, 1 credit) - enrollment is by instructor’s permission and will be granted only to students who have obtained a commitment from a faculty thesis advisor. This commitment should normally be obtained no later than April 30th of the junior year.

For questions about the honors track in history or finding a thesis advisor, consult your departmental advisor or the current Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Minor in History

The minor in history offers to students majoring in other programs of study an opportunity to pursue a serious interest in history.

  • Students must earn a “C-“ or higher grade in all courses used to satisfy minor requirements and may not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.
  • No more than one course offered outside the History department (AS.100.xxx) may be used to satisfy minor requirements (e.g.: cross-listed, transfer, and study abroad courses).
MINOR REQUIREMENTS
Introductory Courses (select one option):6
Two introductory history courses (AS.100.1xx)
-or-
One introductory history course (AS.100.1xx) + one "Freshman Seminar" (AS.100.200-229)
Elective Courses
One 200-level or higher history course3
Three 300-level or higher history courses9
Total Credits18

Cognate Courses The History Department encourages interdisciplinary work in cognate fields of learning. History minors are therefore strongly advised to take additional courses in any department, including the History Department, that relate to the student’s major discipline in a historical way. 

B.A.- M.A. Programs in History

The department offers two B.A.– M.A options for current Hopkins undergraduate students.  Details can be found on the Graduate tab. 

The graduate program prepares professionally motivated students for careers as research scholars and college and university teachers. Hence it is designed for candidates who want to proceed directly to the Ph.D. degree, who have developed historical interests, and who are prepared to work independently. Within the areas of European history, American history, and the histories of Africa, Latin America, and China, the department emphasizes social/economic and intellectual/cultural history. Although diplomatic and political history are not emphasized, attention is given to the social, economic, and cultural bases of politics.

The program is organized around seminars rather than courses, credits, or grades. AS.100.781 The Seminar-AS.100.782 The Seminar and satellite seminars in European, American, and Comparative World History bring together students, faculty, and invited scholars from outside the university to discuss their research work. These departmental seminars create a lively intellectual community in which graduate students quickly become contributing members. The combination of flexibility, independence, and scholarly collegiality offered by the Hopkins program gives it a distinctive character.

Students select four fields (one major and three minor) and make their own arrangements with professors for a study program leading to comprehensive examinations at the end of the second year. Those arrangements may include taking a seminar in the field. One, and exceptionally two, minor field may be taken outside the Department of History. Students have maximum flexibility in the construction of individual plans of study, as well as the opportunity to work closely with several professors.

Admission and Financial Aid

In judging applications, the department puts particularly heavy emphasis on the quality of the student’s historical interests and prior research experience. Each applicant must submit a sample of written work. Applicants must also take the general aptitude portions of the Graduate Record Examination. Ordinarily no candidate for admission is accepted whose record does not indicate an ability to read at least one foreign language.

The department accepts only those students who plan to work in the specific fields of the faculty, and each student is admitted only with the approval of a particular professor. Applicants should indicate the proposed field of specialization at the time of application. With the concurrence of a new faculty advisor, students may, of course, later change their major professor.

The department normally provides full fellowship support for all admitted students including both tuition and a stipend.  Students are encouraged to apply for external support if eligible.

Four-year B.A.- M.A. Program in History

The B.A.– M.A Program is an accelerated program that allows the undergraduate to complete a BA and an MA in history in four years.  It is designed for students who demonstrate exceptional scholarly ability and assumes that the student will complete most other requirements for graduation by the end of the junior year.  Minimum prerequisites for admission include a GPA of 3.8 or higher, completion of language requirements through the intermediate level by the end of the junior year, and the securing of a faculty sponsor in the department of history in advance of application.  Students seeking admission into the BA-MA program shall submit a formal application to the regular graduate program in history:  the application deadline is December 15 of the junior year.

 The program of study during the senior year includes 6-7 credits of graduate reading and research seminars or independent study each semester, mastery of the scholarship in the student’s area of research concentration as demonstrated by the successful completion of a graduate field examination in that area of concentration; and, in lieu of the senior thesis, the completion of a major scholarly research essay equivalent in quality to those completed by first year graduate students in the regular doctoral program. For questions and further details about the program, contact Megan Zeller, mzeller4@jhu.edu, Graduate Coordinator, Department of History, who can also provide details about application procedures.

Five-year Barcelona B.A.- M.A. Program

Hopkins Barcelona
5-year BA/MA in World History Program

This program provides a select group of undergraduates the opportunity to pursue an integrated, consecutive 5-year dual-degree BA/MA between JHU and Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) in Barcelona that will lead to the MA in world history from UPF. JHU students will spend either the fall or spring of their junior year at UPF, earning credits toward their UPF MA requirements. They will receive their Hopkins BA at the end of four years, and then pursue the UPF MA degree in their fifth year of study.

Further information is available through the Office of Study Abroad.

View poster.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students are required to have a reading knowledge of those foreign languages that are necessary for the satisfactory completion of their program of graduate study. Students in European history must have a reading knowledge of at least two languages, and students in medieval history must also have a reading knowledge of Latin. Students of Chinese history are expected to have reading knowledge of modern and classical Chinese and in most cases should also have reading knowledge of Japanese and/or a European language.  Students in the Latin American area must have a reading knowledge of two of the following, depending upon their particular specialties: French, Spanish, Portuguese, or Dutch. In African history, students must have a reading knowledge of three languages including English and French. Depending upon their fields of specialization, students in African history may have other language needs. Students are expected to pass a written examination in one language within a month after entering the department, and they are required to do so before the end of the first year.

Each student is required to take a seminar under his/her major professor and to participate in at least one departmental seminar each semester.

The student’s knowledge of four fields will be tested by written and oral examinations before the end of the second year of graduate study.

The student must write and defend a dissertation that is a major piece of historical research and interpretation based on primary sources and representing a contribution to historical knowledge. Its content, form, and style must be adequate to make it suitable for publication.

Normally, each student is required to perform some supervised teaching or research duties at some point during the graduate program, most often as a teaching fellow during the second and fourth years.

M.A. Degree

The master of arts degree is automatically awarded to each doctoral candidate following the passing of field examinations and the completion of the language requirements. In special circumstances, a student may be permitted to take an M.A. degree after one full year of graduate study. In such cases students will be required to demonstrate by examination an ability to read at least one foreign language, write a satisfactory research essay, and satisfy the director of their research that they have a mastery of the field of history that forms its background. The essay must be submitted to the Graduate Board.

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.100.102. The Medieval World. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.
Instructor(s): G. Spiegel
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.103. Early Modern Europe & the Wider World. 3.0 Credits.

This course surveys the history of Europe and its interactions with Africa, the Americas, and Asia during the early modern period (c. 1400-1800). Topics include: the Renaissance, the Reformation, International Relations and Warfare, Colonialism, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Revolutions.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.104. Modern Europe and the Wider World. 3.0 Credits.

European history since the French Revolution. Topics include: revolutions and democratization, industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, two World Wars, fascism, decolonization, Soviet communism, and formation of the European Union.
Instructor(s): P. Jelavich
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.108. Making America: Black Freedom Struggles to 1896. 3.0 Credits.

From slave revolts on the West African coast to national conventions and civil war, people of African descent have defined freedom and struggle in terms of kinship, diasporic connection, and fighting antiblack violence. This course explores the arc of that history and its role in the making of America.
Instructor(s): J. Johnson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.109. Making America: Slavery, Violence, and the Coming of the Civil War. 3.0 Credits.

An examination of violence - primarily racial and political - in the decades between the American Revolution and Civil War (1789 to 1861).
Instructor(s): R. Walters
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.110. Making America: Politics and Society since the Great Depression. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the interplay between economic growth and instability, diversity and conformity, war and protest, and liberalism and conservatism in modern American politics and society. Previously offered as AS.100.182, “The United States since 1929.”
Instructor(s): A. Burgin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.112. Making America: Mastery & Freedom, 1609-1789. 3.0 Credits.

Early America from the arrival of Europeans to the US constitution. Covers transatlantic empires and their rivalries; formation of Anglo-American settler societies based on slavery and patriarchal households; conflict with Native Americans; the revolutionary era and its tensions between republican principles of freedom and independence and persisting, even deepening, gender and racial inequalities.
Instructor(s): T. Ditz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.113. Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform. 3.0 Credits.

Beginning with the end of Reconstruction and continuing through the present day, this course will examine the complicated ways in which Americans attempted to come to terms with racial, ethnic, cultural, and other forms of diversity.
Instructor(s): R. Walters
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.114. Making America: U.S. History in the Age of Atlantic Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

Transnational approaches to U.S. history, c. 1760-1830, with a particular emphasis on the impact of the French and Haitian Revolutions.
Instructor(s): F. Furstenberg
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.115. Modern Latin America. 3.0 Credits.

Survey of Latin American history from Independence to the present. The course will look at the meaning of nations and citizenship through the lenses of international relations, development, and identity.
Instructor(s): C. Lurtz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.117. History of Brazil. 3.0 Credits.

An introductory survey of Brazilian History, 1500-2017.
Instructor(s): G. Paquette
Area: Humanities.

AS.100.122. Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880). 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the African past. First term: to 1880. Second term: to since 1880. Cross-listed with Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): E. Thornberry
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.123. Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to African history with emphasis on diversity, mobility, and innovation. Considers both early and modern times.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.129. Introduction to Modern Jewish History. 3.0 Credits.

Jewish history 1750-present in Europe, the Near East, the US, Israel; the challenges of modernity and new forms of Jewish life and conflict from Enlightenment and emancipation, Hasidism, Reform and Orthodox Judaism to capitalism and socialism; empire, nationalism and Zionism; the Holocaust. Extensive attention to US Jewry and State of Israel.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.154. Modern Mexico from the Alamo to El Chapo. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will use popular depictions of Mexico’s heroes and villains, tragedies and triumphs to delve into both the nation’s history and the importance of thinking historically.
Instructor(s): C. Lurtz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.163. Online: Modern European History Through Film, 1789 to 1991. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the history of Western Europe from the French Revolution through to the end of the Cold War. It examines such themes as revolutions and democratization, the origins of egalitarianism, the spread of secularism, the post-war reshaping and modernization of Western culture and political policies (European and otherwise), Europe's role in the fall of the Ottoman Empire, and decolonization. Films depicting key periods and events will be used to complement readings.
Instructor(s): S. Stewart
Area: Humanities.

AS.100.193. Undergraduate Seminar In History. 3.0 Credits.

The first semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Following a survey of approaches to the study of the past and an introduction to research methods, students undertake original research and write an extended essay. Intended for history majors and prospective majors.
Instructor(s): F. Furstenberg; L. Mason
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.194. Undergraduate Seminar in History. 3.0 Credits.

The second semester of the two-semester sequence required for majors, this course further introduces students to the theory and practice of history. Students write an essay based on original research.
Prerequisites: AS.100.193
Instructor(s): K. Hindmarch-Watson; W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.201. Freshman Seminar: Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750-2012. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context.
Instructor(s): S. Stewart
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.202. Conflict and Co-Existence: The Early Modern Mediterranean. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the dynamic and fluid world of the early modern Mediterranean (1453-1650), where Christians, Jews, and Muslims met, fought, traded with, and enslaved each other.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.203. Freshman Seminar: From Columbus to Calypso: The Caribbean and the Wider World. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the history of the Caribbean and how five hundred years of colonization, slavery, piracy, rebellion, and revolution have shaped the politics and culture of the islands today.
Instructor(s): L. MacDonald
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.204. Freshman Seminar: Abraham Lincoln and his America. 3.0 Credits.

Freshman seminar that explores the life and times of Abraham Lincoln though contemporary sources and texts by historians.
Instructor(s): M. Johnson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.205. Freshman Seminar: Health, Healing, and Medicine in Africa. 3.0 Credits.

A freshman seminar introducing students to the history of health, healing, and forms of medical practice in Africa over the last two centuries.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.206. Freshman Seminar: Law, Society, and Power in America, 1500-1877. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the relationship between law, governance, and social structures in America between the start of European settlement and the era of the Civil War. Topics will include Native American and European land claims, the regulation of family life, economic and commercial disputes, and the legal regimes of race and slavery. Throughout, we will consider both the aims of governing officials and how ordinary men and women maneuvered within the legal system. Freshman only.
Instructor(s): S. Damiano
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.207. Freshman Seminar: Americans in Paris, 1787-1971. 3.0 Credits.

This freshman seminar focuses on the often life-changing experiences of American travelers and expatriates in Paris as a way of thinking about travel and what gives cities particular identities.
Instructor(s): R. Walters
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.209. Fresh Sem:Mexico and the World from Cortés to Cartels. 3.0 Credits.

This introductory course examines Mexico's political, economic, and cultural role in global history from the time of Spanish conquest until the twenty-first century.
Instructor(s): J. Clark
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.210. Freshman Seminar: Real Pirates of the Caribbean. 3.0 Credits.

This freshman seminar explores the rise of economic crimes, including piracy, smuggling, and counterfeiting, in the 17th- and 18th-century British North America and Caribbean, and their portrayal in popular culture. Freshmen Only.
Instructor(s): K. Smoak
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.211. Freshman Seminar: American Slavery. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores the history of American slavery, tracing developments over time and across space, probing the impact of this iniquitous and dynamic institution on societies and individuals, and examining a variety of sources that historians use to construct their narratives. Freshman only
Instructor(s): P. Morgan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.212. Freshman Seminar: Jews in the Medieval Mediterranean: The Politics of Conquest under Crescent and Cross. 3.0 Credits.

How can Jewish history help us understand the politics of Islamic and Christian states in Sicily, Spain, and Palestine in the age of Crusade and holy war? Freshman only
Instructor(s): B. Goldman
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.213. Freshman Seminar: History of Gender and the Family in the United States. 3.0 Credits.

For Freshman Only. Discussion style. Introduces major themes since 1700: family sentiment and authority relations; gender and sexuality; family and work; dynamics of family and race. Readings emphasize interdisciplinary perspectives and interpretation of primary sources.
Instructor(s): T. Ditz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.214. Freshman Seminar: Russia and the West. 3.0 Credits.

Students will consider Russian political culture and the Russian cultural tradition from Pushkin to Putin.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.215. Freshman Seminar: US-USSR Cold War. 3.0 Credits.

Focus on Stalin, Khrushchev/ Truman Ike period but includes Brezhnev. 2 sides of cold war, write 6-7 journals of 300 wds, 2 papers of 1200 words, 2 quizzes, no midterm or final.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.217. Freshman Seminar: Cities and Modern Life in Victorian Britain. 3.0 Credits.

Victorian Cities focuses on the politics of everyday life, space, consumption, and concepts of the self in Britain's major urban centers, including London, Manchester, and Dublin, from 1830 to 1914.
Instructor(s): K. Hindmarch-Watson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.218. Freshman Seminar: Russian History from Revolution to Cold War. 3.0 Credits.

Students will explore Russian politics and culture from 1905 to 1953.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.219. Chinese Cultural Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to trasform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revoltuion decade and since.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.220. Freshman Seminar: Trade Wars: Commerce and Competition in the Early Modern World. 3.0 Credits.

In the Age of Exploration, European states engaged in fierce competition for valuable natural resources, trade routes, and markets. This course will explore the ways in which Britain, France, Spain, Portugal, and the Netherlands vied with each other by land and sea to increase their share of global trade. Freshman Only.
Instructor(s): C. Consolino
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.221. Freshman Seminar: The Medieval City. 3.0 Credits.

This course focuses on the development and growth of medieval cities in western Europe. Students will explore the various functions of cities, uses of urban space, and challenges they faced.
Instructor(s): N. Daniels
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.233. History of Modern Germany. 3.0 Credits.

There is more to Germany than beer, BMWs, and Bayern Munich. We will explore politics, culture, economics and society to understand Germany and its position within Europe and the world.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.234. The Making of the Muslim Middle East, 600-1100 A.D.. 3.0 Credits.

A survey of the major historical transformations of the region we now call the 'Middle East' (from late antiquity through the 11th century) in relation to the formation and development of Islam and various Muslim empires. Cross-listed with Near Eastern Studies and the Program in Islamic Studies.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.235. Freshman Seminar: Politics, Society and Economics in the Renaissance. 3.0 Credits.

This course will focus on the long-distance trade of both foodstuffs and clothe in order to investigate urbanization and the development of national monarchies in western Europe from the outbreak of the Black Death (1347) to the eve of the Reformation (1517).
Instructor(s): H. Stein
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.236. Chinese Cultural Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. Previously offered as AS.100.219.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.237. Freshman Seminar: Impeachments and Beyond: Law, Justice, and Politics in Latin America. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an introduction to legal ideas and institutions through the Latin American political experience. By the end of this course, students will be equipped with the fundamentals of Latin America's long political history (from colony to present) and will be able to identify how legal ideas and institutions change over time. Students will also gain insights on debates and conversations on the relationship between law, justice, and politics that go beyond Latin America's history.
Instructor(s): A. Caso Bello
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.241. American Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

This course provides an intensive introduction to the causes, character, and consequences of the American Revolution, the colonial rebellion that produced the first republic in the Americas, and set in motion an age of democratic revolutions in the Atlantic world. A remarkable epoch in world history, the revolutionary era was of momentous significance.
Instructor(s): P. Morgan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.243. China: Neolithic to Song. 3.0 Credits.

This class offers a broad overview of changes in China from Neolithic times through the Song Dynasty (roughly from 5000 BCE through the 13th century CE) and will include discussion of art, material culture, and literature as well as politics and society. Close readings of primary sources in discussion sections and extensive use of visual material in lectures will help students gain firsthand perspective on the materials covered. Not open to students who have previously taken AS.100.208. Cross listed with East Asian Studies
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.244. The Power and Politics of Clothing in American History. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the power of clothing and the politicization of appearances at moments of deep political and social unrest in American history (18th-20th centuries).
Instructor(s): S. Templier
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.245. Freshman Seminar: You are what you eat: Food and Farm Politics, Policy, and Culture in 20th Century America. 3.0 Credits.

This class will examine food production and consumption both in the classroom and outside of it to understand how high-stakes policy and grassroots culture meet to shape our nutritional reality. Freshman only
Instructor(s): R. Stoil
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.246. Colonial Latin American History Survey. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers a general survey of Colonial Latin American history, covering both Spanish and Portuguese America, from European conquest to the revolutionary wars of independence. Emphasis will be placed in exploring the nature and effects of conquest, the making of new pluri-ethnic societies, and the eventual break of these societies from Spain and Portugal.
Instructor(s): G. Garcia Montufar
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.248. Japan in the World. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.
Instructor(s): H. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.249. Baltimore as Historical Site. 3.0 Credits.

The city of Baltimore will serve as a laboratory in which to study American History. We will explore the urban landscape on foot as well as through written sources.
Instructor(s): M. Ryan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.251. From Columbus to Calypso: The Caribbean and the Wider World. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the history of the Caribbean and how five hundred years of colonization, slavery, piracy, rebellion, and revolution have shaped the politics and culture of the islands today.
Instructor(s): L. MacDonald
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.252. Invisible Borders: Exchanges and Migrations in the Modern Mediterranean. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the patterns of movement formed and transgressed by empire, trade, sex tourism, cultural exchange, war, and nationalism, starting from the nineteenth century to the present-day refugee crisis.
Instructor(s): S. Rahnama
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.254. Modern Mexico from the Alamo to El Chapo. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will use popular depictions of Mexico’s heroes and villains, tragedies and triumphs to delve into both the nation’s history and the importance of thinking historically.
Instructor(s): C. Lurtz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.255. The Haitian Revolution in World History. 3.0 Credits.

This introductory seminar examines the revolution that transformed the slave colony of Saint-Domingue into the first black republic and second independent nation in the Americas, and its repercussions around the world. Non-Majors welcome.
Instructor(s): N. Marvin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.256. Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750-2012. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context.
Instructor(s): S. Stewart
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.257. From Voice to Parchment: Media and Communication before the Printing Press, 800-1440. 3.0 Credits.

Epic traditions, call to Crusade, public curses, music of the troubadours: this course examines oral tradition and music—the "viral media" of pre-modern Europe—while tracing the impact of new recording technologies: early musical notation, manuscripts, and book production.
Instructor(s): J. Phillips
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.260. Boom, Bust, and the Rise of Financial Capitalism in America, 1700-1900. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores how legal, social, and political contestation shaped the development of American financial capitalism. The course also focuses on how financial crises precipitated change throughout American history.
Instructor(s): J. Wallace
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.265. The Medieval City. 3.0 Credits.

This course focuses on the development and growth of medieval cities in western Europe. Students will explore the various functions of cities, uses of urban space, and challenges they faced.
Instructor(s): N. Daniels
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.268. Jewish and Christian mysticism in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period. 3.0 Credits.

This course will trace the historical development of Jewish and Christian mysticism between the 12th and the 17th centuries.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.272. Online: Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750 to Present. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context.
Instructor(s): S. Stewart
Area: Humanities.

AS.100.279. Europe since 1945. 3.0 Credits.

This lecture course examines the political, social, and cultural history of postwar Europe with emphasis on the Cold War and the formation of the European Union.
Instructor(s): H. Balz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.282. Race & Power in Modern South Africa. 3.0 Credits.

South African history from 1800 to the present, with focus on the rise and fall of the apartheid racial state
Instructor(s): E. Thornberry
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.291. Medicine in an Age of Empires, 1500-1800. 3.0 Credits.

How did medicine emerge as a distinctive body of knowledge and a profession in the early modern period? The answers lie in the histories of disease, empire, and global commerce.
Instructor(s): Z. Dorner
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.295. American Intellectual History since the Civil War. 3.0 Credits.

Readings in American social thought since 1865, ranging across developments in philosophy, literature, law, economics, and political theory.
Instructor(s): A. Burgin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.301. America after the Civil Rights Movement. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the history of late twentieth-century America by examining the social, economic, and political legacies of 1960s civil rights protest for the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Students will also participate on an archiving project capturing the experience of Hopkins employees who have recollections of the decades immediately following the civil rights legislations of the 1960s.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.303. Old Regime and Revolutionary France. 3.0 Credits.

Examines the history of France from the reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution, focusing on early modern society, popular culture, absolutism, the Enlightenment, overseas empire, and the French and Haitian Revolutions.
Instructor(s): M. Kwass
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.304. Myth and History in Medieval Europe. 3.0 Credits.

Can a myth be history? This class examines how medieval historians used myths to shape, debate, and even forge their past, and how they redefined history writing in the process.
Instructor(s): N. Weijer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.306. America and the Great War, 1898-1920. 3.0 Credits.

This small, discussion-oriented course covers the period from the Spanish-American War through the end of WWI and the Red Scare that more or less ended in 1920.
Instructor(s): R. Walters
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.307. Latin American Independence. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar examines the breakdown of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and the emergence of new states in Latin America in the nineteenth century. Topics include: war, revolution, slavery, liberalism, and monarchism.
Instructor(s): G. Paquette
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.308. Introduction to the History of Jewish Mysticism. 3.0 Credits.

The course will familiarize the student with the history of the main phenomena of Jewish mysticism from the ancient times to the present.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.309. American Social Thought since 1865. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the intellectual development of the modern United States through readings in philosophy, literature, law, economics, politics, and social theory.
Prerequisites: Cannot enroll if you have taken AS.100.400, same course.
Instructor(s): A. Burgin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.310. The French Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

Political, social and cultural history of one of the great turning-points in European history. Previously offered as AS.100.204.
Instructor(s): L. Mason
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.311. National Pastimes: Sports, Culture, and American History. 3.0 Credits.

National Pastimes examines the development of sports in the United States over the course of the 20th century with a particular interest in the relationship between sports and politics as well as issues of race, gender, sexuality and class.
Instructor(s): A. Davis
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.314. The Enlightenment. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the Enlightenment, an intellectual movement that swept Europe in the eighteenth century to shape the modern world.
Instructor(s): M. Kwass
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.315. Jewish Political Thought and Social Imagination, 1880-1940. 3.0 Credits.

How a range of Jewish thinkers, activists, and creative writers grappled intellectually with the challenge of the nation-state, the rise and collapse of empires, antisemitism as a political phenomenon, the nature of politics and political action, the nature of modern societies, and the question of Jewish self-determination and sovereignty, 1880-1940. Readings by Herzl, Bernard Lazare, Freud, Kafka, Leshtshinsky, Arendt, Adorno, Michael Chabon, among others.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.316. American Foreign Policy in the Age of Human Rights. 3.0 Credits.

American Foreign Policy in the Age of Human Rights examines competing narratives about the origins of modern international human rights, and explores how those narratives historically informed American foreign policy from the American Revolution up to the present, with an emphasis on the twentieth century.
Instructor(s): K. Sohasky
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.318. The Age of Revolutions. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar focuses on the political, social, and economic thought animating the revolutions which transformed Europe and the Americas, c. 1760 - 1850.
Instructor(s): G. Paquette
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.319. The Tudors: Reforming England 1485-1603. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine Tudor England, including the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I, and the intellectual and cultural movements of the Reformation and the Renaissance.
Instructor(s): J. Walker
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.320. Writing U.S. Empire. 3.0 Credits.

Attends to the composition and interpretive problems raised by studying the history of American imperialism, 1880s-1930s.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.321. From Ferguson to Cape Town: The Global Black Freedom Struggle since Slavery. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar underscores the global and historical dimensions of the black freedom struggle through a series of case studies spanning North America, Africa and Latin America. Major themes addresses include race, diaspora, and movement(s) from slavery to the present.
Instructor(s): J. Levy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.323. America in the 1960s. 3.0 Credits.

The years between 1959, when the course begins, and 1971, when it ends, were tumultuous and divisive. This course explores the political, racial, and cultural struggles of a half century ago.
Instructor(s): R. Walters
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.324. Dostoevsky's Russia. 3.0 Credits.

Dostoevsky and the culture of his era but also echoes of his ideas of Russia, religion, ethnicity, freedom, authority, and gender from 1917 until today. Short papers, quizzes.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.325. Images of War in the 19th and 20th Centuries. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the changing face of war in photographs, propaganda posters, comics, and film from the American Civil War to the "war on terror."
Instructor(s): H. Balz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.326. From Blood Feud to Black Death: European Society in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1400. 3.0 Credits.

Explores the development of society and institutions in the medieval west including kingship and law, religion and difference, gender and ideology. Looks closely at social responses to change and adversity.
Instructor(s): A. Lester
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.327. Gender and Sexuality in Reformation and Counter-Reformation Europe. 3.0 Credits.

This course will discuss the centrality of gender, sexuality, and gendered rhetoric to the genesis and development of the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation in Europe.
Instructor(s): J. Keene
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.328. Caged America: Policing, Confinement, and Criminality in the "Land of the Free". 3.0 Credits.

This course focuses on the evolution of law enforcement practices, the history of federal and state prison systems, and the ways in which Americans have understood and reacted to crime.
Instructor(s): M. Shahan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.329. Russian Imagination in Three Revolutions. 3.0 Credits.

Russian Literature and the arts in Revolutions of 1905, 1917, and Stalin era to 1941. Req: 6 journals of 350 words, 2 papers 1250, 2 quizzes. No midterm or final.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.330. National Identity in 20th Century China & Japan. 3.0 Credits.

Using primary sources, including literature and film, we will explore the changing ways in which ideologues, intellectuals, and ordinary citizens defined national identity in 20th century China and Japan.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.332. Persecution and Toleration in Early Modern Europe. 3.0 Credits.

Explores hostilities and fears provoked by religious diversity and deviance from orthodoxy in early modern Europe. Outlines theories, practices, and limits of early modern religious tolerance and intolerance.
Instructor(s): J. Fradkin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.334. Billie Holiday and American Culture. 3.0 Credits.

A course examining introducing students to the life, times and music of Billie Holiday. We will read biographies, autobiographies, novels, and listen to music.
Instructor(s): L. Jackson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.335. The American West. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): R. Walters
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.337. Historical Perspectives on Humans and Animals in the Atlantic World and the Early United States, 1500-1860. 3.0 Credits.

Relationships between humans and animals offer a fascinating window into the American past. Readings, written assignments, and discussions will explore environmental, cultural, and scientific approaches to the history of hunting, the domestication of animals and animal ethics in the Atlantic world and the early United States.
Instructor(s): C. Gherini
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.338. Displacement: A History of U.S. Cities from Urban Renewal to Gentrification. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores historical conflicts over urban planning and public health. Working with the Baltimore City Archives, we will piece together histories of Baltimore residents displaced by urban renewal and the social contexts in which they lived. Tours of Baltimore will consider whether recent strategies have addressed the legacies of racism and classism in urban development.
Instructor(s): M. Speller
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.340. Russian Imagination. 3.0 Credits.

Culture, Politics, and Society in Russia’s great age of creativity, 1850s to 1950s.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.341. Historical Performance in the Age of the Troubadours and Trouvères. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar examines the practices of musical and theatrical performance in the era of the trouvères and troubadours, “the long thirteenth century.” We look at the context in which trouvère song was composed, performed, and transmitted in manuscript form. Students will also sing trouvère music, and while a knowledge of musical notation is not strictly necessary, it is helpful. The culmination of the course will be a concert and recording session. A final paper based on primary sources about an aspect of medieval performance is required.
Instructor(s): J. Phillips
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.342. Colonial Lives: Individuals in the Atlantic World, 1600-1850. 3.0 Credits.

This course traces the emergence of an Atlantic world, 1600-1850, through the lens of biography. Major themes include European colonization, cross-cultural encounters, slavery and trade, imperial warfare, and political revolutions. Prior experience in an introductory history course strongly recommended.
Instructor(s): W. Brown
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.343. Diaspora, Nation, Race, and Politics. 3.0 Credits.

For millions of people across the globe, political fate in the 20th century was defined at the intersection of diaspora, race, and nation — and this may be true in the 21st century as well. This course, a collaborative effort involving a historian and a political scientist, explores the parallels and divergences in the deployment of these terms in nationalist and transnational mobilization, literature and aesthetics, and group identity formation in Eastern Europe, Africa and the New World of the Americas. Set against the backdrop of the fall of significant empires in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, we will explore themes of migration, human rights, the nation-state system, and racism through history, political sociology, and political and social theory. We will pay particular attention to the theoretically exemplary Jewish and Black experiences of diaspora, race, and nation, engaging both with how those experiences were specially shaped by the imposition of national and racial logics and with Black and Jewish politics and thought in relation to those categories. Readings include Max Weber, W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Theodor Herzl, Hannah Arendt, Benedict Anderson, Rogers Brubaker, Andrew Zimmerman, Michele Mitchell, David Scott.
Instructor(s): K. Moss; M. Hanchard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.345. Religion, Secularity, and Nationhood in Modern Jewish Identity Politics. 3.0 Credits.

How have ethnonational, religious, and secular forms of self-definition played out in Jewish life over the past hundred years, and what sorts of relationships are taking shape between them now? Particular foci include: religious revival in Israel and the fate of Zionism’s ostensibly secular nationalist project in comparative perspective (Ravitzky, Walzer, Friedland); the surprising flourishing of kabbalistic/mystical thought in contemporary Jewish life (Garb); varieties of secular and religious visions of Jewish collective identity (Ohana, Lustick); new and resurgent forms of Judaism in the US; religion and gender (Fader), among other topics. Time at end of semester for independent reading and research.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.346. Soviet-American Cold War. 3.0 Credits.

The focus will be on Soviet-American interactions, Cold-War Cultures, and the impact on both societies.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.347. Early Modern China. 3.0 Credits.

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.348. 20th-Century China. 3.0 Credits.

The history of China from the last years of the Qing Empire to the post-Mao reforms.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.350. Capital before Capitalism: Economic Debates in the British Empire, 1600-1800. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the events, ideas, and debates that shaped economic thought in early modern Britain and its empire before the advent of Capitalism.
Instructor(s): C. Consolino
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.352. Age Of Pasternak. 3.0 Credits.

This course concerns Russian literature and the arts, including ballet, from the 1910s to the 1950s. Two short papers, journals, two quizzes, and no midterm or final.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.353. Youth and Youth Movements during 20th Century: Germany, Britain, and the U.S. 3.0 Credits.

Through texts, music, and films, this course examines the rise of "youth" as a social and cultural category in a variety of forms, ranging from spontaneous (such as Rock'n'Roll and Techno) to state-organized (Hitler Youth).
Instructor(s): H. Balz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.355. Islam between History and Anthropology. 3.0 Credits.

Co-taught by an anthropologist and a historian, this course will explore recent scholarly debates about--and critiques of--the representations of Islam and Muslim societies.
Instructor(s): N. Khan; T. Shepard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.356. W.E.B. Du Bois and the Problem of the Color-Line. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar will introduce students to the ideas and legacy of the renowned American scholar, journalist, and activist, W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1963), asking students to locate Du Bois in his historical context and in our own. Through readings and discussions of his key works in various forms, we will assess Du Bois’s impact on major debates in American politics, African-American affairs, and academic disciplines like sociology and history. We will track changes in Du Bois's thinking over time, including in his views of racism, class, gender, liberalism, radicalism, imperialism, and war. Finally, we will consider the ways in which Du Bois's work continues to shape our understanding of these issues and debates in contemporary American society.
Instructor(s): A. Brann
Area: Humanities.

AS.100.357. Panic and Liberation: The Politics of Sex in 20th Century Europe. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the 20th century history of sexual attitudes, desires, behaviors, identities, communities, and movements in Western Europe (most notably, Germany, France, and the United Kingdom).
Instructor(s): T. Shepard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.358. Black Code Studies: Black History and Digital Media. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores doing histories of people of African descent in an age of digital and social media. The focus will be on African-descended communities in the United States, but content will range across time space. Examples include: West African digital art communities; the use of slave trade databases to write Caribbean history; and the use of social media in social justice organizing from Paris to Baltimore. Students will explore questions of blackness, race, ethnicity, sex and sexuality, violence and justice while creating digital content using platforms like Wordpress, Omeka, Twitter, and Tumblr. Students will be evaluated on their acquisition of African American and Afro-Diasporic history; their knowledge of digital and social media platforms; and their ability to creatively and accurately relate the histories of blackness and black people to their representation and discussion online.
Instructor(s): J. Johnson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.359. Gender, Patriarchy, and the English Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the varied experiences of gender and gender roles in seventeenth-century Britain and analyzes how these roles were challenged, changed, and sometimes upended during the English Revolution (1642-1660).
Instructor(s): C. Hinchliff
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.360. The Modern British World: Imperial Encounters, Regimes, and Resistance, from the American Revolution to the present. 3.0 Credits.

The Modern British World introduces some of the major themes and contestations tied to Britain’s rise to global dominance and its ultimate decline as an imperial power.
Instructor(s): K. Hindmarch-Watson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.361. Age of Tolstoy. 3.0 Credits.

Tolstoy and his era, 1820s to 1910s. Topics include state and politics, empire, the Russian identity, and forms of cultural expression. Students consider "War and Peace" and other masterworks.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.362. Children and Childhood in the Middle Ages. 3.0 Credits.

Seminar on the history of childhood and ideas of childhood around the medieval Mediterranean; themes include child custody; medieval education and punishment; parent-child private letters; child mortality and the arts of bereavement/consolation. Cross-listed with the Program in Islamic Studies and Near Eastern Studies.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.363. The Development of the Sabbatian Movement. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the development of Sabbatianism, the most important messianic movement in the history of Judaism. We shall discuss the messianic claims of Sabbatai Tsevi, the spread of religious fervor among the Jews of Middle East, Europe, and North Africa, rabbinic opposition to the movement, and shall compare it to similar phenomena in Islam and Christianity. Special attention will be paid to reading of primary Sabbatian sources in English translation.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.364. Sacrilegious Jews: Accusations of Ritual Crime in Pre-Modern Europe. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the history of the accusations of the Jews of ritual crime (blood libel, host desecration etc.) in pre-modern Europe.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.365. Culture & Society in the High Middle Ages. 3.0 Credits.

This course will treat the flourishing of culture and society in the High Middle Ages (11-14th centuries). Topics covered include the emergence of feudal society and literature, the economic, social and cultural revival of Europe in the 11th and 12th centuries, the Renaissance of the twelfth century and the growth of scholasticism and the University, and the development of feudal monarchies in England and France..
Instructor(s): G. Spiegel
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.368. History of Colombia 1800-present. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar examines the key moments in the history of Colombia from its independence in 1810 and the construction of a Liberal Republic. The course will concentrate on the crucial political events that have defined Colombia up until the present.
Instructor(s): E. Vargas
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.369. Themes and Concepts in Jewish History. 3.0 Credits.

The course will introduce students to the main themes and debates in Jewish historiography.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.371. Jewish History in the 20th Century. 3.0 Credits.

Jewish history, politics, and culture across a century of enormous transformations and transformative enormities in Europe, the US, and the Middle East. Topics include: impacts on Jewish life of World War I, the Russian Revolution, and the post-imperial reordering of the Eastern Europe and the Middle East; Zionism and other modes of Jewish contestatory politics; the consolidation of American Jewry; Nazism and the Holocaust in Europe; formation and development of the State of Israel; the global reordering of Jewish life amid cross-currents of the Cold War, conflict in the Middle East, and success in the US. Substantial attention to recent and contemporary history including the dramatic changes in Israeli society and polity over the past forty years and the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Each week, professor will provide detailed background lecture during first session and second session will be devoted to in-depth discussion of key primary texts and historical monographs that capture Jewish responses to 20th century processes and events.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.372. The Victorians. 3.0 Credits.

This course focuses on the politics of everyday life, consumption, intimate relations, and concepts of the self in Britain and its empire in the long nineteenth century. We devote particular attention to visual culture, entertainment, and the built environment. Course themes include popular nationalism; class differences; gender and body politics; and imperial expansion and racial thought.
Instructor(s): L. Pepitone
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.374. Conquest, Conversion, and Language Change in the Middle Ages. 3.0 Credits.

Examines cases of imperial conquest and attendant religious transformation (Christianization; Islamization) and language change in the medieval Mediterranean (Europe and Middle East), e.g. transition from Latin to vernacular languages in Europe; Arabization; translation movements.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.378. Race and Capitalism in the City. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the intersections of race and capital in U.S. cities since 1800. In addition to classroom lectures and exercises involving various kinds of digital media, students will participate in walking tours exploring the particular conjunctures of race and economic development in Baltimore as manifested through the histories of slavery, segregation, and post-1960s urban growth. Students will also gain practice communicating their ideas through blog posts, policy briefings, and other modes of reporting.
Instructor(s): M. Speller
Area: Humanities.

AS.100.379. Age of Religious Wars: Reformation Europe, 1500-1650. 3.0 Credits.

Offers an in-depth examination of a volatile time in European history, when the rupture of unity in the Christian Church led to wide scale political upheaval, violence, rioting, and persecution.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.381. Religion, Medicine, and the Mind in Japan. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores the relationship between religion and medicine in treating disorders of the mind and soul throughout Japanese history. We will consider such topics as animal spirit possession, Buddhism, family-based care, psychotherapy, gender, and social withdrawal.
Instructor(s): H. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.382. Early Modern African Atlantic. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the history of West and Central Africa and its diasporic people and cultures during the early modern period (c. 1400-1750) in disparate parts of the Atlantic world, including Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Anglo-America. Themes include: West and Central African political and religious cultures; trans-Atlantic slavery; African Christianity; and the question of cultural survivals.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.383. Conversion and Apostasy in the Middle Ages. 3.0 Credits.

Compares religious transformation in medieval Europe and the Middle East (ca. 600-1500), including conquest and conversion; conversion narratives; apostasy, martyrdom and other encounters between medieval Jews, Christians, and Muslims.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.385. Mobility and Encounter in the Medieval Indian Ocean. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar discusses forms of mobility and exchange- trade and travel, conquest and religious transformation, diasporas and migration, the spread of practices and technologies- across the Indian Ocean from the 8th to 16th centuries.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.387. Everyday Life in the Medieval Middle East. 3.0 Credits.

In this seminar, students will explore the daily lives of non-elites in medieval Egypt (i.e. average folk, not kings in palaces)—including their food and cooking; clothes (and government edicts regulating fashion); the houses they inhabited; their marriage patterns, divorce rates, and child custody battles; and the burden of taxes on the working poor (e.g. urban craftsmen). We will examine and discuss artifacts and documents, including surviving hats (stuffed with recycled documents), private letters, marriage contracts (and the clauses women inserted into them), petitions for charity, and court records.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.389. History of Law and Social Justice. 3.0 Credits.

Cause lawyering aims to change the status quo. This course examines histories of this approach to social justice, from battles against the slave trade to contemporary campaigns for marriage equality.
Instructor(s): M. Jones
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.397. U.S. Histories Male and Female. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar will be devoted to exploring gender differences as they have been expressed in a sequence of autobiographies and autobiographical fiction set in a shifting social and historical context.
Instructor(s): M. Ryan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.398. Images of Postwar Japan. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores Japan’s changing place in the world in the decades following World War II, with an emphasis on analyzing visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, and comic books. Topics include relations with the U.S. and other countries in East Asia, particularly the two Koreas; the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and the global contexts for an expanding Japanese consumerism in the late 20th century.
Instructor(s): H. Kim.

AS.100.399. Decolonization and Citizenship in Africa, 1945-2015. 3.0 Credits.

Critically explores issues of decolonization and citizenship in Africa from WWII to the present. Emphasis on political inclusion and exclusion, and violence, fostered by nationalist movements and postcolonial African governments.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.403. Law & Custom in Colonial Africa. 3.0 Credits.

Examines how colonial rule transformed African legal systems, while Africans used European law for political resistance and personal gain. Research project based on colonial South African court records.
Instructor(s): E. Thornberry
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.404. John Locke. 3.0 Credits.

Seminar style course in which John Locke’s major works will be read intensively, together with some of his contemporaries’ works, and select scholarly interpretations.
Instructor(s): J. Marshall
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.405. European Socialist Thought. 3.0 Credits.

Examination of socialist, social-democratic, communist, and anarchist theorists, including Proudhon, Marx, Engels, Bakunin, Bernstein, Lenin, Luxemburg, and Sorel.
Instructor(s): P. Jelavich
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.406. American Business in the Age of the Modern Corporation. 3.0 Credits.

This course will focus on business organizations, their performance, and sociopolitical relations in the 20th century. Each of the students will be expected to reach conclusions about that history and will be required to sharpen those conclusions by writing three, interrelated essays.
Instructor(s): L. Galambos
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.411. Readings in the History of Public Health in the 20th and 21st Centuries. 3.0 Credits.

The students will read major and some minor works in the history of global public health and will each develop their own concept of how and why the major institutions, professions, and practices associated with public health have evolved over the past long century. To help the students focus on their ideas, they will write three essays on particular aspects of the history.
Instructor(s): L. Galambos
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.412. Jewish History in British Mandatory Palestine 1917-1947. 3.0 Credits.

Recent historical writing on Jewish politics, culture, and society in British Mandatory Palestine, 1917-1947. Significant attention will also be paid to work on Palestinian Arab society and politics and to Jewish-Arab-British relations.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.413. London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city. 3.0 Credits.

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.
Instructor(s): J. Marshall
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.414. Love, Death, and the Afterlife in the Medieval West. 3.0 Credits.

Romantic love, it is often claimed, is an invention of the High Middle Ages. The vocabulary of sexual desire that is still current in the twenty-first century was authored in the twelfth and thirteenth, by troubadours, court poets, writers like Dante; even by crusaders returning from the eastern Mediterranean. How did this devout society come to elevate the experience of sensual love? This course draws on primary sources such as medieval songs, folktales, the “epic rap battles” of the thirteenth century, along with the writings of Boccaccio, Saint Augustine and others, to understand the unexpected connections between love, death, and the afterlife from late antiquity to the fourteenth century. Each week, we will use a literary or artistic work as an interpretive window into cultural attitudes towards love, death or the afterlife. These readings are analyzed in tandem with major historical developments, including the rise of Christianity, the emergence of feudal society and chivalric culture, the crusading movement, and the social breakdown of the fourteenth century.
Instructor(s): J. Phillips
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.416. Urban Space and City People. 3.0 Credits.

Readings and research in urban history focused on the United States since the 18th century with special attention to gender and race.
Instructor(s): M. Ryan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.417. Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the ideas of Joseph A. Schumpeter, the father of entrepreneurial studies. Each student will develop a perspective on the history of capitalism and socialism.
Instructor(s): L. Galambos
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.418. Comparative Slavery: Haiti and Brazil. 3.0 Credits.

Haiti is born after a powerful slave insurrection (1804). Brazil was the last country to abolish slavery (1888). Why did these slave societies, which shared many common characteristics, have such different histories?
Instructor(s): J. Hebrard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.420. George Washington and his World. 3.0 Credits.

This research-intensive course explores eighteenth-century America through George Washington's papers. Although Washington is not the most representative person, he is an exceptionally well-documented one; we use his papers to focus on life in Virginia, North America, and the Atlantic World. Workshop-style research and writing prepare students for the craft of history.
Instructor(s): F. Furstenberg
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.422. Society & Social Change in 18th Century China. 3.0 Credits.

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.423. Multiethnic Japan. 3.0 Credits.

An advanced undergraduate seminar on the intertwined histories of race, ethnicity, and empire in Japan and its former colonies from the early twentieth century to the present.
Instructor(s): H. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.424. Women & Modern Chinese History. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas. Cross listed with East Asian Studies.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.426. Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe. 3.0 Credits.

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.
Instructor(s): J. Marshall
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.437. Late Imperial China: History and Fantasy. 3.0 Credits.

Students in this seminar will look at the ways in which Chinese and Western scholars, novelists, film-makers, and artists have represented China’s Late Imperial period. We will look at the way foreigners have imagined China, and the ways in which Chinese writers past and present have fancifully, nostalgically, and inventively rendered their personal and national pasts. The course will explore issues of historical, geographical, and literary imagination. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.441. Migration and the Americas. 3.0 Credits.

From the Spanish Conquest to contemporary debates in the US, this course looks at the great diversity of migrations that have shaped life in the Americas.
Instructor(s): C. Lurtz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.445. African Fiction as History. 3.0 Credits.

An exploration of Modern African history through the African historical novel.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.456. Getting Medieval? Public Violence in the Middle Ages. 3.0 Credits.

Traditional studies and popular culture often consider violence as a hallmark of medieval life and hence, present it as a fundamental difference between a ‘brutal and violent’ Middle Ages and a ‘civilized and humane’ (Western) modernity. To evaluate these claims and images, we will examine different forms of violence in medieval societies—European and Middle Eastern—especially (i) martyrdom, (ii) communal violence, and (iii) public punishment. After exploring the specific cultural meanings of these practices, we will re-examine those modern polemics that invoke ‘the medieval’ (often vis-à-vis non-Western traditions and societies).
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.482. Historiography Mod China. 3.0 Credits.

A survey of assumptions and approaches in the study of modern Chinese history, as written by Chinese, Japanese, and Western historians.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.486. Jim Crow in America. 3.0 Credits.

Explores the history of legalized racial segregation in the United States from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.488. The Caribbean World, 1450-1850. 3.0 Credits.

The Caribbean was the key focal point of overseas European expansion in the early modern world. This course traces developments in the region from the Tainos to Toussaint Louverture.
Instructor(s): P. Morgan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.494. Senior Honors Seminar. 1.0 Credit.

A two-semester coordinating seminar for history majors writing senior honors theses. Admission is granted by instructor only after the student has selected a faculty thesis advisor. AS.100.494 is to be taken concurrently with AS.100.507 Senior Thesis.
Prerequisites: AS.100.494 is to be taken concurrently with AS.100.507 Senior Thesis.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.495. Senior Honors Seminar. 1.0 Credit.

The Senior Honors Seminar is a coordinating seminar for senior history majors who are writing senior honors theses and wish to graduate with departmental honors. To be taken concurrently with AS.100.508, Senior Thesis.
Corequisites: Co-requisite: AS.100.508
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.497. Year of Revolt: 1968 in Europe. 3.0 Credits.

The shorthand “1968” stands for rebels and revolutions, but also for incremental changes throughout the 1960s that fundamentally changed the post-war order and the Cold War in East and West.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.498. History of the Family & Gender in the United States. 3.0 Credits.

Topics include: history of emotions; politics of sexuality and marriage; impact of race, ethnicity, and class on family life; women and gender inequality. Primarily colonial era through the early twentieth century, with some attention to contemporary politics of family, gender, and sexuality.
Instructor(s): T. Ditz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.499. Film and Propaganda in Nazi Germany. 3.0 Credits.

By examining a range of cinematic works—from explicitly ideological pseudo-documentaries to entertainment films—this course will explore the transmission of propaganda into the everyday culture of Nazi Germany.
Instructor(s): H. Balz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.501. Internship. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): J. Brooks; M. Johnson; T. Shepard.

AS.100.502. Internship. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.507. Senior Thesis. 3.0 Credits.

Two semesters. Senior thesis writers will undertake research in primary materials that will explore a significant historical issue or problem. The DUS will confirm admission as soon as the student has selected a faculty thesis advisor: the outside deadline for confirmation is May 1. AS.100.507 is to be taken concurrently with AS.100.494 Senior Honors Seminar.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.508. Senior Thesis. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar is required for senior history majors who are writing senior honors theses and wish to graduate with departmental honors.
Prerequisites: Pre-requisite: AS.100.507
Instructor(s): J. Brooks; S. Berry
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.535. Independent Study. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.536. Independent Study. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.594. Internship - Summer. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): A. Burgin; E. Rowe; K. Moss; M. Ryan.

AS.100.599. Independent Study. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): G. Paquette; H. Balz; K. Moss.

AS.100.602. The French Revolution.

Introduces graduate students to the rich historiography of the French Revolution. Topics include: revolutionary origins, political culture and radicalization, citizenship, violence, family & gender, the search for stability after the Terror, global revolution, Napoleon’s Brumaire coup.
Instructor(s): L. Mason
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.603. Readings in the Early U.S. Republic/Nineteenth Century.

Readings in the Early U.S. Republic/Nineteenth Century. A continuation of course AS.100.604.
Instructor(s): F. Furstenberg
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.604. Readings in the Early U.S. Republic/Nineteenth Century.

Readings in the Early U.S. Republic/Nineteenth Century
Instructor(s): F. Furstenberg.

AS.100.605. Modern Britain & the British Empire.

This is a graduate reading seminar covering Modern Britain and the British Empire, with particular focus on urban space, labor, gender, and comparing political ideologies.
Instructor(s): K. Hindmarch-Watson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.606. South African History and Historiography.

Reading seminar in the history and historiography of South Africa from the late precolonial period through the present.
Instructor(s): E. Thornberry
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.607. Consumer Revolution in Global Perspective.

First semester of year-long seminar examining transformations in European consumption from 1650 to 1800. Topics include cultural theory; fashion, gender, and social identity; capitalism, retail, and credit; Enlightenment and the public sphere; political economy; overseas empire; globalization; and the Atlantic revolutions.
Instructor(s): M. Kwass
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.608. The Consumer Revolution in Global Perspective.

Second semester of year-long seminar examining transformations in European consumption from 1650 to 1800. Topics include capitalism and consumption; political economy; fashion, gender, and identity; Enlightenment and the public sphere; globalization; empire and colonization; and the Atlantic revolutions.
Instructor(s): M. Kwass
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.611. Kabbalah and the Enlightenment: Reading 'The Manuscript' Found in Saragossa.

The course will discuss the European Enlightenment’s attitude to the Jewish esoteric lore. As a lens to discuss this topic, we shall use Jan Potocki’s novel “The Manuscript Found in Saragossa”.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.612. Everyday Life in Medieval Cairo.

Introduction to sources and methods available to social historians of the medieval Middle East, including close readings of documents (private letters, legal deeds, etc.) and discussing their production and survival. Grad Students only.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.613. Modern Japanese and Korean Histories.

A reading seminar on the interconnected histories and historiographies of Japan and Korea in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Instructor(s): H. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.614. Seminar in Modern Chinese History.

A seminar covering major milestones in research on late imperial and modern Chinese history, primarily in English. Open to undergraduates with the permission of the instructor.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.615. States, Scribes, and Archives: Medieval Arabic Documentary Cultures.

A historical survey of the bureaucratic practices of medieval Islamic states (in comparative perspective); includes clos readings of primary official documents, e.g. petitions, edicts, fiscal receipts, and administrative reports.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.617. Space, Place, and History.

A workshop on the spatial dimension of modern history. Readings will include monographs, some theoretical readings, and student research, mostly focused on the Americas with some comparison with Western Europe. Open to undergraduate juniors and seniors.
Instructor(s): M. Ryan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.618. Historiography of Law and Empire.

Reading seminar covering recent work on the history of law in the context of empire. Emphasis on colonial rule in Africa, with some attention to Asia and the Americas.
Instructor(s): E. Thornberry
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.619. Early Modern France.

Second semester of year-long reading seminar on French history from Louis XIV to the French Revolution. Topics include: absolutism, the Enlightenment, gender and sociability, consumption and trade, the French empire, the French Atlantic, the French Revolution, and the Haitian Revolution.
Instructor(s): M. Kwass
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.620. Early Modern France.

The first part of a two-semester sequence, this seminar examines the history of France and its empire from the seventeenth century to the French Revolution.
Instructor(s): M. Kwass
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.625. The Right and the Far Right in Western Europe, 1870 to the Present.

We will explore both classic and new histories of right-wing and far-right political movements.
Instructor(s): T. Shepard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.627. Histories of Development.

Reading seminar on the history of development as both ideology and practice in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Instructor(s): C. Lurtz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.630. Modern European Imperialism and the History of Sex and Sexuality.

This reading seminar will explore how the history of sexuality has shaped recent historiographies of European empires.
Instructor(s): T. Shepard.

AS.100.631. Ibero-Atlantic History.

A reading seminar on the history and historiography of the Portuguese and Spanish empires c. 1600-1900.
Instructor(s): G. Paquette
Area: Humanities.

AS.100.633. Spain and its Empire.

This graduate seminar will explore the historiography of Spain and its empire, 1480-1700.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe.

AS.100.635. Topics in European Imperial History.

This graduate reading course covers key topics in European Imperial History, c. 1600-1900.
Instructor(s): G. Paquette
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.639. Topics in the History and Sociology of Nationalism.

Advanced topics in the history and sociology of nationalism, with special attention to questions of childhood and education in the age of the nation-state; memory and memory-conflicts; nation and European overseas empire. Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.641. Global Catholicism in the Early Modern Period.

Explores religious culture in medieval and early modern Europe, with an emphasis on spiritual beliefs and practices, relics, miracles, pilgrimage, and saint-making. Emphasis on reading and discussing written sources and visual culture. Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.643. Jewish Paths Through Modernity.

Intensive introduction to the key trends and trajectories in modern Jewish history and the major themes in Jewish historiography. Intended to serve both graduate students outside the Jewish history field and graduate students pursuing a field in modern Jewish history.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.644. Approaches to Brazilian History.

A reading seminar on the history and historiography of Brazil (colonial and national periods). Open to undergraduates with the permission of the instructor.
Instructor(s): G. Paquette
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.645. Race, Law, History.

This seminar examines the relationship of law to the construction of race and inequality in US history, investigating the legal archive through the perspectives of critical race theory and critical legal history.
Instructor(s): M. Jones
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.646. Marvels and Wonder in medieval Arabic Culture.

Explores the concept of marvels in different genres of medieval Arabic culture: Qur'anic exegesis; travel literature; 'ethnography'; cosmography and geography; marvels of the natural world (e.g. hermaphrodites); Muslim views of pre-Islamic ('pagan') monuments.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.648. Crown, Court, and Charter: Political Culture in the High Middle Ages.

Explores mechanisms of political power and the rise of the state in Europe during the High Middle Ages by analyzing royal ideology, administrative growth, legal change, and cultural production.
Instructor(s): A. Lester
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.650. The American South.

Instructor(s): M. Johnson.

AS.100.651. Readings in Urban and Suburban America: The Twentieth Century.

Introduces students to intellectual trends shaping historical treatments of urban and suburban life in twentieth-century America.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly.

AS.100.656. Reading Koselleck.

The course will be devoted to close reading of the works of Reinhardt Koselleck.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.657. Reading Koselleck.

The course will be devoted to close reading of the works of Reinhardt Koselleck.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.661. Racial Literacy in the Archives.

This course explores how to use race as a historical category of analysis, and teaches attendees how to locate how historical actors deploy race and racism to make claims, organize labor and identities, and imagine political possibility.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.671. Play and Violence in Medieval France.

Since the work of Geertz, Huizinga, Bakhtin and Caillois, among others, the intersection of play and violence has been a focal point for historians, anthropologists, literary scholars, even psychologists. This seminar traces the twin themes of violence and play as instantiated by the fighting classes in the High Middle Ages, beginning with the emergence of the tournament and the crusading movement in the eleventh century. By examining sources in Old French and Latin, we will contextualize music, dances, comedies, and contests that accompanied the violent rituals around which French aristocratic life revolved. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): J. Phillips
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.680. Reading Seminar in Atlantic History 1600-1800.

This reading seminar will highlight some of the major new works and wide-ranging genres in this lively, stimulating field.
Instructor(s): P. Morgan.

AS.100.681. Research Seminar in Atlantic History, 1600-1800.

Continuation of AS.100.680
Instructor(s): F. Furstenberg
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.684. Research Seminar in the Atlantic World, 1500-1810.

This seminar selectively explores the emergence and subsequent growth of the Atlantic basin as a site for exchange among and within the continents of Europe, Africa, and the Americas in the early modern era.
Instructor(s): P. Morgan.

AS.100.685. Reading Seminar in Atlantic History.

Instructor(s): P. Morgan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.692. Graduate Reading Seminar in Early American History.

A probing look at various genres and classics ranging from Native Americans to the Early Republic.
Instructor(s): P. Morgan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.695. Problems in U.S. Social & Cultural History.

This is a seminar reading widely in U.S. social and cultural history, ranging chronologically this semester from the mid-18th century to the late 19th century.
Instructor(s): R. Walters.

AS.100.696. Problems in American Society and Culture.

An intensive graduate seminar exploring various topics in US social and cultural history, focusing on the period from the late 19th century to the late 20th century.
Instructor(s): R. Walters.

AS.100.699. Neoliberalism.

Readings on the history, theory, and politics of neoliberalism, from midcentury to the present.
Instructor(s): A. Burgin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.700. American Intellectual History.

Readings in late nineteenth- and twentieth-century American social theory and historical works on related themes.
Instructor(s): A. Burgin.

AS.100.702. European Empires in the Indian Ocean.

A reading overview of Portuguese, Dutch, English and French empire in the Indian Ocean.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.703. Nationhood and Nationalism: theory, historiography, sociologies.

Theories, historiographies, and sociologies of nationhood and nationalism. Nationhood as institutional form, practical category, and site of contestation. Nationalisms and nationalist movements, nation-states and nationalizing states, borderlands, memory struggles. The subjectivities generated by nationalism and national conflict, including forms of national minorityhood. Recent work on national indifference, nation and empire, nation and religion, and supranationalisms and internationalisms.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.711. Approaches to International, Transnational and Global History.

Graduate students will read and analyze classic as well as recent works of International, Transnational and Global History.
Instructor(s): G. Paquette
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.713. Black Womanhood.

What does a usable history of black womanhood (black queer and trans womanhood inclusive) look like? Black women’s history across time and space.
Instructor(s): J. Johnson; M. Jones
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.716. Cultural Theory For Historians.

An examination of modern cultural theories, with emphasis on mass culture and consumerism. Authors include Simmel, Kracauer, Benjamin, Horkheimer, Adorno, Barthes, Debord, Bourdieu, and de Certeau.
Instructor(s): P. Jelavich.

AS.100.721. Topics In African History.

Critical readings on selected themes in African history and historiography.
Instructor(s): S. Berry.

AS.100.724. Sex and Slavery.

Research and methods in the field of sexuality and slavery studies.
Instructor(s): J. Johnson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.728. Historical Writing in the Middle Ages.

The course will begin with readings of literary and critical theory, as a preparation for the study of modes of historical writing in the Middle Ages. We will then read a sampling of medieval historiographical texts, beginning with Eusebius.
Instructor(s): G. Spiegel.

AS.100.729. Reading Seminar: British America and the Early United States in Atlantic Perspective.

Introduction to the history and historiography on British North America and the United States.
Instructor(s): F. Furstenberg.

AS.100.730. Reading Seminar: British America and the Early United States in Atlantic Perspective.

Instructor(s): F. Furstenberg.

AS.100.731. Colonial Africa: French African Empire.

A reading seminar in colonial African history; the focus may be on French African empire.
Instructor(s): P. Larson.

AS.100.732. Urban Space and City People.

Readings and research in urban history focused on the United States since the 18th century with special attention to gender and race.
Instructor(s): M. Ryan.

AS.100.733. Reading Qing Documents.

Open to advanced undergraduates with at least one semester of Classical Chinese. This course has several objectives. First and foremost, it is a hands on document reading class designed to familiarize students with the skills, sources, and reference materials necessary to conduct research in Qing history. To that end, we will spend much of our time reading documents. At the same time, we will engage in problem solving exercises designed to develop and enhance basic research skills. Finally, several important archive-based secondary works in the secondary literature are available on reserve for your reference. These works demonstrate the ways in which historians have recently applied archival skills (and materials).
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong.

AS.100.735. Early Modern Britain.

Instructor(s): J. Marshall.

AS.100.736. Early Modern Britain.

Instructor(s): J. Marshall.

AS.100.744. Twentieth Century France and the French Empire.

We will explore major recent work in the history of France, with particular attention to transnational and imperial questions.
Instructor(s): T. Shepard.

AS.100.749. Social Theory for Historians.

An examination of the works of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber, as examples of the Hegelian, positivist, and hermeneutic traditions of social theory.
Instructor(s): P. Jelavich.

AS.100.750. Victorian Culture and Society.

This course covers major thematic and interpretive approaches to family formations, urban environment, popular nationalism, class cultures, feminism and body politics, Empire and racial thought, commercial culture, the media and concepts of the self.
Instructor(s): J. Walkowitz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.753. Twentieth Century Seminar.

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in 20th century history. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.755. Twentieth Century Seminar.

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in 20th century history. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.756. Reading Seminar in Chinese History.

A seminar covering recent work on late imperial and modern Chinese history, primarily in English.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.760. The Cairo Geniza.

Documentary sources from the Cairo Geniza in Judaeo-Arabic, Arabic, and Hebrew (depending on student interest). Diplomatic, paleography, research methods, historiography, and history of the field. Arabic required, some Hebrew preferred.
Instructor(s): M. Rustow
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.761. History of Capitalism.

Readings on the history of capitalism since the mid-nineteenth century, with an emphasis on the American context.
Instructor(s): A. Burgin.

AS.100.762. History and Historiography of 19th France in Europe and the World.

We will explore recent and classic studies of 19th-century French history, with particular attention to transnational and colonial questions.
Instructor(s): T. Shepard.

AS.100.765. Problems in Women and Gender Studies.

An exploration of recent work in women’s and gender history, focusing on some of the following: sexuality, cultural production, politics, family formation, work, religion, difference, and civic orders.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe; H. Kim.

AS.100.766. Problems in the History of Women & Gender.

An exploration of recent work in modern European and US women's and gender history, focusing on some of the following: sexuality, cultural production, politics, family formation, work, religion, differences, and civic orders. A continuation of AS.100.765.
Instructor(s): T. Ditz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.769. Gender History Workshop.

Workshop for presentation of works-in-progress on the history of women, gender, and/or sexuality, including drafts of dissertation chapters, research papers, talks, and proposals. Students in disciplines other than history are welcome.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe; H. Kim.

AS.100.770. Gender History Workshop.

Workshop for presentation of works-in-progress on the history of women, gender, and/or sexuality, including drafts of dissertation chapters, research papers, talks, and proposals. Students in disciplines other than history are welcome. Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): K. Hindmarch-Watson; T. Ditz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.772. The Indian Ocean and European Empire.

A reading seminar on the history and historiography of European Empire in the Indian Ocean region.
Instructor(s): P. Larson.

AS.100.781. The Seminar.

This course features presentations from invited speakers. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.782. The Seminar.

This course features presentations from invited speakers. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.783. Seminar: Medieval Europe.

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Medieval European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.784. Seminar: Medieval Europe.

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Medieval European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.785. Seminar: Early Modern Europe.

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Early Modern European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.786. Seminar: Early Modern Europe.

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Early Modern European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.787. Seminar: Modern Europe.

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Modern European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.788. General Seminar: Modern Europe.

A graduate workshop in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Modern European History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.789. Seminar: American.

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in American History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.790. General Seminar: America.

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in American History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.791. Seminar: Latin American.

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Latin American History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.792. General Seminar: Latin America.

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in Latin American History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.793. Seminar: African.

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in African History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.794. General Seminar: Africa.

A seminar series in which graduate students, faculty, and invited speakers present their latest research results in African History. Q&A, with an emphasis on critical thinking, intellectual discussions, and written and oral presentations. Course may not meet weekly.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.797. First Year Graduate Workshop.

First year graduate workshop.
Instructor(s): A. Burgin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.798. First Year Graduate Workshop.

First year graduate workshop.
Instructor(s): A. Burgin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.801. Dissertation Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.802. Dissertation Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.803. Independent Study.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.804. Independent Study.

Instructor(s): A. Burgin; G. Paquette; H. Kim; S. Berry; W. Rowe.

AS.100.821. Fall Practicum.

Instructor(s): W. Rowe.

AS.100.822. Spring Practicum.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.890. Independent Study.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.100.891. Summer Practicum.

Instructor(s): Staff.

Cross Listed Courses

History of Art

AS.010.330. Art of the Caliphates: Visual Culture and Competition in the Medieval Islamic World. 3.0 Credits.

Despite its modern-day association with a fringe extremist movement, the term “caliphate” was traditionally used to describe the Muslim world at large, the political and spiritual ruler of which bore the title of caliph. The original Islamic caliphate was established in the seventh century as a vast empire centered on the Middle East and extending deep into Africa, Asia, and Europe. It soon broke apart into a series of competing powers, until in the tenth century, three rival dynasties—the Baghdad-based Abbasids, the Spanish Umayyads, and the Fatimids of North Africa—each claimed to be the rightful caliphate. This course will examine how these fascinating political developments and conflicts played out in the realm of art and architecture between the seventh and thirteenth centuries. As well as palaces, mosques, and commemorative buildings, the course will look at media ranging from ceramics and metalwork to textiles and illustrated manuscripts, with many of the artifacts being viewed firsthand in local museum collections. These works will be considered in relation to such themes as patronage, audience, ceremony, and meaning. Particular attention will be paid to how the various caliphates—both in emulation of and competition with one another—used visual culture as a powerful tool to assert their legitimacy.
Instructor(s): U. Rustem
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.425. Patronage and Power: The Art of the Book in the Middle Ages. 3.0 Credits.

This research seminar surveys the rich history of manuscript painting in the Middle Ages through the lens of patronage. By focusing on elite patrons – i.e. Popes, Clerics, Holy Roman Emperors, Princes, Princesses, and other ruling figures – we will investigate how changes in style from the early Christian period through the fifteenth century reveal the fluid nature of politics and power during this volatile time period. We will visit local collections of manuscripts (e.g. the Walters Art Museum) and make use of the extensive holdings of medieval facsimiles in Special Collections.
Instructor(s): C. Lakey
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.622. Ceremonial, Diplomacy, and Gift-Giving in Ottoman Visual Culture.

As a major global power straddling three continents, the Ottoman Empire developed a rich and diversified ceremonial culture aimed at impressing local and international audiences alike. This seminar will explore the ways in which works of art and architecture provided settings and apparatus for, and were themselves shaped and enlivened by, the ceremonial acts in which they featured. Covering the period between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, we will address a range of case studies—including mosque inaugurations, royal processions, the reception of foreign ambassadors, and the exchange of diplomatic gifts—with regard to their sociopolitical, visual, material, and spatial contexts. A major concern of the seminar will be the question of how Ottoman ceremonies, together with their staging and attendant art forms, were adapted in response to changing conditions and audiences, particularly with the shift from the early modern to the modern period. While our focus will be on the Ottoman Empire and its interactions with the surrounding world, the course will also consider the ceremonial cultures of two other great Islamic polities, Iran and Mughal India, which provide telling points of contrast to the Ottoman case.
Instructor(s): U. Rustem
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.627. Patronage and Power: The Art of the Book in the Middle Ages.

This research seminar surveys the rich history of manuscript painting in the Middle Ages through the lens of patronage. By focusing on elite patrons – i.e. Popes, Clerics, Holy Roman Emperors, Princes, Princesses, and other ruling figures – we will investigate how changes in style from the early Christian period through the fifteenth century reveal the fluid nature of politics and power during this volatile time period. We will visit local collections of manuscripts (e.g. the Walters Art Museum) and make use of the extensive holdings of medieval facsimiles in Special Collections.
Instructor(s): C. Lakey
Area: Humanities.

Classics

AS.040.601. Italian Renaissance Humanism and Modern Humanities.

This course will reflect on certain key moments in the development of Latinate and Italian Renaissance humanism and will also include reading and discussion of certain recent landmark contributions to the history of the modern humanities.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza.

English

AS.060.633. Biography and African American Subjects from the 19th and 20th Centuries.

This course will read through contemporary biographical treatments of prominent 19th and 20th century African American writers to explore the prominent ideological predispositions as well as the structure of archival sourcing in the creation of life-writing on black subjects. Students will make research trips to the Library of Congress, the University of Delaware, Morgan State University and other local archives for instruction in research methodology and the collection of primary source materials. Student final projects will use primary archival sources to intervene in debates about the interpretation of historical subjects and historical events.
Instructor(s): L. Jackson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Film and Media Studies

AS.061.396. Modern Paris on Film. 3.0 Credits.

This course uses French film to examine the history of twentieth-century Paris. We will consider how filmmakers interpreted the social, political, and technological transformations that shaped Paris in the modern era, treating movies as expressions of change and means by which filmmakers comment on it. Taught in English. $50 lab fee.
Instructor(s): L. Mason
Area: Humanities.

AS.061.397. French Masculinities. 3.0 Credits.

Examines changing ideals of masculinity in France after 1960 as they found expression on film, rooting the work of iconic stars and directors in their cultural, political and historical contexts.
Instructor(s): L. Mason
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.061.421. History and Film. 3.0 Credits.

How do films inform, shape, or fundamentally alter our sense of the past? What are the strengths and limitations of cine-history? This course pairs traditional and avant-garde fiction films and documentaries with essays about history, historiography, memory and the political uses of the past to investigate fast-changing relationships between image and text, film and history. Lab fee: $50 Counts toward 300 or 400-level critical studies requirement.
Instructor(s): L. Mason
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Anthropology

AS.070.290. Modern South Asia: Bangladesh/Pakistan. 3.0 Credits.

Bangladesh and Pakistan, two major regional players in South Asia, originate in the 1947 Partition of India and shared nationhood between 1947 and 1971, ending with the War of Independence in 1971 in which Bangladesh separated from Pakistan. Since that time the two nation-states have been on different paths that have sometimes mirrored each other. This course brings together contemporary works of national histories, social movements and cultural production to consider the politics of self-differentiation and the points of convergences.
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.318. The Atlantic World. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores the formation of the South Atlantic through a reading of historical and ethnographic texts. We examine the making of history and culture as contentious fields of struggle
Instructor(s): A. Angelini
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.352. Evolution, Ecology, Becoming. 3.0 Credits.

The concept of evolution is central to social theory. Originating in the question of the species, it has moved into questions of human ecology, cultural forms and modes of thought. While it remains a deeply contested, often criticized concept, particularly in its neo-Darwinian manifestation, it orients anthropological thinking in ways that are as yet to be examined. Reaching into the archives of anthropology and other cognate disciplines, this course will examine the writings of Lyell, Darwin, Marx, Morgan, Boas, Steward, Bateson, Ingold among others. Co-listed with AS.070.610
Instructor(s): A. Goodfellow; N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.605. Anthropology and the Everyday.

Analysis of the everyday groans under the theoretical weight of concepts such “modernity,” “governmentality,” “capitalism,” “globalization” and more recently “security.” What might a sharper focus on the everyday yield in terms of its own analytical frameworks and empirical descriptions? We read some contemporary greats (Foucault, Derrida, Cavell, de Certeau, Lefebvre). Simultaneously we look at how each has been received within ethnography by reading anthropologists in engagement with them (Mahmood, Ivy, Das, Siegel, Harvey). We ask what critical stakes anthropology maintains in relation to the everyday.
Instructor(s): N. Khan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Near Eastern Studies

AS.130.126. Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt. 3.0 Credits.

To provide a basic introduction to Egyptian Religion, with a special focus on the nature of the gods and how humans interact with them. We will devote particular time to the Book of the Dead and to the "magical" aspects of religion designed for protective purposes.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.243. Hammurabi in the Digital Age: Digital Humanities and the Ancient Middle East. 3.0 Credits.

The world’s earliest poetry, cities, and empires all hail from the ancient Near East, but the remains of its remarkable cultures are under direct threat by the current conflicts in the Middle East. Digital technologies can help us to study, preserve, and recreate the artifacts that remain, and this class combines the use of such technologies with the study of the ancient world, offering students the chance to critically engage with modern scholarship methods and create their own digital resources, as well as gain familiarity with key themes and features of the ancient Near East, including urbanization, internationalism, and literature.
Instructor(s): M. Lewis
Area: Humanities.

History of Science & Technology

AS.140.105. History of Medicine. 3.0 Credits.

Course provides an overview of the medical traditions of six ancient cultures; the development of Greek and Islamic traditions in Europe; and the reform and displacement of the Classical traditions during the Scientific Revolution.
Instructor(s): G. Pomata
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.140.146. History of Public Health in East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the history of disease, epidemics, and public health responses in East Asia from the 17th-20th centuries. This public health history emphasizes the interactions, connections, and comparisons among China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan.
Instructor(s): M. Hanson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.313. Psychopolitics: Science, Mind, and Society. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the history of psychiatry and the mind sciences as social and political institutions in the United States, from the country's founding to the present. Each class meeting will explore a set of "alternative facts" emerging in the setting of a landmark political dispute in US history. Students will read, discuss, and research claims made by competing scientific experts about who should participate in American society and to what extent. Overall, the course is geared toward students interested in making sense of the exchange between scientific knowledge and social politics.
Instructor(s): S. Scharff
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.322. Follow the money: Science, technology, and the ‘knowledge economy,’ c.1800-present. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the historical emergence of knowledge-driven economies, paying special attention to the funding, development, and use of science and technology for commercial purposes.
Instructor(s): J. Mercelis
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.381. History of Reproduction. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates the history of reproduction in American medicine, science, politics, and culture. It explores changing ideas about reproductive bodies, sexuality, and the family as well as practices of contraception, conception, and childbirth.
Instructor(s): B. Gurtler
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.413. The White Plague: History of Tuberculosis. 3.0 Credits.

Examination of interrelated scientific, medical, social, and cultural dimensions of tuberculosis from early modernity to the present in various geographical and cultural settings. Extensive reading, research based on primary sources. Juniors and Seniors only. Instructor's permission for all others. Cross-listed with History and Anthropology.
Instructor(s): D. Todes
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.441. Metaphor in Science and Medicine. 3.0 Credits.

Science and medicine are permeated by metaphors. Generated by every domain of human experience, these metaphors embed scientific and medical thought in historically specific times, places, experiences, issues, attitudes and cultures. We will explore the dynamics of metaphorical thinking and examine such specific examples as “The Great Chain of Being,” Darwin’s “struggle for existence” and “natural selection,” the “reflex” from Descartes to Pavlov to cybernetics, body and mind as clock, factory and computer; illness as imbalance and invasion, and the metaphorical associations of tuberculosis and cancer.
Instructor(s): D. Todes
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.674. Science and Medicine in Early Modern Atlantic World Culture.

How were changes in scientific and medical ideas reflected in cultural products of the early modern Atlantic world? We will study these ideas as they appeared in literary genres such as poetry,utopias, natural histories and travel narratives. Likewise, we will examine the visual culture of the Atlantic space for clues about changing conceptions about the natural world. Our expedition will encompass Anglophone, French and Hispanic regions, and will pay careful attention to hybrid cultural products that reflect the interaction between indigenous cultures and the (changing) European understanding of the natural world.
Instructor(s): M. Portuondo.

Islamic Studies

AS.194.201. Jews, Muslims, and Christians in the Medieval World. 3.0 Credits.

The three most widespread monotheisms have much more in common than is generally portrayed: a common founding figure, a partly shared succession of prophets, closely comparable ethical concerns and religious practices, a history of coexistence and of cultural, religious, social and economic interaction. This course will focus on a number of key texts and historical events that have shaped the relationships between Jews, Muslims, and Christians during the Middle Ages and contributed to their reciprocal construction of the image of the “other.” The geographical center of the course will be the Mediterranean and the Near and Middle East, a true cradle of civilizations, religions, and exchange.
Instructor(s): G. Ferrario.

German & Romance Languages & Literatures

AS.211.202. Freshman Seminar: A Thousand Years of Jewish Culture. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the history and culture of Ashkanzi Jews through their vernacular, Yiddish, from the settlement of Jews in German-speaking lands in medieval times to the present day. Particular emphasis will be placed on the responses of Yiddish-speaking Jews to the challenges posed by modernity to a traditional society. In addition to studying a wide range of texts—including fiction, poetry, memoir, song, and film—students will learn how to read the Yiddish alphabet, and will prepare a meal of traditional Ashkenazi dishes. No prior knowledge of Yiddish is necessary for this course.
Instructor(s): B. Lang
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.265. Panorama of German Thought. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the rich terrain of German literature and philosophical thought, from Kant to today. At each meeting, we will investigate canonical texts of the German intellectual tradition, with an eye to discovering their unity as “German” philosophical and cultural artifacts and icons, as well as with an interest in establishing their well-deserved place in the wider, global discourses of world literature. In this way, we will learn to think critically in and with these important literary and philosophical texts from German-speaking lands as a means of viewing and appreciating the full panorama of German thought. Among authors read and discussed will be Kant, Goethe, Schiller, Hegel, Kleist, Heine, Fontane, Nietzsche, Freud, Kafka, Heidegger, Mann and Bernhard. Readings and discussion will be in English. German is appreciated but not required.
Instructor(s): M. Dornbach
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.211.328. Berlin Between the Wars: Literature, Art, Music, Film. 3.0 Credits.

Explore the diverse culture of Berlin during the heyday of modernism. During the Weimar Republic, Berlin became a center for theater, visual arts, film, music, and literature that would have an outsize impact on culture throughout the world and the twentieth century. The thinkers, artists, and writers drawn to interwar Berlin produced a body of work that encapsulates many of the issues of the period: the effect of the modern city on society; “the New Woman”; socialist revolutionary politics; the rise of the Nazis; and economic turmoil. While learning about interwar Berlin's cultural diversity, we will take a special look at works by Jewish writers and artists that engage with the question of ethnic, religious, and national identity in the modern world, specifically in the context of Berlin’s rich Jewish history and the rise of anti-Semitism in the interwar period. All readings will be in translation.
Instructor(s): S. Spinner
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.341. Power and Resistance in French Political Thought. 3.0 Credits.

Even as a strong, divine-right monarchy emerged in France, following the Renaissance wars of religion, rebellious French thinkers never stopped questioning the foundations of power. They focused critically not only on the claims of authority issuing from the top, but also on the submissiveness of the governed and the reach of propaganda. This course examines how power shapes minds and bodies, from absolutism to the Revolution, to democratic laïcité. Readings include works by La Boétie, Montaigne, Loyseau, Bayle, Rousseau, Saint-Just, Maistre, Tocqueville, Foucault, Lefort, Rancière and the Assemblée Nationale. Readings and discussion in English.
Instructor(s): E. Russo
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.394. Brazilian Culture & Civilization. 3.0 Credits.

The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Portuguese is required. This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)
Instructor(s): F. De Azeredo Cerqueira
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.211.449. America Through French Eyes: French Travellers to America. 3.0 Credits.

From early colonial efforts in the sixteenth century through the time of the great political revolutions and down to the present, America has exercised a deep fascination on the French. This course will look at French representations of America in art, literature and political thought across the centuries. Through a range of materials including travel accounts, essays, novels, maps, paintings and film, we will investigate how French perceptions of America have shifted over time, often in response to changes in French society and culture. All texts will be read in translation. Course work will include visits to JHU’s Special Collections and the Walters Art Museum downtown
Instructor(s): S. Miglietti
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.479. Dante's Journey through the Afterlife. 3.0 Credits.

Dante's Divine Comedy presents a complete picture of the medieval world-view in all its aspects: physical (the structure of the cosmos), historical (the major actors from Adam to Dante himself) and moral (a complete system of right and wrong). Dante shows how the Christian religion portrayed itself, other religions, the nature of God, humans, angels and devils, and human society. We will explore these topics both from the viewpoint of Dante's own time, and in terms of its relevance to our own societal and cultural concerns.
Instructor(s): W. Stephens
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.212.341. Power and Resistance: Approaches to French Political Thought.. 3.0 Credits.

Even as a coherent, rational conception of state power emerged in France in as early as the Renaissance, French thinkers never stopped challenging the ways by which power justified itself in order to foster obedience and consensus. In so doing, they focused critically as much on the claims of sovereignty issuing from the top as on the willingness of the governed to submit to them. The course will examine the dialectic between the legitimation and delegitimation of power, from the Renaissance wars of religion to the Revolution and beyond: the haunting fear of the corruption and death of the political body; the notion of permanent crisis; the right to revoke the social contract; the reach of power in shaping minds and bodies. Readings may include works by La Boétie, Bodin, Bayle, Rousseau, Sade, Saint-Just, Constant, Maistre, Tocqueville, Foucault, Lefort and Rancière. Readings and discussion in English.
Instructor(s): E. Russo; W. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.212.699. Cultures of Criticism from the Classics to Foucault.

From fault-finding to the crossover of aesthetic and political judgment, criticism never loses sight of its medical cognates critical and crisis. This course examines the emergence and the transformations of critical judgment in the arts, culture and politics, from the early days of its collusion with French monarchical propaganda, to the critical genealogies of the Enlightenment, to the postrevolutionary critique of history, to Foucault’s critique of practices of veridiction. Works by Perrault, Bayle, Diderot, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Cassirer, Koselleck, Derrida, Barthes, Bourdieu, Foucault. Taught in English; most texts available in translation, but knowledge of French recommended.
Instructor(s): E. Russo
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.706. Literature, Museums, Mimesis.

Can museums be literary? Can literature be museal? Throughout the twentieth century and into the present, the museum has repeatedly challenged models of representation, none more so than mimesis, both as aesthetic theory and representational practice. This has been a role played by museums, both in their traditional guises as repositories of objects and — as André Malraux presciently had it — as “imaginary museums.” This course will examine the larger disruption of mimesis, and more specifically literary realism, through the particular catalyzing effects of museums. We will deal with two primary museological phenomena: first, the introduction of the “primitive other” into European modernity via ethnographic museums; second, the museological commemoration and representation of trauma, specifically of the Holocaust. Special attention will be paid to discursive, formal, and rhetorical locations of overlap between the museal and the literary, including ekphrasis, linearity, volume, and collection. Readings will include fiction, poetry, and theoretical texts, as well as secondary sources examining particular museums and exhibitions. All texts in English.
Instructor(s): S. Spinner
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.213.749. Modern Subjectivities: Legal, Economic, Political.

The course explores some aspects of the contradictory constitution of the modern subject as a subject that is split, opposed, in tension. Two archetypal figures of this split are the “bourgeois,” as the social-economic subject, and the “citoyen” or “citizen,” as the political subject. The bourgeois and the citoyen are defined by distinct and opposing conceptions of the “will,” of education (Bildung), and of the relation between law and nature, normativity and facticity. In asking how to understand the conflictual relationship between these two basic figures of the modern subject, the course will focus especially on the paradoxes of “individual rights” (subjektive Rechte) as the fundamental mechanism of modern subject-formation. How do rights both empower subjects, while also contributing to forms of their disempowerment? To what extent do rights contain and organize the tensions between subjects understood as social or economic, and as political? CLASS BEGINS FEBRUARY 25 AND ENDS APRIL 1.Readings will include excerpts from (among others): Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Horkheimer and Adorno, Heidegger, Foucault, Balibar and Rancière.
Instructor(s): C. Menke; R. Tobias
Area: Humanities.

AS.214.347. Petrarch and the Beginnings of the Renaissance. 3.0 Credits.

This course will focus on the life, work, and thought of Francesco Petrarca, or "Petrarch." Though known today primarily as the author of Italian love poetry, Petrarch considered his Latin work more lasting. We will explore both sides of his work, the vernacular and Latin (in English translation) to come to an understanding of his place in medieval intellectual history, the history of philosophy, and the history of literature.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.390. Machiavelli: A Renaissance Master. 3.0 Credits.

Who was Niccolò Machiavelli? The author of the Italian Renaissance's most famous book, The Prince, he also wrote histories, commentaries, comedies, and letters. And he had a career as a prominent Florentine diplomat, which ended tragically but informed everything he wrote. This course is intended to offer students an introduction to Machiavelli's major works and to the intellectual, social, and political contexts that shaped his thinking.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.437. The Intellectual World of the Italian Renaissance. 3.0 Credits.

This course is intended to familiarize students with the intellectual world of Renaissance Italy, or more specifically, the “lost” Italian Renaissance of the long fifteenth century, from the time when Petrarch (1304-74) was in full maturity to the 1520s. During this period, most Italian intellectuals wrote the majority of their work in Latin – not the Medieval Latin of the Church and the universities but in what they saw as a more authentic Latin, like that used in ancient Rome, in the time of Cicero, Virgil, Quintilian, and others. These Renaissance “humanists,” inspiring by the example of Roman, and eventually Greek, antiquity, believed that they were carrying out a cultural revival. Who were these humanists? Why then did they choose Latin (and a reformed Latin at that) instead of their “native” tongue as the language in which to effect this renewal? What did this choice afford them in terms of literature and philosophy? Why was this phase of literary and philosophical history undervalued in the evolution of modern scholarship? By the end of this course, you should be able to formulate answers to those questions.Some of the works of these authors still await editions, lying in manuscript libraries or difficult-to-access early printed editions. Many have now had their Latin texts edited, and a number have recently been translated into English. Students therefore have the chance to explore work in a field that is new and growing. A separate Renaissance Latin reading group will accompany the course for those who have studied Latin.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.477. Magic, Marvel, and Monstrosity in the Renaissance. 3.0 Credits.

Magic, Monstrosity,and Marvels or Wonders call into question what we see and experience: what is reality, what is illusion; what’s natural and what’s supernatural? What’s human and what’s more, or less, than human? During the Renaissance, ideas about the nature of reality were bound up with questions and issues very different from those of our time. With the exact sciences still being invented, the nature of the world was much less hard and fast for Renaissance people than it is for the modern educated person. The literary masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance provide vivid illustrations of the early modern sense of wonder. Foremost among these are the theatrical comedies which Italian authors revived in imitation of the ancients, and the romances, especially Ariosto’s Orlando furioso (1532) and Tasso’s Gerusalemme liberata (1581). These and other works influenced ideas about magical and marvelous phenomena across Europe for centuries to come. Works will be read and discussed in English. Italian majors and graduate students (who should enroll in section 2) will attend a weekly supplemental discussion in Italian and compose their written work in Italian.
Instructor(s): W. Stephens
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.479. Dante Visits the Afterlife: The Divine Comedy. 3.0 Credits.

Dante’s Divina commedia is the greatest long poem of the Middle Ages; some say the greatest poem of all time. We will study the Commedia critically to find: (1) What it reveals about the worldview of late-medieval Europe; (2) how it works as poetry; (3) its relation to the intellectual cultures of pagan antiquity and Latin (Catholic) Christianity; (4) its presentation of political and social issues; (5) its influence on intellectual history, in Italy and elsewhere; (6) the challenges it presents to modern readers and translators; (7) what it reveals about Dante’s understanding of cosmology, world history and culture. We will read and discuss the Commedia in English, but students will be expected to familiarize themselves with key Italian terms and concepts. Students taking section 02 (for 4 credits) will spend an additional hour working in Italian at a time to be mutually decided upon by students and professor.
Instructor(s): W. Stephens
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.637. The Intellectual World of the Italian Renaissance.

This course is intended to familiarize students with the intellectual world of Renaissance Italy, or more specifically, the “lost” Italian Renaissance of the long fifteenth century, from the time when Petrarch (1304-74) was in full maturity to the 1520s. During this period, most Italian intellectuals wrote the majority of their work in Latin – not the Medieval Latin of the Church and the universities but in what they saw as a more authentic Latin, like that used in ancient Rome, in the time of Cicero, Virgil, Quintilian, and others. These Renaissance “humanists,” inspiring by the example of Roman, and eventually Greek, antiquity, believed that they were carrying out a cultural revival. Who were these humanists? Why then did they choose Latin (and a reformed Latin at that) instead of their “native” tongue as the language in which to effect this renewal? What did this choice afford them in terms of literature and philosophy? Why was this phase of literary and philosophical history undervalued in the evolution of modern scholarship? By the end of this course, you should be able to formulate answers to those questions.Some of the works of these authors still await editions, lying in manuscript libraries or difficult-to-access early printed editions. Many have now had their Latin texts edited, and a number have recently been translated into English. Students therefore have the chance to explore work in a field that is new and growing. A separate Renaissance Latin reading group will accompany the course for those who have studied Latin.
Instructor(s): C. Celenza
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.748. Vico and the Old Science.

Giambattista Vico’s Principi di scienza nuova d’intorno alla comune natura delle nazioni (1725, 1730, 1744) was intended to found an “ideal” and “eternal” model of human development, valid for all societies. Vico considered his project both philology and philosophy, and tried to revolutionize thinking about human history as practiced between about 1550 and 1700, by exposing misconceptions behind attempts to square “sacred history” (the presumed historical accuracy of the Bible) with “profane” or non Judeo-Christian concepts of history, both ancient and modern. The culture shock underlying this “old science” stimulated Vico to base philosophical and historical knowledge of mythology on a conception of narration. Recommended Course background: Italian and Latin
Instructor(s): W. Stephens
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.215.324. Reading Terror: The Migrant in the Trans-national Narrative: Abancay, Lima, London, Alabama, Madrid, Connecticut. 3.0 Credits.

The readings bring into consideration the question of terror (of war) and displacement as experienced by migrants in novels by prize winning authors such as Arguedas, Vargas Llosa, Alarcon, Riesco, Roncagiolo and Silva Passuni.
Instructor(s): S. Castro-Klaren
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.215.350. Mexico: A cultural history from the Olmecs to the Mexican revolution of 1910. 3.0 Credits.

The offers a survey of Mexican culture from the formative years of the Olmecs (2000 b.c.) to the Mexican revolution of 1910. History of ideas, matrix social formations, art and literature are the focus of this historical overview.
Instructor(s): S. Castro-Klaren
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.215.406. Novelist Intellectuals. 3.0 Credits.

What does a novelist’s op-ed about economics have to do with her literary writing? In what ways does a fiction writer’s essays on the environment inform how we read her novels? What happens when we find the political opinions of a writer objectionable? This undergraduate seminar will consider what the Spanish writer Francisco Ayala termed “novelist intellectuals,” that is, literary writers who actively participate in a society’s public sphere. Considering writers from Madrid to New York, from London to Buenos Aires, we will ask how one should hold a novelist’s fictional and non-fictional writings in the balance and explore ways of reading that allow us to consider the public intellectual side and the aesthetic side of a novelist together.
Instructor(s): B. Seguin
Area: Humanities.

AS.215.413. Cuba y España. 3.0 Credits.

La frase “más se perdió en Cuba” alude al singular rango de la antigua Provincia de Ultramar en el mapa geopolítico del colonialismo hispánico. Hemos de estudiar la prolongada relación entre España y Cuba, desde 1492 al presente, a través de materiales literarios, crónicas, artes plásticas, música y medios sociales al corriente. Enseñado íntegramente en español.
Prerequisites: AS.210.311
Instructor(s): E. Gonzalez
Area: Humanities.

AS.215.452. Che Guevara and Magical Realism. 3.0 Credits.

His detractors often compare him to Hitler while many of his admirers see in him a saint and a martyr like Jesus Christ. Cuban school children are taught to be like him. Che was killed in 1967, the same year in which Gabriel García Márquez published Cien años de soledad (One Hundred Years of Solitute). We will study Guevara's life as a militant revolutionary through his own writings and the exorbitant style known as realismo mágico, crafted by García Márquez, one of Che's great admirers. Four movies will anchor our visual take on the myth and the man: Los diarios de motocicleta (Walter Salles, 2004), Che I and Che II (Steven Soderbergh, 2008), and Wall Street (Oliver Stone, 1987). The nineteen-eighties narcotraffic boom in Colombia and the cocaine-driven financial high times during the late Reagan years will frame our study. Taught in Spanish
Instructor(s): E. Gonzalez
Area: Humanities.

AS.215.490. Reading Ancient Mexico Today: Amoxtli, Tlacuilos and the Florentine Codex. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers an in depth study of "Mexican" writing systems before and after the Spanish Conquest in 1521. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the tlacuilos--nathuatl intellectuals-- in the writing of the Florentine Codex (1584), the largest surviving compendium on pre-conquest Mexico.
Instructor(s): S. Castro-Klaren
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.215.646. The Narrative of Conquest in the Andes, 1530 - 1680.

Departing form narratology and the perspective of post-colonial studies, the course will analyze the narrative of conquest as developed by Cieza de Leon, Garcilaso de la Vega, Inca, Guaman Poma, Jose de Acosta and William Prescott.
Instructor(s): S. Castro-Klaren.

AS.215.650. Mexico and the Invention of America.

Departing from O'Gorman, the course will entail a reconsideration of the discursive invention of Mexico-America. Anonymous, Sahagun, Clavijero, Humboldt, Dussel and Alzandua will conform part of the readings. Taught in English
Instructor(s): S. Castro-Klaren
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Sociology

AS.230.166. Chinese Migration in Modern World History 1500's-2000's. 3.0 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course applies theories of economic sociology to examine the effects of Chinese overseas migration on modern world economy from the sixteenth century to the contemporary era. It examines the contribution of overseas Chinese to the development of capitalism in the following junctures: the East-West economic integration in the pre-modern era, China's modern transformation after the Opium War (1839-1842), the making of US national economy in the early twentieth century, as well as the postwar economic miracles in the Pacific Rim, among others. Special Note: Fufills History requirement for GSCD track students.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.377. Colonialism and Anti-Colonialism. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism and anti-colonial movements. It focuses on the establishment of the colonial division of labor, comparative colonialism, identity formation, and nationalism as well as anti-colonial movement.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Comparative Thought and Literature

AS.300.139. Introduction to Intellectual History. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers a conceptual and historical introduction to Intellectual History. What makes the “history of ideas” different from the history of other objects? What, if anything, distinguishes the history of ideas from the history of philosophy? What is it exactly that we call “ideas”? In what sense do they have a history? These are examples of the kind of questions addressed in the course.
Instructor(s): P. Marrati
Area: Humanities.

Humanities Center

AS.300.228. Brain and Society. 3.0 Credits.

On April 2, 2013, President Obama unveiled the Brain Activity Map Project, a 100 million dollar investment to map the single-celled neurons composing the human brain. Scientific in its aim, the project is culturally significant as well. Popular websites lumosity.com and neuronetlearning.com offer brain-exercises to boost intelligence, while the emergent academic fields neurophilosophy, neuroethics, and neurohistory borrow from the brain sciences. The interaction between the brain and society, however, is by no means new. In this course, we will investigate the origins of brain maps and trace their reception in nineteenth-century European and American literature, philosophy, and politics. Topics include phrenology, the nervous system, psychopathology, and brain localization, and these fields’ resonance in German Idealism, Victorian literature, French anthropology, and American fiction. The course is reading intensive.
Instructor(s): L. McGrath
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Comparative Thought and Literature

AS.300.311. Introduction to Intellectual History. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers a conceptual and historical introduction to Intellectual History. What makes the “history of ideas” different from the history of other objects? What, if anything, distinguishes the history of ideas from the history of philosophy? What is it exactly that we call “ideas”? In what sense do they have a history? These are examples of the kind of questions addressed in the course.
Instructor(s): H. Sirin; P. Marrati
Area: Humanities.

Humanities Center

AS.300.365. Desire in the Fin de siècle. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the obsession with desire at the turn of the 20th century in literature, drama, philosophy and social thought and its implications for notions of self and community in modernity. We will read comparatively across European, Russian and American cultures, including Stoker's Dracula, Hamsun's Hunger, plays by Chekhov, Strindberg, Ibsen, Wilde, and stories by Tolstoy, Gorky, Chopin and Larsen.
Instructor(s): A. Eakin Moss
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.300.383. History of Madness from the Bible to DSM-V. 3.0 Credits.

Madmen, lunatics or the insane, have seen an extraordinary variety of responses and attitudes across the centuries. Whether seen as a “true” phenomenon or as socially constructed “madness” was defined and treated, examined and controlled, diagnosed and “cured” according to the spirit of the time. This course will follow the varied social imageries of “madness” throughout Western history, from the Bible to the contemporary and controversial Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM) in its most recent 5th edition. Alongside primary texts by Hippocrates, Avicenna, Pinel, and Freud and secondary texts by Michel Foucault, Ian Hacking, Edward Shorter, and Elaine Showalter, among others, we will acquaint ourselves with first-person accounts of “madness” and its different forms of treatment, ranging from lunatic asylum, through electric-shock treatments and lobotomies to psychoanalysis. The course will explore the interaction between the historical and social, scientific and political as well as economical factors that have shaped the views of “madness” and its treatment.
Instructor(s): O. Ophir
Area: Humanities.

East Asian Studies

AS.310.106. Introduction to Korean History and Culture. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers a comprehensive overview of Korean history and culture from ancient times to the modern era. Through primary, secondary, and audio-visual sources, students will become familiar not only with the overall contours of the entirety of Korean history, but also with its cultural and religious legacy. The course combines lectures and class discussions.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.108. Introduction to Chinese Fiction and Drama. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce Chinese fiction and drama from the Tang dynasty (618-906) to the early Republican period (1911-1949), such as the romantic dramas of Tang Xianzu and the uncanny tales of Pu Songling. Students will draw connection between these vibrant literary genres and the cultural and socio-historical events that shaped imperial China. Key topics include story-telling, romance, urban culture, gender, reincarnation, and many more. Students will acquire skills in how to read, analyze and discuss the rich legacy of Chinese fiction and drama in translation and to think critically about these writings. Reading materials are all in English.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.201. Freshman Seminar: Korean History through Film and Literature. 3.0 Credits.

In this course, students will engage with select topics in Korean history from premodern and modern times and examine how the past has been represented through various forms of film and literature. This will be combined with readings of academic articles to allow students to gauge the distance between scholarship and cultural expressions of history. Through this, students will be introduced to the highly contested and often polarizing nature of Korean history and the competition surrounding historical memory.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.301. Documentary Photography in a Changing China. 3.0 Credits.

This course aims to inspire students to explore the impacts, meanings, and explanations of social transformation in contemporary China, via the lens of documentary photography. The photographic images of selective topics will include the products of photojournalism and documentary photography, and several documentary films, by both Chinese and non-Chinese photographers. While one picture is worth thousand words, one picture may also provoke countless interpretations. Students are strongly encouraged to read broadly about different aspects of social transformations in contemporary China, and to select and curate their own subjects of photo images. The spirit of comparative study of documentary photography of China and other parts of world will be strongly encouraged. Active class participation is imperative. A small exhibition on the campus will be organized by the Spring semester. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).
Instructor(s): G. He
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.308. The Frontier in Late Imperial China. 3.0 Credits.

The tremendous expansion of Chinese frontiers during the late imperial period forced the state and those who lived within it to grapple with complex problems of governance, ethnicity, and the geographic extent of "China". Issues and concerns associated with the massive Chinese frontiers have extended into the present; hence, no one can appreciate the current problems plaguing China's northwestern, southwestern, or coastal regions without an understanding of its historical antecedents. This seminar is designed to introduce major scholarly works and theoretical frameworks on the Chinese frontier.
Instructor(s): J. Bandy
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.402. Labor Politics in China. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the transformation of labor relations in China over the past century. It will cover the origins of the labor movement, the changes brought about by the 1949 Revolution, the industrial battles of the Cultural Revolution, the traumatic restructuring of state-owned enterprises over the past two decades, the rise of private enterprise and export-oriented industry, the conditions faced by migrant workers today, and recent developments in industrial relations and labor conflict. The course is designed for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Cross-listed with Sociology and International Studies (CP).
Instructor(s): G. He; J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Interdepartmental

AS.360.147. Freshmen Seminar:Adam Smith and Karl Marx. 3.0 Credits.

This course will compare the ideas of Adam Smith, the most famous proponent of free trade and free enterprise, with those of Karl Marx, the greatest critic of capitalism. For freshmen only.
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger; P. Jelavich
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Program in Latin American Studies

AS.361.130. Introduction to Latin American Studies. 3.0 Credits.

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of Latin America, analyzing political and cultural aspects, chronologically organized. We will begin studying the origins of the multi–ethnic societies, starting with the ancient civilizations and their transformation under colonization. It is important to understand the survival of cultural traits among indigenous peasants today in the countries that were the cradle of ancient civilizations: Mexico, Guatemala and the Andean countries. In the republican era the course will focus on the classical Caribbean dictators in the first half of the 20th century and their reflection in the literature, comparing the historical reality with the magic representation in the work of Garcia Marquez. The course will scrutinize the most important revolutions in the continent: the Mexican, Cuban and Bolivian revolutions and the geopolitics of USA in the Americas. Weekly lectures related to the assigned reading will focus on specific periods, topics and regions. After each lecture, we will review the material, connecting specific details from the readings with the more theoretical aspects provided in my lecture. The course has a website where the PowerPoint presentations will be posted. Students are encouraged to post their questions, comments and suggestions on the web after their readings. Students will be given a study guide for each lecture, which will be the basis for the exams. Our perspective on Latin America will be enhanced by a selection of few films related to the topics.
Instructor(s): E. Cervone
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.361.207. Afro-Latin American Biography. 3.0 Credits.

In this course, we will examine biographical accounts of men and women of African descent in Latin America and in the broader Black Atlantic. These individuals include conquistadors and slaves, saints and sinners, revolutionaries and ordinary people. In their life stories, we will not only examine questions of race, gender, and religiosity that were central to the construction of identity in the early modern Atlantic world, but also the nature of the sources that allow us to tell their stories.
Instructor(s): J. Clark
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.361.410. Colombia and Venezuela: Postcolonial History and the European Novel. 3.0 Credits.

The intertwined histories of Colombia, Venezuela, Panama, and the Caribbean studied in two novels: Joseph Conrad’s Nostromo (1904) and Juan Javier Vázquez’s The Secret History of Costaguana (2007). Other novelists include Rómulo Gallegos (Doña Bárbara, 1929); Alejo Carpentier (The Lost Steps, 1953), and Gabriel García Márquez (The General in his Labyrinth, 1989).
Instructor(s): E. Gonzalez
Area: Humanities.

Center for Africana Studies

AS.362.112. Introduction to Africana Studies. 3.0 Credits.

Introduction to the core concepts, theories, cultural and intellectual production across the black diaspora. Antiracist, queer, and insurgent black thought welcome here.
Instructor(s): J. Johnson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.362.122. History of Africa (since 1880). 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the African past since 1880.
Prerequisites: Students are not allow to take both 100.122 and 362.122.
Instructor(s): K. Gallon
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.175. Freshman Seminar: Remembering the Black Power Movement. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores trends, developments, contradictions, and dilemmas related to the Black Power Movement. The objective of studying this historical movement is not to engage in nostalgia, but to think through and learn the lessons of this historic social movement. An active participant in the Black Power Movement as a university undergraduate and graduate student, I do not approach this subject merely as a set of interesting intellectual issues and dynamics that can be explored with complete dispassion and objectivity. Rather, I seek to examine critically some of the contradictions and dilemmas that I, too, was caught up in, seeking to come to grips with and clarify my own participation and activities. We study these historical events with the expectation of making a positive contribution to the future.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.340. Power and Racism. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates the impact of white supremacy and anti-black racism, as a global system of power, on the political development of the United States of America.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.450. Critical Thinking in Africana Studies. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar examines various ideas, theories, and practices of thinkers, writers, and activists whose work and practices have constitued an Africana Studies intellectual tradition. The purpose of this seminar is to teach stdents to read, think, and write critically about questions relative to the formation and history of Africana thought and its intellectual tradition, in particular, and the genealogy of thought and intellectual traditions, in general. We will also think about vrious fields of knowledge that have shaped Africana Studies. The seminar therefore will work through the different meanings of intellectual work and critical thought and theory in Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Writing Intensive.

Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality

AS.363.201. Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.
Instructor(s): K. Pahl
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Program in Museums and Society

AS.389.201. Introduction to the Museum: Past and Present. 3.0 Credits.

This course surveys museums, from their origins to their most contemporary forms, in the context of broader historical, intellectual, and cultural trends including the social movements of the 20th century. Anthropology, art, history, and science museums are considered. Cross-listed with History and History of Art.
Instructor(s): J. Kingsley
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.389.275. Interpreting Sites & Collections: An Introduction to Museum Education. 3.0 Credits.

Part public history, part introduction to museum practices, this hands-on course explores how heritage areas and museums serve communities through interpretation. Each year, students partner with a community to develop research-based, visitor-centered interpretive material, in the 2015 Baltimore National Heritage Area. Field trips and community meetings will be a significant part of the course. Cross-listed with History and History of Science. M&S practicum course. Class usually meets 1:30 - 3:50 except for days with field trips.
Instructor(s): E. Maloney
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.389.301. Curating Material Culture for the Digital Age. 4.0 Credits.

JHU pioneered the concept of the modern research university in the United States, but what does that mean for the everyday experiences of its students, faculty, staff and friends? Excavate the history of this place through the things collected, made and used here since the university's founding in 1876. Students research the material culture of Hopkins and present their findings on an interactive website: collectionsweb.jhu.edu. Course includes digital media labs. Cross-listed with History and History of Science. M&S practicum.
Instructor(s): J. Kingsley
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.389.302. The Virtual Museum. 3.0 Credits.

Course draws on both classic readings in material culture and emerging theories of the digital to consider how the internet has changed objects and the institutions that collect, preserve, display and interpret them. Students will contribute to an established virtual museum and create their own.
Instructor(s): J. Kingsley
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.352. Bibliomania: Ambition, Desire, & the Making of the George Peabody Library in 19th-century Baltimore. 3.0 Credits.

In 1857 Baltimore’s historic George Peabody Library was born, one of America’s first public libraries. This course studies its history, rare book collections, and foundational role in Baltimore’s cultural history.
Instructor(s): E. Havens
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.389.356. Halls of Wonder: Art, Science, and Literature in the Age of the Marvelous, 1500-1800. 3.0 Credits.

Explore the material culture of "wonder" from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment in literature, science, and art, with Hopkins’ rare book collections and the Walters Art Museum. M&S practicum course. Cross-listed with GRLL, History, and History of Art.
Instructor(s): E. Havens
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.357. Heaven on Earth: Art, Culture and Wonder in the Vatican Museum and Library. 3.0 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course will explore the institutional, cultural, artistic and architectural history of St. Peter's and the Vatican Museum and Library from Antiquity through the Renaissance, up to the present day. Class meets in the Dick Macksey Seminar Room of the Brody Learning Commons. Cross-listed with History.
Instructor(s): E. Havens
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.376. Enslaved at Homewood: Slavery in 19th Century Maryland. 3.0 Credits.

Students consider the representation of slavery in historic house museums of the late 20th century through the present, and use the university's Homewood Museum as a laboratory for the development, production and mounting of an exhibit about the men, women and children who labored at Homewood in the nineteenth century. Museums and Society Practicum course.
Instructor(s): A. Schreiber
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.389.450. Readings in Material Culture. 3.0 Credits.

Objects, things, "stuff"- this seminar will pursue classic texts and emerging methodologies to explore the myriad ways materials and materiality have been theorized across disciplines. For graduate/advanced undergraduate students.
Instructor(s): E. Rodini; R. Brown
Area: Humanities.

AS.389.650. Readings in Material Culture.

Objects, things, "stuff"- this seminar will pursue classic texts and emerging methodologies to explore the myriad ways materials and materiality have been theorized across disciplines. For graduate/advanced undergraduate students.
Instructor(s): E. Rodini; R. Brown
Area: Humanities.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://history.jhu.edu/people/

Faculty

Chair

Michael A. Kwass
Department Chair: Early Modern France, French Revolution, French Atlantic, and globalization.

Professors

Jeffrey Brooks
Russian and Soviet history, with an emphasis on culture and society, the press, and popular culture.

Toby L. Ditz
Early American, Atlantic World, cultural history, and the history of women and gender.

Francois Furstenberg
United States, c. 18th and 19th centuries, and the French Atlantic.

Peter Jelavich
Cultural and intellectual history of Europe since the Enlightenment, with emphasis on Germany, popular culture, mass culture, and the media, and modern social and cultural theory.

Martha S. Jones
Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and Professor of History: Race and rights in the 19th century U.S. with an emphasis on slavery, law, gender, and visual culture.

Michael A. Kwass
Department Chair: Early Modern France, French Revolution, French Atlantic, and globalization.

Pier M. Larson
African history with specialization in East Africa, Madagascar, the Indian Ocean, and the history of slavery and the slave trade in the Atlantic world.

John Marshall
Leonard and Helen R. Stulman Professor of History: Early Modern British and Early Modern British Imperial History, Early Modern European Cultural and Intellectual History, and the History of Political Thought.

Tobie Meyer-Fong
East Asia, especially social and cultural history of China since 1600.

Philip D. Morgan
Harry C. Black Professor: Early Modern colonial British America and slavery.

Gabriel Paquette
Imperial, International and Intellectual History (Europe, Latin America).

William T. Rowe
John and Diane Cooke Professor of Chinese History: Modern East Asia, especially socioeconomic, and urban history.

Todd Shepard
Arthur O. Lovejoy Professor: Modern France and French empire, decolonization, and gender and sexuality

Gabrielle Spiegel
Krieger-Eisenhower Professor: Medieval history, with special interest in historiography and linguistic analysis.

Ronald G. Walters
Social and cultural history of the United States with special interest in radicalism, reform, race, and popular culture.

Associate Professors

Angus Burgin
Director of Graduate Studies: 20th-century United States, political history, intellectual history, and the history of capitalism.

Nathan Connolly
Herbert Baxter Adams Associate Professor of History: Twentieth-century America, racism, capitalism, urban and suburban history, and African diaspora.

Pawel Maciejko
Early modern history, Jewish history, intellectual history, and East-Central Europe.

Kenneth Moss
Felix Posen Chair in Modern Jewish History: Modern Jewish history, history of Israel, Russia, Poland, and Eastern Europe, Jewish political thought, Hebrew and Yiddish literature and culture, history and sociology of nationalism, theory and practice of cultural history, and the history of the cultural sphere.

Erin Rowe
Director of Undergraduate Studies: Early modern Spain, the Mediterranean, saints and sanctity, and women and gender.

Assistant Professors

Tamer el-Leithy
Social/cultural history of the medieval Middle East and Mediterranean, and history of religious difference.

Katie Hindmarch-Watson
Modern Britain and the British Empire, urban space, gender and sexuality, and labor and technology.

Jessica Marie Johnson
Women, gender, and sexuality in the African diaspora, histories of slavery and the slave trade, and digital history and new media.

Hayang "Yumi" Kim
19th- and 20th-century Japan and Korea, medicine and religion, folk culture, colonialism, and the history of women and gender.

Casey Lurtz
Modern Mexico and Latin America more broadly, rural and agricultural history, commodities, history of development, economic history, and Atlantic history.

Elizabeth Thornberry
History of gender, sexuality, empire, and law in Southern Africa and across the continent.

Senior Lecturers

Laura Mason
French Revolution, democracy and violence, cultural history and media, history and film, and French film.

Visiting Professors

Jean Hébrard

Professors Emeriti

Sara S. Berry

Robert Forster

Louis Galambos

Richard Goldthwaite

Jack P. Greene
Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the Humanities Emeritus.

Jane Guyer

Michael Johnson

Richard L. Kagan

Franklin W. Knight
Leonard and Helen R. Stulman Professor of History.

Ruth Leys

Vernon Lidtke

John G. A. Pocock
Harry C. Black Professor Emeritus.

Orest Ranum

Willie Lee Rose

Dorothy Ross
Arthur O. Lovejoy Professor Emerita.

Mary Ryan

Nancy Struever

Mack Walker

Judith Walkowitz