International Studies

The International Studies major is an interdisciplinary program drawn from the departments of political science, history, economics, languages, sociology, and anthropology. There are three programs in International Studies: a regular undergraduate major leading to the B.A. degree in four years, and two accelerated programs leading to a B.A. and M.A. degree in five years. One of the accelerated programs is in partnership with the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. and the other is with political science institute Sciences Po in Paris. The three programs, and all other aspects of the International Studies Program, are described on the International Studies website at http://krieger.jhu.edu/internationalstudies

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

Also see Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree.

Students considering a major in International Studies should begin introductory courses required of the major early in their college careers. Choices may include an introductory history course at the 100-level, AS.180.101 Elements of Macroeconomics-AS.180.102 Elements of Microeconomics, and one of the core political science courses.

Major Requirements

The international studies major is comprised of three main components:

  • Foreign language study
  • Core courses in history, political science, and economics
  • A focus area of the student's choosing

In addition, students must earn a grade of C- or better in all courses applied towards major requirements and courses may not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.  Students must also complete at least 5 courses of major requirements at the 300 level or higher within the history, political science, and/or economics components of the major. This excludes courses used to fulfill the language requirement and focal area.

Foreign Language

Proficiency in one major foreign language is required. This requirement may be met either by taking two courses beyond the intermediate level or by special examination. If the student can demonstrate proficiency through examination, s/he must take an additional two semesters of either a new language or upper-level literature and culture courses taught in the language of proficiency.

Core Courses

Courses fulfilling the specific requirements below are listed on the International Studies website

  • Five courses in history, including one introductory course at the 100-level from the History Department at Johns Hopkins University. Four out of the five courses must be Global history (identified by the POS-Tag INST-GLOBAL in their course description in the schedule of classes).
  • One Gateway course: AS.190.111 Introduction to Global Studies, AS.190.209 Contemporary International Politics, or AS.230.150 Issues in International Development
  • One course in international relations (POS-Tag INST-IR)
  • One course in American politics (POS-Tag INST-AP)
  • Two courses in comparative politics (POS-Tag INST-CP)
  • One course in political theory (POS-Tag INST-PT)
  • Four courses in economics. One must be an internationally-oriented course identified by the POS-Tag INST-ECON in their course description in the schedule of classes. Two courses must be AS.180.101 Elements of Macroeconomics and AS.180.102 Elements of Microeconomics. The final course may be of the students’ choosing from courses offered in the  Economics Department.

Focus Area Specialization

Every major in International Studies selects a specialization area, which consists of four semester courses within a coherent field of interest. Specialization fields may be organized in terms of area (Latin America, East Asia), theme (security studies, international economics), or language (e.g., Mandarin, Arabic).  These courses may not overlap with other requirements of the major.

Major Requirements:

Foreign Language Study
Two courses beyond the intermediate level or, if proficient based on exam, two additional language courses6-8
One Gateway Course
AS.190.111Introduction to Global Studies3
or AS.190.209 Contemporary International Politics
or AS.230.150 Issues in International Development
Political Science Courses
One international relations course3
One American politics course3
Two comparative politics courses6
One political theory course3
Economics Courses
AS.180.101Elements of Macroeconomics3
AS.180.102Elements of Microeconomics3
One AS.180.xxx course3
One approved internationally-focused economics course *3
History Courses
One AS.100.1xx history course3
Four additional history courses with the POS-Tag INST-GLOBAL12
Focus Area
Four courses within a coherent field of interest12
Total Credits63-65
*

Approved internationally-focused economics courses are listed each semester on the International Studies website and can be identified by the POS-Tag INST-ECON in their course description in the schedule of classes.

Sample Four Year Plan of Study

Note: Not displayed on the plan below is the requirement that at least 5 courses of major requirements be taken at the 300 level or higher within the history, political science, and/or economics components of the major. This excludes courses used to fulfill the language requirement and focal area.

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.190.209Contemporary International Politics (or other Gateway course)3AS.180.102Elements of Microeconomics3
AS.180.101Elements of Macroeconomics3Foreign language4
History course AS.100.1xx3Comparative politics (INST-CP) course3
Foreign language4 
  13  10
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Foreign language3Foreign language3
International relations (INST-IR) course3Political theory (INST-PT) course3
Economics course (AS.180.xxx)3Focus area course3
History course (INST-GLOBAL)3 
  12  9
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Foreign language 3Foreign language3
American politics (INST-AP) course3Comparative politics (INST-CP) course3
History course (INST-GLOBAL)3Internationally-focused economics course (INST-ECON)3
  9  9
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Focus area course3Focus area course3
Focus area course3History course (INST-GLOBAL)3
History course (INST-GLOBAL)3 
  9  6
Total Credits: 77

Double-Major and Major-Minor Programs

Students may pursue one of International Studies’ unique double-major or major-minor programs. These are offered in conjunction with affiliated departments and allow students to concentrate their course of study within a specific department or program while simultaneously benefiting from the interdisciplinary training offered by the International Studies major.

Students pursuing a double-major program will receive a major in International Studies as well as a major in the affiliated department or program. For example, students pursuing the Global Social Change and Development track will receive a double major in International Studies and Sociology. The student’s faculty adviser will be a faculty member from the affiliated department or program.

Students pursuing a major-minor program will receive a major in International Studies and a minor in the affiliated department or program (e.g., students pursuing the Global Modernity and the Jewish Experience minor will receive a minor in Jewish Studies) and benefit from a faculty adviser in the affiliated department or program.

Successful completion of an approved double-major or major-minor program will satisfy the International Studies major's focus area requirement.

Senior Thesis and Honors in the Major

International studies majors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write a thesis, seniors must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project.  Students will work out a specific work plan with their faculty sponsor suitable for their project.  Students who wish to receive honors in international studies need a major GPA of 3.7 or better in addition to completion of a senior thesis.

Study Abroad

Studying abroad is especially valuable for International Studies majors. JHU encourages all IS majors to spend one or both semesters of their junior year abroad. International Studies sponsors a number of study abroad programs designed for IS majors and administers them in collaboration with the Office of Study Abroad.

The Junior Year Abroad at SAIS Europe, offered through the Bologna, Italy campus of the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), allows motivated International Studies majors to spend their junior year taking graduate level classes. Students who spend their junior year in Bologna and subsequently apply for graduate studies at SAIS will receive one semester of advanced credit at SAIS for their work.

A similar exchange program with the French political science institute Sciences Po allows students to spend a semester or a year studying at one of Sciences Po’s seven regional campuses: Paris, Menton, Reims, Poitiers, Le Havre, Nancy, or Dijon. Courses are offered in English as well as French and thus are open to students regardless of their knowledge of French. One of Europe’s most prestigious universities, Sciences Po has a strong international focus and allows students to develop a cross-cultural and transatlantic perspective, while simultaneously offering unique access to the field of international affairs.

Sciences Po’s School of Journalism also offers a competitive spring semester English language program in Journalism. This selective program is designed for students who are interested in pursuing a career in journalism or who have had some journalism experience. The program curriculum consists of a combination of lectures, workshops and reporting projects, in addition to mandatory French language classes for students who are not proficient in French.

Additionally, the Office of Study Abroad also offers a wide range of study abroad opportunities across the globe tailored to students' specific interests.
 

Five-Year Accelerated B.A./M.A. Program with the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS)

For students wishing to pursue a master’s degree after graduation from Hopkins, the university offers an accelerated and competitive International Studies B.A./M.A. Program drawing upon its resources at SAIS, located in Washington, D.C. Combining a liberal arts curriculum with a strong specialization in international studies, the program allows those enrolled to receive the B.A. and M.A. degrees in five years instead of the usual six.

Approximately eight sophomores are selected for the program each year. Admission is limited to those who are highly motivated toward careers for which a background in international studies is essential: research, teaching, or practice in international affairs. Financial assistance is available to those admitted based on need and on academic achievement.

Students admitted to SAIS through the Direct Matriculation Program (DMP) may be subject to additional requirements. https://apply.jhu.edu/apply/direct-matriculation-programs/

Five-Year Accelerated B.A./M.A. Program with Sciences Po

Students may also apply to participate in a five-year accelerated B.A./M.A. program with Sciences Po, one of Europe’s finest schools of political science. The B.A./M.A. Program is aimed principally at students who are interested in international affairs and who would like to develop their intellectual and professional capabilities from an international and multidisciplinary perspective. After the junior year, students spend two years at Sciences Po’s Paris campus completing graduate-level coursework at the Paris School of International Affairs (PSIA), which houses the majority of Sciences Po’s internationally-oriented master’s programs. PSIA is a bilingual institution, thus students may choose to pursue either an English or French track. Students may also elect to pursue a master’s degree at the School of Journalism, School of Communication, or School of Law. Students interested in an academic career may also choose to pursue a research master’s with the Doctoral Program at Sciences Po. Students who are not proficient in French will also pursue French language training during their course of study at Sciences Po.

Applicants follow an application and review process similar to the one for the SAIS program. Approximately three to four sophomores are selected each year for the Sciences Po program. Students pay tuition to Johns Hopkins for the first year in Paris and to Sciences Po for the second. Financial aid from Johns Hopkins continues only through the end of a student’s fourth year.

Progress toward the B.A./M.A. Degrees

Students in both programs described above spend their first three years at the Homewood campus and the last two at either SAIS or Sciences Po. Students receive the B.A. degree at the end of their first year at either SAIS or Sciences Po and the M.A. at the end of their second year.

Students selected for either of the accelerated programs may not study abroad during their Homewood years, with the exception of summer or intersession programs.

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.192.110. Special Opportunities in Undergraduate Learning: Library Research & Proposal Writing Skills for International Studies Students. 1.0 Credit.

This course offers training to undergraduate students in International Studies (and related majors) on the fundamentals of library research and research/grant proposal writing. The course will introduce students to the major research resources in global studies in the humanities and social sciences, strategies and techniques to conduct effective research, and how to use library research to enhance research and grant proposal writing. This course aims to help students learn the basics of research and grant proposal writing and develop research skills for use in their major coursework and major-related research projects.
Instructor(s): Y. Ye.

AS.192.310. Program Abroad: Populism in Comparative Perspective. 3.0 Credits.

International Studies elective offered on the JHU Summer Program Abroad in Bologna. Open to students on the JHU Bologna Summer Program only. Permission required.
Instructor(s): S. Karatasli; S. Morgan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.192.401. Political Violence. 2.0 Credits.

This class will function predominantly as a discussion seminar that uses the case of the Lebanese Civil War to examine the causes, duration, and dynamics of civil war as well as the debates surrounding foreign intervention and peacebuilding. Themes include: ethnic violence; economic explanations for civil war; civilian targeting; intra-rebellion dynamics; sexual and gender-based violence; election violence; occupation; peacekeeping; and the Responsibility to Protect.
Instructor(s): S. Parkinson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.192.402. Military Organizations in the Middle East and North Africa. 2.0 Credits.

This course will examine the diverse roles state and non-state military organizations play in MENA politics, economics, and society. Each week will use an organizational case study as a window into core themes such as military involvement in state economies, militia politics, or combatant discipline in war.
Instructor(s): S. Parkinson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.192.501. Internship- International Studies. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): S. Morgan.

AS.192.551. Program Abroad: International Studies - Leadership Seminar. 1.0 Credit.

The International Studies Leadership Seminar builds core leadership skills and introduces students to critical social, political and economic policies in their local and international contexts. The seminar takes place in different countries each year and builds upon global partnerships that exist between the International Studies Program, Johns Hopkins University, and academic institutions worldwide. Global partners include Waseda University, SAIS Europe, and Sciences Po, among others. Students engage in joint projects, panel presentations and other assignments designed to develop skills in critical analysis and public speaking. Seminar may be taken multiple times.
Instructor(s): S. Morgan.

AS.192.591. Research- International Studies. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): S. Morgan.

AS.192.598. Independent Study. 3.0 Credits.

Approval Required.
Instructor(s): S. Morgan.

Cross Listed Courses

Anthropology

AS.070.285. Understanding Aid: Anthropological Perspectives for Technology-Based Interventions. 3.0 Credits.

This course combines anthropological perspectives with the discussion and examination of technology–based interventions in the field of development and aid policies, with particular focus on activities related to water resources, sanitation, and hygiene. Readings and discussions analyze some of the theoretical, historically rooted, and practical issues that challenge those who hope to provide effective aid. A key aim of this course is to provide students with better understanding of cultural, social, environmental and economic issues relevant to technical intervention in developing countries.
Instructor(s): E. Cervone; W. Ball
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.333. Theologies of Political Life. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the relationship between modern political forms and theological traditions. Looking at developments both in the West and the postcolonial world, we will examine the multiple ways in which theological traditions have continued to inform how political life is conceived and pursued. In particular, we will focus on the relation between liberalism and the Christian tradition; the turn to messianism in critical theory; the transformation of the shari?a into a legal form; and its imbrication in anti-colonial politics
Instructor(s): S. Al-Bahloly
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

History

AS.100.102. The Medieval World. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore selected topics in the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Western Europe in the period between the fall of the Roman Empire and the thirteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to understanding the ways in which medieval society functioned as a pioneer civilization, compelled to reorganize itself after the almost total collapse of the ancient world, and to the interplay between material and cultural forces in the processes of social organization.
Instructor(s): G. Spiegel
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.103. Early Modern Europe & the Wider World. 3.0 Credits.

This course surveys the history of Europe and its interactions with Africa, the Americas, and Asia during the early modern period (c. 1400-1800). Topics include: the Renaissance, the Reformation, International Relations and Warfare, Colonialism, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Revolutions.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.104. Modern Europe and the Wider World. 3.0 Credits.

European history since the French Revolution. Topics include: revolutions and democratization, industrialization, nationalism, imperialism, two World Wars, fascism, decolonization, Soviet communism, and formation of the European Union.
Instructor(s): T. Shepard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.113. Making America: Race, Radicalism, and Reform. 3.0 Credits.

Beginning with the end of Reconstruction and continuing through the present day, this course will examine the complicated ways in which Americans attempted to come to terms with racial, ethnic, cultural, and other forms of diversity.
Instructor(s): R. Walters
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.117. History of Brazil. 3.0 Credits.

An introductory survey of Brazilian History, 1500-2017.
Instructor(s): G. Paquette
Area: Humanities.

AS.100.121. History of Africa to 1880. 3.0 Credits.

A history of Africa from human evolution to the mid-nineteenth century focusing on key themes in social, economic, and political history.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.122. Introduction to History of Africa (since 1880). 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the African past. First term: to 1880. Second term: to since 1880. Cross-listed with Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): E. Thornberry
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.123. Introduction to African History: Diversity, Mobility, Innovation. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to African history with emphasis on diversity, mobility, and innovation. Considers both early and modern times.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.129. Introduction to Modern Jewish History. 3.0 Credits.

Jewish history 1750-present in Europe, the Near East, the US, Israel; the challenges of modernity and new forms of Jewish life and conflict from Enlightenment and emancipation, Hasidism, Reform and Orthodox Judaism to capitalism and socialism; empire, nationalism and Zionism; the Holocaust. Extensive attention to US Jewry and State of Israel.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.201. Freshman Seminar: Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750-2012. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context.
Instructor(s): S. Stewart
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.203. Freshman Seminar: From Columbus to Calypso: The Caribbean and the Wider World. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the history of the Caribbean and how five hundred years of colonization, slavery, piracy, rebellion, and revolution have shaped the politics and culture of the islands today.
Instructor(s): L. MacDonald
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.209. Fresh Sem:Mexico and the World from Cortés to Cartels. 3.0 Credits.

This introductory course examines Mexico's political, economic, and cultural role in global history from the time of Spanish conquest until the twenty-first century.
Instructor(s): J. Clark
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.212. Freshman Seminar: Jews in the Medieval Mediterranean: The Politics of Conquest under Crescent and Cross. 3.0 Credits.

How can Jewish history help us understand the politics of Islamic and Christian states in Sicily, Spain, and Palestine in the age of Crusade and holy war? Freshman only
Instructor(s): B. Goldman
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.214. Freshman Seminar: Russia and the West. 3.0 Credits.

Students will consider Russian political culture and the Russian cultural tradition from Pushkin to Putin.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.215. Freshman Seminar: US-USSR Cold War. 3.0 Credits.

Students explore politics and culture of the interactive Cold War from 1945 to the fall of Communism. Considerable assigned reading, 2 quizzes, and weekly 500 word papers on readings. Freshman Only.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.219. Chinese Cultural Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to trasform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revoltuion decade and since.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.220. Freshman Seminar: Politics, Information, and the State in Early Modern China and Japan. 3.0 Credits.

This introductory seminar examines culture and politics in early modern East Asia (ca. 1500-1900) by looking at changing modes of communication and attitudes about state control of information and ideology. Freshmen Only.
Instructor(s): E. Mokros
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.233. History of Modern Germany. 3.0 Credits.

This course will offer a concise introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of Germany from the founding of the Empire in 1871 until the present.
Instructor(s): H. Balz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.236. Chinese Cultural Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

The Cultural Revolution was Mao Zedong's last attempt to transform Chinese society spiritually and structurally. The events of this period were marked by social upheaval, personal vendettas, violence, massive youth movements, and extreme ideological pressure. This course will explore the Cultural Revolution from a variety of perspectives, focusing on the relationship between events in China from 1966-1976, and their interpretation in China and the West during the Cultural Revolution decade and since. Previously offered as AS.100.219.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.246. Colonial Latin American History Survey. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers a general survey of Colonial Latin American history, covering both Spanish and Portuguese America, from European conquest to the revolutionary wars of independence. Emphasis will be placed in exploring the nature and effects of conquest, the making of new pluri-ethnic societies, and the eventual break of these societies from Spain and Portugal.
Instructor(s): G. Garcia Montufar
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.248. Japan in the World. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an introduction to Japan’s history from 1800 to the present with emphasis on the influences of an increasing global circulation of ideas and people. Topics include the emperor system, family and gender, imperialism, World War II, the postwar economy, and global J-pop.
Instructor(s): H. Kim
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.252. Invisible Borders: Exchanges and Migrations in the Modern Mediterranean. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the patterns of movement formed and transgressed by empire, trade, sex tourism, cultural exchange, war, and nationalism, starting from the nineteenth century to the present-day refugee crisis.
Instructor(s): S. Rahnama
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.254. Modern Mexico from the Alamo to El Chapo. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will use popular depictions of Mexico’s heroes and villains, tragedies and triumphs to delve into both the nation’s history and the importance of thinking historically.
Instructor(s): C. Lurtz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.255. The Haitian Revolution in World History. 3.0 Credits.

This introductory seminar examines the revolution that transformed the slave colony of Saint-Domingue into the first black republic and second independent nation in the Americas, and its repercussions around the world. Non-Majors welcome.
Instructor(s): N. Marvin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.256. Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750-2012. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context.
Instructor(s): S. Stewart
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.265. The Medieval City. 3.0 Credits.

This course focuses on the development and growth of medieval cities in western Europe. Students will explore the various functions of cities, uses of urban space, and challenges they faced.
Instructor(s): N. Daniels
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.279. Europe since 1945. 3.0 Credits.

This lecture course examines the political, social, and cultural history of postwar Europe with emphasis on the Cold War and the formation of the European Union.
Instructor(s): H. Balz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.282. Race & Power in Modern South Africa. 3.0 Credits.

South African history from 1800 to the present, with focus on the rise and fall of the apartheid racial state
Instructor(s): E. Thornberry
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.303. Old Regime and Revolutionary France. 3.0 Credits.

Examines the history of France from the reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution, focusing on early modern society, popular culture, absolutism, the Enlightenment, overseas empire, and the French and Haitian Revolutions.
Instructor(s): M. Kwass
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.308. Introduction to the History of Jewish Mysticism. 3.0 Credits.

The course will familiarize the student with the history of the main phenomena of Jewish mysticism from the ancient times to the present.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.310. The French Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

Political, social and cultural history of one of the great turning-points in European history. Previously offered as AS.100.204.
Instructor(s): L. Mason
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.320. Writing U.S. Empire. 3.0 Credits.

Attends to the composition and interpretive problems raised by studying the history of American imperialism, 1880s-1930s.
Instructor(s): N. Connolly
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.324. Dostoevsky's Russia. 3.0 Credits.

Dostoevsky and the culture of his era but also echoes of his ideas of Russia, religion, ethnicity, freedom, authority, and gender from 1917 until today. Short papers, quizzes.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.342. Colonial Lives: Individuals in the Atlantic World, 1600-1850. 3.0 Credits.

This course traces the emergence of an Atlantic world, 1600-1850, through the lens of biography. Major themes include European colonization, cross-cultural encounters, slavery and trade, imperial warfare, and political revolutions. Prior experience in an introductory history course strongly recommended.
Instructor(s): W. Brown
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.343. Diaspora, Nation, Race, and Politics. 3.0 Credits.

For millions of people across the globe, political fate in the 20th century was defined at the intersection of diaspora, race, and nation — and this may be true in the 21st century as well. This course, a collaborative effort involving a historian and a political scientist, explores the parallels and divergences in the deployment of these terms in nationalist and transnational mobilization, literature and aesthetics, and group identity formation in Eastern Europe, Africa and the New World of the Americas. Set against the backdrop of the fall of significant empires in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, we will explore themes of migration, human rights, the nation-state system, and racism through history, political sociology, and political and social theory. We will pay particular attention to the theoretically exemplary Jewish and Black experiences of diaspora, race, and nation, engaging both with how those experiences were specially shaped by the imposition of national and racial logics and with Black and Jewish politics and thought in relation to those categories. Readings include Max Weber, W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Theodor Herzl, Hannah Arendt, Benedict Anderson, Rogers Brubaker, Andrew Zimmerman, Michele Mitchell, David Scott.
Instructor(s): K. Moss; M. Hanchard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.346. Soviet-American Cold War. 3.0 Credits.

The focus will be on Soviet-American interactions, Cold-War Cultures, and the impact on both societies.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.347. Early Modern China. 3.0 Credits.

The history of China from the 16th to the late 19th centuries.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.348. 20th-Century China. 3.0 Credits.

The history of China from the last years of the Qing Empire to the post-Mao reforms.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.352. Age Of Pasternak. 3.0 Credits.

This course concerns Russian literature and the arts, including ballet, from the 1910s to the 1950s. Two short papers, journals, two quizzes, and no midterm or final.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.353. Youth and Youth Movements during 20th Century: Germany, Britain, and the U.S. 3.0 Credits.

Through texts, music, and films, this course examines the rise of "youth" as a social and cultural category in a variety of forms, ranging from spontaneous (such as Rock'n'Roll and Techno) to state-organized (Hitler Youth).
Instructor(s): H. Balz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.355. Islam between History and Anthropology. 3.0 Credits.

Co-taught by an anthropologist and a historian, this course will explore recent scholarly debates about--and critiques of--the representations of Islam and Muslim societies.
Instructor(s): N. Khan; T. Shepard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.357. Panic and Liberation: The Politics of Sex in 20th Century Europe. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the 20th century history of sexual attitudes, desires, behaviors, identities, communities, and movements in Western Europe (most notably, Germany, France, and the United Kingdom).
Instructor(s): T. Shepard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.358. Black Code Studies: Black History and Digital Media. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores doing histories of people of African descent in an age of digital and social media. The focus will be on African-descended communities in the United States, but content will range across time space. Examples include: West African digital art communities; the use of slave trade databases to write Caribbean history; and the use of social media in social justice organizing from Paris to Baltimore. Students will explore questions of blackness, race, ethnicity, sex and sexuality, violence and justice while creating digital content using platforms like Wordpress, Omeka, Twitter, and Tumblr. Students will be evaluated on their acquisition of African American and Afro-Diasporic history; their knowledge of digital and social media platforms; and their ability to creatively and accurately relate the histories of blackness and black people to their representation and discussion online.
Instructor(s): J. Johnson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.361. Age of Tolstoy. 3.0 Credits.

Tolstoy and his era, 1820s to 1910s. Topics include state and politics, empire, the Russian identity, and forms of cultural expression. Students consider "War and Peace" and other masterworks.
Instructor(s): J. Brooks
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.369. Themes and Concepts in Jewish History. 3.0 Credits.

The course will introduce students to the main themes and debates in Jewish historiography.
Instructor(s): P. Maciejko
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.374. Conquest, Conversion, and Language Change in the Middle Ages. 3.0 Credits.

Examines cases of imperial conquest and attendant religious transformation (Christianization; Islamization) and language change in the medieval Mediterranean (Europe and Middle East), e.g. transition from Latin to vernacular languages in Europe; Arabization; translation movements.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.382. Early Modern African Atlantic. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the history of West and Central Africa and its diasporic people and cultures during the early modern period (c. 1400-1750) in disparate parts of the Atlantic world, including Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Anglo-America. Themes include: West and Central African political and religious cultures; trans-Atlantic slavery; African Christianity; and the question of cultural survivals.
Instructor(s): E. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.387. Everyday Life in the Medieval Middle East. 3.0 Credits.

In this seminar, students will explore the daily lives of non-elites in medieval Egypt (i.e. average folk, not kings in palaces)—including their food and cooking; clothes (and government edicts regulating fashion); the houses they inhabited; their marriage patterns, divorce rates, and child custody battles; and the burden of taxes on the working poor (e.g. urban craftsmen). We will examine and discuss artifacts and documents, including surviving hats (stuffed with recycled documents), private letters, marriage contracts (and the clauses women inserted into them), petitions for charity, and court records.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.398. Images of Postwar Japan. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores Japan’s changing place in the world in the decades following World War II, with an emphasis on analyzing visual media such as photographs, films, advertisements, and comic books. Topics include relations with the U.S. and other countries in East Asia, particularly the two Koreas; the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and the global contexts for an expanding Japanese consumerism in the late 20th century.
Instructor(s): H. Kim.

AS.100.403. Law & Custom in Colonial Africa. 3.0 Credits.

Examines how colonial rule transformed African legal systems, while Africans used European law for political resistance and personal gain. Research project based on colonial South African court records.
Instructor(s): E. Thornberry
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.412. Jewish History in British Mandatory Palestine 1917-1947. 3.0 Credits.

Recent historical writing on Jewish politics, culture, and society in British Mandatory Palestine, 1917-1947. Significant attention will also be paid to work on Palestinian Arab society and politics and to Jewish-Arab-British relations.
Instructor(s): K. Moss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.413. London 1580-1830: The History of Britain's capital city. 3.0 Credits.

Seminar-style class analyzing the social, cultural, gender, religious, economic, and political history of London from Shakespeare's time through revolutions, plague, fire, and commercial, colonial, and industrial expansion.
Instructor(s): J. Marshall
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.422. Society & Social Change in 18th Century China. 3.0 Credits.

What did Chinese local society look like under the Qing Empire, and how did it change over the early modern era?
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.424. Women & Modern Chinese History. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas. Cross listed with East Asian Studies.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.426. Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe. 3.0 Credits.

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.
Instructor(s): J. Marshall
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.445. African Fiction as History. 3.0 Credits.

An exploration of Modern African history through the African historical novel.
Instructor(s): P. Larson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.456. Getting Medieval? Public Violence in the Middle Ages. 3.0 Credits.

Traditional studies and popular culture often consider violence as a hallmark of medieval life and hence, present it as a fundamental difference between a ‘brutal and violent’ Middle Ages and a ‘civilized and humane’ (Western) modernity. To evaluate these claims and images, we will examine different forms of violence in medieval societies—European and Middle Eastern—especially (i) martyrdom, (ii) communal violence, and (iii) public punishment. After exploring the specific cultural meanings of these practices, we will re-examine those modern polemics that invoke ‘the medieval’ (often vis-à-vis non-Western traditions and societies).
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.482. Historiography Mod China. 3.0 Credits.

A survey of assumptions and approaches in the study of modern Chinese history, as written by Chinese, Japanese, and Western historians.
Instructor(s): W. Rowe
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.488. The Early Caribbean and the Atlantic World Seminar. 3.0 Credits.

The Caribbean was the key focal point of overseas European expansion in the early modern world. Its centrality, importance, and significance will be explored.
Instructor(s): P. Morgan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.497. Year of Revolt: 1968 in Europe. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the dramatic events of 1968 in Western and Eastern Europe during 1968—a year of social and political revolts, generational conflicts, and cultural activism—as well as their long-term consequences.
Instructor(s): H. Balz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.499. Film and Propaganda in Nazi Germany. 3.0 Credits.

By examining a range of cinematic works—from explicitly ideological pseudo-documentaries to entertainment films—this course will explore the transmission of propaganda into the everyday culture of Nazi Germany.
Instructor(s): H. Balz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Near Eastern Studies

AS.130.170. Diplomacy and Conflict in the Ancient Middle East. 3.0 Credits.

The Middle East is home to the invention of agriculture, cities, and writing. It is also in the Middle East that we find evidence of humanity’s earliest diplomatic activity in, for instance, the actual letters sent by ancient kings to one another, the treaties drawn up after their conflicts, and the inscriptions that commemorate their conquests. In this course, we examine texts such as these to explore questions such as: How do we characterize the international system of the ancient Middle East? Does this system change over the approximately two millennia for which we have documentation? Is it better to approach ancient diplomacy through present-day eyes or in the context of ancient world-views? Is an understanding of diplomacy in the ancient Middle East relevant to our understanding of modern international relations? All texts read in translation.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger
Area: Humanities.

History of Science & Technology

AS.140.398. Godzilla and Fukushima: Japanese Environment in History and Films. 3.0 Credits.

Juxtaposing Japanese environmental history and its reflection in popular media, the course will explore the intersection between technology, environment, and culture. The course will be accompanied by relevant movie screenings.
Instructor(s): Y. Frumer
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Philosophy

AS.150.237. Foundations of Modern Political Philosophy. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an introduction to modern political philosophy through an intensive study of the classic texts. The focus will be on the nature and limits of political authority under modern social conditions. Authors included are Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Mill.
Instructor(s): D. Moyar
Area: Humanities.

AS.150.320. Marx: Critique of Political Economy. 3.0 Credits.

A close reading of Marx’s Capital: Volume One. Specific attention will be given to clarification of Marx’s methodology, the foundational categories of his critique of politcal economy, the systemtatic unity of his theory, and the underlying normative concepts which inform his work. No previous course in philosophy or social sciences is required.
Instructor(s): A. Abazari
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.150.408. The Ethics of Climate Change. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we consider ethical issues related to climate change and climate change policy. These include issues about how we ought to distribute the burden of mitigation and adaption, what we owe to future generations and to the non-human world, and about our responsibilities as individuals (with respect, for example, to our diets). We briefly consider geoengineering and issues related to the widespread reliance on cost-benefit analyses in climate policy.
Instructor(s): J. McBee
Area: Humanities.

AS.150.411. Arabic-Islamic Philosophy. 3.0 Credits.

Introduction to major philosophers of the Arabic-Islamic tradition, including Avicenna, al-Ghazali, and Averroes. Topics addressed include the existence of God, metaphysics (e.g., causality), human freedom and knowledge, revelation and reason.
Instructor(s): S. Ogden
Area: Humanities.

Economics

AS.180.101. Elements of Macroeconomics. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.
Instructor(s): R. Barbera
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.102. Elements of Microeconomics. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services; theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra. *Students who are looking to register for AS.180.102 and need to take the course should attend the first day of class and see Dr. Hamilton immediately afterwards*
Instructor(s): J. Li; Y. Gong
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.217. Game Theory in Social Sciences. 3.0 Credits.

Game Theory is the study of multiple person decision problems in which the well-being of a decision maker depends not only on his own actions but also on those of others. Such problems arise frequently in economics, political science, business, military science and many other areas. In this course, we will learn how to model different social situations as games and how to use solution concepts to understand players' behavior. We will consider various examples from different fields and will play several games in class. The emphasis of the class is on the conceptual analysis and applications and we will keep the level of mathematical technicalities at the minimum -- high school algebra and one term of calculus will be sufficient. Students who took AS.180.117 are not eligible to take AS.180.217.
Prerequisites: Students may not have previously taken AS.180.117.;AS.180.102 or instructor permission
Instructor(s): Y. Chen
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.219. History of Economics: Modes of Analysis. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the long arc of the history of economics. We will cover readings from Aristotle, Hume, Smith, Ricardo, and Marx, as well as from the Scholastics, Mercantilists, and Physiocrats. Themes will include economic values, the question of whether and when economics became a science, the market in relation to gender, and the interaction between economic theorizing and other cultural, social, and political currents of an age.
Prerequisites: AS.180.102
Instructor(s): N. Johnson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.180.228. Economic Development. 3.0 Credits.

A comprehensive survey of economic behavior by households, farms and firms in poor countries and the role of and for governments. Discussions include measurement of income levels, economy-wide equilibrium, sources of growth, agriculture and industry, international trade and investment, savings, population, fertility, education, health, income distribution and public finances. Applies economic theory rigorously to interpret and evaluate the economic experience of poor countries. Diagnostic test on Elements of Economics is required in the second week. Grading based on 3 exams and one paper.
Prerequisites: AS.180.101 AND AS.180.102
Instructor(s): M. Gersovitz
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.241. International Trade. 3.0 Credits.

Theory of comparative advantage and the international division of labor: the determinants and pattern of trade, factor price equalization, factor mobility, gains from trade and distribution of income, and theory and practice or tariffs and other trade restrictions. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101.
Prerequisites: AS.180.102.
Instructor(s): S. Dasgupta
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.242. International Monetary Economics. 3.0 Credits.

This course presents International Monetary Economics theory and applies it towards gaining an understanding of recent events and current policy issues. The theory presented in this course covers a broad range of topics including exchange rate determination, monetary and fiscal policy in an open economy, balance of payments crises, the choice of exchange rate systems, and international debt. The insights provided by these theoretical frameworks will enable us to discuss topics such as the current global financial crisis, global financial imbalances, the Chinese exchange rate regime, and proposed changes in the international financial architecture.
Instructor(s): S. Bahk
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.261. Monetary Analysis. 3.0 Credits.

This course analyzes the financial and monetary system of the U.S. economy and the design and implementation of U.S. monetary policy. Among other topics, we will examine the role of banks in the economy, the term structure of interest rates, the stock market, the supply of money, the role of the Federal Reserve in the economy, the objectives of monetary policy in the United States and current monetary policy practice.
Prerequisites: AS.180.101 and AS.180.102
Instructor(s): L. Poliakova; S. Dasgupta
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.266. Financial Markets and Institutions. 3.0 Credits.

Understanding design and functioning of financial markets and institutions, connecting theoretical foundations and real-world applications and cases. Basic principles of asymmetric information problems, management of risk. Money, bond, and equity markets; investment banking, security brokers, and venture capital firms; structure, competition, and regulation of commercial banks. Importance of electronic technology on financial systems.
Prerequisites: AS.180.101 AND AS.180.102
Instructor(s): J. Faust
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.289. Economics Of Health. 3.0 Credits.

Application of economic concepts and analysis to the health services system. Review of empirical studies of demand for health services, behavior of providers, and relationship of health services to population health levels. Discussion of current policy issues relating to financing and resource allocation.
Prerequisites: AS.180.102
Instructor(s): D. Bishai
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.303. Topics in International Macroeconomics and Finance. 3.0 Credits.

The course will review selected topics in international macroeconomics and finance. The topics for the Fall of 2015 include: financial globalization; international portfolio diversification; the problems posed by “sudden stops” in capital flows to emerging markets; global imbalances and global demand rebalancing; how different exchange rate regimes have fared in the global financial crisis; sovereign default in the light of the Argentine experience; and the ongoing Russian currency and financial crisis. The course involves mathematical modeling as well as data analysis.
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.180.101 AND AS.180.102 AND AS.180.302
Instructor(s): O. Jeanne
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.351. Labor Economics. 3.0 Credits.

The course discusses various issues in labor markets from the perspective of economic theory. We first study the major forces at work that shape labor market behavior; firms’ labor demand and workers’ labor supply. Then we discuss the equilibrium behavior of employment and wages. Using these tools, we also cover various applied topics in labor economics, such as minimum wage regulations, male-female wage differentials, human capital investment, worker mobility, and unemployment.
Prerequisites: AS.180.301
Instructor(s): M. Husain
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.355. Economics of Poverty/Inequality. 3.0 Credits.

This course focuses on the economics of poverty and inequality. It covers the measurement of poverty and inequality, facts and trends over time, the causes of poverty and inequality with a focus on those related to earnings and the labor market, and public policy toward poverty and inequality, covering both taxation and government expenditure and programs. By the nature of the material, the course is fairly statistical and quantitative. Students should have an intermediate understanding of microeconomic concepts. Basic knowledge of regression analysis is also helpful.
Prerequisites: AS.180.301
Instructor(s): R. Moffitt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.389. Social Policy Implications of Behavioral Economics. 3.0 Credits.

Economists increasingly incorporate insights from psychology into models of rational decision-making. Known as "behavioral economics", this line of research considers how, for example, emotions, rules-of-thumb, biased beliefs and time-inconsistent preferences influence how we make choices. Behavioral economics increasingly pervades policy discussions on topics as diverse as: obesity, the role of media, subprime mortgages and voting patterns. Behavioral models are certainly novel, but do they help us to design superior social policies? With the goal of preparing students to address this question, this course (1) provides a thorough overview of the main contributions of behavioral economics, highlighting departures from more traditional economic models and (2) emphasizes how behavioral economic models might (or might not) improve how we think about social policy.
Prerequisites: Prereqs: AS.180.301 AND AS.180.334 or knowledge of statistical analysis up to the level of multi-variate regression.
Instructor(s): N. Papageorge
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.180.390. Health Economics & Developing Countries. 3.0 Credits.

Benefits of good health and its costs. Health demand and supply in poor countries. Welfare economics of Public Health.
Prerequisites: AS.180.301
Instructor(s): M. Gersovitz
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.180.391. Economics of China. 3.0 Credits.

Discussion of the economic experince of Post-War China, primarily emphasizing topics rather than historical narative: agriculture, industry including corporate governance and public enterprises, international trade, population, migration, education, health, public finances among other topics.
Prerequisites: AS.180.301
Instructor(s): M. Gersovitz
Writing Intensive.

Political Science

AS.190.101. Introduction to American Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.
Instructor(s): B. Ginsberg
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.102. Introduction To Comparative Politics. 3.0 Credits.

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.
Instructor(s): N. Jabko
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.108. Freshmen Seminar: The Human Condition. 3.0 Credits.

This freshman seminar will focus on reading just one book, The Human Condition, by Hannah Arendt. Such a narrow focus is justified by the breadth of topics the book itself discusses and the influence these various discussions have had on modern political thought. Among the various topics that will be studied and talked about are the meaning of the distinctions Arendt makes between “public,” “private,” and “social,” as well as between “labor,” “work,” and “action.” In the course of their studies, students will be challenged to think about the relation of philosophy to politics, the significance of the scientific revolution for public life, the character of contemporary society, and what it means to be “free.” Also, by focusing on just one book, students will have the opportunity to learn how to do the kind of close reading and textual analysis success in college requires. In addition to reading assignments, students will be required to write four short papers.
Instructor(s): J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.109. Politics of East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.204. Ancient Political Thought. 3.0 Credits.

The premise of this course is that a political perspective is tied up with a (meta)physical one, that is to say, with ideas about the nature of Nature and of the status of the human and nonhuman elements within it. How is the universe ordered? Who or what is responsible for it? What place do or should humans occupy within it? How ought we to relate to nonhuman beings and forces? We will read three different responses to such questions and show how they are linked to a particular vision of political life. In the first, the world into which human are born is ordered by gods whose actions often appear inexplicable: Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, Oedipus the King by Sophocles, and Hippolytus by Euripedes will represent this tragic vision of the cosmos. In the second, Plato , in Republic and in Phaedrus, the forces of reason and eros play central and powerful roles. In the third, Augustine of Hippo presents a world designed by a benevolent, omnipotent God who nevertheless has allowed humans a share in their own fate. We end the course with Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy , which offers a perspective on these three visions of the world -- the tragic, the rational, and the faithful -- which will help us evaluate them in the light of contemporary political and ecological concerns.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.209. Contemporary International Politics. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered.
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.217. Introduction to International Relations Theory. 3.0 Credits.

This course is a broad introduction to international relations theory in a format that encompasses lecture and discussion. We will explore mainstream theoretical perspectives and critiques of those perspectives, as well as more recent developments in the field.
Instructor(s): S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.220. Global Security Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.226. Global Governance. 3.0 Credits.

Global problems like poverty, financial instability, human rights abuses, and climate change threaten both international order and human well-being. In the absence of a world state, these problems must be addressed by an increasingly complex, transnational network of organizations and social groups. First, we will aim to understand and explain how global problems are governed through detailed case studies of International Organizations and Non-Governmental Organizations such as the United Nations, World Bank, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Amnesty International and more. Second, we will critically evaluate the successes and failures of these organizations and explore the possibilities for improving democratic governance at the global level.
Instructor(s): B. Allan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.227. U.S. Foreign Policy. 3.0 Credits.

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.
Instructor(s): S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.265. Comparative Political Behavior. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the study of political behavior, emphasizing electoral behavior in democratic countries.
Instructor(s): R. Katz
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.280. Political Persuasion. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to Euro-American political thought, with a focus on the role of language, rhetoric, and Eros within politics. Texts by Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Walt Whitman, and Emma Goldman.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.281. Virtue, Labor, and Power (Classics of Political Thought II). 3.0 Credits.

This is not a class in the history of political thought. Instead, it is an opportunity for a selective, circumscribed, but very focused engagement with some of the most powerful and provocative texts in that history. We will read selections from six thinkers (Socrates, Machiavelli, Locke, Marx, Nietzsche, and Foucault), focusing on three themes (Virtue, Labor, and Power). These texts have all profoundly shaped the way we think about politics, and they are texts that resonate with our own political problematics today.
Instructor(s): S. Chambers
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.283. The Politics of Memory (Classics of Political Thought IV). 3.0 Credits.

Was George Orwell right that those who control the past control the future--and those who control the present control the past? This is a course on the politics of memory: how political power shapes what is available to be remembered, the timing, spaces, and occasions of commemoration, and who is permitted to invoke (or disavow) the past. We will engage a range of highly contested works of ancient, modern and contemporary political theory to investigate how the past might haunt present day politics through memories that are conscious and unconscious. The themes we will take up include: the correspondence between memory and freedom; whether we ever be free given that we are creatures endowed with memory, whether it is sometimes politically necessary (or even possible) for people to forget, and what politics of memory emboldens, or threatens, democracy. There are no prerequisites for this course.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.284. Classics of Political Theory: Political Freedom. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, and the relationship between freedom, responsibility and political judgment. Spanning texts ancient, modern and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past possible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom’s opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.301. Global Political Economy. 3.0 Credits.

Examines the intersection of politics and economics in global affairs. Focuses on theoretical approaches to global political economy; institutions of governance of the global political economy; flows of goods, services, capital, and information; and transborder problems. Recommended Course Background: AS.190.209
Prerequisites: Not open if you have previously taken AS.190.216.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.307. Race, Politics and Literature. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.311. Disposable People: Race, Immigration and Biopolitics. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore theories and practices of race and immigration in order to illuminate the proliferation of populations regarded as disposable in contemporary politics. We will pay special attention to the contestable criteria used to determine eligibility for membership in the human race. We shall also examine how political power influences the relays between citizenship status and those whose lives are worthy of protection, and those who should be allowed to die.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.314. Struggles for Democracy: from the French Revolution to the Arab Spring. 3.0 Credits.

This course is a systematic introduction to theories of regime change, which includes episodes of democratic transitions (gradual or revolutionary) and breakdowns, as well as trajectories of regime stability, like the persistence of various types of authoritarian rule and democratic polities. Two thirds of the course will cover theories, which in comparative politics are mostly inductive constructions from historical experiences. The remaining third will be case studies of exemplary events and processes, for instance, the differentiation of political regimes in post- WWI Europe in terms of liberal, fascist, and social-democratic regimes; the convergence towards democracy in Western Europe and Latin America between 1950 and 1990, and the fragility of democracy in Tropical Africa and the Middle East.
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.320. Politics Of East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

Examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. Topics include state-society relations, late development, nationalism, democratization, political culture, social movements, and globalization.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.326. Democracy And Elections. 3.0 Credits.

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.
Instructor(s): R. Katz
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.327. Politics of Information. 3.0 Credits.

Considers global and comparative politics of information, information technologies, and the Internet. Examines governance of information (ownership of information, rights to information, privacy) and governance of information technologies (domain names, social media websites, etc.). Students who previously took AS.190.327 Politics of Information may not take this course.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.329. National Security-Nuclear Age. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the impact of weapons of mass destruction on international politics with an emphasis on security issues. The first half of the course focuses on the history of nuclear weapons development during the Cold War and theories of deterrence. The second half of the class considers contemporary issues including terrorism, chemical and biological weapons, ballistic missile defense and proliferation. Requirements include a midterm, final and a ten page paper.
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.333. American Constitutional Law. 3.0 Credits.

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.
Instructor(s): E. Zackin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.334. Constitutional Law. 3.0 Credits.

The second semester of a two semester course. Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.
Prerequisites: AS.190.333
Instructor(s): E. Zackin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.335. Imagining Borders. 3.0 Credits.

What is a border and why do borders mater in global politics. What do borders mean under conditions of globalization? An examination of the politics of borders, transborder flows, and networks within and across borders. The readings which come from political science and other disciplines, will include theoretical and case-specific works.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.339. American Racial Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.214
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.340. Black Politics I. 3.0 Credits.

This course is a survey of the bases and substance of politics among black Americans and the relation of black politics to the American political system up to the end of Jim Crow. The intention is both to provide a general sense of pertinent issues and relations over this period as a way of helping to make sense of the present and to develop criteria for evaluating political scientists' and others' claims regarding the status and characteristics of black American political activity.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.341. Korean Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to the historical and institutional foundations of modern South Korean politics. Topics include nationalism, political economic development, civil society, globalization, and ROK-DPRK relations. (CP)
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.342. Black Politics II. 3.0 Credits.

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.340.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.368. Pluralism. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar will explore the theory and politics of pluralism: from European debates over religious tolerance to American debates over constitutional founding; from liberal political philosophy to radical democracy. Authors may include Bentley, Dahl, Locke, Madison, Ranciere, Rawls, Young. Recommended Course Background: Previous course in political theory or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): S. Chambers
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.373. The Politics of Public Policy. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the political structure and process of making public policy in the United States. Public policymaking is, above all, an arena in which policy professionals try to bring systematic evidence and scientific knowledge to bear to diagnose, understand, and solve social problems. At the same time, policymaking also takes place in a political environment, in which strategic and purposive actors contend for power and seek to advance their own goals and realize their own visions about how the world ought to be changed for the better. The goals that participants in the policymaking process pursue may take a variety of forms: substantive policy outcomes, of course, but also power, political advancement, or material advantage. The actors who populate the process, moreover, may disagree about the goals they seek and making policy — especially in democratic political systems — requires some means of resolving these disagreements. Actors also differ in the resources they have at their disposal to seek their goals — power, money, organization, for example, but also knowledge and expertise. Finally, policymakers cannot do anything they want in pursuit of their goals. They are constrained by the rules and structures that make up the policymaking system. These factors — actors, goals, resources, knowledge, and rules — shape the politics of policymaking and frame the strategic options available to policymakers.
Instructor(s): B. Mikulski; R. Lieberman.

AS.190.379. Nationalism and the Politics of Identity. 3.0 Credits.

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.380. The American Welfare State. 3.0 Credits.

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Obama. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Prerequisites: Students may take AS.190.380 or AS.360.380, but not both.
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.385. Urban Politics and Policy. 3.0 Credits.

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross listed with Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.391. Time to Kill: Race, Punishment, Death and Desire. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the role of race in determining who deserves to be punished, the timing and occasions of punitive action and how long punishment should endure. Key to our inquiry is how racialized presumptions about human desire might justify punitive logics of power. The class explores inequalities in the distribution of punishment and death in order to illuminate how race shapes questions of whose time is more valuable, who lives and who dies, and ultimately whose lives count as human.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.393. Theories of Constitutional Interpretation. 3.0 Credits.

In this course, we will read and discuss a variety of arguments about how best to interpret constitutional texts, with particular attention to debates about the U.S. Constitution. The course will also cover debates about the role of ordinary people, legislatures, and judges in determining the content of constitutional law.
Instructor(s): E. Zackin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.394. Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the domestic, regional, and transnational politics of the Middle East and North Africa. The class is organized into three units. The first examines major armed conflicts— anti-colonial, intra-state, and inter-state—from 1948 through the 1990s. It uses these historical moments as windows onto key issues in Middle Eastern and North African political issues such as external intervention/occupation, human rights, sectarianism, social movements, and memory politics. Unit Two focuses on policy relevant issues such as democratization, minority populations, religion and politics, and gender. In Unit Three, students will explore the politics of the Arab Uprisings through critical reading and discussion of new (post-2011) scholarship on MENA states, organizations, and populations. Enrollment limited to Political Science and International Studies majors.
Instructor(s): S. Parkinson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.396. Capitalism and Ecology. 3.0 Credits.

Capitalism and Ecology focuses on the relations between capitalism and climate during the era of the Anthropocene. How do capitalist processes of fossil extraction, consumption, production and governance contribute to the pace of climate warming, glacier flows, the ocean conveyor system, species loss and other phenomena? What are the effects and the possible modes of political response? How do the nonhuman, self-organizing processes such as glaciers, oceans and climate change on their own as they also amplify the effects of capitalist emissions? The course combines texts on capitalism and activism with those by geoscientists on how the nonhuman systems work. Books by authors in the fields of political theory, geology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and ethology will be drawn upon. Authors such as Michael Benton, Brian Fagan, Hayek, Naomi Klein, Fred Hirsch, Fred Pearce, van Dooren and Connolly are apt to be read to engage these issues. A previous course in political theory is recommended. The class is organized around student presentations on assigned readings. Two papers, 10-12 pages in length. Extensive class discussion.
Instructor(s): W. Connolly
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.398. Politics Of Good & Evil. 3.0 Credits.

The politics of good and evil places a set of classic myths into conversation with recent philosophical and political work on good and evil. The myths include the Book of Job, Genesis (J version), two dramas by Sophocles, a reading from Augustine, and Voltaire’s Candide. Texts by Nietzsche, William James and Connolly are then placed into conversation with each other and hose mythic texts. Kohlhberg’s The Sixth Extinction closes the class, allowing us to look again at the relevance of myth to today. This class is organized around “elemental theory” in which diverse existential stories jostle and disturb both each other and us. Previous work in theory is highly recommended. Assignments: A class presentation, two 10-12 page papers, extensive class discussion.
Instructor(s): W. Connolly
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.402. Environmental Racism. 3.0 Credits.

This is an undergraduate political theory seminar that addresses the disproportionate impact of environmental destruction on racially stigmatized populations. We shall examine the logics of power whereby the natural world is subjected to exploitation and domination, in tandem with the subordination of racial subjects historically identified as closer to nature. Likewise, we will explore political and theoretical challenges to environmental racism, such as those posed by indigenous communities, decolonial theory, and political movements contesting the intersection of racial inequalities and ecological crises.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.407. Geopolitics, Nuclear Weapons and World Order. 3.0 Credits.

Intensive examination of unresolved debates about the implications of nuclear weapons for world order, focusing on deterrence, strategy, arms control, multipolarity, proliferation, terrorism, and abolition, as well as roles of liberal, democratic, and constitutional political forms and popular public involvement. Readings from classic and contemporary sources.
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.408. Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Issues. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the concept of sovereignty by examining its historical development and its use in international relations scholarship. Our discussion will also be informed by works in political theory and the international law literature. The course is open to advanced undergraduate students and graduate students.
Instructor(s): S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.412. Political Violence. 3.0 Credits.

An examination of the ways in which violence has been used to secure political ends. Topics include terrorism, assassination, genocide, coups, rebellions and war itself. Students examine what makes types of political violence unique and what unites them. (Formerly AS.190.372)
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.425. The New Deal and American Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores how the New Deal, the fundamental moment in the post-Civil War United States, has structured politics and government across a variety of domains ever since. Topics include presidential leadership, executive power, political parties, labor, race, and the welfare state.
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.426. Science and Expertise in Global Politics. 3.0 Credits.

An in-depth examination of complex global problems that demand the effective use of scientific and expert knowledge in global governance. We will begin with a theoretical overview covering different perspectives on the role of knowledge and technology in global politics before looking in more detail at case studies drawn from environmental politics, nuclear management, colonial history, international political economy, UN peacekeeping, and more.
Instructor(s): B. Allan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.430. Time and Punishment. 3.0 Credits.

“If you can’t do the time, don’t do the crime.” According to ask.com, this common expression was made popular in the 1970s by the theme song for the television show “Beretta.” Aside from amusing us with the irony that the star of “Beretta” was Robert Blake who was later charged with the murder of Bony Lee Bakely, the expression raises a profound issue: What is the relationship between punishment and time? This course will explore that question. Topics to be discussed include different philosophical understandings and experiences of time, views of mortality and fate, theories of punishment, specific punishments in the U.S. (including sentences of juveniles, life, death, and LWOP), as well as punishments that are not specifically meted out but are known to be the consequences of political, social, and economic circumstance. Students will read texts in criminology, political theory, philosophy, and jurisprudence, as well as a selection of Supreme Court cases, novels, and short stories. This writing intensive course is limited to undergraduates who have taken at least one “Classics of Political Thought” course (190.280, 190.281, 190.282, or 190.283).
Instructor(s): J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.434. Does Israel Have a Future?. 3.0 Credits.

Israel is one of the only countries whose existence is openly challenged. This class will examine the future of Israel focusing on international and domestic threats to its continued existence as a Jewish democracy. Outside threats to be considered include nuclear attack and the growing international movement to delegitimize Israel. domestic challenges include demographic changes, the role of religion in governance, and doubts as to whether one can be a Jewish state and still be a democracy. Lessons from the destruction of the ancient Israelite kingdoms and from contemporary state deaths will be included. The course will conclude by considering efforts that Israel can undertake to meet the threats it faces.
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.436. Republican Orders and Sustainability. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.438. Violence and Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar will address the role of violence–both domestic and international–in political life. Though most claim to abhor violence, since the advent of recorded history, violence and politics have been intimately related. States practice violence against internal and external foes. Political dissidents engage in violence against states. Competing political forces inflict violence upon one another. Writing in 1924, Winston Churchill declared–and not without reason–that, "The story of the human race is war." Indeed, violence and the threat of violence are the most potent forces in political life. It is, to be sure, often averred that problems can never truly be solved by the use of force. Violence, the saying goes, is not the answer. This adage certainly appeals to our moral sensibilities. But whether or not violence is the answer presumably depends upon the question being asked. For better or worse, it is violence that usually provides the most definitive answers to three of the major questions of political life--statehood, territoriality and power. Violent struggle, in the form of war, revolution, civil war, terrorism and the like, more than any other immediate factor, determines what states will exist and their relative power, what territories they will occupy, and which groups will and will not exercise power within them.
Instructor(s): B. Ginsberg
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.439. Advanced Topics in Global Politics: Learning Through Research. 3.0 Credits.

Join a research team. In this course, students will explore topics in global politics and methods for the conduct of inquiry in the Johns Hopkins tradition of learning through research. Under the guidance of the professor, students will learn about a topic from existing primary and secondary sources, collect new empirical evidence, analyze the evidence, and contribute to research products. Recommended for students planning to write a thesis. Junior or Senior standing in Political Science or International Studies or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.441. Comparative European Politics. 3.0 Credits.

In comparison with other regions of the world, Europe can easily appear as a pacified and somewhat boring place. This course will question this stereotype through an examination of European politics in historical and cross-national perspective. From a historical perspective, Europe has been the crucible of modern politics. And to this day, Europe remains a locus of intense conflict as well as remarkably diverse experimentation. We will read seminal scholarly works as well as recent comparative politics literature on European politics. The goal is to understand and discuss central concepts that comparative politics scholars mobilize in the study of European politics across time and space. Topics will include: political, legal, and economic governance; the evolution of democracy, the welfare state, partisan politics, immigration, race, and religion; European integration and globalization.
Instructor(s): N. Jabko
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.442. Civil Society. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores classic and contemporary debates on the concept of civil society and critically examines its analytical value in light of recent developments. Topics include the relationship between civil society, the state, and markets, the role of civil society in development and democratization, social capital, and global civil society. This course is open to graduate students from any discipline. Advanced undergraduate students must obtain permission from the instructor and are expected to keep up with graduate students during class discussions.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.443. Politics of Outer Space. 3.0 Credits.

Intensive examination of the political aspects of human activities in outer space, past, present and future, with focus on militarization, earth-remote sensing, surveillance, navigation, resource exploitation, the Outer Space Treaty, and colonization.
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.444. Causes of Peace. 3.0 Credits.

Since 1945, the great powers have enjoyed their longest period of peace in history. Interstate conflict between lesser powers is also at an all time low. What accounts for this “long peace?” This course will look at various explanations including the spread of democracy , the proliferation of nuclear weapons, globalization, American hegemony, and fundamental changes in attitudes regarding the use of force. Students will present draft versions of their research papers during the last weeks of the course. Co-listed with AS.190.619
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.445. Power and Wealth: Sources, Dynamics and Linkages. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores theoretical approaches to the multiple relations between political power and economic power, including pluralism, Marxism, and historical institutionalism. Major empirical transformations will provide the motivation: the rise of modern states, capitalism and social classes in Early Modern Europe, the creation of highly unequal societies in post-colonial Latin America and Africa, the varieties of Welfare State in the golden age of advanced capitalism (1950-75), and the powerful rebirth of inequality in advanced economies for the last 25 years. Theories of sources and interactions of political and economic power will be coupled with accounts of the effects of power and wealth on macroscopic change, especially democratization and economic development. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.455. Comparative Racial Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This upper-level seminar surveys the major trends and approaches to the comparative study of race in political science and critically examines the link between race and politics. Topics include race and state formation, citizenship and national membership, immigration, racial regimes, and the political economy of race. Recommended background: Courses in comparative politics, political economy, immigration, and racial politics
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.471. The University and Society. 3.0 Credits.

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.
Instructor(s): B. Ginsberg; R. Kargon
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.480. Planetary Interdependence and World Governments. 3.0 Credits.

Intensive exploration of alternative global political architectures for high levels of security, ecological and internet interdependence
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.481. Conservatism and Crime. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the evolution of conservative thought on crime and criminal justice from the 1960s to the present. We will focus in particular on how the subject of crime illuminates different strains of conservatism, reveals tensions between its values of liberty, authority and anti-statism, and shows the changing approach that conservative intellectuals have had to race.
Instructor(s): S. Teles
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.491. Game Theory in the Social Sciences. 3.0 Credits.

Strategic thinking is a fundamental component of many political and economic phenomena, from international wars and national elections to wage bargains and monopoly power. Game Theory is a set of ideas and techniques for analyzing strategic interactions and making predictions about its outcomes. This course provides an introduction to Game Theory and its main applications to relevant political and social outcomes. Juniors and Seniors Only.
Prerequisites: AS.110.106 or AS.110.108
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.678. Law and Politics.

As a field, Law and Politics has evolved from the study of constitutional law and judicial politics to the political behavior of judges and their associates to the study of law and society, the operation of law and courts “on the ground” in the international arena as well as in the United States, historical institutionalism, and the carceral state. In this graduate course, we will review some of the classic texts in the field, with a focus on the tension between legal institutions and democratic politics. In particular, we will examine how that tension is manifest in the foundations of the American political system and in critical reflection on contemporary practices of American democracy. Students will turn in response papers every week on the reading. In addition, there will be two 10-20 page papers due during the semester. Graduate Students Only.
Instructor(s): E. Zackin; J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.335. Arab-Israeli Conflict. 3.0 Credits.

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.
Instructor(s): R. Freedman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.344. Belonging to Nature in the Anthropocene. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores debates in contemporary environmental political thought concerning humanity's relationship to nature in the Anthropocene. The Anthropocene refers to the era in which "human" activity becomes a force of "nature"–when the impact of human activity on natural processes manifests itself in the stuff of the Earth. For many of us, these planetary transformations are hardly noticeable in day-to-day life, but they are dramatic: we are living through the Earth's sixth mass extinction. What is our relationship to these transformations? Do we have the power to stop them, or at least to minimize their harmful effects? Course readings and films introduce multiple visions of the human/nature relationship and examine the responses they recommend to these and other questions. The political stakes of these visions are brought to light as we consider: How do visions of the human/nature relationship shape and texture core political concepts like freedom, agency, responsibility, and progress? What do they suggest about the strategies most likely to motivate action amid the uncertainty of the Anthropocene? How do these visions subtly (and not so subtly) relegate some to the realm of "nature" so that others can be classified as "human"?
Instructor(s): S. Erev
Writing Intensive.

AS.191.345. Russian Foreign Policy. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.
Instructor(s): R. Freedman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.365. U.S Constitutional Law - Civil Liberities. 3.0 Credits.

The course is designed to introduce students to the study of civil liberties as protected by the Constitution of the United States. The emphasis will be upon those rights incorporated into the Bill of Rights and made applicable to the states through the Fourteenth Amendment. Specifically, the course will examine freedom of speech and freedom of the press – as well as freedom of freedom of thought, belief, and association. In addition, the course will address the right to privacy, the rights of those accused of crimes, and the rights and protections secured under the two clauses of the First Amendment relating to religious liberty – the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause
Instructor(s): S. Snell
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.191.389. The Politics of Race and Ethnicity in the Postcolonial Society. 3.0 Credits.

The postcolonial society offers a unique terrain for the study of comparative racial politics, providing a setting for which racial and ethnic politics often take place between predominately non-white groups. In this course, students will examine contemporary understandings of the concepts of race and ethnicity and how they are deployed politically in the postcolonial society, enabling students to make deeper explications about the relationship between race, ethnicity and national inclusion as global phenomena that are the persistent and widespread legacies of colonialism, nationalism and white supremacy. Specifically, students will become familiar with the processes of colonization and decolonization--as well as postcolonial theories of resistance--that structure group politics today, drawing upon theoretical sources from Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. These theoretical and historical tools will be used to study racial and ethnic politics across a range of postcolonial cases, including Indonesia, Mauritius, Fiji, Trinidad, Colombia and Brazil.
Instructor(s): E. Thornton.

AS.191.402. Numbers, Pictures, Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Aitchison students only.
Instructor(s): L. Drutman
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Islamic Studies

AS.194.101. Introduction to Islam. 3.0 Credits.

Study of Islam, its beliefs and practices in their historical development, from the preaching of Muhammad to the end of the Middle Ages, providing a historically-grounded understanding of Islam
Instructor(s): G. Ferrario
Area: Humanities.

German & Romance Languages & Literatures

AS.211.265. Panorama of German Thought. 3.0 Credits.

A unique aspect of the German intellectual tradition is the attention it pays to the role of the subject in constructing the world. While this tendency is associated in particular with Kant who turned philosophy back to the study of the subject’s faculties, it also features prominently in the work of thinkers as varied as Freud, Panofsky, and Einstein, who founded new disciplines (i.e., psychoanalysis, iconology, and quantum mechanics). This course will examine the crucial role that German thought has played in the development not only of modern philosophy but also of modern science and the humanities. Students will become acquainted with an intellectual tradition that is as concerned with what we know as how we know it.
Instructor(s): R. Tobias
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.211.341. Power and Resistance in French Political Thought. 3.0 Credits.

Even as a strong, divine-right monarchy emerged in France, following the Renaissance wars of religion, rebellious French thinkers never stopped questioning the foundations of power. They focused critically not only on the claims of authority issuing from the top, but also on the submissiveness of the governed and the reach of propaganda. This course examines how power shapes minds and bodies, from absolutism to the Revolution, to democratic laïcité. Readings include works by La Boétie, Montaigne, Loyseau, Bayle, Rousseau, Saint-Just, Maistre, Tocqueville, Foucault, Lefort, Rancière and the Assemblée Nationale. Readings and discussion in English.
Instructor(s): E. Russo
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.361. Narratives of Dissent in Israeli Society and Culture. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will study and analyze the notion of dissent in Israeli society and culture on its various literary and artistic forms. We will examine the emergence and the formation of various political and social protest movements, such as the Israeli Black Panthers, Israeli feminism and the 2011 Social Justice protest. We will discuss at length the history and the nature of dissent in the military and in relation to Israeli wars and will track changes in these relations. Significant portion of the course will be dedicated to the literary, cinematic and artistic aspects of Israeli dissent and their influence on Israeli discourse. We will explore the nature and role of specific genres and media such as the Israeli satire, Israeli television, newspaper op-ed and the recent emergence of social media. Students wishing to work in English exclusively for 3 credits should enroll in section one. Students who are fluent in Hebrew and are wishing to attend an additional hour-long Hebrew discussion session per week with Professor Cohen (time TBD in consultation with enrolled students) for 4 credits should enroll in section two.
Instructor(s): N. Stahl; Z. Cohen
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.380. Modern Latin American Culture. 3.0 Credits.

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.
Prerequisites: AS.210.312
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.394. Brazilian Culture & Civilization. 3.0 Credits.

This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)
Instructor(s): F. De Azeredo Cerqueira
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.212.341. Power and Resistance: Approaches to French Political Thought.. 3.0 Credits.

Even as a coherent, rational conception of state power emerged in France in as early as the Renaissance, French thinkers never stopped challenging the ways by which power justified itself in order to foster obedience and consensus. In so doing, they focused critically as much on the claims of sovereignty issuing from the top as on the willingness of the governed to submit to them. The course will examine the dialectic between the legitimation and delegitimation of power, from the Renaissance wars of religion to the Revolution and beyond: the haunting fear of the corruption and death of the political body; the notion of permanent crisis; the right to revoke the social contract; the reach of power in shaping minds and bodies. Readings may include works by La Boétie, Bodin, Bayle, Rousseau, Sade, Saint-Just, Constant, Maistre, Tocqueville, Foucault, Lefort and Rancière. Readings and discussion in English.
Instructor(s): E. Russo; W. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.104. Freshman Seminar: Weimar on the Pacific: German Exile Culture in the United States. 3.0 Credits.

Freshmen seminar. After Hitler's seizure of power in 1933, the number of artists and intellectuals who fled the Nazi regime soon rose into the thousands. Many of these German expatriates ultimately settled in the United States (e.g. Los Angeles, New York), where, simultaneously attracted and alienated by their new surroundings, they made a significant impact on American culture. The seminar will explore German Exile Culture in the U.S. in its broad variety spanning a spectrum from film to architecture, literature, and philosophy. Based on the aesthetic and conceptual specificities of the artifacts, class discussions will focus on the relations between art and politics, modernist and mass culture, art and capitalism, culture and democracy. The seminar will close with a look at postwar America and the McCarthy era, when European emigrants became the target of suspicion as left-wing intellectuals.
Instructor(s): A. Krauss
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.265. Panorama of German Thought. 3.0 Credits.

German thought is a broad intellectual tradition that encompasses works in an astonishing number of fields including philosophy, aesthetics, sociology, epistemology, psychology, anthropology, history, religious studies, and cultural analysis. The most prominent representatives of this tradition include Luther, Leibniz, Kant, Humboldt, Hegel, Nietzsche, Marx, Warburg, Freud, Benjamin, Kracauer, Weber,Simmel, Cassirer, Auerbach, Adorno, Arendt, Heidegger, and Luhmann. Indeed, current approaches to understanding cultural, historical, and social phenomena as well as literary and artistic forms would not have been possible without the German intellectual tradition which, beginning with the Enlightenment, emphasized the role of the subject in constituting objects of knowledge and experience. This survey course will highlight important topics in German Thought, which may include the subject, consciousness and unconsciousness, Bildung and the idea of the university, the sublime and the uncanny, irony, hermeneutics and translation, the desire for knowledge, tragedy and repetition, civilization, symbolic forms and medial reproduction, memory, and authority in a historical scope. Taught in English.
Instructor(s): R. Tobias
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.270. Die Erfindung der Moderne. 3.0 Credits.

Taught in German. An introduction to key conceptions of modernity elaborated in the German-language cultural context. We consider the rise of historical awareness and the question of whether history has a purpose, modernity's difference from ancient and medieval times, secularization and the crisis of meaning, the role of intellectual reflection and subjectivity, the relation between cultural production, political power, and economic processes. Excerpts in the original German from works by Kant, Schiller, Novalis, Hegel, Heine, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, Benjamin, Heidegger
Prerequisites: AS.210.362 or placement exam.
Instructor(s): M. Dornbach
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.305. Contemporary German Film. 3.0 Credits.

After almost a quarter century of neglect, German cinema is on the map again. The many awards German films have been granted over the last 15 years speak to the renaissance of German Cinema since 2000. Among these movies are Florian Henckel von Donnersmarcks The Lives of Others (Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, 2006), Caroline Link's Nowhere in Africa (Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, 2002), Fatih Akin's Head-On (Golden Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival, 2004; European Film Award 2004), Oliver Hirschbiegel's Downfall (nominated for Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, 2004) or Wolfgang Becker’s Goodbye, Lenin! (European Film Award, 2003). Nazi Germany, the Stasi, or the Reunification are prominent topics of this internationally acclaimed Contemporary German Cinema. Parallel to these mainstream productions, an aesthetically far more adventurous cinema has developed known as “Berlin School” or "Nouvelle Vague Allemande". Directors associated with the Berlin School are Christian Petzold, Angela Schanelec, Christoph Hochhäusler or Valeska Grisebach. Dissecting the everyday reality of post-wall Germany, this ‘counter-cinema’ draws on the New German Cinema of the 1970s (among others) to develop radical notions of realism and challenge narrative conventions. This course will give a survey on German Film since 2000 – discussing the historical and cultural context of selected movies as well as analyzing aesthetic strategies and concepts of realism in Contemporary German Cinema. Taught in German.
Instructor(s): E. Strowick
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.322. Museums and Jews, Jews in Museums. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the presence of Jews in museums. We will consider the history of the exhibition and collection of Jewish material culture in museums from the 19th century to the present day. Our main task will be to identify the various museological traditions that engage Jewish identity, including the collection of art and antiquities, ethnographic exhibitions, history museums, and Holocaust museums. Some of the questions we will ask include: how do museums shape identity? what is the relationship between the scholarly premises of many museums and their popular reception? and, centrally, what is the relationship between Jewish museums and museums of the Holocaust?
Instructor(s): S. Spinner
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.387. Major City, Minor Literature? Berlin in German-Jewish and Yiddish Literature. 3.0 Credits.

Between the two World Wars, a period of intense artistic and intellectual vitality, Berlin was an international center for theater, visual arts, and literature. Many important Yiddish-language writers were drawn to Berlin and, together with their German- language counterparts, produced a body of literature that explores issues of modernity and identity. By comparing works in Yiddish and German, we will learn about inter-War Berlin’s cultural diversity and richness, while also gaining insight into the particular issues of writing about Jewish identity in the 1920s, and the implications of writing in a minor language (Yiddish). We will read works by authors including Joseph Roth and Alfred Döblin in German, and Moyshe Kulbak and Dovid Bergelson in Yiddish. All texts will be in translation. Some questions we will explore include: • What is a minority/minor language or literature? • How did German and Yiddish interact in cultural and social spheres? • Can texts in different languages comprise a single body of literature? • What did it mean to be German and what did it mean to be Jewish? • Are assimilation and hybridity useful concepts? • Is there such a thing as Jewish modernism? • How did literature of the period respond to the rise of the Nazi party and the intensification of antisemitism?
Instructor(s): S. Spinner
Area: Humanities.

AS.215.324. Reading Terror: The Migrant in the Trans-national Narrative: Abancay, Lima, London, Alabama, Madrid, Connecticut. 3.0 Credits.

The readings bring into consideration the question of terror (of war) and displacement as experienced by migrants in novels by prize winning authors such as Arguedas, Vargas Llosa, Alarcon, Riesco, Roncagiolo and Silva Passuni.
Instructor(s): S. Castro-Klaren
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.215.350. Mexico: An interdisciplinary approach to the construction of our image and understanding of Mexico. 3.0 Credits.

The course studies the accounts of the Mexica on the journey and foundation of Tenochtitlan. Later we move on to the clash of cultures with the Spanish conquest (1521). After studying the art of the colonial period, the course focuses of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and ends with a consideration of the image of the nation in murals and writers such as Octavio Paz, Carlos Fuentes and Elena Garro. Taught in English.
Instructor(s): S. Castro-Klaren
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.215.380. Modern Latin American Culture. 3.0 Credits.

Taught in Spanish. This course will explore the fundamental aspects of Latin- America culture from the formation of independent states through the present—in light of the social, political, and economic histories of the region. The course will offer a general survey of history of Latin- America, and will discuss texts, movies, songs, pictures, and paintings, in relation to their social, political, and cultural contexts. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.
Prerequisites: AS.210.312;Students may earn credit for AS.211.380 or AS.215.380, but not both.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities.

AS.215.404. Cuba Between Heresy and Revolution. 3.0 Credits.

We will examine the Stalinist and Leninist refashioned doctrines of Fidel Castro and Ernesto Che Guevara; Cuba's Devil's Pact with Obama; the decline to near breakdown of Cuba-Venezuela Alba dual nation Chavismo; and the startling implications that all of it poses to the rise of sham populism in America. We will press hard into the fabric of Cuba's battered daily lives, mostly in greater Havana, but also in Miami. Among others, the work of filmmaker Fernándo Pérez, the fiction of Leonardo Padura, and Mariel exodus artists will inform our discussions. Our shared hypothesis: that post-revolutionary national sovereignty, coupled with Cuban exile irredentism, may have engendered the island's dual nation status, tied to Miami's so-called Cuban enclave. As a result, a theologico-political confessional crisis continues into infinity in terms of plural and bipolar heresies supported by US electoral mapping and lobbying, and in some minds having Cuba become the Fifty-First US state.
Instructor(s): E. Gonzalez
Area: Humanities.

AS.215.646. The Narrative of Conquest in the Andes, 1530 - 1680.

Departing form narratology and the perspective of post-colonial studies, the course will analyze the narrative of conquest as developed by Cieza de Leon, Garcilaso de la Vega, Inca, Guaman Poma, Jose de Acosta and William Prescott.
Instructor(s): S. Castro-Klaren.

AS.216.307. Reflective Mirrors: Israeli and Palestinian Cinema. 3.0 Credits.

Palestinian and Israeli cinemas have emerged side by side, each depicting its Other as a deceiving mirror of its own self. This course will analyze the different images of these Others in both cinemas.
Instructor(s): N. Stahl; Z. Cohen
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.216.342. The Holocaust in Israeli Society and Culture. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the role of the Holocaust in Israeli society and culture. We will study the emergence of the discourse of the Holocaust in Israel and its development throughout the years. Through focusing on literary, artistic and cinematic responses to the Holocaust, we will analyze the impact of its memory on the nation, its politics and its self-perception.
Instructor(s): N. Stahl
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.216.370. Israel Through Prose. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines representations of various aspects of Israeli society and culture in contemporary Israeli prose. The course will follow both a thematic and chronological path in order to study the ways in which Israeli prose reflects political, ideological, social and cultural aspects of contemporary Israel. In this context, we will read works by several major authors such as: Agnon, Shabtai, Kahanah-Carmon, Oz, Kenaz, Yehoshua, Grossman, Castel-Bloom, Matalon, Laor, Kashua and Hoffmann. Students who sign up for section 2 will work an additional hour in Hebrew with Professor Cohen at a time mutually agreed upon by the professor and the students enrolled.-Carmon, Oz, Kenaz, Yehoshua, Grossman, Castel-Bloom, Matalon, Laor, Kashua and Hoffmann.
Instructor(s): N. Stahl; Z. Cohen
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.216.373. War in Israeli Arts and Culture. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will study the various representations of what functions as one of Israel’s most unifying and yet dividing forces: war. By analyzing literary and cinematic works as well as visual art and popular culture we will attempt to understand the role of war in shaping Israeli society, culture and politics. Topics such as commemoration and mourning, dissent and protest, trauma and memory and the changing image of the soldier will stand at the center of the course. Students with a knowledge of Hebrew wishing to do extra work in Hebrew should enroll in section 2 and the fourth hour will be scheduled at a time convenient to the enrollees and instructor.
Instructor(s): N. Stahl; Z. Cohen
Area: Humanities.

Sociology

AS.230.143. Global Migration: Refugees, Economic Migrants, and Borders. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to the different forms, catalysts, and consequences of global migration. Even as the plight of migrants and refugees has elicited the sympathy of millions worldwide, the majority of them still encounter closed borders and draconian immigration regimes on the fringes of more “desirable” destinations in Europe, Australia, and the United States, and many others remain in limbo in their countries of origin or in transit states. Are these border restrictions new? Or are they consistent with states’ long-standing ways of regulating who is and is not worthy of being admitted through their borders? Throughout the course, we will trace the divergent factors that prompt refugees and economic migrants to migrate, juxtaposing these with the responses of states, international treaties, and humanitarian organizations to their movement and arrival in host countries. Using a variety of written and verbal assignments, we will question the fundamental categories of migration: What is an economic migrant? What is a refugee? How are they different or similar? Whose interests do such categories serve, and how have they been used justify governmental practices of inclusion and exclusion over time?
Instructor(s): I. Naveh Benjamin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.147. Introduction to Islam and Islamicate Societies since 1800. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an introduction to contemporary Islam and Muslim societies from approximately 1800 to the present. Key themes will include the colonial encounter, state formation and reform, revolution, Islamic revival, and globalization. Reflecting Islam’s status as a world religion, the course will touch on developments around the Muslim-majority world and in the West.
Instructor(s): R. Calder
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.150. Issues in International Development. 3.0 Credits.

This course will provide an undergraduate level introduction to the study and practice, as well as the successes and failures, of international development. Students will be introduced to the various theoretical frameworks used to explain underdevelopment. Students will also explore the practice of development since the 1950s by examining specific strategies employed in Latin America, South Asia, East Asia, and Africa. Using a variety of country-specific case studies, students will have the opportunity to apply the theoretical and practical frameworks learned in the class to assess the successes and failures of real-life cases.
Instructor(s): M. Levien
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.166. Chinese Migration in Modern World History 1500's-2000's. 3.0 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course applies theories of economic sociology to examine the effects of Chinese overseas migration on modern world economy from the sixteenth century to the contemporary era. It examines the contribution of overseas Chinese to the development of capitalism in the following junctures: the East-West economic integration in the pre-modern era, China's modern transformation after the Opium War (1839-1842), the making of US national economy in the early twentieth century, as well as the postwar economic miracles in the Pacific Rim, among others. Special Note: Fufills History requirement for GSCD track students.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.175. Chinese Revolutions. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.213. Social Theory. 3.0 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to classical sociological theories (with an emphasis on Marx, Weber, and Durkheim). Contemporary theoretical perspectives on social inequality, conflict, and social change are also explored. Emphasis is placed on understanding the theoretical constructs as well as on applying them in the analysis of current social issues. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.221. Global Social Change. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to issues of global social change, with a particular focus on the challenges of international development and the contemporary globalization process. Specific themes include world income inequality and global poverty, the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. WTO and EU) and their relations with sovereign states, anti-globalization activism, the rise of China and India in the global economy, and the origins as well as consequences of the current global economic crisis, among others. Lectures will be aided by documentary films and other multi-media materials. Special Note: Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only. Formerly offered as AS 230.353. Students who took AS.230.353 cannot take AS.230.221.
Instructor(s): H. Hung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.223. Housing and Homelessness in the United States. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.228. Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism in Asia, with special focus on the development of British Straits Settlements and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Taiwan. We will review the competing discourses about the impact of colonial dominations in these areas from the 1800s to the present-day. In the beginning of the era, the British built up the economic linkage between Hong Kong and Penang, Malacca as well as Singapore to sustain its dominance throughout the “Far East.” In the middle of the period, the expanding Japanese empire developed Taiwan as a footstep to compete with the British interests in South China and Southeast Asia. Hong Kong and the Straits Settlements, especially Singapore, became the contested terrain where two colonial powers vied for their influences in the region. The competition was not only about trade, but about the construction of a new East Asian regional order after the end of the Chinese hegemony. In the end of the period, the intervention of the US power in postwar Asia facilitated the retreat of the colonial establishments, British and Japanese ones included. The course that compares the colonial establishments and discourses on colonial legacies among the three areas points out that colonialism constituted an inalienable part of Asian history.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.244. Race and Ethnicity in American Society. 3.0 Credits.

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.255. Men and Women in Society. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore what it means to be male or female through academic writings, fiction, and film. It will examine how genders are defined by individuals, cultures, and institutions, and how those meanings shape everyday life for men and women. Power, inequality, and intersections with race-ethnicity, class, and sexuality will be a primary focus. Theories of gender addressed will include those related to masculinity, social psychology, feminism, and intersectionality. Though the course will primarily consider the United States, gender in other countries and cultures will also be addressed. Cross-listed with WGS.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.265. Research Tools for Global Sociology and Development. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students. Course previously titled "Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences
Instructor(s): S. Upadhyay
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.275. Revolution, Reform and Social Inequality in China. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores various aspects of social inequality in China during the Mao Zedong and the post-Mao reform eras. We will examine inequality within villages, the rural/urban divide, urban inequality, education and health policies, and gender and ethnic inequality. Each of these issue areas will be tackled analytically, but the aim is also to understand what it was/is like to live in China during and after the Mao era. Formerly offered as AS.230.321.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.285. Maritime East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the transnational connections among merchants and migrants in the waters of East and Southeast Asia from a historical and comparative perspective. We will explore how diplomatic ties, long-distance trade and migration contributed to the making of cosmopolitan cities such as Quanzhou (Zayton), Malacca, Fort Zeelandia (Formosa), Batavia, Manila, Singapore and Hong Kong in the region from the tenth century onwards. The course will close with an examination of how the transnational connections are relevant to understand inter-state competition in Asia’s long twentieth century. Key subjects to be introduced include tribute trade system, trading diasporas, Euro-Chinese co-colonialism, pan-Asianism, as well as history and historiography of maritime silk road.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.313. Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public Housing. 3.0 Credits.

Is a neighborhood just a grouping of individuals living in the same place, or do neighborhoods have collective meanings and impacts on children and families? We will capitalize on research methodologies used to define and describe neighborhoods and their effects on economic and educational outcomes. These include case studies, census data, surveys, quasi/experimental data. Focus is on how research measures neighborhood effects and incorporates community level processes into models of social causation (e.g., social capital/control, community efficacy, civic engagement). Also examined: patterns in residential mobility, segregation, and preferences within black and white populations; development of housing policy in the U.S.; programs to determine how neighborhoods affect issues of social importance. Statistics and public policy background is helpful but not required.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.316. African American Family. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.324. Gender and International Development. 3.0 Credits.

This course employs a comparative perspective to examine the gendered impact of international development experiences and policies. Students will discuss the historical evolution of how the concept of gender has been constructed, conceptualized, and integrated into international development theory and practice. The course will also examine how greater international development. In particular, we will examine structural theories of poverty reduction, individual theories of power and processes of stratification at the household and family level. Specific issue areas will include the globalization, class and work political participation and social movements. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.
Instructor(s): R. Agarwala
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.325. Global Social Change and Development Practicum. 3.0 Credits.

This course provides "hands on" research experience in the field of global social change and development. Students will participate in a collaborative research project analyzing the causes and consequences of the recent upsurge of protest around the world in comparison with previous historical waves of social unrest. The course fulfills the "research practicum" requirement for Sociology majors and is required for the GSCD track.
Prerequisites: AS.230.265 or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): B. Silver; S. Karatasli
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.332. Race, Racism & Racial Privilege. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the concepts of race, racism, racial privilege in contemporary America, and the West in general. Examples from other countries will be integrated as well. Historical contexts such as the colonialism, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, and the post Civil Rights era will help to provide an understanding of the social, political, economic, and cultural forces processes that have constructed and shaped the concepts of race and the racialized subject over time.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.335. Medical Humanitarianism. 3.0 Credits.

Humanitarian organizations play life-preserving roles in global conflicts, and have front-row views of disasters ranging from the 2010 Haiti earthquake to the 2011 Fukushima tsunami in Japan. Yet even while they provide vital assistance to millions of people in crisis, such organizations are beset by important paradoxes that hinder their capacity to create sustainable interventions. They work to fill long-lasting needs, but are prone to moving quickly from one site to the next in search of the latest emergency. They strive to be apolitical, yet are invariably influenced by the geopolitical agendas of global powers. How do such contradictions arise, and what is their impact upon millions of aid recipients around the world? Drawing on case studies from South Sudan to Haiti, this course addresses these contradictions by exploring how and why medical aid organizations attempt, and sometimes fail, to reconcile short-term goals, such as immediate life-saving, with long-term missions, such as public health programs and conflict resolution initiatives.
Instructor(s): I. Naveh Benjamin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.336. Family, Gender and Sexuality in China. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines social changes in China since the beginning of the People’s Republic (1949) through the lenses of family, gender and sexuality. The first half of the course focuses on understanding family institutions, women’s status, gender relations and sexualities in connection with major historical transitions between 1949 and the present. The second half includes readings and discussions around several thematic topics regarding family, gender and sexuality in contemporary China in the broader context of politics, economy, and social norms.
Instructor(s): Y. Dong
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.343. Political Sociology of Latin America. 3.0 Credits.

This course provides an overview of Latin America through its historical, economic, social, and political dimensions. Emphasis will be given to the analysis of social structures: class, race and ethnicity, and the contemporary social movements. The course begins with an overview of the pre-Columbian civilizations and colonial legacies that gave rise to the multiethnic societies and the ethnic conflicts which characterize contemporary Latin America.Cross-listed with Program in Latin American Studies and International Studies (CP)
Instructor(s): M. von der Heydt-Coca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.346. Economic Sociology of Latin America. 3.0 Credits.

This course will offer an overview of Latin America’s economic reality as an intertwined process of economic and political domestic factors within the constraints of the world economy. Latin American development will be analyzed from a historical perspective. The first half of the semester the course will focus on the analysis of the economic developmental patterns starting in the middle of the 19thcentury to the populist era in the middle of the 20thcentury. In the second half of the semester, we will analyze in depth the contemporary neoliberal approach to development. Globalization is the force that drives economic, social and political processes in Latin America. The course will include case studies as well the social conflicts generated by the increasing polarization of the society. Students will be exposed to important sociological theories.
Instructor(s): M. von der Heydt-Coca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.361. Class and Culture. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the intersection of social class and culture—both the popular culture of movies, TV, music, etc, and “culture” in the anthropological sense as the shared way of life of a people. The course is divided into three main sections: 1) concepts of class, culture and the ways in which they interact; 2) cultures of each major class within American society, beginning with the “Old” and “New Money” classes, the “New Class” of intelligentsia, the much-invoked Middle Classes, the shrinking Working Class, and continuing through the poverty-stricken Lower Classes; 3) issues of cultural consumption and production and their role in reproducing the class structure.
Instructor(s): T. Nelson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.362. Migration & Development. 3.0 Credits.

This course focuses on the relationship between international migration and development. The course first introduces theories of international migration, immigrant integration, and international development. Building on this foundation, we then examine how immigrants interact with their homeland and how sending country governments tap their diaspora to improve development outcomes. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.
Instructor(s): L. Hao; R. Agarwala
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.363. Sociology of Dispossession. 3.0 Credits.

The “grabbing” of land and natural resources has, in recent years, generated widespread political conflict across the Global South and put dispossession on the agenda of academics and policy-makers. Nevertheless, compared to other social relations—such as labor exploitation—dispossession has not been central to social scientific understandings of capitalism, the state, “development,” or politics. In this class, we will collectively explore the nascent field that we might call the sociology of dispossession. We will begin with existing theoretical approaches to the problem, and then proceed to challenge, reconstruct or supplant those theories as we consider a wide range of historical examples of dispossession—including the English enclosures, colonial plunder, large dams, mining, water privatization, Special Economic Zones, transnational agricultural investments, conservation projects, and climate-induced displacement. Students will write weekly reading responses and a final paper.
Instructor(s): M. Levien
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.364. Ethnic Violence in Comparative and Global Perspective. 3.0 Credits.

This course provides a framework for understanding and analyzing different forms of ethnic violence including ethnic riots, ethnic wars, and genocides around the world. Beginning with foundational texts on defining ethnic groups, we will examine causes and dynamics of ethnic mobilization and violence from different disciplines and perspectives. Throughout the course, we will explore texts that treat key themes in studies of ethnic violence including globalization, economic development, inequality, dismantling of the developmental state, migration, state formation and failure, conflict resolution, and democratization; focusing on various cases of ethnic violence in different regions including Eastern Europe, Basque Region, Turkey, Sudan, India, Sri Lanka, China, and historical cases like Northern Ireland. Fulfills Non-Western History (NWHIST) requirement for IS GSCD students only.
Instructor(s): S. Kumral
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.367. Islamic Finance. 3.0 Credits.

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $2 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on riba in the Quran and hadith, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.
Instructor(s): R. Calder
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.370. Housing and Homelessness in the United States. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.
Prerequisites: Students may not have previously taken AS.230.223.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.375. Nations, States, and Boundaries. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the historical origins and development of the modern global political order based on sovereign nation-states, the crisis of this order through the twentieth century, as well as the unraveling of this order at the turn of the twenty-first century. We will focus on how dominant political organizations in the changing world order (such as states, political parties, and transnational governing bodies) have been shaped by different social forces (such as classes and ethnic groups) and vice versa. Topics covered include rise and fall of modern nationalism, formation of regional and global governing structures, “civilizational” turn of global politics, waves of separatism and redrawing of nation’s boundaries after the Cold War, politics of immigration and citizenship, among others.
Instructor(s): H. Hung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.377. Colonialism and Anti-Colonialism. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism and anti-colonial movements. It focuses on the establishment of the colonial division of labor, comparative colonialism, identity formation, and nationalism as well as anti-colonial movement.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.381. Sociology of the Middle East and North Africa. 3.0 Credits.

This course takes a sociological approach to the contemporary Middle East and North Africa. Topics include urbanization and demographic change; rentier welfare states and the global political economy of oil; women in higher education and the labor force; the 2011 Arab Spring; conflict in Syria, Libya, and Yemen; Amazigh (Berber) identity in northwest Africa; Israel-Palestine; “Dubai, Inc.” and the sociology of migrant labor; neoliberal Islamic politics in Turkey; cinema and everyday life in Iran; conservative monarchy in Morocco and Saudi Arabia; and the role of the United States in the MENA region. Students will give presentations, write memos, and submit two papers. One aim of the course is to turn students into clear, polished academic writers and thinkers.
Instructor(s): R. Calder
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.383. Courts, Housing, and the City: A Research Seminar on Social Justice in Baltimore. 3.0 Credits.

This course will join an existing survey of the Housing Court in Baltimore City by the Public Justice Center (PJC) of Maryland to examine the role and process of evictions in the Baltimore civil litigation system. The course will examine the history of housing in Baltimore and the changing role of the courts in housing rights and law from the mid-20th century to the present. Working with the PJC’s Human Right to Housing Project, students will be expected to participate in the survey collection process by attending Rent Court and participating in the data collection process, followed by cleaning and analysis of the data. Counts as American Politics/Sociology of the United States for GSCD Track.
Prerequisites: AS.230.205 AND AS.230.265 or permission of instructor
Instructor(s): D. Pasciuti
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.385. Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America. 3.0 Credits.

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.
Instructor(s): S. Morgan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.391. Theories of International Development. 3.0 Credits.

This course will cover major theoretical approaches to the study of development. We will begin with foundational political economic texts (including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx, and Karl Polanyi). After setting the historical context of decolonization, we will then proceed to cover major theoretical approaches to the study of development in the past sixty years, including: modernization theory, dependency and world systems analysis, state-centered approaches, neo-institutionalism, the capabilities approach, political-ecology, post-development, feminism, the Washington consensus, social capital, experimental economics, and contemporary sociological reconstructions of Marx, Smith and Polanyi. Cross listed with International Studies (IR); fulfills IS Economics requirement for GSCD track students only.
Instructor(s): M. Levien
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.395. Contemporary Social Theory. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine how major social theorists of the 20th century advanced upon the “classical” social theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. As they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20th century—the Russian revolution and its degeneration into Stalinism, the failure of communist movements in the West, the rise and fall of fascism and Nazism, the consolidation of capitalist democracies and welfare states, the emergence of anti-colonial movements in the “Third World,” and the persistence of race, gender and sexuality as forms of domination—social theorists provided novel answers to classical questions of social theory: 1) what is the structure of modern society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced?; 2) what is the relation between social structures and ideas, knowledge, and subjectivity?; and 3) what are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? Theorists to be covered include Antonio Gramsci, Franz Fanon, W.E.B. Dubois, Georg Lukacs, Talcott Parsons, Herbert Marcuse, Jurgen Habermas, Louis Althusser, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Nancy Fraser, Patricia Hill Collins, Judith Butler, and Henri Lefebvre. In addition to understanding and comparing the theories, we will try to use them to understand contemporary societies.
Instructor(s): M. Levien
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.415. Social Problems in Contemporary China. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will examine contemporary Chinese society, looking at economic development, rural transformation, urbanization and migration, labor relations, changes in class structure and family organization, health care, environmental problems, governance, and popular protest. The course is designed for both graduate and undergraduate students. Undergraduates must have already completed a course about China at Hopkins. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.435. The China Boom. 3.0 Credits.

This course addresses the origins, global impacts, and demise of China’s economic ascendancy as a world economic and political powerhouse at the turn of the twenty-first century. The course will cover the historical origins of the China boom and impacts of the boom on global political economic order. It will also address the social-political imbalances within China that contribute to the global financial crisis and recent slowdown of the Chinese economy. Particular topics include late imperial and Maoist legacies’ relation to contemporary economic growth, stages of China’s capitalist development, China’s outward investment in the developing world, formation and limits of US-China economic symbiosis, and China’s participation in global governance, among others.
Instructor(s): H. Hung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.440. Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime Asia. 3.0 Credits.

The goal of the seminar is to examine the prospects and limits of understanding the incorporation of Asia in the capitalist world-system from the prism of oceanic connections. The theoretical thrust of this course is to develop but also to adapt Janet Abu-Lughod emphasis on the connections across port cities and littoral in the Afro-Eurasian continents before the long sixteenth century in her Before European Hegemony. But instead of looking at a port city as its adjacent hinterland polity’s gateway to global trade in the premodern era, the course examines the multifarious coast-hinterland relationships. The readings are organized by a chronological order, which begins with the historical maritime silk road between the third and thirteenth centuries, and will be followed by Asian port cities in the European age of empire and postwar American-led Cold War Structure, as well as the present-day Chinese New Silk Road Diplomacy. Students are expected to select an issue of regional tensions and to analyze its historical root.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.460. Research Seminar on Stratification in the Modern World Economy: 1600-2014. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines stratification in the modern world economy from the 16th century to today, covering classical and contemporary theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the hierarchical structure of the capitalist world economy (including Baranko Milanovic, Thomas Pikkety, Andre Gunder Frank, Giovanni Arrighi, Christopher Chase-Dunn, P. Korzeniewicz and T. Moran, W. W. Rostow). Students will be expected to recreate and extend these empirical studies and engage in a quantitative discussion of theories of global inequality and development. In doing so, we will discuss how methodological choices, research designs, choice of indicators and inequality measures affect the outcomes and conclusions of this research. Using this theoretical and empirical background, the course will engage key questions on the contemporary and historical conditions of world inequality such as; has world income inequality been increasing or decreasing over time? Do we see stability or change in the hierarchical structure of the capitalist world economy? What are the consequences for contemporary rise of China and recent global financial meltdown for world income inequality? What will stratification in the world economy look like in the 21st century? Counts as IR/Global Sociology or Economics/Economic Sociology for GSCD Track.
Prerequisites: AS.230.150 AND AS.230.265 or permission of instructor
Instructor(s): D. Pasciuti; S. Karatasli
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Earth & Planetary Sciences

AS.271.360. Climate Change: Science & Policy. 3.0 Credits.

Prereq: 270.103 or permission of instructor. This course will investigate the policy and scientific debate over global warming. It will review the current state of scientific knowledge about climate change, examine the potential impacts and implications of climate change, explore our options for responding to climate change, and discuss the present political debate over global warming.
Instructor(s): B. Zaitchik; D. Waugh
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.271.403. Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis. 3.0 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad introduction to US environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA, RCRA, and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of this course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the proper perspective. This course is taught in conjunction with an identical graduate course. All students will be expected to perform at a graduate level.
Instructor(s): H. Serassio; R. Solomon
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

East Asian Studies

AS.310.103. Modern Japan - 1800 to the Present. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the history of Japan from the 18th century to the present. In lectures and discussion we will draw upon a combination of primary source materials (political documents, memoirs, oral histories, journalism, fiction, film) and scholarly writings in order to gain insight into the complex and tumultuous process by which Japan became an industrialized society, a modern nation-state, and a world power.
Instructor(s): A. Bronson
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.115. Ghost Tales from China and Japan, 14th-19th Centuries. 3.0 Credits.

We cannot express our own experience of death – only imagine life after death. How did people in the past conceptualize the world of the dead? Ghost tales will teach us what we imagine as the experience of dead and life after death. This course aims to introduce students to a variety of ghost stories in Late Imperial China and Tokugawa Japan and connect their literary imagination of the dead to the cultural, socio-historical, and religious context of each society as well as to the broad East Asian tradition of supernatural narratives. While we also touch upon earlier traditions on narrating the dead, most of the stories in class readings are from the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties of China, and the Tokugawa period (1600-1868) of Japan. Key issues include family, gender, sexuality, body, medicine and many more. Although we will also take a look at visual and theatrical representations of the dead, we will primarily focus on literary texts about ghostly phenomena. Film screenings required. All readings are in English.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.305. Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy. 3.0 Credits.

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.
Instructor(s): M. Ott
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.306. Domestic Politics of Contemporary China. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to China's contemporary political history and current political system. It helps students develop a critical understanding of China's governance institutions and processes, political economy, and state-society relations. The course focuses primarily on China's domestic politics but also covers China's changing role in Asia and the world.
Instructor(s): Y. Yang
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.308. The Frontier in Late Imperial China. 3.0 Credits.

The tremendous expansion of Chinese frontiers during the late imperial period forced the state and those who lived within it to grapple with complex problems of governance, ethnicity, and the geographic extent of "China". Issues and concerns associated with the massive Chinese frontiers have extended into the present; hence, no one can appreciate the current problems plaguing China's northwestern, southwestern, or coastal regions without an understanding of its historical antecedents. This seminar is designed to introduce major scholarly works and theoretical frameworks on the Chinese frontier.
Instructor(s): J. Bandy
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.352. Current Issues in US-Asia Relations: A Practitioner's View. 3.0 Credits.

We will examine how major political events, players, norms and institutions have shaped US-Asia relations in the modern era.
Instructor(s): W. Konishi
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Program in Latin American Studies

AS.361.130. Introduction to Latin American Studies. 3.0 Credits.

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of Latin America, analyzing political and cultural aspects, chronologically organized. We will begin studying the origins of the multi–ethnic societies, starting with the ancient civilizations and their transformation under colonization. It is important to understand the survival of cultural traits among indigenous peasants today in the countries that were the cradle of ancient civilizations: Mexico, Guatemala and the Andean countries. In the republican era the course will focus on the classical Caribbean dictators in the first half of the 20th century and their reflection in the literature, comparing the historical reality with the magic representation in the work of Garcia Marquez. The course will scrutinize the most important revolutions in the continent: the Mexican, Cuban and Bolivian revolutions and the geopolitics of USA in the Americas. Weekly lectures related to the assigned reading will focus on specific periods, topics and regions. After each lecture, we will review the material, connecting specific details from the readings with the more theoretical aspects provided in my lecture. The course has a website where the PowerPoint presentations will be posted. Students are encouraged to post their questions, comments and suggestions on the web after their readings. Students will be given a study guide for each lecture, which will be the basis for the exams. Our perspective on Latin America will be enhanced by a selection of few films related to the topics.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.361.207. Afro-Latin American Biography. 3.0 Credits.

In this course, we will examine biographical accounts of men and women of African descent in Latin America and in the broader Black Atlantic. These individuals include conquistadors and slaves, saints and sinners, revolutionaries and ordinary people. In their life stories, we will not only examine questions of race, gender, and religiosity that were central to the construction of identity in the early modern Atlantic world, but also the nature of the sources that allow us to tell their stories.
Instructor(s): J. Clark
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.361.330. Latin America Otherwise: Voicing Dissent. 3.0 Credits.

This course proposes to look at various Latin American texts through an unconventional lens: that of dissent. Partly inspired by French philosopher Jacques Rancie?re (2001), we will take as a premise the idea of dissent not simply as a moment of protest or resistance, nor of the collective plea for rights, but the moment when already given or accepted ways of living and institutional forms are unexpectedly modified by subjects not previously recognized as political. We will draw from diverse materials, ranging from political theory texts, Latin American literature, the literature on development, to the experiences of various social movements in the region. Recommended Course Background: an introductory level course in International Studies, Political Science, Anthropology, or Sociology
Instructor(s): T. Zille
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.361.380. Brazil: Cinema, Popular Music, Counterculture and Politics from 1960-1990. 3.0 Credits.

We believe that understanding the second half of the 20th century is crucial to understand the challenges that Brazil faces in the 21st Century. This course investigates the cultural, intellectual, social and political history of Brazil from mid-1950s to the1990s. We begin with an overview of the legacy of Getúlio Vargas (1930-45) and the construction of Brasília (1961), examining the formation of ideas about Brazilian identity, development and modernization of the country. We then examine the dictatorship (1964-1985), its economic and social project, the place of human rights and its impact on Brazilian society, paying attention to how the people responded to an authoritarian regime through a counter revolutionary movement and through culture (Cinema Novo, MPB/Brazilian popular music, Tropicália) in a fight for democracy. And, finally, we discuss the current issues that the country has dealt with such as of democracy, development, corruption, social mobility, and sporting mega events, for example. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor's permission required)
Instructor(s): V. Santos
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Center for Africana Studies

AS.362.104. Introduction to the African Diaspora. 3.0 Credits.

This course will begin in Africa before Atlantic slave trade, move to cover that trade into Brazil, the Caribbean and South Carolina. Comparisons of slave systems with Africa, Brazil, some parts of the Caribbean and Carolina (later South Carolina).
Instructor(s): P. Romero
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.122. History of Africa (since 1880). 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the African past since 1880.
Prerequisites: Students are not allow to take both 100.122 and 362.122.
Instructor(s): K. Gallon
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.340. Power and Racism. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates the impact of white supremacy and anti-black racism, as a global system of power, on the political development of the United States of America.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.344. Education Politics in Urban America. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar analyzes trends, developments, and future challenges related to the politics of urban public schooling with a concentration on community political dynamics and the struggle for equal educational opportunity and quality education. The course emphasizes the impact of socioeconomic class inequality, racial/ethnic conflict, and gender politics on the changing character of public school reform since the 1954 Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education. Cross-listed with Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality

AS.363.328. Beyond the Global West: Gender/Sexuality, Post-colonialism & Global Capitalism: Feminist Inquiries from Asian Perspectives. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines gender and sexuality issues in both East and South Asian Societies and situates subject matters in the broader contexts of post-colonialism, state formation, revolution and global capitalism.
Instructor(s): Y. Dong
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://krieger.jhu.edu/internationalstudies/directory/

Faculty

Director

Sydney Van Morgan
Director, International Centers and Programs

Advisory Board

Renee Marlin-Bennett
Liason to the Faculty and Professor, Department of Political Science

Lori Citti
Director, Office of Study Abroad

Marton Dornbach
Visiting Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies, German Division, Department of German and Romance Languages and Literatures

Nicolas Jabko
Associate Professor, Department of Political Science

Yuki Johnson
Director, Center for Language Education

Naveeda Khan
Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Anthropology

Michael Levien
Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology

Barbara Morgan
Senior Lecturer, Department of Economics

Gabriel Paquette
Professor, Department of History

Sarah Parkinson
Aronson Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and the International Studies Program

Beverly Silver
Director, Global Social Change and Development Program and Professor, Department of Sociology