Near Eastern Studies

http://neareast.jhu.edu/

The Department of Near Eastern Studies offers programs in four main areas: Egyptology, Assyriology, Northwest Semitic languages and literatures (including the Hebrew Bible), and Near Eastern Archaeology. The department approaches Near Eastern civilizations primarily through their own records, and language study is therefore an important part of the curriculum. However, many undergraduate courses require no knowledge of foreign languages and any interested student may take them.

Facilities

The university’s Milton S. Eisenhower Library contains an outstanding collection of books and journals in the branches of Near Eastern studies pursued by the department. The Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum has a collection of Near Eastern antiquities, including excellent study collections of Egyptian artifacts and Palestinian pottery. The Baltimore-Washington area is especially rich in library and museum facilities. Of special interest to students of the Near East are the Walters Art Museum, the Smithsonian Institution, and the Library of Congress.

The ancient Near East is where history begins. It is where the first crops were sown, the first towns built, and where writing was first invented. The origins of Western culture are to be found in its great civilizations, from the three great monotheistic religions—Christianity, Islam, and Judaism—to everyday aspects of our life that we take for granted, such as the alphabet and marking time by hours and minutes. The Near Eastern studies major can be the focal point of a broad liberal arts education, as well as a basis for graduate study. An undergraduate major can specialize in one of the four main areas of specialization of the department - Egyptology, Assyriology, Northwest Semitic languages and literatures (including the Hebrew Bible), and Near Eastern Archaeology - or in the civilizations of the ancient Near East in general.

Near Eastern Studies Major Requirements

Also see Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree.

Students must earn a “C-“ or higher grade in all courses used to satisfy major requirements and courses may not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Two Introductory Courses (Select two of the following):6
Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations
Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt
Pyramids, Temples and Tombs
Two Upper-Level Core Courses (Select two of the following):6
History of Ancient Syria-Palestine
History: Ancient Syria-Palestine II
Seminar Near Eastern History: Egypt
or AS.130.313 History of Egypt from ca. 1200-30 BCE
or AS.130.300 History Anccient Mesopotamia when offered
or AS.130.382 History:Ancient Mesopotamia II when offered
Four 300-level courses in a focus area of art and archaeology, history and culture, or language *12
Three Near Eastern Studies courses at any level9
AS.130.420Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Text and Image in Ancient Near Eastern Art and Texts3
Total36

Note: AS.130.420 - This writing intensive seminar covers different selected topics in order help students develop skills in specific research areas such as critical reading, analysis, interpretation, and writing. Specific topics vary each semester. AS.130.420 is required of NES Majors, but is also open to non-majors who have taken at least one 100-level and one 300-level Near Eastern Civilization course, or with the consent of the instructor. It is recommended that NES majors take the class during their sophomore or junior years.

*

Students pursuing the language focus area need to select four courses from the following languages: Akkadian, Arabic, Ancient Egyptian, Biblical Hebrew, Modern Hebrew or Sumerian.  These may not be 300-level.

Honors

Those seniors wishing to be considered for departmental honors may choose to write a senior thesis. A student must maintain a 3.5 GPA in the major (through the junior year) to be eligible for departmental honors. It is advisable for such students to contact a faculty member to supervise the thesis during the spring semester of their junior year. The student should then register for two semesters of independent study in the senior year.

Sample Program

A typical path toward degree completion might include the following sequence of courses:

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Near Eastern elective at any level #13Required intro course #13
  3  3
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Required intro course #23Near Eastern elective at any level #23
 Course in focus area at 300 level #13
  3  6
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Required upper level core course #13Required upper level core course #23
AS.130.420Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Text and Image in Ancient Near Eastern Art and Texts3Course in focus area at 300 level #23
  6  6
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Course in focus area at 300 level #33Course in focus area at 300 level #43
Near Eastern elective at any level #33 
  6  3
Total Credits: 36

Near Eastern Studies Minor Requirements

To minor in Near Eastern Studies, a student must complete six courses (18 credits) from among the department’s offerings. One of these courses must be from among the Department’s regularly offered introductory courses to the ancient Near East: 130.101 Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations; 130.126 Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt; 130.135 Pyramids, Temples and Tombs.  The remaining five courses are selected, in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies in Near Eastern Studies, to meet the needs and interests of the student. Minors may wish to survey all of the different fields covered by the department or to focus on a single ancient language, culture, or methodology in more depth.     

Students must earn a “C-“ or higher grade in all courses used to satisfy minor requirements and courses may not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

AS.130.101Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations3
or AS.130.126 Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt
or AS.130.135 Pyramids, Temples and Tombs
5 Additional Near Eastern Studies Courses15
Total Credits18

The graduate program, the oldest of its kind in the nation, is designed to train professional scholars and teachers in the above-mentioned areas. The courses listed below may be modified in particular years to suit the needs of students currently in residence. Reading and private study under the direction of the faculty are considered as important as work in class. The seminars allow small groups of students and faculty to engage in close study of special problems. As the program is intended to lead to the Ph.D., students are admitted as candidates for the M.A. only in unusual cases.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Students working full time toward the Ph.D. may expect to do three to four years of course work, after which comprehensive examinations must be written before work on the dissertation begins. The examinations cover a student’s major and minor fields of concentration. After passing these examinations, the student, in consultation with the faculty, prepares a dissertation proposal for faculty consideration and then proceeds to write the dissertation.

An ability to read scholarly French and German is necessary, and an examination in one of these must be passed within the first semester of residence at Hopkins. The examination in the other may be delayed not more than one year. Some command of Greek and Latin is necessary to pursue biblical studies.

Financial Aid

The department awards most students admitted to the Ph.D. program who are in need of financial aid a basic annual fellowship covering full tuition and a full stipend for living expenses for up to five years. For some of this period, the department’s support may take the form of a teaching assistantship. In addition, the period of support may be extended by the various competitive awards available to advanced students within the university. When appropriate, the department will award travel stipends for graduate students to participate in archaeological excavations in the Near East or visit collections in this country and abroad.

For further information on graduate study in Near Eastern Studies, visit the departmental website at http://neareast.jhu.edu/.

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.130.101. Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations. 3.00 Credits.

Review of important issues in ancient Near Eastern history and culture from the Neolithic era to the Persian period. Included will be an examination of the Neolithic agricultural revolution, the emergence of cities, states and writing, and formation of empires. Cultures such as Sumer and Akkad, Egypt, the Hittites, Israelites, Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians will be discussed.
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.102. From the Neanderthals to the Neolithic. 3.00 Credits.

Emphasizing theories about human biological and cultural development, this course consists of an in-depth survey of Neanderthal morphology and culture, a brief discussion of evolutionary theory and our fossil ancestors, and concludes with an exploration of the mechanisms and results of the shift from hunting and gathering to farming. (Course formerly known as Introduction: Human Prehistory.) Cross-listed with Anthropology.
Instructor(s): S. McCarter
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.105. Freshman Seminar: Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll in Ancient Egypt. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar explores the social roles of sexuality, alcohol, other drugs, music, fragrance, and sensuality in secular and religious areas of Egyptian life, largely but not exclusively during the New Kingdom, ca. 1500 to 1000 B.C. The ancient attitudes towards these elements will be explored through the ancient textual sources in translation and the artistic representations.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.106. Freshman Seminar: Ancient Empires. 3.00 Credits.

Freshman Only A case-study approach to the political, social, and cultural history of one of the ancient Near Eastern states commonly described as an “empire,” such as the Akkadian Empire, the Neo-Assyrian Empire, the Neo-Babylonian Empire, or the Achaemenid (Persian) Empire. Individual classes mix a discussion of theoretical issues relevant to the study of ancient empires with close attention to primary sources.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.107. Freshman Seminar - BIG: Monumental Buildings and Sculpture in Antiquity and Today. 3.00 Credits.

The building of sculpted monuments and monumental architecture seems to be a universal human trait in all parts of the world, from the pyramids of ancient Egypt to the inuksuit cairns of the Inuit. What explains our urge to create monumental things? Why are monuments built, and how do we experience them? This course explores various answers to these questions through the disciplines that most frequently address monuments: archaeology, architecture, and art history. We will examine the archaeological record through a series of famous case studies from around the world to investigate the social significance of monuments in their original ancient contexts. We will also determine whether lessons learned from the past can be applied to the study of monuments today, and whether studying modern monuments--including those from our immediate surroundings in Baltimore--can help us understand those of the past. As a writing intensive seminar, students will also be taught techniques in academic essay writing, culminating in a final paper analyzing the social significance of a monument from the past or present.
Instructor(s): J. Osborne
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.108. Freshman Seminar: Demons & Doctors: Magic and Medicine in the Ancient Near East. 3.00 Credits.

This course will provide an introduction to the magical and medical arts of ancient Mesopotamia and Syria-Palestine by engaging with ritual texts dealing with disease, exorcisms, sorcery, and harmful ghosts.
Instructor(s): E. Guinn-Villareal
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.109. Freshman Seminar: Ancient Homes and Houses. 3.00 Credits.

What will your bedroom tell future archaeologists? What can ancient houses tell archaeologists of past societies? This course explores methods/theories of Household Archaeology in the Near East and beyond.
Instructor(s): J. Swerida
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.110. Introduction To Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to archaeology and to archaeological method and theory, exploring how archaeologists excavate, analyze, and interpret ancient remains in order to reconstruct how ancient societies functioned. Specific examples from a variety of archaeological projects in different parts of the world will be used to illustrate techniques and principles discussed.
Instructor(s): C. Brinker
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.111. Freshman Seminar: Cleopatra's Egypt. 3.00 Credits.

Egypt in the time of Cleopatra was a fascinating mix of peoples and cultures. Jews, Greeks, and other ethnic groups lived in this unique landscape along with the native Egyptians. In this class we will consider the rich civilization and complex history of Egypt during the reign of this legendary Queen.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.116. Freshman Seminar: Ritual and Magic in Ancient Egypt. 3.00 Credits.

This course will serve to introduce students to the study of religion, ritual and magic through the lens of a specific culture: ancient Egypt. Throughout the course students will be introduced to ancient Egyptian culture and will interact with Egyptian texts and artifacts, including those found in the collections of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum, in order to illustrate key concepts.
Instructor(s): M. Fraser
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.118. Ancient Israel: In Their Own Words. 3.00 Credits.

This course will focus on the inscriptions of ancient Israel and its neighbors from the first millennium BCE. Texts speak to us directly in ways that other nonverbal archaeological remains – such as architecture or pottery – cannot. Also, secondary sources written by later historians and commentators are similarly limited, as they are separated from original events by space, time, and cultural situation. Considering how individuals from an ancient culture articulate thoughts “in their own words” is invaluable to any meaningful reconstruction of history. Participants will learn to glean information from inscriptions, including those that are fragmentary or seemingly mundane. They will experience hands-on history writing, using primary sources in translation, though those with any knowledge of ancient languages, especially Classical Hebrew, will be able and encouraged to engage with the texts in their original vernacular. Basic knowledge of world history will be helpful though not prerequisite.
Prerequisites: AS.130.134
Instructor(s): H. Parker
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.122. Freshman Seminar: The Archaeology of Death, Burial, and the Human Skeleton. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the archaeological investigation of past human populations through their mortuary and physical human remains. To this end, major theories and methodologies will be introduced, along with pertinent case studies for discussion.
Instructor(s): C. Brinker
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.126. Gods and Monsters in Ancient Egypt. 3.00 Credits.

To provide a basic introduction to Egyptian Religion, with a special focus on the nature of the gods and how humans interact with them. We will devote particular time to the Book of the Dead and to the magical aspects of religion designed for protective purposes.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.135. Pyramids, Temples and Tombs. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to the monuments and culture of Egypt from 3500 B.C. to 100 A.D. From the pyramids at Giza to Hellenistic Alexandria, this course surveys in slide illustrated lectures the remains of one of the world’s greatest early cultures.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.140. Hebrew Bible / Old Testament. 3.00 Credits.

The Bible is arguably the most read and yet most misinterpreted book of all time, one of the most influential and yet most misapplied work of literature. The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is Scripture to Jews and Christians yet also a rich collection of literature w/ numerous literary genres that has been highly influential on secular Western culture. At its core, it is our most important literary source that (when wed with archaeology) helps us to understand the people and culture of Iron Age Israel and Judah. This is an introductory course surveying of the books of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) giving primary attention to the religious ideas they contain and the ancient contexts in which they were composed. Topics include: The Academic Study of Religion, Ancient Creation Accounts, Ancestral Religion, The Exodus and Moses, Covenant, Tribalism and Monarchy, The Ideology of Kingship, Prophecy, Priestly Sources, Psalms, Wisdom Literature, and Apocalyptic Thought.
Instructor(s): T. Lewis
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.170. Diplomacy and Conflict in the Ancient Middle East. 3.00 Credits.

The Middle East is home to the invention of agriculture, cities, and writing. It is also in the Middle East that we find evidence of humanity’s earliest diplomatic activity in, for instance, the actual letters sent by ancient kings to one another, the treaties drawn up after their conflicts, and the inscriptions that commemorate their conquests. In this course, we examine texts such as these to explore questions such as: How do we characterize the international system of the ancient Middle East? Does this system change over the approximately two millennia for which we have documentation? Is it better to approach ancient diplomacy through present-day eyes or in the context of ancient world-views? Is an understanding of diplomacy in the ancient Middle East relevant to our understanding of modern international relations? All texts read in translation.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.174. Scientists and Soothsayers: The Pursuit of Knowledge in Ancient Egypt. 3.00 Credits.

The ancient world viewed Egypt as a repository of wisdom and learning, and even today, Egypt possesses in the modern consciousness a reputation for secret knowledge. From within Egypt, a diverse corpus of texts meant to record and transmit knowledge have survived and attest to Egyptian “scholarship.” This course will focus on what kinds of knowledge belonged to this written tradition (3000 BCE to 300 CE) and how those texts reflected broader social and cultural norms. This course will also consider, where relevant, the relationship between the intellectual traditions of Egypt and other societies of the ancient world, particularly Greece and Mesopotamia. Strong correlations between the Egyptian material and modern intellectual and scientific traditions, such as mathematics, astronomy, and medicine exist; but magic, divination, and religion were often treated in the same systematic, critical manner by the Egyptians. Thus the course will challenge modern understandings of science, and modern dichotomies such as rational versus irrational. After a brief introduction to Egypt, the first few weeks will concern who created these texts, who had access tothem, and their physical and intellectual milieu. Then, each week will cover a particular area of knowledge, its primary sources, social and multicultural context, and its relationship to the theoreticalthemes of the course.
Instructor(s): K. Davis
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.177. World Prehistory: An Anthropological Perspective. 3.00 Credits.

How and why did our nomadic hunting and gathering ancestors become farmers? What led agricultural societies to build cities, develop writing, religious institutions, wage war, and trade for exotic goods? This course surveys prehistory and ancient history from the origins of human culture to the emergence civilization. Although prehistory and ancient history yield evidence of tremendous cultural diversity this course emphasizes common elements of past human experience, culture, and culture change. These include the origins of modern humans and their adjustment to a variety of post-ice age environments, shifts from hunting and gathering to agricultural lifeways, and the initial development of the world’s earliest cities and civilizations.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.201. Cleopatra. 3.00 Credits.

Few individuals in history have left as lasting an impression as that of Cleopatra. In this seminar-style class we will examine both the fact and fiction associated with her eventful life (and death). All readings in translation.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.202. Ancient Mythology. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the mythology of the ancient Near East from the invention of writing in Sumer in 3000 B.C. until the conquest of Alexander the Great near the end of the first millennium B.C. Mythological texts from Mesopotamia, Egypt, Anatolia, the Levant, and the Bible will be read from a comparative perspective. Special attention is paid to the origin and development of the epic, culminating in the great Epic of Gilgamesh, but considerable time is also given to the vast mythological and historical literature, and such diverse genres as love poetry, proverbs, humorous dialogues, Omens, and legal and medical texts. All readings are in English translation.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.203. Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of Civilizations. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines Africa’s ancient past from the emergence of biologically modern humans, ancient hunter-gatherers, the earliest animal herding and farming populations, to cities and civilizations. While Egypt plays an undeniably central role in world history, this course concentrates in particular on ancient geographies other than Egypt.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.212. The Archaeology of Death, Burial and The Human Skeleton. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the archaeological investigation of past human populations through their mortuary and physical human remains. To this end, major theories and methodologies will be introduced, along with pertinent case studies for discussion. Dean's Teaching Prize Fellowship Course.
Instructor(s): C. Brinker
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.213. Introduction to Ancient Egyptian Art. 3.00 Credits.

This class is a combination of illustrated lecture and discussion, punctuated with visits to museums with Egyptian collections. Participants must be able to join at least one overnight trip to New York and/or Boston (weekend) and be available for two half day visits to Philadelphia and Washington, D.C . or elsewhere (TBA as best for participants) , in addition to visiting Baltimore institutions with the class as part of the course. Discussion of sculpture will take place in front of the objects, so attendance is important for the visits.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.215. David and Solomon in History and Legend. 3.00 Credits.

TBD
Instructor(s): A. Knapp
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.249. Sorcerers, Warriors and Femmes Fatales: Intro to Ancient Egyptian Literature. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the ancient Egyptian literature of the first millennium BCE and the Roman Era: stories of magic, epic battles, animal fables, and even cultic sex hymns.
Instructor(s): M. Escolano Poveda
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.251. Made for the Gods: Votive Eqyptian Objects in the Archaeological Museum. 3.00 Credits.

This course investigates Egyptian votive objects made as gifts to the Gods. Students will learn about Egyptian religious practices and study groups of objects in the Archaeological Museum to learn to identify how they were produced, when, and for what functions. Physical analyses of the objects will be part of the class and facilitated by museum staff.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.252. New Kingdom Egypt: Empire and Cosmopolitanism. 3.00 Credits.

This class surveys the history and art of Egypt empire period when pharaoh ruled over an area reaching from the Sudan to the north of Syria. Tutankhamun, Akhenaten, and Ramesses the Great represent the period, and the class will study how Egypt's interaction outside its borders affected the political, social, and artistic environment at home and abroad.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.255. From Feast to Famine in the Ancient World. 2.00 Credits.

Biological life, on its most basic level, is the quest for sustenance. However, in human societies, food transcends mere sustenance to become a major actor in each society’s structure and beliefs. This dual nature of food as basic necessity and cultural touchstone makes its study of great importance to our understanding of civilization, both past and present. This class will explore the role food has played in Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Mesoamerican, and Andean cultures as evidenced in the archaeological record. Dean's Teaching Prize Fellowship Course.
Instructor(s): A. Maskevich
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.258. Ceramic Analysis in Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

At archaeological sites following the invention of pottery roughly 10,000 BCE, ceramics are the single most frequent and ubiquitous class of artefact that archaeologists uncover. This class, which will be conducted in the Hopkins Archaeological Museum as a combination of lectures, discussions, and hands-on interactions with ancient and modern ceramics, surveys the methods and interpretive techniques that archaeologists use when studying this important category of material culture. Specific topics include manufacturing techniques, craft specialization, typology and chronology, production and exchange, scientific analyses, stylistic and functional analysis, and socio-political organization.
Instructor(s): J. Osborne
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.259. Ancient Science and Technology. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of scientific practices and technological innovations in the ancient world, including astronomy, medicine, law, and divination. Special attention will be devoted to the relationship between magic and science during the periods covered.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.270. Ancient Demonology. 3.00 Credits.

After identifying the character of demons, ghosts, and zombies in modern literature and popular culture, this class will investigate similar disruptive and threatening creatures in the literature of Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, and Greece, as well as early Christian traditions. By the end of the term, students will be able to address the question, What makes an evil spirit 'evil?'
Instructor(s): M. Simone
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.300. History Anc Mesopotamia. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of the history of Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.301. History of Ancient Syria-Palestine. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of the history of Ancient Syria and Cannan, including Ancient Israel.
Instructor(s): P. McCarter
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.302. History: Ancient Syria-Palestine II. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of the history of Ancient Syria and Cannan, including ancient Israel. Taught with AS.134.661. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.
Instructor(s): P. McCarter
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.303. Seminar Near Eastern History: Egypt. 3.00 Credits.

This class is one of the upper level choices for majors in Near Eastern Studies. It includes Graduate Students. Taught jointly with AS.131.600
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.304. Ancient Cities. 3.00 Credits.

This course is a survey of cities in the ancient world from Uruk, around 3000 BC until the conquest of Babylon in 539 BC. The most important cities from this period will be studied and discussed from a historical, literary, and anthropological perspective. The topics covered include (1) the archaeological and textual evidence for these cities, (2) the depiction of these cities in literary and mythological works, and (3) contemporary theoretical approaches to understanding ancient urbanism.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.312. Ancient Medicine. 3.00 Credits.

A study of medicine in the ancient Near Eastern and Aegean worlds, including an examination of the practices of medicine in these ancient societies but with primary emphasis given to ideas about health and disease. Readings are selected from primary sources in the writings of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Israel, Greece, and Rome. Topics treated include the sources of our knowledge; the nature of medical practitioners, medical treatment, and surgery; beliefs about disease and the etiology of illness; concepts of contagion and ritual purity. Special attention is given to Hippocratic medicine, the synthesis of Galen, and the rise of humoralism.
Instructor(s): P. McCarter
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.313. History of Egypt from ca. 1200-30 BCE. 3.00 Credits.

In this class we will study selected historical topics from the end of the New Kingdom (ca. 1200 BCE) to the death of Cleopatra VII (30 BCE).
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.323. Cleopatra's Egypt: Ptolemaic-Roman Egypt. 3.00 Credits.

This lecture course is a survey of the history, society, and culture of Graeco-Roman Egypt. We will concentrate on Ptolemaic Egypt (ca. 332-30 B.C.), but will also devote some time to Roman Egypt, especially to the subjects of the decline of paganism and spread of Christianity in Egypt.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.328. Ancient Egypt /Africa. 3.00 Credits.

Recent excavation and research have shed light on several ancient cultures of the Nile and its tributaries. We will look at the available archaeological and textual (all Egyptian) evidence for these societies and their interactions with Egypt between 3500 and 300 B.C. We will also discuss research aims and methods employed now and in the past in Egypt and the Sudan.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.329. Ancient Egyptian Art and Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of Egyptian art as seen in the temples, tombs, funerary, and minor arts of Egypt between 3000 and 100 B.C. Slide lectures will provide a survey of art from the Pyramids to Augustus Caesar and will focus on such topics as the principles of Egyptian art; can the term art apply to early Egypt? How were artisans trained and what techniques and materials were utilized in their work? Co-listed (meets with) AS.133.750.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.330. The Garden of Eden. 3.00 Credits.

References to the story of the Garden of Eden can be found in every significant issue of our time, from sex to politics, from race to the environment. The course will examine the story itself as well as how it's been interpreted, leading up to today. Enthusiastic participation required.
Instructor(s): E. Robbins
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.333. Ancient Egypt and Her Neighbors. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to ancient Egypt's portrayals of and interactions with foreign lands and peoples, including Syria-Palestine to the east and Nubia to the south. Topics include trade, travel, warfare and diplomacy. Textual, iconographical and archaeological sources will be considered.
Instructor(s): A. Arico
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.334. Egyptian Funerary Arts in the Archaeological Museum. 3.00 Credits.

This class will aim to cover the production and choice of funerary objects for Egyptian elite tombs in several eras of antiquity: the Middle and New Kingdoms, the Third Intermediate Period, and the Late Periods. Students will work with specific objects after learning generally about them, and they will carry out analyses of materials, pigments, construction methods, and erosion and degradation effects. They will create a virtual exhibition for the Museum's website and present their results for inclusion in the museum cataloguing project.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan; S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.335. The Pharaohs: Power and Authority in Ancient Egypt. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the triumphs and struggles of the men (and women) who ruled ancient Egypt, comparing Egyptian kingship to other ancient and modern systems of political power and authority.
Instructor(s): K. Bryson
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.341. Traditionalism vs. Orthodoxy in the Modern Era: The Case of Judaism. 3.00 Credits.

During the Modern Era in European history, the Traditionalist Jewish civilization of Europe that had evolved over many centuries went into deep crisis. The new political, social, and intellectual realities which characterized Modernity seriously challenged, overwhelmed, and indeed threatened to destroy the Jewish Traditionalist culture and society. In response, different Traditionalist thinkers and communities evolved a number of strategies for surviving in a modern environment, strategies that unexpectedly transformed Traditionalism into something different, which came to be called Orthodox Judaism. This course explores this process of transformation, which has had an important impact on Jewish life in the modern and post-modern eras. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.
Instructor(s): D. Katz
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.343. Dead Sea Scrolls-English. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of the manuscripts found at Quran and other sites near the Dead Sea.
Instructor(s): P. McCarter
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.346. Introduction to the History of Rabbinic Literature. 3.00 Credits.

Broadly surveying classic rabbinic literature, including the Talmud and its commentaries, the legal codes and the response, this seminar explores the immanent as well as the external factors that shaped the development of this literature, the seminal role of this literature in Jewish self-definition and self-perception, and the role of this literature in pre-modern and modern Jewish culture.
Instructor(s): D. Katz
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.348. Religious Law Wrestles With Change: The Case of Judaism. 3.00 Credits.

Description: How does a religious system which defines its ancient laws as God-given and unchangeable apply them to radically different and changing social, political and intellectual situations? This course explores the literature of Questions and Answers(She'elot u-Teshuvot), the Jewish legal responsa which have struggled to match Jewish religious law to modern life for fifteen centuries. A sweeping survey of Jewish history as revealed by one of its most impenetrable yet fascinating sources. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.
Instructor(s): D. Katz
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.352. History of Hasidism. 3.00 Credits.

Although it appears to be a relic of pre-modern Judaism, Hasidism is a phenomenon of the modern era of Jewish history. This course surveys the political and social history of the Hasidic movement over the course of the last three centuries. Students will also explore basic features of Hasidic culture and thought in their historical development. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.
Instructor(s): D. Katz
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.353. Space Archaeology: An Introduction to Satellite Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces technologies archaeologists use to map ancient landscapes. These include Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping software, advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, and various types of satellite imagery. Taught together with AS.131.653.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.354. Archaeological Method and Theory. 3.00 Credits.

Climate change, population growth, war - what questions do archaeologists ask about the ancient past, how do they collect relevant evidence, and how do they arrive at satisfying answers to their questions? This course will review major theoretical currents in archaeology including evolutionary, cultural-historical, processual and post-processual approaches and discuss the future of archaeology as a scientific and humanistic discipline. Basic techniques for analyzing major categories of artifacts such as lithics, ceramics, archaeobotanical, and zooarchaeological materials will also be introduced.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.357. Geographic Information Systems in Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

Applications of GIS in archaeology have recently expanded dramatically and GIS has now become an indispensible tool for archaeological research worldwide. This course will introduce the major applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in archaeology. These include the history of GIS in archaeology, air photography and satellite imagery, predictive modeling, hydrological modeling, viewsheds, and least-cost routes. It will grapple with theoretical issues manifest in archaeological GIS including conflicts between environment and social understandings of the ancient past, and will foster discussion of issues that affect outcomes of analyses including spatial scale and boundary delineation choices that can dramatically influence results. Students will learn the basics of ESRI’s ArcGIS software. Taught with AS.131.657.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Natural Sciences.

AS.130.359. Reading the Talmud in the Post-Talmudic Era. 3.00 Credits.

Life and Death, Survival and Martyrdom, in the Literature of Post-Talmudic Rabbinic Judaism. Readings in the Original Sources (Knowledge of Hebrew Required). Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.
Instructor(s): D. Katz
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.364. Archaeology of Arabia. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula from the earliest Paleolithic in the region (c. 1.5 million years ago) through the first few centuries of the Islamic era (c. 1000 AD). We will review basic geology and environmental conditions, examine the development of animal herding and crop cultivating lifeways, and scrutinize the rise of ancient South Arabian complex societies and civilizations. Co-listed with AS.131.664.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.366. Reading the Talmud in Pre-modern Jewish Culture. Attempting to Cope With Abusive Husbands: Annullment of Marriage in the Literature of Post Talmudic Rabbinic Juadism. 3.00 Credits.

The evolution of Talmudic thinking resulted in laws which made marriage too easy, divorce too difficult. This generated centuries of attempts to grapple with the consequences of this conundrum in real-life situations. This course analyzes the literature produced by these attempts. Students will read texts in original Hebrew.
Instructor(s): D. Katz
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.367. Jerusalem: The Holy City in History and Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

Jerusalem has a global significance utterly disproportionate to its size or wealth, and it has been this way since the days when the city was first settled. On the one hand, this is due to Jerusalem’s role as a sacred space for all three of the world’s largest monotheistic religions: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism. On the other, Jerusalem has long been the fulcrum of geopolitical struggles in the Middle East and beyond. This lecture course explores Jerusalem’s political, cultural, and religious trajectory over the past three millennia through the lens of the city’s amazingly rich historical and archaeological records. In so doing, we unravel the mythical and historical threads that combine to create the powerful symbolic resonance of Jerusalem today, discovering en route that, when it comes to Jerusalem, identifying what is “myth” and what is “history” is a complex and contested undertaking.
Instructor(s): J. Osborne
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.368. Nomads, Tyrants and Kings: Water in the Ancient Near East. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores economic and social histories of water in the ancient Near East. It examines water’s diverse roles in ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Levantine and South Arabian agriculture, politics, ritual and religion, including water’s interconnected significance in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Taught jointly with AS.131.615.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.369. Law in the Ancient Middle East. 3.00 Credits.

The Middle East offers the earliest and most abundant source material for reconstructing ancient legal systems. From stone monuments like the Code of Hammurabi to clay tablets the size of postage stamps, the cuneiform record provides a window into not just legal thought but actual legal practice in the ancient Middle East. Surveying a span of more than two thousand years, we will explore the law in both its deep structure and its regional and temporal diversity. Specific topics will include homicide and personal injury law, family law, the legal status of women, codes and codification, and ancient Israelite law in its Middle Eastern context. No background is required and all texts are read in translation, but every enrolled student is expected to actively participate in this seminar-style course.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.371. Ritual and Magic in Ancient Egypt. 3.00 Credits.

This course will serve to introduce students to the study of religion, ritual, and magic through the lens of a specific culture: ancient Egypt. Throughout the course students will be introduced to ancient Egyptian culture and will interact with Egyptian texts and artifacts, including those found in the collections of The Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum, in order to illustrate key concepts. Dean’s Teaching Fellowship course.
Instructor(s): M. Fraser
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.373. Prophets and Prophecy in the Bible. 3.00 Credits.

From thundering voices of social justice to apocalyptic visionaries, biblical prophets have been revered by Jews, Christians and Muslims for thousands of years. They have inspired civic leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr. yet also provided fodder for modern charlatans promising a utopian future. Yet who were these individuals (orators? politicians? diviners? poets?) and what was the full range of their message as set against the Realpolitik world of ancient Israel, Iraq, Egypt, Syria and Jordan?
Instructor(s): T. Lewis
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.374. The Archaeology of Imaginary, Entangled, Hybrid Globalizations. 3.00 Credits.

In this course students will read and examine two recent books, Michael Shanks' (2012) “The Archaeological Imagination”, Ian Hodder's (2012) “Entangled: An Archaeology of the Relationships between Humans and Things” and critically compare them with readings on archaeologies of world systems, colonialism, hybridity, and globalization. In particular, we will examine how post-colonial social theory can inform and enhance understandings of ancient past and how it might interface with scientific, empirically oriented archaeological field research and history building. Course requirements will include a short weekly written response to the readings - no exams or term paper will be required. (Taught jointly with AS.131.674)
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.376. Ancient Ritual. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the vast body of rituals that were practiced and performed in antiquity, with a particular emphasis on rituals from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Hebrew Bible. In addition to examining rituals from a comparative perspective, anthropological and sociological studies of ritual will be read and discussed to shed light on the social, cultural, and political significance of ritual in the ancient world and beyond.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.377. Creating an Egyptian Temple. 3.00 Credits.

This class will challenge every participant to plan a temple environment for a particular deity. The readings, lectures, and discussions will cover the mythology around specific gods and how it influenced temple architecture, location, ritual, and festivals. It will survey the history of temple building in Egypt, the role of architecture and art -- particularly wall reliefs -- in communicating the functions of particular parts of temples. The aim is to help students understand what requirements an Egyptian temple needed to fulfill. Then each student will plan a temple for a chosen deity and explain to peers how it meets the ancient requirements.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.378. Geoarchaeology: Applications of Earth Science to Archaeology. 3.00 Credits.

Geoarchaeology is a multidisciplinary subfield that applies the tools and techniques of earth science to understand ancient humans and their interactions with environments. This course examines basic topics and concepts, including archaeological site formation, paleo-environmental reconstruction, raw materials and resources, soil science, deposition and erosion of wind and water-borne sediments in different environments such as along rivers, lakes and coastlines, radiocarbon and other chronometric dating methods, and ground-based remote sensing, including ground penetrating radar.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.130.379. The Development of Useful Things: Technology and Economy in the Ancient World. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides an overview of technological developments in the ancient world, by foregrounding the development of objects (stone tools, pottery, metals) and of non-material technologies (agriculture, animal domestication, writing).
Instructor(s): I. Dumitru
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.381. Elementary Akkadian. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the paleography, grammar and lexicon of the Akkadian language, and the reading of simpler texts in that language. Co-listed with AS.132.600
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger; P. Delnero
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.382. History of Mesopotamia II. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of the history of Sumer, Babylonia, and Assyria.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.383. Elementary Akkadian II. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the paleography, grammar, and lexicon of the Akkadian language, and the reading of simpler texts in that language. Continues AS.130.381
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.384. Old Kingdom Art. 3.00 Credits.

This course will explore the artistic expression of Egyptian culture from the 3rd through the 6th Dynasties, ca. 2700-2100 B.C. Tombs, temples, statuary, and two-dimensional wall decoration provide a large visual vocabulary of Egyptian concepts. This class will look at these elements, separately and in combination in order to consider the intentions behind the art and evaluate the degree to which religious and ideological symbolism, known from later Egyptian art, should be understood in the early pyramid-building era.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.400. Introduction to Middle Egyptian. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2055-1650 B.C.). In the second semester, literary texts and royal inscriptions will be read. Course meets with AS.133.600.
Instructor(s): M. Escolano Poveda
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.401. Introduction To Middle Egyptian. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2011- 1700 B.C.). Co-listed with AS.133.601.
Prerequisites: Preqreq: AS.130.400 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): M. Escolano Poveda
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.420. Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Text and Image in Ancient Near Eastern Art and Texts. 3.00 Credits.

This writing intensive seminar examines how textual and artistic production were used separately and together to engender and communicate social, cultural, and political meaning in ancient Mesopotamia and the rest of the Near East from the 4th millennium to the Hellenistic period. Using a variety of case studies, students will develop skills in specific research skills such as critical reading, analysis, and interpretation. AS.130.420 is required of NES Majors, but is also open to non-majors who have taken at least one 100-level and one 300-level Near Eastern Civilization course, or with the consent of the instructor. Cross-listed with History of Art.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman; P. Delnero
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.440. Elementary Biblical Hebrew. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and writing system of biblical Hebrew.
Instructor(s): K. Medill
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.441. Elementary Biblical Hebrew. 3.00 Credits.

Survey of grammar and reading of simple texts. (Credit given only on completion of AS.130.440 and AS.130.441). May not be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Instructor(s): K. Medill
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.442. Readings - Hebrew Prose. 3.00 Credits.

Reading of biblical Hebrew prose, especially from the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.
Instructor(s): R. Liebermann
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.443. Reading Of Hebrew Prose. 3.00 Credits.

Reading of Biblical Hebrew prose, especially from the Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings.
Instructor(s): R. Liebermann
Area: Humanities.

AS.130.501. Readings & Research. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): M. Feldman.

AS.130.502. Readings & Research. 0.00 - 3.00 Credit.

AS.130.504. Independent Study. 1.00 - 4.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): B. Bryan; G. Schwartz; P. Delnero; P. McCarter; R. Jasnow.

AS.130.505. Independent Study-Archaeology Fieldwork. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): G. Schwartz.

AS.130.506. Independent Study-Archaeology Fieldwork. 1.00 - 3.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): G. Schwartz.

AS.130.510. Archaeology Major Honors Thesis I. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): E. Anderson; G. Schwartz; M. Harrower
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.511. Archaelogy Major Honors Thesis II. 3.00 Credits.

Prerequisites: AS.130.510
Instructor(s): B. Bryan; E. Anderson; G. Schwartz; L. Deleonardis; M. Roller
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.590. Independent Study. 0.00 - 3.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): M. Harrower.

AS.131.600. Seminar in Near Eastern History: Mesopotamia.

Seminar in Near Eastern History: Egypt. Taught jointly with AS.130.300.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero.

AS.131.601. Seminar Near Eastern History: Mesopotamia.

A three-year history cycle required of all graduate students and forming the core of our graduate program. One year each will be devoted to Egyptian history, Mesopotamian history, and Syro-Palestinian history.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger.

AS.131.613. Archaeology of Africa: From Human Origins to the Emergence of Civilizations.

This course examines Africa’s ancient past from the emergence of biologically modern humans, ancient hunter-gatherers, the earliest animal herding and farming populations, to cities and civilizations. While Egypt plays an undeniably central role in world history, this course concentrates in particular on ancient geographies other than Egypt.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities.

AS.131.615. Nomads, Tyrants, and Kings: Water in the Ancient Near East.

This course explores economic and social histories of water in the ancient Near East. It examines water’s diverse roles in ancient Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Levantine and South Arabian agriculture, politics, ritual and religion, including water’s interconnected significance in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Taught jointly with AS.130.368
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities.

AS.131.634. Seminar: Near Eastern Archaeology.

Topic varies but can include the archaeology of Mesopotamia, Syria, or Palestine, or thematic discussions (e.g., on ideology, state collapse, etc.).
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz.

AS.131.635. Seminar: Near East Archaeology.

Topic varies but can include the archaeology of Mesopotamia, Syria, or Palestine, or thematic discussions (e.g., on ideology, state collapse, etc.).
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz
Area: Humanities.

AS.131.653. Space Archaeology: An Introduction to Satellite Remote Sensing, GIS and GPS.

This course introduces technologies archaeologists use to map ancient landscapes. These include Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping software, advanced Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, and various types of satellite imagery. Taught together with AS.130.353.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.131.654. Advanced Archaeological Method and Theory.

Climate change, population growth, war - what questions do archaeologists ask about the ancient past, how do they collect relevant evidence, and how do they arrive at satisfying answers to their questions? This course will review major theoretical currents in archaeology including evolutionary, cultural-historical, processual and post-processual approaches and discuss the future of archaeology as a scientific and humanistic discipline. Basic techniques for analyzing major categories of artifacts such as lithics, ceramics, archaeobotanical, and zooarchaeological materials will also be introduced.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.131.657. Geographic Information Systems in Archaeology.

Applications of GIS in archaeology have recently expanded dramatically and GIS has now become an indispensible tool for archaeological research worldwide. This course will introduce the major applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in archaeology. These include the history of GIS in archaeology, air photography and satellite imagery, predictive modeling, hydrological modeling, viewsheds, and least-cost routes. It will grapple with theoretical issues manifest in archaeological GIS including conflicts between environment and social understandings of the ancient past, and will foster discussion of issues that affect outcomes of analyses including spatial scale and boundary delineation choices that can dramatically influence results. Students will learn the basics of ESRI’s ArcGIS software. Taught with AS.130.357.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Natural Sciences.

AS.131.664. Archaeology of Arabia.

This course examines the archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula from the earliest Paleolithic in the region (c. 1.5 million years ago) through the first few centuries of the Islamic era (c. 1000 AD). We will review basic geology and environmental conditions, examine the development of animal herding and crop cultivating lifeways, and scrutinize the rise of ancient South Arabian complex societies and civilizations. Co-listed with AS.130.364.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower.

AS.131.674. The Archaeology of Imaginary, Entangled, Hybrid Globalizations.

In this course students will read and examine two recent books, Michael Shanks' (2012) “The Archaeological Imagination”, Ian Hodder's (2012) “Entangled: An Archaeology of the Relationships between Humans and Things” and critically compare them with readings on archaeologies of world systems, colonialism, hybridity, and globalization. In particular, we will examine how post-colonial social theory can inform and enhance understandings of ancient past and how it might interface with scientific, empirically oriented archaeological field research and history building. Course requirements will include a short weekly written response to the readings - no exams or term paper will be required. (Taught jointly with AS.130.374)
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.131.678. Geoarchaeology: Applications of Earth Science to Archaeology.

Geoarchaeology is a multidisciplinary subfield that applies the tools and techniques of earth science to understand ancient humans and their interactions with environments. This course examines basic topics and concepts, including archaeological site formation, paleo-environmental reconstruction, raw materials and resources, soil science, deposition and erosion of wind and water-borne sediments in different environments such as along rivers, lakes and coastlines, radiocarbon and other chronometric dating methods, and ground-based remote sensing, including ground penetrating radar.
Instructor(s): M. Harrower
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.131.800. Readings & Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.131.801. Readings and Research.

Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities.

AS.131.848. Dissertation Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.131.849. Dissertation Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.132.600. Elementary Akkadian.

An introduction to the paleography, grammar and lexicon of the Akkadian language, and the reading of simpler texts in that language. Co-listed with AS.130.381
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger; P. Delnero.

AS.132.601. Elementary Akkadian II.

An introduction to the paleography, grammar and lexicon of the Akkadian language, and the reading of simpler texts in that language. Undergraduates admitted to this course earn 4.5 credits per semester.
Instructor(s): J. Howard
Area: Humanities.

AS.132.606. Intermediate Akkadian Texts.

In this course a selection of intermediate level Akkadian texts from different genres and period will be read, analyzed and discussed. To build on skills learned in Introduction to Akkadian, specific emphasis will be placed on understanding more advanced grammatical forms and learning how to critically use research tools like the Chicago Assyrian Dictionary and von Soden's Akkadisches Handwoerterbuch.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger.

AS.132.608. Akkadian Letters.

This course introduces students to letters written in the Akkadian language from a variety of historical periods. Recommended course background: AS.132.600 and AS.132.601.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger
Area: Humanities.

AS.132.609. Seminar in Research Methods in Near Eastern Studies: Text and Image in Ancient Near Eastern Art and Texts.

This writing intensive seminar examines how textual and artistic production were used separately and together to engender and communicate social, cultural, and political meaning in ancient Mesopotamia and the rest of the Near East from the 4th millennium to the Hellenistic period. Using a variety of case studies, students will develop skills in specific research skills such as critical reading, analysis, and interpretation. AS.130.420 is required of NES Majors, but is also open to non-majors who have taken at least one 100-level and one 300-level Near Eastern Civilization course, or with the consent of the instructor. Cross-listed with History of Art.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman; P. Delnero
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.132.630. Akkadian Literary & Religous Texts.

Students will read a variety of Akkadian texts commonly described as literary in the original cuneiform.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger.

AS.132.640. Historical Texts.

This course has two primary objectives: To introduce students to texts commonly described as “historical” (e.g., royal inscriptions, chronicles); and to further expose students to the Old Babylonian dialect of the Akkadian language. A secondary objective is to begin to develop familiarity with critical research tools such as the Chicago Assyrian Dictionary and the Akkadisches Handwörterbuch.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger.

AS.132.642. The Amarna Letters.

Students read the diplomatic correspondence from Tell el-Amarna in the original cuneiform. Focus is on language and history: the dialect(s) of Akkadian in which the letters are written and the diplomatic history of the Late Bronze Age.
Prerequisites: Prereqs: AS.132.600 or instructor's consent.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger
Area: Humanities.

AS.132.644. Treaties And Diplomacy.

Reading treaties and related materials in Akkadian.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger.

AS.132.650. Peripheral Akkadian.

Includes texts from Amarna, Emar, Ugarit, Boghazkoi, Nuzi, Alalakh, and Elam.
Instructor(s): J. Lauinger.

AS.132.691. Divination & Ritual Texts.

Instructor(s): J. Lauinger.

AS.132.700. Elementary Sumerian.

TBD
Instructor(s): A. Glenn
Area: Humanities.

AS.132.701. Elementary Sumerian.

Instructor(s): P. Delnero
Area: Humanities.

AS.132.710. Advanced Sumerian.

We will read Letter Collection B and related materials in the original cuneiform.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero.

AS.132.711. Advanced Sumerian.

In this course a selection of Sumerian texts from different periods and genres will be read and discussed from a linguistic, philological, historical, and literary perspective.
Instructor(s): P. Delnero.

AS.132.800. Mesopotamian Seminar.

Research and discussion on topics of current interest.
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz; J. Lauinger; M. Feldman; M. Harrower; P. Delnero.

AS.132.801. Mesopotamian Seminar.

Research and discussion on topics of current interest.
Instructor(s): G. Schwartz; J. Lauinger; M. Harrower; P. Delnero
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.600. Introduction to Middle Egyptian.

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2135-2000 B.C.). In the second semester, literary texts and royal inscriptions will be read.
Instructor(s): M. Escolano Poveda.

AS.133.601. Introduction To Middle Egyptian (Hieroglyphs).

Introduction to the grammar and writing system of the classical language of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom (ca. 2011-1700 B.C.). Co-listed with AS.130.401
Prerequisites: Preqreq: AS.133.600 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): M. Escolano Poveda
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.610. Middle Egyptian Texts.

In this course we read a variety of Middle Egyptian hieroglyphic compositions and documents. Knowledge of Middle Egyptian Required.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan; R. Jasnow.

AS.133.611. Middle Egyptian Texts.

In this course we read a variety of Middle Egyptian hieroglyphic compositions and documents. Knowledge of Middle Egyptian Required.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan; R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.614. Funerary Texts.

Advanced Middle Egyptian texts course covering Coffin Texts and the Book of the Dead, and other afterlife ritual texts.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan; R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.620. Hieratic.

Instructor(s): R. Jasnow.

AS.133.621. Hieratic.

Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.630. Old Egyptian.

Instructor(s): B. Bryan.

AS.133.631. Old Egyptian.

Instructor(s): B. Bryan.

AS.133.640. Late Egyptian.

Instructor(s): R. Jasnow.

AS.133.641. Late Egyptian Texts.

An introduction to the grammar and texts of Late Egyptian.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.646. Demotic Texts.

Instructor(s): R. Jasnow.

AS.133.647. Demotic Texts.

Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.648. Intro To Coptic.

Instructor(s): R. Jasnow.

AS.133.649. Advanced Coptic.

In this class we will read Coptic texts of various genres.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow.

AS.133.653. Introduction to Ptolemaic Hieroglyphs.

An introduction to the grammar and hieroglyphic writing system employed in Graeco-Roman Period Egyptian temple texts.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.656. Advanced Demotic Texts.

Reading of texts of varying content in Demotic Egyptian.
Instructor(s): R. Jasnow.

AS.133.657. Creating an Egyptian Temple.

This class will challenge every participant to plan a temple environment for a particular deity. The readings, lectures, and discussions will cover the mythology around specific gods and how it influenced temple architecture, location, ritual, and festivals. It will survey the history of temple building in Egypt, the role of architecture and art -- particularly wall reliefs -- in communicating the functions of particular parts of temples. The aim is to help students understand what requirements an Egyptian temple needed to fulfill. Then each student will plan a temple for a chosen deity and explain to peers how it meets the ancient requirements.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities.

AS.133.706. Egyptian Funerary Arts in the Archaeological Museum.

This class will aim to cover the production and choice of funerary objects for Egyptian elite tombs in several eras of antiquity: the Middle and New Kingdoms, the Third Intermediate Period, and the Late Periods. Students will work with specific objects after learning generally about them, and they will carry out analyses of materials, pigments, construction methods, and erosion and degradation effects. They will create a virtual exhibition for the Museum's website and present their results for inclusion in the museum cataloguing project.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan.

AS.133.750. Seminar in Egyptian Art and Archaeology.

The theme for this course will be archaeology of the Mut precinct in Luxor where Johns Hopkins is excavating. Study of the comparative materials from other sites will be central with the publication of the work approaching.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan.

AS.133.751. Seminar in Egyptian Art and Archaeology: Old Kingdom Art.

This course will explore the artistic expression of Egyptian culture from the 3rd through the 6th Dynasties, ca. 2700-2100 B.C. Tombs, temples, statuary, and two-dimensional wall decoration provide a large visual vocabulary of Egyptian concepts. This class will look at these elements, separately and in combination in order to consider the intentions behind the art and evaluate the degree to which religious and ideological symbolism, known from later Egyptian art, should be understood in the early pyramid-building era.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan.

AS.134.603. Graduate Seminar in Rabbinic Text.

Readings from the Talmud, the Sugya, and the Codes, in the original Hebrew and Aramaic: Emphasis on skills in reading, interpreting, and historical and cultural contextualization.
Instructor(s): D. Katz
Area: Humanities.

AS.134.604. The Book Of Job.

Reading the Hebrew text of the book of Job with attention to philology, textual criticism, and various aspects of interpretation.
Instructor(s): T. Lewis
Area: Humanities.

AS.134.608. Book Of Ezekiel.

A rapid reading course aimed at increasing proficiency in reading the Hebrew text of the book of Ezekiel. Various aspects of translation and interpretation will be studied (e.g., grammar, textual criticism, Philology) including literary, historical, and theological questions. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.
Instructor(s): T. Lewis.

AS.134.610. Historical Hebrew Grammar.

Phonology and morphology of Biblical Hebrew.
Instructor(s): P. McCarter.

AS.134.621. Textual Criticism.

An introduction to the ancient witnesses of the biblical text and the principles of textual criticism.
Instructor(s): P. McCarter.

AS.134.630. Qumran (Dead Sea) Texts.

Instructor(s): P. McCarter.

AS.134.650. Seminar in Hebrew: The Book of Jeremiah.

Translation and analysis of selected texts in Biblical Hebrew giving attention to advanced features of grammar and syntax. Topic: “The Book of Judges”
Instructor(s): P. McCarter.

AS.134.652. Seminar in Ancient Israelite Religion.

Topics include history of scholarship, methodology, representations of deity, the aniconic tradition, solar Yahwism, sacred space, blood rituals, passover, royal cult, family religion, divination, prophecy, incantations, etc.
Instructor(s): T. Lewis.

AS.134.656. Comparative Semitics.

Comparative and historical analysis of the Semitic languages in their Afro-Asiatic context.
Instructor(s): P. McCarter.

AS.134.660. History of Ancient Syria/Palestine.

A survey of the history of Ancient Syria and Cannan, including Ancient Israel. In addition to attending the lectures at the scheduled times, graduate students will also meet one hour per week (time TBA) for a discussion session with the instructor.
Instructor(s): P. McCarter.

AS.134.661. History: Ancient Syria-Palestine II.

A survey of the history of Ancient Syria and Cannan, including Ancient Israel.
Instructor(s): P. McCarter
Area: Humanities.

AS.134.700. Northwest Semitic Epigraphy.

Instructor(s): P. McCarter.

AS.134.701. Northwest Semitic Epigraphy.

Instructor(s): P. McCarter
Area: Humanities.

AS.134.720. Ugaritic I.

A year-long course studying Ugaritic language and literature. The first semester will focus on grammar and translating a representative selection of mythological texts. The second semester will concentrate on ritual texts. The course will also be epigraphic in nature using both conventional and digital techniques.
Instructor(s): T. Lewis.

AS.134.721. Ugaritic II.

A continuation of AS.134.720 with emphasis on the mythological and ritual texts from Ugarit. A digital epigraphy lab will also form part of the course.
Instructor(s): T. Lewis
Area: Humanities.

AS.134.744. Survey Of Aramaic Texts.

Instructor(s): T. Lewis
Area: Humanities.

AS.134.747. Old Aramaic.

An advanced course in Aramaic devoted to the study of Old Aramaic inscriptions. We will be translating and analyzing a selection of texts from Northern Syria (e.g. Bar-Rakib; Hadad; Kuttamuwa, Nerab, Panamuwa, Sefire, Zakkur), Southern Syria (e.g. Bar-Hadad/Melqart Stela, Hazael, Tel Dan) and Northern Mesopotamia (e.g. Tell Fakhariyah). Students will be expected to vocalize such texts as a study in historical and comparative linguistics and to clarify their understanding of the morphology and syntax.
Instructor(s): T. Lewis
Area: Humanities.

Cross Listed Courses

History of Art

AS.010.105. Art of the Ancient Americas. 3.00 Credits.

Surveys the art of Olmec, West Mexico, Teotihuacan, Maya, and Aztec.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.234. Lower, Later, Farther Away: Roman Art Beyond the Center. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to three topics that represent a dramatic shift away from the traditional “center” of the study of Roman art (art created for the wealthy and politically privileged citizens of central Italy between the first century BCE and the first century CE). Students will explore art created by and for the Roman lower classes, as created in late antiquity, and as created in the provinces of the empire. There will be a final paper.
Instructor(s): E. Bevis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.236. Palaces, Temples and Tombs in Mesopotamia. 3.00 Credits.

Mesopotamia, the “land between the rivers,” is considered the cradle of civilization. Its earliest urban centers appeared by 3500 BCE in the region of modern-day Iraq, Iran, and Syria. Along with urbanism came the emergence of temples and palaces as large-scale elite institutions (replete with written records). Their arts manifest some of the earliest complex representations. This course explores the art and architecture within the social, political and cultural context of ancient Sumer, Babylonia and Assyria. It provides an integrated picture of the arts of Mesopotamia from 3500 to 330 BCE with an emphasis on the development of visual narrative and the use of art in the expression of authority and legitimacy.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.300. Houses of the Ancient Mediterranean. 3.00 Credits.

In the ancient world the house was not merely a private space for interacting with family and close friends, but the setting for a diverse array of social rituals and activities. This course will examine the houses of the ancient Mediterranean, from the Bronze Age through Late Antiquity, in order to better understand how they acted as medium through which culture is passed down and transformed. There will be a particular focus on the architecture and décor of such residences and we will draw on methods and readings from the History of Art, Classics, and Archaeology. This course will take advantage of Baltimore’s museums and together we will visit the collections of ancient art at the Johns Hopkins Archaeology Museum, the Walters Art Museum, and The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA). We will also visit the BMA’s current installation, “Imagining Home,” whose exploration of home as a universal theme is directly related to the goals of this course. There will be a final paper.
Instructor(s): N. Berlin
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.301. Art and Interactions in the Eastern Mediterranean from 2000-500 BCE. 3.00 Credits.

The Mediterranean Sea has always acted as a connector for the many great civilizations that flourished around its shores. From 2000 to 500 BCE, these interactions were particularly dynamic, resulting in a diversity of arts including painting wall frescoes, precious jewelry, and elaborate furnishings and weaponry. This course examines the arts of the interactions among the Egyptians, Near Easterners, and Greeks, considering the role of artistic products in intercultural relations.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.307. Diplomats, Dealers, and Diggers: The Birth of Archaeology and the Rise of Collecting from the 19th c. to Today. 3.00 Credits.

The development of archaeology in the Middle East – its history of explorers, diplomats, missionaries and gentlemen-scholars – profoundly shaped the modern world, from the creation of new museums and the antiquities market to international relations and terrorism.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.314. The Great Debate on Images: from Zurich to Guadalupe. 3.00 Credits.

Images became a central topic of debate at the time of the Protestant Reformation. Images were not only a topic of doctrinal discussion, but also a target for desecration and destruction. The response to Iconoclasm on the Catholic side of this divide was also intense before, during and after the Council of Trent (1547-63), leading to a reconsideration of images’ role in an economy of the sacred. But the geography of this debate was not limited to Europe: the evangelization of the New World constituted a new scenario in which previous arguments and doctrinal positions were challenged under completely different circumstances. The Great Image Debate is not only a crucial episode of history, but it is also an argument reflecting on the nature of images and their paradoxical contribution to the Early “modern” world. This course is geared towards students with interests in History, Art History and Anthropology.
Instructor(s): F. Pereda
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.315. Art of the Assyrian Empire, 1000-600 BCE. 3.00 Credits.

The Assyrian Empire dominated the ancient world from 1000-612 BCE, stretching from Iran to Egypt and laying the foundation for the later Persian and Macedonian empires. With imperial expansion came an explosion of artistic production ranging from palace wall reliefs to small-scale luxury objects. This course provides an integrated picture of the imperial arts of this first great empire, situating it within the broader social and political contexts of the first millennium BCE.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.364. Babylon: Myth and Reality. 3.00 Credits.

“Babylon - the name resonates, from the Biblical whore of Revelations to sci-fi. But what do we really know about the ancient city and its civilization?”
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.389. The Stone and the Thread. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the built environment of the Inka and considers architecture in its social, historical, and cultural contexts. Shared forms and ideas implicit in the fiber arts offer comparative points for analysis and discussion.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.398. Tombs for the Living. 3.00 Credits.

Centering on the tomb as the unit of analysis, this course examines the cultural and material aspects of death and funerary ritual. Draws on case studies from North America, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Collections study in museums.
Instructor(s): L. Deleonardis
Area: Humanities.

AS.010.421. Creating Sacred Space in the Ancient and Medieval World. 3.00 Credits.

What makes a space sacred? How is it different from other spaces? This seminar explores the various means - visual, artifactual, architectural, and performative - of creating sacred space in the ancient and medieval worlds of the Near East and Mediterranean. Possible cases for study include early Sumerian temples, state-sponsored Assyrian temples, votive deposits, Greek sanctuaries, sanctuaries and landscape, early medieval Jewish, Christian, and Islamic cult buildings, cave sanctuaries, pilgrim sites, icons and sacred space.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.470. Power and Politics in Assyrian Art. 3.00 Credits.

Assyria, centered in northern Iraq, created one of the world’s first great empires that dominated the ancient Near Eastern world from around 900 to 612 BCE. In concert with imperial expansion came an explosion of artistic production ranging from palace wall reliefs to small-scale luxury objects. This seminar examines the close relationship between the arts and politics in the Assyrian empire. Some themes that will be explored are: historical narrative, text and image, portable luxury arts and gender, politics and religion. The course will engage in close visual analysis of the ancient materials and readings of critical scholarship.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.010.611. Selected Topics in Near Eastern Art.

Topics tp be determined.
Instructor(s): M. Feldman.

Classics

AS.040.137. Freshman Seminar: Archaeology at the Crossroads: The Ancient Eastern Mediterranean through Objects in the JHU Archaeological Museum. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar investigates the Eastern Mediterranean as a space of intense cultural interaction in the Late Bronze Age, exploring how people, ideas, and things not only came into contact but deeply influenced one another through maritime trade, art, politics, etc. In addition to class discussion, we will work hands-on with artifacts from the JHU Archaeological Museum, focusing on material from Cyprus.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.363. Craft and Craftpersons of the Ancient World: Status, Creativity and Tradition. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the dynamic work and social roles of craftpersons in early Greece, the eastern Mediterranean and Near East. Readings and discussion will query the identities and contributions of these people—travelers, captives, lauded masters, and even children—through topics including gender, class, and ethnicity. Special focus on late third-early first millennia BCE; local field trips.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.040.366. The Archaeology of Ancient Cyprus: Investigating a Mediterranean Island World in the JHU Museum. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the visual and material worlds of ancient Cyprus from the earliest human evidence through the Iron Age. Class involves regular analysis of artifacts based in the Archaeological Museum.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

History

AS.100.234. The Making of the Muslim Middle East, 600-1100 A.D.. 3.00 Credits.

A survey of the major historical transformations of the region we now call the 'Middle East' (from late antiquity through the 11th century) in relation to the formation and development of Islam and various Muslim empires.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.362. Children and Childhood in the Middle Ages. 3.00 Credits.

Seminar on the history of childhood and ideas of childhood around the medieval Mediterranean; themes include child custody; medieval education and punishment; parent-child private letters; child mortality and the arts of bereavement/consolation. Cross-listed with Program in Islamic Studies.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.383. Conversion and Apostasy in the Middle Ages. 3.00 Credits.

Compares religious transformation in medieval Europe and the Middle East (ca. 600-1500), including conquest and conversion; conversion narratives; apostasy, martyrdom and other encounters between medieval Jews, Christians, and Muslims.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.615. States, Scribes, and Archives: Medieval Arabic Documentary Cultures.

A historical survey of the bureaucratic practices of medieval Islamic states (in comparative perspective); includes clos readings of primary official documents, e.g. petitions, edicts, fiscal receipts, and administrative reports.
Instructor(s): T. El-leithy
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Jewish Studies Program

AS.193.301. Reading the Bible and Encountering its World. 3.00 Credits.

The course examines the interactions between travel and biblical interpretation between the seventeenth and twentieth centuries, paying particular attention to the ways in which travelers to the Middle East and then scholars saw its residents as relics of an unchanging biblical world, whose practices could be used to interpret scriptural texts from both the Old and New Testaments.
Instructor(s): E. Horowitz
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.193.304. Everyday Voices of the Holocaust: Popular Jewish Poetic Expression in the Ghettos and Camps. 3.00 Credits.

The course aims to encourage knowledge of a relatively unknown mass phenomenon - poetic creativity by Jews under Nazi Rule, in the Ghettos and Camps. The study of multi-lingual texts, written by non-professional writers, will enable to better understand the complexity of immediate Jewish reaction to Holocaust reality, in its multi-cultural contexts. Texts from selected ghettos and camps, originally written in Yiddish, Polish, German and Hebrew will be read in English translation and analyzed. Emphasis will be put on the differences and similarities between Eastern and Western European Jewry.
Instructor(s): M. Trinh
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Earth & Planetary Sciences

AS.270.205. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis. 3.00 Credits.

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.
Instructor(s): X. Chen
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

Program in Museums and Society

AS.389.205. Examining Archaeological Objects. 3.00 Credits.

This course considers the role of materials in the production, study and interpretation of objects by examining artifacts from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Students will consider materials such as ceramics, stone, metal, glass, wood and textiles, and visit artists' studios to gain an understanding of historical manufacturing processes. M&S practicum course. Cross-listed with Archaeology, Near Eastern Studies, Classics, and History of Art.
Instructor(s): S. Balachandran
Area: Humanities.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://neareast.jhu.edu/directory/

Faculty

Chair

Glenn M. Schwartz
Whiting Professor of Archaeology: Near Eastern archaeology.

Professors

Betsy M. Bryan
Alexander Badawy Chair in Egyptian Art and Archaeology: Egyptian art and archaeology, Egyptology.

Marian Feldman
Ancient Near East and Eastern Mediterranean Art

Richard Jasnow
Egyptology.

Theodore J. Lewis
Blum-Iwry Professor: Hebrew Bible, Northwest Semitic philology and religion.

P. Kyle McCarter Jr.
William Foxwell Albright Chair in Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies: Hebrew Bible, Northwest Semitic philology.

Associate Professor

Paul Delnero
Assyriology

Assistant Professors

Michael Harrower
Archaeology.

Jacob Lauinger
Assyriology.

Professor Emeritus

Jerrold S. Cooper
W.W. Spence Professor Emeritus of Semitic Languages.

Lecturers

Sanchita Balachandran
Lecturer: museum studies.

Ellen Robbins
Lecturer: Hebrew Bible.