Neuroscience

http://www.neuroscience.jhu.edu/

Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system and how it functions. Neuroscientists study the nervous system from all levels, ranging from molecules interacting with cell membranes to brain systems subserving cognitive functions such as language. Dramatic progress has been made at all levels, and the field continues to grow. On the Homewood campus, researchers studying the nervous system are in the departments of Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Biophysics, Cognitive Science, and Psychological and Brain Sciences and in the Krieger Mind/Brain Institute. Their presence provides the opportunity for an innovative, interdepartmental program which offers a broad overview of the neuroscience field, as well as more advanced training in one of three focus areas.

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience (CM) focuses on the mechanisms by which information flows within and between cells in the nervous system, and the mechanisms through which the cellular structure of the nervous system develops and is maintained. Topics include the molecular basis of membrane permeability, action potentials, sensory transduction, synaptic transmission, neuronal modulation, mechanisms of drug action, and the molecular basis of genetic disorders of the nervous system.

Systems Neuroscience (ST) seeks to relate brain structure and functioning to behaviors and related physiological processes. Research in this area explores the description and analysis of neural circuits. This includes identifying the brain nuclei and interconnections making up a circuit, identifying and investigating the implicated neurotransmitters, and characterizing the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that modulate the development and adult functioning of the circuit. Topics as diverse as learning and memory, communication, sensory systems, and motivated behaviors (e.g., reproduction, feeding, and aggression) are explored from this perspective.

Cognitive Neuroscience (CG) focuses on how cognitive functions, such as vision or language, are implemented by the brain. Drawing upon a variety of techniques for probing the working brain at cognitive and neural levels, including functional neuroimaging, analysis of cognitive impairments in brain-damaged patients, and electrophysiological techniques, research in cognitive neuroscience seeks to relate mental representations and computations to brain mechanisms and processes.

Computational Neuroscience (CP) focuses on applying mathematical tools and theories to investigate brain function.  This discipline incorporates a diverse set of approaches from mathematics, physics, engineering, and computer science, to understand how the nervous system processes information.  Such principles are used to answer questions across a variety of domains of neuroscience: cellular/molecular, systems and circuits, behavioral and cognitive.

Neuroscience Program Committee

The Neuroscience Program Committee coordinates course offerings, oversees the program’s interdepartmental courses, reviews and updates the administration of the program, makes decisions about admission to the B.S./M.S. program, approves proposed research programs and mentors for students in the B.S./M.S. mentored research program, and evaluates the final reports and presentations from the research year.

The neuroscience major consists of two degree programs: a four-year B.S. based primarily on course work and 6 credits of research; and a five-year concurrent B.S./M.S. involving additional course work and a yearlong intensive laboratory experience. (Under special circumstances, a student may be able to complete the B.S./M.S. program in less than five years.) Both programs are designed to provide rigorous preparation for advanced study in either a Ph.D., M.D. or Ph.D./M.D. programs. The concurrent B.S./M.S. program accepts students every spring semester.

Additional information regarding the undergraduate degree and the B.S./M.S. programs is available through our website at http://krieger.jhu.edu/neuroscience. You may also contact our Program Administrator, Hope Fisher, hope.stein@jhu.edu or 410-516-6196.

Requirements for the B.S. Degree

Also see Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree.

General Information
  • Students are encouraged to complete an optional introductory course in their freshman year, such as AS.200.141 Foundations of Brain, Behavior and Cognition or AS.050.105 Introduction to Cognitive Neuropsychology.
  • Students interested in attending medical school will need to take a second semester of organic chemistry and its corresponding laboratory to meet medical school admission requirements; however, these courses are not major requirements.
  • Students are required to select their advanced neuroscience elective courses from one of three approved focus areas: systems neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, or cellular and molecular neuroscience. Approved courses fulfilling this requirement are found on the neuroscience website or in the schedule of classes.
  • To apply towards the major, all courses must be taken for a letter grade and a grade of C- or better is required.
Neuroscience Sequence *
AS.080.203Cognitive Neuroscience (spring)3
AS.080.250Neuroscience Laboratory (fall/spring)3
AS.080.305Neuroscience: Cellular and Systems I (fall)3
AS.080.306The Nervous System II (spring)3
Mathematics, Statistics, and Science Courses
EN.553.211Probability and Statistics for the Life Sciences4
or EN.553.230 Introduction to Biostatistics
or EN.553.310 Probability & Statistics
or EN.553.311 Probability and Statistics for the Biological Sciences and Engineering
or EN.553.111
EN.553.112
Statistical Analysis I
and Statistical Analysis II
AS.110.106Calculus I (Biology and Social Sciences)4
or AS.110.108 Calculus I
AS.110.107Calculus II (For Biological and Social Science)4
or AS.110.109 Calculus II (For Physical Sciences and Engineering)
or AS.110.113 Honors Single Variable Calculus
AS.030.101
AS.030.105
Introductory Chemistry I
and Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I
4
AS.030.102
AS.030.106
Introductory Chemistry II
and Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II
4
or AS.030.103 Applied Chemical Equilibrium and Reactivity w/lab
AS.030.205Introductory Organic Chemistry I4
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4
or AS.171.103 General Physics I for Biological Science Majors
or AS.171.107 General Physics for Physical Sciences Majors (AL)
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1
AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Major II4
or AS.171.104 General Physics/Biology Majors II
or AS.171.108 General Physics for Physical Science Majors (AL)
AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II1
Biology Sequence
Two biology courses with lab selected from the following:
General Biology I
and General Biology Laboratory I (see footnote about AP Biology credits) ***
General Biology II
and General Biology Lab II (see footnote about AP Biology credits) ***
Genetics
and Genetics Laboratory
Biochemistry
and Biochemistry Laboratory (or AS.250.253)
Cell Biology
and Cell Biology Lab
Advanced Neuroscience Elective Courses and Focus Area
Nine credits of 300-level or higher approved courses from one of four focus areas: systems neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, computational neuroscience, or cellular and molecular neuroscience9
Three credits of 300-level or higher approved course outside of focus area selected above3
If pursuing the Computational Neuroscience focus area, EN.553.291 is required in addition to the other 12 credits required of the focus area (or the combo of AS.110.201/212 and AS.110.302 may be used)
If pursuing the Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience focus area, AS.020.306 and AS.020.316 must be selected as one of the two required biology courses with lab
Research **
Six credits of neuroscience research6
AS.080.500Scientific Communication: Neuroscience
*

These courses are normally completed during the sophomore and junior years. We recommend that students complete these courses in the sequence listed.

**

Research must be conducted in one of the neuroscience laboratories participating in the program. Students must register for AS.080.500 Scientific Communication: Neuroscience concurrently with neuroscience research each term they register for research until they have completed 6 credits of research.

***

  For students with AP Biology credit, they may use only one course and its lab from those credits towards this requirement.  Therefore, these student must take at least one biology course and its lab at JHU.  Students who elect to take General Biology I or II with its lab will lose the corresponding AP credits.  Students should also refer to AP credit policies for additional details around the use of AP Biology credits.  

Sample Program

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3AS.030.102Introductory Chemistry II3
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I1AS.030.106Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II1
AS.110.106Calculus I (Biology and Social Sciences)4AS.110.107Calculus II (For Biological and Social Science)4
Biology Option 1 AS.080.203Cognitive Neuroscience (Intro course (AS.200.141,AS.080.203))23
Biology Lab Option 1 1 Biology Option 2 1 
 Biology Lab Option 21 
  8  11
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.080.305Neuroscience: Cellular and Systems I33AS.080.306The Nervous System II3
AS.030.205Introductory Organic Chemistry I4EN.553.211Probability and Statistics for the Life Sciences4
EN.553.291Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (Computational Focus ONLY)74 
  11  7
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.171.103General Physics I for Biological Science Majors4AS.171.104General Physics/Biology Majors II4
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II1
AS.080.551Research Neuroscience for Juniors53AS.080.554Neuroscience Research - Juniors3
AS.080.500Scientific Communication: Neuroscience AS.080.500Scientific Communication: Neuroscience 
  8  8
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.080.250Neuroscience Laboratory63Upper Level NS Course #43
Upper Level NS Course #23 
Upper Level NS Course #33 
  9  3
Total Credits: 65
1

Biology options and Biology Lab Options can be taken in any year.For Students who are obtaining a Cellular and Molecular focus area, one of the biology options must be Cell Biology with lab.

2

 Neuroscience:Cognitive Neuroscience can be taken anytime after BBC OR NCS I & NCS II.

3

 NCS I & NCS II can be taken sophomore or junior year.

4

For students interested in applying to medical school.

5

 Research in Neuroscience can be taken at any time. (6 credits are needed for the major) Students typically do more credits.

6

 Neuroscience Lab can be taken any time after completing BBC or NCS I & II

7

 For Computational Focus Area only.

Honors in the Major

To receive honors in Neuroscience, students must meet the following criteria:

  • Earn a GPA of 3.5 or better in major requirements
  • Conduct research and give a research presentation
  • Receive a recommendation from research mentor
  • Additional Neuroscience Research credit(s) beyond the required 6 credits for the major (Effective for students entering Fall 2016)

Requirements for the M.S. Degree

Current JHU undergraduate students who wish to apply for the B.S./M.S. Program in their junior or senior year must meet the following minimum requirements (prior to applying):

  • A minimum 3.5 GPA in all required courses for the undergraduate major and cumulative GPA of 3.5,
  • Completion of no fewer than three credits of undergraduate research, and
  • Completion of all courses required for the JHU B.S. degree in Neuroscience.

Advanced Seminars in Neuroscience (6 credits)

The Advanced Seminar in Neuroscience is offered in the fall and spring terms.

Final Spring Courses (12 credits)

Degree requirements include 12 credits of additional advanced course work (300-level or above). At least three credits must be at 400-level or above. Courses must be related to the study of neuroscience and ideally focused on the student’s concentration of study and area of research. Students may choose courses from the approved list of undergraduate advanced courses. (In addition, up to six additional credits of the Advanced Seminar in Neuroscience, and/or statistics courses, graduate courses and seminars may be taken with the approval of the program director.)

Mentored Research (24 credits)

During the research year, students will complete a total of 24 credits of mentored research. Students must complete nine credits of research in a spring academic term, six in the summer and an additional nine in the fall.

B.S./M.S. Commencement Project (1 credit)

After completing the research year, students must register for a one-credit independent study course intended to track the progress and defense of the student’s final research project.

Note: This masters degree is only open to current Johns Hopkins University undergraduate students pursuing a major in neuroscience. 

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.080.105. An Introduction to Neuroscience. 3.0 Credits.

Our knowledge of brain function from the level of single molecules to human behavior continues to expand at something approaching light speed. That knowledge invades our lives every day. And decisions are made based on that knowledge from every corner of life…from physician to politician and every stop in between. This course is meant to provide a fundamental understanding of how the cells and molecules as well as the regions and systems of the brain work to have you see and hear and move and remember. The course is divided into four sections that progress from the cells of the brain and spinal cord to circuits then systems and finally behaviors. Introduction to Neuroscience is designed for any college student who has an interest in the range of disciplines we call neuroscience.
Instructor(s): S. Hendry
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.203. Cognitive Neuroscience. 3.0 Credits.

This course surveys theory and research concerning how the human brain carries out mental processes. The sections of this course correspond with the sections listed for AS.020.203. All sections will meet together on exams day and guest lecture days. Co-listed as AS.050.203 in Cognitive Science.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.080.250. Neuroscience Laboratory. 3.0 Credits.

This course will give students the "hands-on" experience of the inter-disciplinary nature of neuroscience. Students will use anatomical and neuro-physiological techniques to understand the basic underlying principles of neuroscience. There will be a total of 13 class meetings during the summer session. Course open to JHU undergraduates only.
Prerequisites: ( AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306 ) OR AS.200.141
Instructor(s): J. Trageser; L. Gorman
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.260. Bridging the gap between Biology and Statistics. 1.0 Credit.

This course is designed to support the lectures and assignments in Probability and Statistics in Life Sciences, EN.553.211. This one-hour a week course is led by a behavioral biology professor with extensive expertise in statistics and mathematics. The primary goal of this course is to increase success and understanding of EN.553.211 by bridging the gap between theoretical statistics and biological thinking. In addition, when possible, examples and direct applications in neuroscience and behavioral biology will be presented to provide a context for EN.553.211 materials.
Instructor(s): K. Bohn.

AS.080.301. Behavioral Assessment of Animal Models of Cognition and Neuropsychiatric Disorders. 3.0 Credits.

What does a rat exploring its environment tell us about memory? How can a mouse help us better understand schizophrenia? This course will focus on procedures that are routinely used to study behavior in animal models of cognition and neuropsychiatric disorders. The procedures discussed will include assessments that fall into 3 broad functional domains: motor function, affective or emotional states, and cognition. Throughout the course, we will read and discuss original research articles to illustrate and compare some of the measures and results from the various procedures.
Prerequisites: Students may not have taken AS.200.302;AS.200.141 OR (AS.080.305 and AS.080.306), OR by instructor permission.
Instructor(s): D. Smith
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.080.302. Applied Neuroscience & Neurotechnology. 1.0 Credit.

Seminar course in which applications of neuroscience and neurotechnologies are explored. The class meets once a week for an hour. Each week, an application of neuroscience or a neurotechnology will be discussed. Readings will be assigned in preparation for each class. At each meeting of the class, the readings will be discussed, and if possible there will be a demonstration of the technology or application. Each student will choose one neurotechnology or application of neuroscience and prepare a short presentation, which will be given towards the end of the semester. Topics to be covered include but are not limited to: brain recording technologies, neuroimaging, deep brain stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, optogenetics, brain-computer interfaces, neuroprosthetics, neuroeconomics, neurolaw, and neuromorphic engineering. Grading is pass/fail.
Prerequisites: AS.080.305 OR AS.080.306 OR AS.200.141 OR AS.020.306
Instructor(s): R. Yaffe
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.303. Structure of the Nervous System. 3.0 Credits.

This course takes a structural biological approach to studying the nervous system. In using a systems approach it provides students of cellular-molecular and computational neuroscience with a thorough introduction to functional, microscopic and submicroscopic organization of the brain, spinal cord and peripheral nervous system.
Prerequisites: AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306
Instructor(s): S. Hendry
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.304. Neuroscience Learning and Memory. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an advanced survey of the scientific study of learning and memory. Different perspectives will be used to review the science of learning and memory including the cellular-molecular basis of synaptic plasticity, the functional circuitry involved in learning and memory and memory systems in the brain. The course is designed to provide a deep understanding of the issues and current debates in learning and memory research and focuses specifically on animal models of memory and memory impairment. This is an interactive lecture course with a strong emphasis on student participation. Recommended Course Background: AS.200.141 OR AS.020.312 OR AS.080.203 OR AS.050.203 OR AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306
Prerequisites: AS.200.141[C] OR ( AS.080.305[C] AND AS.080.306[C] ) OR ( AS.020.312[C] AND AS.020.306[C] ) or instructor permission.
Instructor(s): A. Bakker
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.305. Neuroscience: Cellular and Systems I. 3.0 Credits.

(Formerly Nervous Systems I) Neuroscience: Cellular and Systems I is a fully integrated, two-semester course that surveys the cellular and molecular biology of neurons as well as the structure and function of the nervous system. Students must register for Neuroscience: Cellular and Systems II offered in the second term. Course open to JHU undergraduates only.
Prerequisites: AS.080.203 OR AS.050.203 OR AS.200.141 or 080.105 or Permission
Instructor(s): H. Zhao; S. Hendry
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.306. The Nervous System II. 3.0 Credits.

The course uses the functional organization of the somatosensory system as a means to examine mechanisms of neutral development. Generation and maturation of neurons, guidance of axons, formation of synapses and the regressive events that shape the adult nervous system will be examined. At the same time we will explore the structure and function of brain regions that allow us to feel pain and temperature, detect vibration, recognize shape and perceive where we are in space. Finally, the single-neuron events that lead to adaptive changes in function will be explored in the context of central nervous system control of movement and of higher order functions of speech and memory. Students who do not register for Nervous System I offered during the first term should not register for this class. Course open to JHU undergraduates only.
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.080.203 and AS.080.305
Instructor(s): S. Hendry
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.308. Neuroeconomics. 3.0 Credits.

Every day decisions often require us to weigh the costs and benefits of engaging in a particular course of action in order to obtain some expected outcome. Unfortunately, we often lack the information necessary to obtain our desired goal with complete certainty. Economists have long been interested in understanding human decision-making under these circumstances. In parallel, neuroscientists have made great strides at describing the underlying neural basis of simple decision-making. However, despite much progress in both fields, our understanding of how the brain makes decisions is incomplete. In order to strengthen and further research in both fields, the interdisciplinary field of Neuroeconomics arose. This course will survey the field of Neuroeconomics focusing on theoretical concepts developed by economists and the role these theories are playing in guiding current experimental neuroscience. Recommended Course Background: AS.080.305 and AS.080.306 or AS.020.312 and AS.020.306 or AS.200.141 and AS.020.306 or permission.
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.080.306 OR AS.200.141 OR AS.020.312
Instructor(s): J. Trageser
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.310. Communication Between Cells: The Synapse as a Model System. 3.0 Credits.

Biochemistry (020.305) & Cell Biology (020.306) or 080.304 All cells inform neighbors of their own activities. That act of communication frequently requires the formation of cell junctions across which information can pass. One of the best studied of the means of communication between cells is the synapse between neurons. This course examines the synapse in depth. both as a means to look at the nature of neuronal comunication and as a model for communication across cells of all types. Lectures on the physiology, structure, biochemistry and cell biology of synapses will be used as an introduction to the function of synapses in learning and memory and the effect on synapses of drugs and disease. (CM)
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.020.306 OR ( AS.080.304 AND AS.080.306 )
Instructor(s): A. Kirkwood; H. Lee
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.312. The Making of a Cognitive Map: Insights from Brains, Behaviors and Robots. 3.0 Credits.

Imagine you are in a random place in your neighborhood. You wouldn’t need a map (or your smartphone) to find your way home. You would just know the way because the map of your neighborhood is stored in your brain. But where in your brain? And how can your neurons conjure up a map? In this course we will examine common themes and disparate insights that different disciplines have produced in the pursuit of these questions. Cognitive and behavioral studies across many species have inferred external and internal factors determining a mental “cognitive” map, what type of spatial knowledge it is likely to comprise, and how it is used by the organism. Moreover, the discovery of different classes of spatially modulated neurons in the mammalian brain has illuminated components of the neural architecture of the cognitive map and was recognized by the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Finally, progress in autonomous robot navigation has yielded lovely technological products (Roomba, or the promise of self-driving cars!), but also unique insights into the computational nature of self-localization and map learning. By the end of this course, you will have developed a critical appreciation of the multi-disciplinary inroads made into one of the most fascinating case studies for understanding the physical basis of cognition.
Prerequisites: AS.080.306 AND AS.110.107, or Instructor permission.
Instructor(s): F. Savelli
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.317. Developmental Neurobiology: Signaling in Development and Disease. 3.0 Credits.

An advanced undergraduate level seminar on current topics on signal transduction mechanisms underlying neuronal morphology, development and function. The proper functioning of the nervous system relies on the establishment of precise neuronal circuits through a developmental program including proliferation, neuronal migration, axonal growth, and neuronal survival. This course pertains to the extracellular cues and downstream neuronal signaling pathways that coordinate these key events during neuronal development. The course will also cover the role of aberrant signaling mechanisms in neuronal degeneration and disease. Recommended Course Background: AS.020.305 and AS.020.306.
Prerequisites: Pre-req: AS.080.306
Instructor(s): R. Kuruvilla
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.320. The Auditory System. 3.0 Credits.

This course will cover the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the human auditory system from the ear to the brain. Behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging methods for assessing peripheral and central auditory function will be discussed. Acquired and developmental disorders of auditory function will be reviewed using clinical case studies.
Prerequisites: AS.080.305 OR AS.080.203 OR AS.050.203 OR AS.200.141 OR AS.020.312 or permission of the instructor.
Instructor(s): D. Boatman
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.322. Cellular and Molecular Biology of Sensation. 3.0 Credits.

Leading scientists in sensory biology from the Johns Hopkins community will present the most current knowledge in the cellular and molecular biology of sensation. A lecture and a student presentation of an exemplar manuscript will be presented each week on a different topic of sensory systems.
Prerequisites: AS.080.304 OR AS.080.305 OR AS.080.306 OR AS.020.306 OR AS.020.305.
Instructor(s): P. Fuchs
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.324. Neuroscience Journal Club. 1.0 Credit.

Classic Journal Club course where the students will read and discuss and review articles on differing topics depending on student interests. Open to Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology sophomores, juniors and seniors.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.325. Neuroscience Journal Club. 1.0 Credit.

Open to Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Classic Journal Club course where the students will read and discuss and review articles on differing topics depending on student interests.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.326. Neurobiology and Diseases of the Peripheral Nervous System. 3.0 Credits.

This course will cover neurobiology and disorders of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). A particular emphasis will be on cellular interactions within the PNS and with target tissues. For example, the two principal components of the peripheral nerves- axons and Schwann cells- have intimate and continuous cellular communications that are critical for physiological function of the PNS. The course will teach how these cellular interactions are developed, maintained throughout life, and are impacted by injury and diseases.
Prerequisites: AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306
Instructor(s): M. Farah
Area: Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.080.330. Brain Injury & Recovery. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates numerous types of brain injuries and explores the responses of the nervous system to these injuries. The course's primary focus is the cellular and molecular mechanisms of brain injury and the recovery of function. Discussions of traumatic brain injury, stroke, spinal cord, and tumors, using historical and recent journal articles, will facilitate students' understanding of the current state of the brain injury field. Cross-listed with Psychological and Brain Sciences and Behavioral Biology.
Prerequisites: ( AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306) OR (AS.020.312 OR AS.020.306) OR (200.141 and 020.306) OR Permission of Instructor
Instructor(s): L. Gorman
Area: Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.080.333. Neuroimmunology: Writing About the Nervous System. 3.0 Credits.

To write clearly and cogently about the nervous system demands two things in equal measure. One is serious understanding and the other is skill. Neither is a gift since both must be acquired. We will strive to do both in this course by taking an extant document – either a slim text on a restricted subject in neuroscience or a set of class notes – and, through revision and addition of recently published findings, substantially improve that document. Students will be required to read, write and revise extensively – at least two assignments each week.
Instructor(s): S. Hendry
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.080.345. Great Discoveries in Neuroscience. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the historical and intellectual context of selected, key advances in neuroscience, how they were made and the impact they had on an understanding of the nervous system. Particular attention will be paid to advances in cellular and molecular neuroscience. Among the topics covered will be the discovery of monoamine neurotransmitters and of endocannabinoids, the role of neurotrophins in neural development, and prion-based diseases of the brain.
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.080.306
Instructor(s): J. Baraban
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.348. Science of Learning. 3.0 Credits.

Can what we know about the brain guide how we learn or teach in our schools? This seminar course is designed to address this question. In this course we will focus on the science of what we know about learning and teaching (and not the politics) to see if we can actually use the research to “optimize learning in society”. As we read the literature, we will look at some of the “neuromyths” that have been propagated thus far and discuss how to avoid creating new neuromyths by effectively communicating the research.
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.080.306 OR AS.200.141
Instructor(s): L. Gorman
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.080.352. Higher Brain Function. 3.0 Credits.

Neuroscience is approaching the time when it can offer a compelling explanation for how the brain works. This course takes advantage of work done in humans and non-human primates to survey concepts in sensory perception, motor command, and memory mechanisms. Lectures are given by faculty whose research explores these issues. Each subject is explored as a three-lecture sequence: 1) a background lecture that lays out the general principles and over-riding questions of the field; 2) an in-depth lecture that covers the most recent scientific literature; and 3) a summary lecture that brings together the major questions and their Resolution. Recommended Course Background: AS.080.305
Instructor(s): S. Hendry
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.355. Visual System. 3.0 Credits.

From outer segments of photoreceptors to the Fusiform Face Area of the cerebral cortex we have come to understand how the visual system works at each of many fundamental levels. This course examines the basis for perception of visible objects at each of these levels. We will use the secondary literature (scientific reviews) to accent the hard-won truths about visual system functional organization and to highlight ongoing controversies. Students will be lead through carefully chosen reviews in a series of lectures and written summaries prepared by faculty. Three exams and a final exam will test students not on their memorization of minutiae but on their understanding of fundamental principles.
Prerequisites: AS.080.306 OR AS.020.306 OR Permission
Instructor(s): S. Hendry
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.357. Developmental Neuroscience. 3.0 Credits.

The developmental neuroscience course will cover principles of neural development. The course will focus on major events in neural development: patterning and growth of the nervous system, neuronal determination, axonal navigation and targeting, neuron survival and death, synapse function, developmental plasticity, and behavioral and cognitive development.
Prerequisites: AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306
Instructor(s): M. Farah.

AS.080.360. Diseases & Disorders of the Nervous System. 3.0 Credits.

Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: ( EN.580.421 AND EN.580.422) OR ( AS.020.305 AND AS.020.306 ) OR AS.080.306 OR By Permission.
Instructor(s): G. Mckhann; S. Hendry
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.362. Neurobiology of Hearing. 3.0 Credits.

The course focuses on sound processing, including current research topics in Auditory Neuroscience, including synaptic physiology, neural circuitry, acoustics, physiology, and behavior. Course taught in Salamanca. This course fulfills upper-level Neuroscience electives. Course must be taken for a grade.
Instructor(s): L. Gorman
Area: Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.080.364. Methods in Neuroscience and Orgo?. 3.0 Credits.

Who would have thought that organic chemistry would be playing a role in our understanding of the anatomy of the nervous system!!! In this course, you will work in both the Organic Chemistry and Neuroscience labs to compare the new CLARITY technique, introduced by Karl Deisseroth, with another technique known as SeeDB, introduced by Takeshi Imai. Both techniques are used to make the brain “invisible” and allow subsequent staining to visually examine neuronal circuits. Students will work independently in teams to determine which technique is more amenable to use by students in the Neuroscience Lab course. Permission Required from Instructor to register.
Instructor(s): C. Falzone; E. Hill; L. D'Souza; L. Gorman
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.366. Neuroscience of Pain. 3.0 Credits.

This course is a systems-oriented course focusing on the basic neural processing of pain signals in both the spinal cord and the brain. Class lectures will cover the anatomical and molecular basis for the transmission and perception of pain signals, basic concepts such as allodynia, hyperalgesia, peripheral and central sensitization, remodeling, the pathophysiology of chronic pain disorders and the cognitive and emotional aspects of pain. We will also discuss the regulation of pain signals by descending systems, and current practices and new advances in the treatment of pain.
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.080.306 OR AS.020.312 OR AS.020.316 OR AS.200.141 OR INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION
Instructor(s): H. Adwanikar
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.080.370. The Cerebellum: Is it just for motor control?. 3.0 Credits.

The cerebellum is traditionally thought to be involved in movement and motor control, and observations of patients with cerebellar damage do in fact show motor deficits. However, since the proliferation of functional MRI, cerebellar activations have been observed in a surprising number of brain activation studies that were designed to investigate the neural correlates of cognitive function. Over the past 2 decades, an increasing number of investigators have tried to characterize the role of the cerebellum in cognitive function. Through lectures and reading discussions this course will survey cerebellar circuitry, neuroimaging and neuromodulatory methods for investigating the cerebellum, and traditional and non-traditional functions of the cerebellum, including cerebellar involvement in cognitive functions such as language, working memory, and executive control.
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: ( AS.080.306 AND AS.080.203 ) OR AS.050.203
Instructor(s): J. Desmond
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.080.375. The Neural Control of Movement. 3.0 Credits.

Every day, our brains produce adaptable and complex movements in a constantly changing environment. These motoric abilities are so complex that they are still largely unmatched by current technology. The goal of this course is to provide an understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying movement planning and execution. We will cover the structures and systems that are responsible for feedback and motor control. These include sensory perception, reflex arcs, spinal cord organization, pattern generators, muscle function, locomotion, eye movement, and cognitive aspects of motor control. The roles of cortical motor structures and their interaction with the cerebellum, thalamus, and basal ganglia will be examined in the normally functioning brain as well as in individuals with motor disorders. In addition, we will discuss various theories of motor control using both classical and recent experimental data in order to develop your abilities to review, critique, and report on the scientific motor control literature. By the end of this course you will (1) have an understanding of how muscles and the brain work, how movements are planned and performed, and the computations required to carry out movements and (2) summarize major themes in the motor control literature and assess how new papers contribute to the larger body of work in this field.
Prerequisites: AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306
Instructor(s): E. Emeric
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.080.400. Research Practicum: Language Disorders-Community Based Learning. 2.0 Credits.

This course provides the opportunity to learn about adult aphasias; language disorders which are one of the most common consequence of stroke. You will receive training in Supportive Communication Techniques and work as a communication partner with an individual with aphasia for two hours per week. Three class meetings for orientation and reading assignments will be held on campus; training and practicum will be conducted at a local aphasia support center. Transportation required .A valid driver's license for zip car use. This is a two (2) credit practicum.
Instructor(s): B. Rapp
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.080.401. Research Practicum: KEEN (Kids Enjoying Exercise Now)-Community Based Learning. 1.0 Credit.

KEEN (Kids Enjoy Exercise Now) is a 1-credit S/U practicum. This practicum provides the opportunity to learn and interact with child “athletes” who have neurological disabilities, including autism, cerebral palsy and Down syndrome through exercise and recreational activities. Students “coaches” will receive a profile for the KEEN athlete that they will be paired with during a session. Students will receive initial training and then select 4 sessions to attend to fulfill the 1-credit requirement. Sessions are held on the first and third Sunday of each month during the semester. Students MUST attend a mandatory orientation on Tuesday, 9/5 from 4:30pm-5:30pm and complete a mandatory exit survey at the end of the semester. Sessions will take place at KEEN centers in Maryland. Transportation will be via student carpools using Zipcars, personal vehicles or Hop Vans.
Instructor(s): L. Gorman.

AS.080.402. Teaching Practicum: Making Neuroscience Fun (MNF). 1.0 Credit.

Making Neuroscience Fun (MNF) is a 1-credit S/U practicum and community outreach program which brings age-appropriate interactive presentations about the brain and nervous system to Baltimore city and county elementary school students. MNF is an effort aimed at fostering appreciation for science in general, emphasizing the importance of the brain and the nervous system in everyday life, and enhancing the science curriculum in Baltimore’s City and County schools. Students will receive initial training prior to participating and then will select and present 6, 45-minute presentations. In order to participate, students must be available either 7am-11am or 11am-3pm at least one day per week, Monday-Friday. Students MUST attend a mandatory orientation on Wednesday, 9/6 from 12:00pm-1:00pm, training (day/time TBA) and an exit session on Wednesday, 11/29 from 12:00pm-1:00pm that will be held on campus. Presentations will take place at Baltimore city and county elementary schools. Transportation to the schools will be via student carpools using Zipcars or personal vehicles.
Instructor(s): L. Gorman.

AS.080.404. Research Practicum: HopKids- Children's Center. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

HopKids- Children’s Center is a 1-3 credit S/U practicum that provides students the opportunity to learn, play and interact with children receiving treatment in over 20 different specialties including dermatology, endocrine, GI, immunology, urology, plastics and hematology. Students will volunteer in outpatient clinics at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center where they will encourage and provide play and participate in a variety of activities including art projects, coloring, board games, and reading. Students will gain valuable clinical experience and be exposed to a wide range of children with a variety of diseases/illnesses. This practicum has the option for variable credits, therefore, 1 credit equals 5 shifts, 2 credits equals 10 shifts and 3 credits equals 15 shifts. Shifts are Mondays 1pm-3pm, Tuesdays 10am-12pm, Wednesdays 1pm-3pm and Thursdays 10am-12pm throughout the semester. Students will sign up for shifts on a first-come, first-serve basis after the mandatory orientation, there is a maximum limit of how many students may sign up per day. Students MUST attend a mandatory orientation on Wednesday, 9/6 from 4:30pm-5:30pm and complete a mandatory exit survey at the end of the semester. Volunteer shifts will take place at outpatient clinics in the Rubenstein Child Health Building. Transportation will be provided by the JHMI shuttle.
Instructor(s): L. Gorman.

AS.080.411. Advanced Seminar: Neuroscience I. 3.0 Credits.

For students in the first semester of the BA/MS Program. Instructor permission required.
Instructor(s): J. Baraban
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.412. Advnaced Seminar: Neuroscience II. 3.0 Credits.

For students in the 2nd semester of the BS/MS Program..
Instructor(s): J. Baraban
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.413. Advanced Seminar: Neuroscience III. 3.0 Credits.

For students in the 3rd semester of the BA/MS Program.
Instructor(s): J. Baraban
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.080.500. Scientific Communication: Neuroscience.

Scientific communication is crucial to advancing science. The Scientific Communication section is taken concurrently with Neuroscience Research and consists of a two hour research orientation session held at the beginning of the semester and a two hour exit session held at the end of the semester. The student is also expected to meet with their lab supervisor or attend a lab meeting once a week to understand the research the lab is currently working on and receive feedback on the work they are doing. See special notes section for specific meeting day/time. Students must sign up for Scientific Communication prior to signing up for NS Research until they complete their 6 credits of research. See Neuroscience Research website for more details.
Corequisites: Co-reqs: AS.080.531OR AS.080.541 OR AS.080.551 OR AS.080.561
Instructor(s): D. Smith; H. Adwanikar; J. Trageser; L. Gorman.

AS.080.511. Independent Study. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): L. Gorman.

AS.080.512. Independent Study. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): L. Gorman.

AS.080.531. Research Neuroscience-Freshmen. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500 (Scientific Communication)
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.534. Neuroscience Research- Freshmen. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500[C]
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.541. Research Neuroscience - Sophomores. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500 (Scientific Communication)
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.544. Neuroscience Research-Sophomores. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.550. Neuroscience BS/MS Summer Research - Seniors.

This summer research course is only for Neuroscience BS/MS students that are seniors in the program over the summer.
Instructor(s): J. Baraban.

AS.080.551. Research Neuroscience for Juniors. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500 (Scientific Communication)
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.554. Neuroscience Research - Juniors. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.561. Research Neuroscience for Seniors. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500 (Scientific Communication)
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.564. Neuroscience Research - Seniors. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.572. Direct Readings/Independent Study. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): J. Baraban; L. Gorman.

AS.080.582. Neuroscience: Internship. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): L. Gorman.

AS.080.590. Independent Study. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500
Instructor(s): J. Baraban; L. Gorman.

AS.080.592. Research-Freshmen. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.594. Research-Sophomores. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.595. Neuroscience: Internship. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500
Instructor(s): L. Gorman.

AS.080.596. Research-Juniors-Summer. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.597. Internship: Neuroscience. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): L. Gorman.

AS.080.598. Research-Seniors-Summer. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Corequisites: AS.080.500
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.080.600. Neuroscience Research: BA/MS Undergraduate.

This course is ONLY for Neuroscience BA/MS students that are in the program during their undergraduate senior year. This course is similar to the course that the BA/MS graduate students take but is for BA/MS Seniors in their 7th semester summer period.
Instructor(s): J. Baraban.

AS.080.601. Neuroeconomics -Graduate Level.

Every day decisions often require us to weigh the costs and benefits of engaging in a particular course of action in order to obtain some expected outcome. Unfortunately, we often lack the information necessary to obtain our desired goal with complete certainty. Economists have long been interested in understanding human decision-making under these circumstances. In parallel, neuroscientists have made great strides at describing the underlying neural basis of simple decision-making. However, despite much progress in both fields, our understanding of how the brain makes decisions is incomplete. In order to strengthen and further research in both fields, the interdisciplinary field of Neuroeconomics arose. This course will survey the field of Neuroeconomics focusing on theoretical concepts developed by economists and the role these theories are playing in guiding current experimental neuroscience. Only graduate students can register for this course. Instructor signature is required.
Prerequisites: ( AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306) OR (AS.020.312 AND AS.020.306) OR (AS.200.141 AND AS.020.306) OR Permission
Instructor(s): J. Trageser.

AS.080.610. Research Practicum: HopKids - Kennedy Krieger Institute.

This course provides the opportunity to learn and interact with children recovering from brain, spinal, and musculoskeletal injuries. You will travel to the Kennedy Krieger Institute to volunteer in the Child Life Department where you will participate in a variety of therapeutic activities including playing with the children and helping them achieve goals on two Saturdays (days/times TBA). Students will gain valuable clinical experience while learning patient empathy. Students MUST attend a mandatory orientation on Thursday, 9/7 from 4:30pm-5:30pm and complete a mandatory exit survey at the end of the semester. Transportation will be provided by the JHMI shuttle. No credits or grade are awarded.
Instructor(s): L. Gorman.

AS.080.620. Theoretical Neuroscience.

Topics of theoretical neuroscience and computational neuroscience will be discussed based on the original literature. Students are expected to actively participate in the discussion and also to present selected material to the class.
Instructor(s): E. Niebur.

AS.080.630. Bodian Seminar Series.

The Bodian Seminar is an interdisciplinary colloquium for discussion of current research into the neural basis of mental processes. Leading researchers, generally from outside the University, are invited to give lectures, which will be announced per e-mail. Undergraduate students who register for this course are asked to study a publication by the speaker, as provided with the announcement, and to prepare a question for each speaker together with a brief discussion of the possible answers. Permission required for undergraduate students.
Instructor(s): V. Stuphorn.

AS.080.631. Bodian Seminar Series.

Graduate students and Seniors with instructor permission. The Bodian Seminar is an interdisciplinary colloquium for discussion of current research into the neural basis of mental processes. Leading researchers, generally from outside the University, are invited to give lectures. About 12 lectures are scheduled per semester (see http://www.mb.jhu.edu/seminars.asp). Speakers, titles of lectures, and dates are announced to participants per e-mail (contact Debby Kelly, 410 516-8640). The announcements also include links to one or two recent publications of the speaker. Undergraduate students who register for this course are asked to study these papers and to prepare a question for each speaker together with a brief discussion of the possible answers. Question and discussion have to be in writing and turned in the day before the lecture. Undergradutes must e-mail the instructor for permission (von.der.heydt@jhu.edu) prior to registering for the course.
Instructor(s): V. Stuphorn.

AS.080.660. Commencement Project.

This course is for BA/MS students that have completed their year of research and are now working on their final thesis. In this course, students devote their semester to preparing their final thesis documentation and move forward with their Master’s Thesis Defense which is the last piece to the program. This course is for BA/MS student only and students should only register for this course in their last semester in the program.
Instructor(s): J. Baraban.

AS.080.850. Mentored Research: Neuroscience I.

For students in the BA/MS Program first semester. Permission required.
Instructor(s): J. Baraban.

AS.080.851. Mentored Research: Neuroscience.

Instructor(s): L. Gorman
Writing Intensive.

AS.080.852. Mentored Research: Neuroscience II.

Permission Required. For students in the BA/MS Program.
Instructor(s): J. Baraban.

AS.080.854. Mentored Research: Neuroscience III.

For students in the BA/MS Program Perrmission required.
Instructor(s): J. Baraban.

Cross Listed Courses

Biology

AS.020.317. Signaling in Development and Disease. 3.0 Credits.

An advanced undergraduate level seminar on current topics on signal transduction mechanisms underlying neuronal morphology, development and function. The proper functioning of the nervous system relies on the establishment of precise neuronal circuits through a developmental program including proliferation, neuronal migration, axonal growth, and neuronal survival. This course pertains to the extracellular cues and downstream neuronal signaling pathways that coordinate these key events during neuronal development. The course will also cover the role of aberrant signaling mechanisms in neuronal degeneration and disease. Recommended Course Background: AS.020.305, AS.020.306, and AS.080.306
Instructor(s): R. Kuruvilla
Area: Natural Sciences.

Cognitive Science

AS.050.102. Language and Mind. 3.0 Credits.

Introductory course dealing with theory, methods, and current research topics in the study of language as a component of the mind. What it is to "know" a language: components of linguistic knowledge (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics) and the course of language acquisition. How linguistic knowledge is put to use: language and the brain and linguistic processing in various domains. Cross-listed with Neuroscience and Psychology.
Instructor(s): C. Wilson
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.050.105. Introduction to Cognitive Neuropsychology. 3.0 Credits.

When the brain is damaged or fails to develop normally, even the most basic cognitive abilities (such as the ability to understand words, or perceive objects) may be disrupted, often in remarkable ways. This course explores a wide range of cognitive deficits, focusing on what these deficits can tell us about how the normal brain works. Topics include brain anatomy and causes of brain damage, reading and spelling deficits, unilateral spatial neglect, hemispheric disconnection, cortical plasticity, and visual perception of location and orientation. Students read primary sources: journal articles that report deficits and discuss their implications.
Instructor(s): M. McCloskey
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.050.312. Cognitive Neuroimaging Methods in High-Level Vision. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an advanced seminar and research practicum course. It will provide the opportunity to learn about fMRI methods used in the field of vision science and for students to have hands-on experience to develop, design and analyze a research study on topics in the cognitive neuroscience field of high-level vision. In the first part of the course students will read recent fMRI journal papers and learn about common fMRI designs and analysis methods; in the second part of the course students will conduct a research study as a group to address a research question developed from readings. Students are expected to write a paper in a journal article format at the end of the course and to present their results in front of the class. Research topics will vary but with special focus on topics in object, scene and space recognition. Cross-listed with Neuroscience and Psychology. instructor's permission required.
Prerequisites: AS.050.240[C] OR AS.050.319[C] OR AS.050.105[C] OR AS.200.312[C] OR AS.200.110[C] OR AS.050.203[C] OR AS.080.203[C]
Instructor(s): S. Park
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.050.315. Cognitive Neuropsychology of Visual Perception: The Malfunctioning Visual Brain. 3.0 Credits.

When we think about our ability to see, we tend to think about our eyes, but in fact vision happens mostly in the brain. This course explores the remarkable perceptual deficits that occur when the visual regions of the brain are damaged or fail to develop normally, focusing on what these perceptual malfunctions tell us about normal visual perception. Topics include visual system anatomy and physiology; functional specialization in the lower visual system as revealed by cerebral achromatopsia (color blindness resulting from brain damage) and akinetopsia (impaired motion perception); cortical plasticity in the visual system; spatial deficits in perception and action; and the implications of high-level visual deficits, including prosopagnosia (impaired face recognition), Charles Bonnet syndrome (complex visual hallucinations in blind areas of the visual field), blindsight (accurate responding to visual stimuli despite apparent inability to see them), and Anton’s syndrome (denial of blindness).
Prerequisites: AS.050.105 OR AS.050.203 OR AS.080.203 OR AS.050.101 OR AS.200.110 OR AS.200.211 or instructor's permission.
Instructor(s): M. McCloskey
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.050.326. Foundations of Cognitive Science. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores general issues and methodologies in cognitive science through the reading of classic works (from Plato and Kant through Skinner and Turing) and recent research articles to begin construction of a coherent picture of many seemingly divergent perspectives on the mind/brain. Recent brain-based computational models serve to focus discussion. Recommended Course Background: at least one course at the 300-level or higher in cognitive science, computer science, neuroscience, philosophy, or psychology. Co-listed with AS.050.626.
Instructor(s): P. Smolensky
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.050.332. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscienc. 3.0 Credits.

In-depth examination of the current literature on cognitive development in the context of developmental cognitive neuroscience. Please see course prerequisites. Meets with AS.050.632.
Prerequisites: AS.050.101 OR AS.050.339 OR AS.200.132 OR AS.050.105 OR Instructor's Permission.
Instructor(s): B. Landau
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.050.339. Cognitive Development. 3.0 Credits.

This is a survey course in developmental psychology designed for individuals with some basic background in psychology or cognitive science, but little or none in development. The course is strongly theoretically oriented, with emphasis on issues of nature, and development psychology as well as relevant empirical evidence. The principle focus will be early development, i.e., from conception through middle childhood. The course is organized topically, covering biological and prenatal development, perceptual and cognitive development, the nature and development of intelligence, and language learning.
Instructor(s): J. Yarmolinskaya
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.050.612. Cognitive Neuroimaging Methods in High-Level Vision.

Instructor's permission required. (Also offered as AS.050.312.)
Instructor(s): S. Park
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.050.626. Foundations of Cognitive Science.

This course explores general issues and methodologies in cognitive science through the reading of classic works (from Plato and Kant through Skinner and Turing) and recent research articles to begin construction of a coherent picture of many seemingly divergent perspectives on the mind/brain. Recent brain-based computational models serve to focus discussion. (Same as AS.050.326) Recommended Course Background: at least one course at the 300-level or higher in cognitive science, computer science, neuroscience, philosophy, or psychology.
Instructor(s): P. Smolensky
Writing Intensive.

AS.050.639. Cognitive Development.

Also offered as AS.050.339. See description.
Instructor(s): J. Yarmolinskaya.

Psychological & Brain Sciences

AS.200.141. Foundations of Brain, Behavior and Cognition. 3.0 Credits.

A survey of neuropsychology relating the organization of behavior to the integrative action of the nervous system. Cross-listed with Behavioral Biology and Neuroscience.
Instructor(s): L. Gorman
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.200.302. Behavioral Assessment of Animal Models of Cognition and Neuropsychiatric Disorders. 3.0 Credits.

What does a rat exploring its environment tell us about memory? How can a mouse help us better understand schizophrenia? This course will focus on procedures that are routinely used to study behavior in animal models of cognition and neuropsychiatric disorders. The procedures discussed will include assessments that fall into 3 broad functional domains: motor function, affective or emotional states, and cognition. Throughout the course, we will read and discuss original research articles to illustrate and compare some of the measures and results from the various procedures. Postdoc Teaching Fellowship. This is designed to be an upper level course.
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.200.141 OR ( AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306 ) or permission of the instructor.
Instructor(s): D. Smith
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.200.303. Psychobiology of Drug Addiction. 3.0 Credits.

The goal of this course is to explore the psychobiological bases of drug addiction. The course will begin with a discussion of the evolving concepts and theories of addiction, as well as a review of the methods and animal models relevant for the study of drug addiction. Following this primary introduction, students will learn 1) how drugs of abuse affect neural function and how this relates to their addictive potential, 2) how biological and behavioral phenotypes predispose certain individuals to addiction, and 3) how environmental factors (stress, social context, learning history, drug contingencies, etc.) contribute to the development of addiction. Special focus will be given on the complex interactions between these different factors and levels of analysis. The course will integrate a variety of approaches (molecular biology, system neuroscience, and psychology). Based on this understanding of the psychobiological mechanisms of drug addiction, we will reflect and refine our views of addiction and examine potential ways to prevent and treat the disease.
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.200.141 OR (AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306) OR (AS.020.312 AND AS.020.306).
Instructor(s): R. Keiflin
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.200.304. Neuroscience of Decision Making. 3.0 Credits.

This course will survey the neural mechanisms of decision-making. Current experimental research and theory concerning selection, control, and evaluation of actions are examined in humans and animals. Topics will range from simple perceptual judgements to complex social behavior. The course involves a weekly lecture about a specific topic followed by a student presentation of a current research paper. Cross-listed with Neuroscience.
Prerequisites: AS.080.305 OR AS.080.205 OR AS.200.141
Instructor(s): V. Stuphorn
Area: Natural Sciences.

AS.200.308. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an advanced survey of the scientific study of learning and memory. An interdisciplinary approach is used to integrate the state of the field across levels from the cellular-molecular basis of synaptic plasticity to functional circuitry implicated in learning to memory systems in the brain. The course is designed to provide a deep understanding of the outstanding issues and current debates in learning and memory research with a specific emphasis on animal models. This is an interactive lecture/seminar course with active student participation. Recommended Course Background: AS.200.370 or AS.200.141 or AS.080.305/AS.080.306 or AS.020.306.
Instructor(s): M. Yassa
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.200.319. Sensing & Action in Predator/Prey Encounters. 3.0 Credits.

Receiving and responding to environmental stimuli are fundamental components in a wide variety of behaviors, including the critically important behaviors of finding prey and avoiding predation. In this course, we will examine both invertebrate and vertebrate systems to understand how organisms use sensory systems to detect prey and predators, and how motor systems guide appropriate actions. We will begin by examining predator/prey interactions mediated through vision, followed by olfaction, audition and electrolocation. The course will then cover escape and predatory behaviors for a wide variety of organisms, both vertebrate and invertebrates. For each topic, we will first discuss sensing behaviors, the neural machinery of sensory systems, and how sensory signals are used to guide species-specific escape and attack behaviors at the levels of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Restricted to Juniors & Seniors with Recommended Course Background: AS.080.305 / Nervous System I AND AS.080.306 / Nervous System II OR AS.200.141 / Foundations of Brain, Behavior & Cognition.
Instructor(s): M. Wohlgemuth
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.200.344. Behavioral Endocrinology. 3.0 Credits.

An examination of the effects of hormones on behavior in non-human and human animals. Topics will include the effects of hormones on sexual differentiation, reproductive behavior, parental behavior, homeostasis and biological rhythms, regulation of body weight, learning and memory. Cross-listed with Behavioral Biology and Neuroscience.
Prerequisites: Prereqs: ( AS.200.141 OR AS.080.306 ) OR (AS.020.151 AND AS.020.152) OR ( AS.020.305 AND AS.020.306 ) or instructor's permission
Instructor(s): K. Bohn
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.200.368. Sleep, Dreams, and Altered States of Consciousness. 3.0 Credits.

Sleep, dreaming, resting and arousal to waking represent very different states of consciousness which differ dramatically both psychologically and physiologically. This course focuses on cognitive, psychological, physiological, biological and genetic aspects characterizing each of these states with some reference to other altered states. The course includes a focus on the major pathologies affecting sleep-wake states. Clinical cases will be considered. These inform about both psychological and biological aspects of these states. The relative biological functions of each state will be evaluated with particular attention to the mystery of why we have and apparently need REM and NREM sleep. Actual physiological recordings of sleep states will be reviewed and the student will learn how these are obtained and how to evaluate these. The circadian rhythms, ontogeny and evolution of these sleep-wake states will also be covered. This will include a review of information learned from non-human animal sleep. The change from sleep to full awakening reflects change toward increasing brain organization supporting consciousness. Understanding of the neurobiology of these states will be used to explore some of the more modern and scientific concepts of human self-awareness or consciousness. Recommended Course Background: AS.200.101 OR AS.080.203 OR AS.050.203
Instructor(s): R. Allen
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.200.370. Functional Human Neuroanatomy. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the general organizing principles of the anatomy of the human central nervous system and how this anatomical organization relates to function, from the level of neural circuits, to systems, to behavior. Students will learn to identify neuroanatomical structures and pathways in dissections and MRI images through computerized exercises. Readings and lectures will emphasize general structure-function relationships and an understanding of the functional roles of particular structures in sensory, motor, and cognitive systems.
Prerequisites: AS.080.250 OR AS.080.305
Instructor(s): S. Courtney-Faruqee
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.200.376. Psychopharmacology. 3.0 Credits.

Designed to provide information about how drugs affect the brain and behavior. The course focuses on biological concepts underlying structures and functions of the brain that relate to mental disorders. An introduction to neurobiology and brain function is presented as it applies to the interaction of various classes of drugs with the individual neurotransmitter systems in the brain. A brief historic review is followed by a discussion of clinical relevance. Cross-listed with Behavioral Biology and Neuroscience. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors.
Prerequisites: AS.200.141 OR (AS.020.312 AND AS.020.306) OR (AS.080.305 AND AS.080.306) or permission required.
Instructor(s): H. Adwanikar
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.200.801. Research Semimar: Learning and Memory.

This laboratory meeting is for graduate students studying learning and memory mechanisms, alterations with age or neurologic disease, and advanced neuroimaging methods. Meetings will focus on experimental design, presentation of data, analytical techniques. Undergraduates allowed to add the course with permission as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory only. Recommended Course Background: AS.200.370 or AS.200.141 or AS.080.305/AS.080.306 or AS.020.306.
Instructor(s): M. Yassa.

Biomedical Engineering

EN.580.694. Statistical Connectomics. 3.0 Credits.

This course will cover the basics of an exciting emerging field of statistical connectomics (aka, brain-graphs). It is so new, that we are going to make some of it up in this class! The first week will be introductory lectures that I give. The rest of the semester will be run like a seminar; each week will focus on a different topic. On Tuesdays we will hear about a statistical method that operates on graphs, and on Thursdays we will read about some neuroscience data upon which one could apply these techniques. The final project will consist of implementing a statistical method devised for graphs on a brain-graph problem. Recommended background: coursework in probability, linear algebra, and numerical programming (eg, R, Python, Matlab).
Instructor(s): J. Vogelstein
Area: Engineering.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://neuroscience.jhu.edu/research-faculty/faculty-profiles/primary-faculty/

Faculty

Chair

Hey-Kyoung Lee, Ph.D.
Professor, Mind/Brain Institute

Director of Undergraduate Studies

Linda Gorman, Ph.D.
Teaching Professor, Psychological and Brain Sciences

Director of BS/MS Program

Jay Baraban, MD., Ph.D.
Psychological and Brain Sciences

Professors

Patricia Janak, Ph.D.
Psychological and Brain Sciences

Michael McCloskey, Ph.D.
Cognitive Science

Brenda Rapp, Ph.D.
Cognitive Science

Haiqing Zhao, Ph.D.
Biology

Assistant Professors

Robert Johnston, Ph.D.
Biology

Shreesh Mysore, Ph.D.
Psychological and Brain Sciences

Vikram Chib, Ph.D.
Biomedical Engineering

Lecturers

Hita Adwanikar, Ph.D
Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Dani Smith, Ph.D.
Psychological and Brain Sciences.

Jason Trageser, Ph.D.
Psychological and Brain Sciences.