Political Science

http://politicalscience.jhu.edu

The programs of the Political Science Department are designed to help students attain a deeper understanding of politics and civic life in its various dimensions. The department encourages students to become sophisticated theoretically and to study politics in global and comparative perspective. We divide the curriculum into American Politics, Comparative Politics, Political Theory, and International Relations (and Law and Politics at the graduate level). Students are encouraged to develop expertise in several of these areas.

The department has 23 faculty members. The undergraduate program offers a broad range of courses about politics and government at local, state, national, and international levels. In addition to taking courses on the Homewood campus, students can do independent research under the guidance of a faculty mentor, take courses at the Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, D.C., and participate in the Aitchison Public Service Undergraduate Fellowship Program at the Johns Hopkins Washington Center.

Intellectual Orientation

In addition to our work within the traditional fields of Political Science, faculty research engages four clusters of activity that cut across the various subfields while speaking to core questions of politics: power and inequality, identities and allegiances, agency and structures, and borders and flows.

Power and Inequality

In many ways, political science is the study of power. This includes the wide array of rules, authority structures, and forms of violence at the local, national, transnational and international levels, as well as how the value, distribution, and accumulation of resources create conditions of security and insecurity among nation states, regions, economic classes, or populations.

Identities and Allegiances

A second cluster of research centers on questions of identity and the various allegiances and attachments organized around them. These include how racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual identities inform citizenship and nationalism, the organization of civil society, or the formation of social movements.

Agency and Structure

A third cross-cutting area of activity in the department explores questions of agency and structures. Agency includes entrepreneurship, innovation and creative action, and the agency of material things. Structures include formal and informal institutions, particularly the rules, roles, and regulations that guide human relations in the public, private, and non-profit worlds, among states and within them, at the global level and in local communities.

Borders and Flows

A fourth cluster examines borders and flows. Research in this area examines the movement of people, ideas, material objects, and natural forces across space and over time. A focus on borders and flows informs the study of territorial regimes, sovereignty, religious intensities, immigration and diasporas, globalizing capital, information, and ecological politics.

Political Science courses can contribute to two different majors:

Major in Political Science

The major in political science described below is designed for students interested in intensive study of the institutions, theory, and problems of politics, government and modern political culture.

Major in International Studies

The department contributes to an interdisciplinary program leading to B.A. or B.A./M.A. degrees in International Studies. This program and its requirements are described under International Studies.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

(See also Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree.)

The requirements for the political science major listed below apply to those students who entered the University in Fall 2014 and later. Students who entered prior to Fall 2014 should refer to the archived catalog based on their year of entry into the institution. All courses applied towards the major must be taken for a letter grade and students must receive a grade of C or higher, including courses taken in the first semester of freshman year. A maximum of four courses may come from transfer credit and only one letter-graded independent study of 3 credits may apply towards the major (unless honors thesis). The Department of Political Science does not award credit toward the major for the Advanced Placement Exam in government.

Subfield Courses
One 100- or 200-level course in American Politics (AP)3
One 100- or 200-level course in Comparative Politics (CP)3
One 100- or 200-level course in International Relations (IR)3
One 100- or 200-level course in Political Theory (PT)3
Writing Intensive Course
One 3-credit writing intensive course in political science. This course may overlap with one of the 12 required political science courses and with the the four required KSAS writing-intensive courses.
Political Science Elective Courses
One political science course at any level3
Seven political science courses at the 300- or 400-level21
Cognate Courses
Four elective courses (at any level) selected from the following areas: history, history of art, history of science & technology, philosophy, anthropology, geography, economics, sociology, or psychology12

Sample Program of Study

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
1 American Politics Course31 Comparative Politics Course3
Cognate #13Cognate #23
  6  6
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
1 International Relations Course31 Political Theory Course3
Cognate #33Cognate #43
  6  6
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
1 Political Science Course at any level3Upper Level Political Science Course #23
Upper Level Political Science Course #13Upper Level Political Science Course #33
  6  6
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Upper Level Political Science Course #43Upper Level Political Science Course #63
Upper Level Political Science Course #53Upper Level Politcal Science Course #73
Writing Intensive Political Science Course (if needed, could overlap with other required course)  
  6  6
Total Credits: 48

World Politics and Global Governance Double Major

The World Politics and Global Governance (WPGG) program offers an intellectually rigorous path for students who want to understand world politics from a broad interdisciplinary perspective. Completing this course of study satisfies the requirements for a double major in political science and international studies. Students take courses from one of five different thematic foci: Global governance and law; Political economy; International security; Borders and identities; Environmental politics. The WPGG program enables students to develop their analytical skills and their critical judgment as citizens of the world. The program provides excellent preparation for professional careers as well as for graduate studies in political science, public affairs, law, business, and beyond. http://politicalscience.jhu.edu/undergraduate/world-politics-and-global-governance-double-major/

Honors Thesis Program

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. Prior to writing this thesis, seniors must have taken at least one (1) designated research (R) political science course before the start of their senior year. The student should establish a faculty advisor by the end of the spring semester of their junior year. After the student has obtained approval from a faculty sponsor to supervise the project, the student will enroll in a three-credit thesis colloquium course during the fall semester of their senior year. If at the end of the fall semester adequate progress has been made and the project warrants further work, the student must enroll in a three-credit independent study supervised by the faculty sponsor.

Students who complete a senior thesis and have a final major GPA (including final semester grades) of 3.7 will be awarded departmental honors. All students may write a thesis, regardless of GPA, provided they have a detailed proposal approved by a faculty member at the beginning of the fall semester of their senior year.

All thesis-related courses apply to the total of seven (7) political science courses at the 300- or 400-level and to the total of twelve (12) political science courses required for graduation in the major.

Graduate Program

The Johns Hopkins University Department of Political Science has built an international reputation for its strengths in theory and in innovative and trans-disciplinary approaches to uncovering new knowledge. The program of doctoral study draws on these strengths to provide a diverse and rigorous doctoral education. Our program is designed for highly qualified, intellectually curious, and creative graduate students who seek to learn from and contribute to this community of scholars.

Doctoral students develop in-depth knowledge of a major field and a minor field (or two major fields), chosen from American politics, comparative politics, international relations, law and politics, and political theory. Students may also complete a certificate in comparative racial politics. All doctoral students have opportunities to work closely with faculty, to pursue independent research, and to draw on the deep connections between Political Science and other departments across the humanities and social sciences.

Both the Department and the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences provide opportunities for developing teaching and other career-related skills, all in the vibrant setting of the Homewood campus and Baltimore city. 

Admission

The Department of Political Science admits approximately 16 new graduate students each year, selected from approximately 200 applications. Our entering class is typically around 10 students. The deadline for application for admission to graduate study and the award of financial assistance is January 15 (most years). Decisions are made exclusively in late February or early March and announced by March 15. A B.A., B.S., or their equivalent, and results of the Graduate Record Examination are required for application. Students whose native language is not English must take the TOEFL examinations or provide other evidence of fluency in English (such as a degree from an institution in which the language of instruction is English.) A broad background in the liberal arts and sciences is preferred. Further information can be found at http://grad.jhu.edu/apply/application-process/.

Financial Aid

The department ordinarily provides financial aid to all students admitted to the graduate program unless they hold fellowships from sources outside the university. Departmental fellowships cover full tuition and an annual stipend. Assuming satisfactory progress toward the Ph.D., students can normally expect to receive funding for five years. All students receiving financial aid are expected to serve as teaching assistants for one semester of each academic year.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

The requirements for the Ph.D. are divided between those that must be satisfied by all candidates for that degree and those particular to the student's major and minor fields.

Department-wide Requirements

All candidates for the Ph.D. must satisfy the following requirements:

Course Requirements

A minimum of 12 semester courses at the 600-level with a grade of B or better.  At least 10 of these must be in the Krieger School's Department of Political Science.

Foreign Language Requirement

All students must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language.
This requirement can be fulfilled as follows:
1. Demonstrate fluency in a foreign language (granted automatically for students
whose first language is not English).
2. Complete four semesters of college-level foreign language instruction.
3. Pass a translation exam.
4. Earn a degree from a University where instruction is not in English.
5. With a degree from an institution in which the language of instruction is a
language other than English.
6. Place into a third-year foreign language course through online placement tests
(see GRLL website).

Comprehensive Examination Requirement  

Students are required, at a minimum, to take comprehensive exams in one major field and one minor field. Students may also elect to take two major exams or a major exam and two minor exams (one of which may be outside the Department of Political Science).  Faculty in the field write and evaluate the exams and determine the format.  Major field comprehensive exams take place over two days (8 hours per day); minor field exams take place over one day.  The fields within the department are: American Politics, Law and Politics, Political Theory, Comparative Politics and International Relations.

Students choosing a second minor outside the Political Science Department must devise a coherent program of study in that discipline, in consultation with their Political Science faculty advisor and with faculty from the other department.  Students choosing an external minor must complete a minimum of three courses at the 600 level in the external minor's discipline, earning a grade of B or better.  They must also pass a comprehensive examination prepared and evaluated in consultation with faculty of the Department of Political Science by the instructors in those courses.

Dissertation

The dissertation is the capstone of doctoral education, and it must be a substantial work of independent scholarship that contributes to knowledge in the student's field of study.  Preparation of the dissertation will be supervised and must be approved by two members of the faculty, at least one of whom (the dissertation director) must be a member of the Department of Political Science.

Defense

The final examination of the dissertation will take the form of a defense conducted under the rules of the Graduate Board of The Johns Hopkins University.

Field-specific requirements

Field-specific basic expectations, procedures, and requirements are stated below. These are implemented, interpreted, and adjusted in the light of the intellectual orientations and objectives of individual students. It is of great importance that students work closely with their advisors and with the faculty in their major and minor fields in constructing and pursuing their programs of study.

American Politics

Students majoring and minoring in American Politics will work with at least two faculty members to develop a plan of study that includes recommended course work and other preparation needed to pass a comprehensive exam. Students completing a major are expected to demonstrate a breadth of knowledge sufficient for framing a dissertation in the relevant disciplinary literature and teaching undergraduate courses in the field; students who pursue a minor may focus more narrowly on an area of study in which they demonstrate fluency. These may include, but are not limited to, the following areas of faculty interest:

  • American Political Institutions (Congress, Courts, and the Executive)
  • Urban Politics
  • American Political Development
  • Race and Politics
  • Political Behavior and Public Opinion
  • Public Policy
  • American Political Thought
  • Political Parties and Elections

In addition, students majoring in the field are strongly encouraged to take AS.190.602 Introduction to Quantitative Political Science as part of their course of study.

Comparative Politics

All students majoring and minoring in this Comparative Politics will become conversant with major substantive and methodological debates in the field, and be able to comment on the key theoretical literature in several of those debates. They will normally also develop knowledge of at least one world region. Students majoring or minoring in Comparative Politics are required to take AS.190.625 Theories of Comparative Politics and at least one seminar in quantitative or qualitative methods.  We expect all students to master the material covered in these courses, as well as others with more specialized topics.

Students will take a comprehensive exam that will test their ability to engage with several areas of theoretical debate in Comparative Politics, and their ability to use comparative examples to support their arguments. Students may focus on (but are not limited to):

  • Civil Society
  • Institutional Theories
  • Transnational Relations, Social Movements, and Contentious Politics
  • Political Parties, Interest Groups, Representation, and Political Behavior
  • Comparative Political Economy
  • Comparative Racial Politics, Nationalism, and Migration and Citizenship
  • The Political Economy of Development
  • Economic and Political Transitions
  • Ideas and Politics

Within the spirit of this division of the overall field, students may propose alternative delineations of thematic subfields.

Students working in specific thematic and substantive subfields within Comparative Politics will be required to demonstrate competence in methodologies and bodies of theory judged by the faculty to be necessary for quality research and teaching in those subfields.

International Relations

All students majoring or minoring in International Relations will be required to be conversant with the major theoretical, substantive, and methodological themes and debates of the field.   It is strongly recommended that students take As 190.676 Field Survey of International Relations and a methods course.  Students majoring in International Relations will take an examination covering two subfields.  The first subfield must be International Politics. The other subfield is to be determined in consultation with faculty teaching International Relations.  Choices include but are not restricted to:

  • International Law and Diplomacy
  • International Relations Theory
  • International Security Studies
  • Science, Technology, and Art and International Relations
  • Global Political Economy

Students minoring in International Relations will take a comprehensive examination in International Politics.

Political Theory

Students majoring in Political Theory will take a comprehensive examination covering the following two subfields:

  • Contemporary Political Theory
  • History of Political Thought

Each student preparing for a major comprehensive exam will propose six or seven thinkers in the history of thought, six or seven recent or contemporary thinkers, and three or four issue areas. Examination questions are composed in light of the theorists and issues articulated in the exam prospectus.

The minor comprehensive exam in political theory asks the student to select half the number of thinkers required for the major exam and three issue areas.

Preparation for these examinations will be arranged in consultation with relevant faculty.

Students majoring in political theory will also take at least one minor field from American Politics, Law and Politics, Comparative Politics, or International Relations.

Law and Politics

Law and Politics focuses on American constitutional thought, judicial politics, law and society, and philosophy of law and jurisprudence.  Students learn not only about the history and context of American constitutional developments but also about the operation of the judicial branch of government in the past and the present, how courts and judges do their work, and how that work has changed.  In addition,  students explore how legislation as well as course decisions reflect and influence groups, and professional networks help to shape law's content and implementation.  Students may major or minor in Law and Politics.  in either case, students work closely with at least two members of the faculty to develop a plan of study regarding coursework and additional reading to prepare them for comprehensive exams.  Majors are expected to demonstrate a breadth of knowledge in the field sufficient for framing a dissertation and for teaching undergraduate courses; minors may focus more narrowly on a particular area of study.

Certificate in Comparative Racial Politics

The graduate certificate program in Comparative Racial Politics is designed to help train graduate students who are developing empirically based and/or theoretically informed scholarship on citizenship, racism and immigration in contemporary societies, whether in a single national society or cross-spatially. There are two required courses: Comparative Racial Politics, and Qualitative Methods. In addition the student must take two electives from this (preliminary) list:

  • Nationalism
  • Comparative Citizenship and Immigration
  • Politics
  • Topics in Black Political Thought
  • Race and Political Theory
  • Civil Society
  • States, Regimes and Governmentality
  • American Political Development
  • Political Economy of Development
 
Progress Toward the Ph.D.

The time necessary to obtain a Ph.D. in the department varies according to the preparation individual students bring to the program, the scope and complexity of their dissertation topics, and other factors. Students are required to make satisfactory progress, meaning that they must work toward fulfilling the requirements in a timely manner . Students are encouraged to satisfy the department's foreign language requirement by the time of their first comprehensive exam.  Most students take their comprehensive examinations in the third year in the program.   Students who have completed all requirements except the dissertation must work to complete their dissertations as quickly as is reasonable given the unique circumstances of their course of study, and they must periodically demonstrate progress on the dissertation.

The Master of Arts degree is offered only to students who have been admitted into the Ph.D. program.  For the M.A., the student must complete at least seven one-semester courses at the 600-level with a grade of B or better, and demonstrate an effective reading knowledge of one approved foreign language.

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.190.101. Introduction to American Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the ideals and operation of the American political system. It seeks to understand how our institutions and politics work, why they work as they do, and what the consequences are for representative government in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the federal government and its electoral, legislative, and executive structures and processes. As useful and appropriate, attention is also given to the federal courts and to the role of the states. The purpose of the course is to understand and confront the character and problems of modern government in the United States in a highly polarized and plebiscitary era.
Instructor(s): B. Ginsberg
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.102. Introduction To Comparative Politics. 3.0 Credits.

To understand politics, the sound bites of the modern media take us only so far. In this course, we will take a step back and implement an intellectually rigorous method. Scholars of comparative politics use the method of comparison in order to illuminate important political phenomena of our times. Following this method, we will embark on a scholarly tour of the world and compare the politics of various countries. We will also trace these politics back to their historical sources. We will work from the assumption that there is something to be gained from such comparisons across space and time.
Instructor(s): N. Jabko
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.108. Freshmen Seminar: The Human Condition. 3.0 Credits.

This freshman seminar will focus on reading just one book, The Human Condition, by Hannah Arendt. Such a narrow focus is justified by the breadth of topics the book itself discusses and the influence these various discussions have had on modern political thought. Among the various topics that will be studied and talked about are the meaning of the distinctions Arendt makes between “public,” “private,” and “social,” as well as between “labor,” “work,” and “action.” In the course of their studies, students will be challenged to think about the relation of philosophy to politics, the significance of the scientific revolution for public life, the character of contemporary society, and what it means to be “free.” Also, by focusing on just one book, students will have the opportunity to learn how to do the kind of close reading and textual analysis success in college requires. In addition to reading assignments, students will be required to write four short papers.
Instructor(s): J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.109. Politics of East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.110. American Politics in Film. 3.0 Credits.

This class uses film to explore a central question in American politics: what is the relationship between the public and those who endeavor to represent them? Over the course of several weeks, we will address this question by viewing Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, A Face in the Crowd, The Candidate, Wag the Dog, and The Ides of March. We will use these films to discuss how political institutions, the media, and money shape our politics. We will also consider how the representation of politics in film has changed over time.
Instructor(s): A. Sheingate
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.111. Introduction to Global Studies. 3.0 Credits.

This course surveys scholarly approaches to processes, relations, institutions, and social structures that cross, subvert, or transcend national borders. The course will also introduce students to research tools for global studies. Students who have taken Contemporary International Politics 190.209 or International Politics 190.104 may not register.
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.204. Ancient Political Thought. 3.0 Credits.

The premise of this course is that a political perspective is tied up with a (meta)physical one, that is to say, with ideas about the nature of Nature and of the status of the human and nonhuman elements within it. How is the universe ordered? Who or what is responsible for it? What place do or should humans occupy within it? How ought we to relate to nonhuman beings and forces? We will read three different responses to such questions and show how they are linked to a particular vision of political life. In the first, the world into which human are born is ordered by gods whose actions often appear inexplicable: Prometheus Bound by Aeschylus, Oedipus the King by Sophocles, and Hippolytus by Euripedes will represent this tragic vision of the cosmos. In the second, Plato , in Republic and in Phaedrus, the forces of reason and eros play central and powerful roles. In the third, Augustine of Hippo presents a world designed by a benevolent, omnipotent God who nevertheless has allowed humans a share in their own fate. We end the course with Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy , which offers a perspective on these three visions of the world -- the tragic, the rational, and the faithful -- which will help us evaluate them in the light of contemporary political and ecological concerns.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.205. Capital: The Best Seller. 3.0 Credits.

When Thomas Piketty published _Capital in the Twenty-First Century_ last spring, he made the rounds on talk shows just like a movie star with a new film out, or a rock star with an album about to drop. How is such an “event” possible, and what does it tell us about the book’s subject, capital? This class explores the questions Piketty’s book raises: What is capital? How does it come about, how does it function, and what are its effects?
Instructor(s): S. Chambers
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.208. The Politics of Music. 3.0 Credits.

This course will provide a critical examination of the role of music in political and social change. We will be especially concerned with the correspondences between musical innovations and their capacities to inspire and shape social movements as their capacity to address to the politics of race and sexuality, radical democratic resistance, etc. We will also explore how music is utilized to advance agendas that are anti-democratic, such as the transnational spread of white supremacist groups, the glorification of violence, and exclusionary nationalism.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.209. Contemporary International Politics. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to international politics. Emphasis will be on continuity and change in international politics and the causes of war and peace. The first half of the course will focus on events prior to the end of the Cold War, including the Peloponnesian War, the European balance of power, imperialism, the origins and consequences of WWI and WWII, and the Cold War. The second half will focus on international politics since 1990, including globalization, whether democracies produce peace, the impact of weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, and the prospects for peace in the 21st century. Theories of realism and liberalism will also be considered.
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.217. Introduction to International Relations Theory. 3.0 Credits.

This course is a broad introduction to international relations theory in a format that encompasses lecture and discussion. We will explore mainstream theoretical perspectives and critiques of those perspectives, as well as more recent developments in the field.
Instructor(s): S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.220. Global Security Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Contemporary and emerging technologies of nuclear (weapons, terrorism, energy) outer space (missiles, missile defense, asteroids), biosecurity (bioweapons, pandemics, terrorism) and cyber (war, spying, surveillance) and implications for security, international politics, arms control, and political freedom.
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.226. Global Governance. 3.0 Credits.

Global problems like poverty, financial instability, human rights abuses, and climate change threaten both international order and human well-being. In the absence of a world state, these problems must be addressed by an increasingly complex, transnational network of organizations and social groups. First, we will aim to understand and explain how global problems are governed through detailed case studies of International Organizations and Non-Governmental Organizations such as the United Nations, World Bank, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Amnesty International and more. Second, we will critically evaluate the successes and failures of these organizations and explore the possibilities for improving democratic governance at the global level.
Instructor(s): B. Allan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.227. U.S. Foreign Policy. 3.0 Credits.

This course will provide and analysis of US foreign policy with a focus on the interests, institutions, and ideas underpinning its development. While the course will offer a broader survey, the emphasis will be on important developments during the Cold War, such as the articulation of containment strategies and nuclear deterrence, and the analysis of contemporary foreign policy questions, including the problems of terrorism and failed states. In addition to security issues, attention will also be paid to significant developments in international trade policy.
Instructor(s): S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.228. The American Presidency. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the study of the presidency. It assumes a basic understanding of the American political system as provided in a course such as Introduction to American Politics or its equivalent. We explore the evolution of the modern presidency, how contemporary presidents operate in the political System, and the sources of successful presidential leadership.
Instructor(s): A. Sheingate
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.265. Comparative Political Behavior. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the study of political behavior, emphasizing electoral behavior in democratic countries.
Instructor(s): R. Katz
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.266. Religion, Economics and Terror. 3.0 Credits.

This course will engage a series of questions about how religion and fear are used as tools of political power that shape human values and desires in an age of neoliberal capitalism.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.280. Political Persuasion. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to Euro-American political thought, with a focus on the role of language, rhetoric, and Eros within politics. Texts by Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Walt Whitman, and Emma Goldman.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.281. Virtue, Labor, and Power (Classics of Political Thought II). 3.0 Credits.

This is not a class in the history of political thought. Instead, it is an opportunity for a selective, circumscribed, but very focused engagement with some of the most powerful and provocative texts in that history. We will read selections from six thinkers (Socrates, Machiavelli, Locke, Marx, Nietzsche, and Foucault), focusing on three themes (Virtue, Labor, and Power). These texts have all profoundly shaped the way we think about politics, and they are texts that resonate with our own political problematics today.
Instructor(s): S. Chambers
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.282. Authority and Liberty. 3.0 Credits.

Beginning with Plato, and using Nietzsche’s history of metaphysics as a guide, this course serves as an introduction to Euro-American political thought by analyzing the philosophical foundations of political authority. In addition to works by Plato and Nietzsche, readings will include works by Kant, Mill, Hart, and Foucault.
Instructor(s): J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.283. The Politics of Memory (Classics of Political Thought IV). 3.0 Credits.

Was George Orwell right that those who control the past control the future--and those who control the present control the past? This is a course on the politics of memory: how political power shapes what is available to be remembered, the timing, spaces, and occasions of commemoration, and who is permitted to invoke (or disavow) the past. We will engage a range of highly contested works of ancient, modern and contemporary political theory to investigate how the past might haunt present day politics through memories that are conscious and unconscious. The themes we will take up include: the correspondence between memory and freedom; whether we ever be free given that we are creatures endowed with memory, whether it is sometimes politically necessary (or even possible) for people to forget, and what politics of memory emboldens, or threatens, democracy. There are no prerequisites for this course.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.284. Classics of Political Theory: Political Freedom. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates core questions of what constitutes political freedom, what limits on freedom (if any) should be imposed by authority, and the relationship between freedom, responsibility and political judgment. Spanning texts ancient, modern and contemporary, we shall investigate how power inhabits and invigorates practices of freedom and consent. Among the questions we will consider: Can we always tell the difference between consent and coercion? Are morality and freedom incompatible? Is freedom from the past possible? By wrestling with slavery (freedom’s opposite) we will confront the terrifying possibility that slavery can be both embodied and psychic. If our minds can be held captive by power, can we ever be certain that we are truly free? The political stakes of these problems will be brought to light through a consideration of issues of religion, gender, sexuality, civil liberties, class and race.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.300. Class Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.301. Global Political Economy. 3.0 Credits.

Examines the intersection of politics and economics in global affairs. Focuses on theoretical approaches to global political economy; institutions of governance of the global political economy; flows of goods, services, capital, and information; and transborder problems. Recommended Course Background: AS.190.209
Prerequisites: Not open if you have previously taken AS.190.216.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.302. How to be a Capitalist. 3.0 Credits.

Everyone usually assumes that they know what capitalism is and how it works. Yet some of us often make very poor choices given the framework of a capitalist system, and many of us continually express shock and outrage over outcomes and results that are perfectly reasonable (and to be expected) given the operation of capitalism. This advanced seminar will engage with readings in political theory and political economy that explore the fundamental logic of capitalism. Previous course in Political Theory or Instructor's Permission.
Instructor(s): S. Chambers
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.307. Race, Politics and Literature. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.308. Democracy and Dictatorship: Theory and Cases. 3.0 Credits.

The course will cover three topics: 1) The conceptualization of political regime, democracy and authoritarianism. We will also consider neighboring concepts of other macro-political structures—government, state, and administration—in order to be able to demarcate what is distinctive about the study of political regimes. 2) The characterization of political regimes in most Western and some non-Western countries, in history and today. We will centrally focus on the so called “Waves of Democratization,” but we will also consider stories with less happy outcomes, that is, processes that led to the breakdown of democracies and the installation of repressive dictatorships. 3) The explanation(s) of the stability and change of political regimes around the world. Theoretical accounts of regime change come in many flavors—emphasis on economic versus political causes, focus on agents and choices versus structures and constraints, international versus domestic factors, among others. We will consider most of them.
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.310. The Political Economy of Order and Prosperity. 3.0 Credits.

The course offers an introduction to the relation between politics and economics in the long run by focusing on the interaction between order and prosperity. A central topic is the effects of macro-political institutions, like types of regime and state, on the capacity of societies to generate wealth and redistribute it. The course will also examine the political impact of economic performance across countries, for instance: how do economic booms and recessions affect democratic governance? The course provides the essential conceptual and theoretical tools for the analysis of political economy processes and outcomes.
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.311. Disposable People: Race, Immigration and Biopolitics. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore theories and practices of race and immigration in order to illuminate the proliferation of populations regarded as disposable in contemporary politics. We will pay special attention to the contestable criteria used to determine eligibility for membership in the human race. We shall also examine how political power influences the relays between citizenship status and those whose lives are worthy of protection, and those who should be allowed to die.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.313. Dreams of America. 3.0 Credits.

An exploration of recurrent themes and aspirations in American political thought, focused around three (interconnected) versions of the American dream: Tabula Rasa, Upward Mobility, and Landed Independence.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.314. Struggles for Democracy: from the French Revolution to the Arab Spring. 3.0 Credits.

This course is a systematic introduction to theories of regime change, which includes episodes of democratic transitions (gradual or revolutionary) and breakdowns, as well as trajectories of regime stability, like the persistence of various types of authoritarian rule and democratic polities. Two thirds of the course will cover theories, which in comparative politics are mostly inductive constructions from historical experiences. The remaining third will be case studies of exemplary events and processes, for instance, the differentiation of political regimes in post- WWI Europe in terms of liberal, fascist, and social-democratic regimes; the convergence towards democracy in Western Europe and Latin America between 1950 and 1990, and the fragility of democracy in Tropical Africa and the Middle East.
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.317. Race and Segregated Time. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores how time, and not just space, is segregated along racial lines. We shall examine how racial injustices are experienced as impositions on human time, how resistance to racial inequality has often been figured in temporal terms, and what it means to think in untimely ways that challenge how the extended lifespans of racially dominant groups is contingent upon the foreshortened lifetimes of racial others. Readings will bring political theory into contact with contemporary experiences of race, such as: criminal (in)justice, environmental racism and the proliferation of human disposability. Recommended Course Background: One Political Theory course.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.318. Political Monsters. 3.0 Credits.

This undergraduate seminar in political theory will explore the politics of fear through the trope of political monsters. We will engage with the genre of horror as a political genre, and ask why our current time period seems to be marked by particular sorts of monsters – zombies, vampires, and others. The course will engage with a variety of texts (political tracts, literary and other fictional projects, theoretical works) along with film and television and other media. The trope of political monsters will be the vehicle through which we explore the politics of democracy, of race, of colonialism, and of capitalism.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese; S. Chambers
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.320. Politics Of East Asia. 3.0 Credits.

Examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. Topics include state-society relations, late development, nationalism, democratization, political culture, social movements, and globalization.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.326. Democracy And Elections. 3.0 Credits.

An examination of most aspects of democratic elections with the exception of th e behavior of voters. Topics include the impact of various electoral systems and administrative reforms on the outcome of elections, standards for evaluations of electoral systems, and the impact of the Arrow problem on normative theories of democratic elections.
Instructor(s): R. Katz
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.327. Politics of Information. 3.0 Credits.

Considers global and comparative politics of information, information technologies, and the Internet. Examines governance of information (ownership of information, rights to information, privacy) and governance of information technologies (domain names, social media websites, etc.). Students who previously took AS.190.327 Politics of Information may not take this course.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.329. National Security-Nuclear Age. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the impact of weapons of mass destruction on international politics with an emphasis on security issues. The first half of the course focuses on the history of nuclear weapons development during the Cold War and theories of deterrence. The second half of the class considers contemporary issues including terrorism, chemical and biological weapons, ballistic missile defense and proliferation. Requirements include a midterm, final and a ten page paper.
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.330. Japanese Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese politics. Topics include nationalism, electoral politics, civil society, and immigration.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.333. American Constitutional Law. 3.0 Credits.

This course covers enduring debates about the way the Constitution has structured the U.S. government and about which powers the Constitution assigns to the federal government and to the states. We will examine these debates in the context of American political history and thought by studying the writings of prominent participants, and landmark Supreme Court cases.
Instructor(s): E. Zackin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.334. Constitutional Law. 3.0 Credits.

The second semester of a two semester course. Topics include executive and emergency power, racial and gender equality, and selected free speech and religious freedom issues.
Prerequisites: AS.190.333
Instructor(s): E. Zackin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.335. Imagining Borders. 3.0 Credits.

What is a border and why do borders mater in global politics. What do borders mean under conditions of globalization? An examination of the politics of borders, transborder flows, and networks within and across borders. The readings which come from political science and other disciplines, will include theoretical and case-specific works.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.339. American Racial Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.214
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.340. Black Politics I. 3.0 Credits.

This course is a survey of the bases and substance of politics among black Americans and the relation of black politics to the American political system up to the end of Jim Crow. The intention is both to provide a general sense of pertinent issues and relations over this period as a way of helping to make sense of the present and to develop criteria for evaluating political scientists' and others' claims regarding the status and characteristics of black American political activity.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.341. Korean Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to the historical and institutional foundations of modern South Korean politics. Topics include nationalism, political economic development, civil society, globalization, and ROK-DPRK relations. (CP)
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.342. Black Politics II. 3.0 Credits.

Recommended Course Background: AS.190.340.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.344. Seminar In Anti-Semitism. 3.0 Credits.

Jews exercise a good deal of power in contemporary America.. They are prominent in a number of key industries, play important roles in the political process, and hold many major national offices. For example, though Jews constitute barely two percent of America’s citizens, about one-third of the nation’s wealthiest 400 individuals are Jewish and more than ten percent of the seats in the U.S. Congress are held by Jews. One recent book declared that, “From the Vatican to the Kremlin, from the White House to Capitol Hill, the world’s movers and shakers view American Jewry as a force to be reckoned with.” Of course, Jews have risen to power in many times and places ranging from the medieval Muslim world and early modern Spain through Germany and the Soviet Union in the 20th century. In nearly every prior instance, though, Jewish power proved to be evanescent. No sooner had the Jews become “a force to be reckoned with” than they found themselves banished to the political ma rgins, forced into exile or worse. Though it may rise to a great height, the power of the Jews seems ultimately to rest on a rather insecure foundation. Cross-listed with Jewish Studies.
Instructor(s): B. Ginsberg
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.360. Power and Democracy in the American City. 3.0 Credits.

How do race and class intersect to shape how democracy works in American cities? In this innovative course students will learn about urban citizenship, authority, and activism using Baltimore as a case. The class, co-taught with Baltimore organizers, will use a community based learning approach.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.365. Black Politics: Black Lives Matter. 3.0 Credits.

Over the past two years the #blacklivesmatter movement has transformed the discussion about policing in American cities. In this course we will examine the broad movement against police brutality through the lens of black politics.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.368. Pluralism. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar will explore the theory and politics of pluralism: from European debates over religious tolerance to American debates over constitutional founding; from liberal political philosophy to radical democracy. Authors may include Bentley, Dahl, Locke, Madison, Ranciere, Rawls, Young. Recommended Course Background: Previous course in political theory or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): S. Chambers
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.373. The Politics of Public Policy. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an introduction to the political structure and process of making public policy in the United States. Public policymaking is, above all, an arena in which policy professionals try to bring systematic evidence and scientific knowledge to bear to diagnose, understand, and solve social problems. At the same time, policymaking also takes place in a political environment, in which strategic and purposive actors contend for power and seek to advance their own goals and realize their own visions about how the world ought to be changed for the better. The goals that participants in the policymaking process pursue may take a variety of forms: substantive policy outcomes, of course, but also power, political advancement, or material advantage. The actors who populate the process, moreover, may disagree about the goals they seek and making policy — especially in democratic political systems — requires some means of resolving these disagreements. Actors also differ in the resources they have at their disposal to seek their goals — power, money, organization, for example, but also knowledge and expertise. Finally, policymakers cannot do anything they want in pursuit of their goals. They are constrained by the rules and structures that make up the policymaking system. These factors — actors, goals, resources, knowledge, and rules — shape the politics of policymaking and frame the strategic options available to policymakers.
Instructor(s): B. Mikulski; R. Lieberman.

AS.190.379. Nationalism and the Politics of Identity. 3.0 Credits.

Nationalism ties powerful organizations to political mobilization, territory, and individual loyalty. Yet nationalism is typically studied in isolation from other social formations that depend upon organizational – individual linkages. Alternative types of identity category sometimes depend similarly upon organizations that collect and deploy resources, mobilize individuals, erect boundaries, and promote strong emotional connections among individuals as well as between individuals and institutions. In this class, we study classic and contemporary works on nationalism, drawn from multiple disciplinary and analytic traditions, in the comparative context of alternative forms of identity. The focus of the class will be primarily theoretical, with no regional or temporal limitations.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.380. The American Welfare State. 3.0 Credits.

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Obama. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Prerequisites: Students may take AS.190.380 or AS.360.380, but not both.
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.381. Global Environmental Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): B. Allan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.382. Democracy and Development: Theory and Cases. 3.0 Credits.

Most wealthy countries are democracies. But not all democracies are wealthy—India, Costa Rica, and Mongolia are prominent examples of poor countries with democratic regimes. The course will examine the relation between economic development and political democratization under three big questions. (a) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does economic development promote democracy? (b) If economic development is not possible in the foreseeable future, how do countries achieve stable democratization? (c) Under what conditions, and through which mechanisms, does democracy foster economic development?
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.384. Urban Politics & Policy. 3.0 Credits.

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross-listed with Africana Studies
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.385. Urban Politics and Policy. 3.0 Credits.

An analysis of public policy and policy-making for American Cities. Special attention will be given to the subject of urban crime and law enforcement, poverty and welfare, and intergovernmental relations. Cross listed with Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.387. Parties and Elections in America. 3.0 Credits.

Considers how parties and elections structure political conflict, and facilitate (or not) democratic control of government. Topics include campaigns, voting behavior, election administration, money in politics, presidential nomination, and party coalitions.
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.391. Time to Kill: Race, Punishment, Death and Desire. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the role of race in determining who deserves to be punished, the timing and occasions of punitive action and how long punishment should endure. Key to our inquiry is how racialized presumptions about human desire might justify punitive logics of power. The class explores inequalities in the distribution of punishment and death in order to illuminate how race shapes questions of whose time is more valuable, who lives and who dies, and ultimately whose lives count as human.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.393. Theories of Constitutional Interpretation. 3.0 Credits.

In this course, we will read and discuss a variety of arguments about how best to interpret constitutional texts, with particular attention to debates about the U.S. Constitution. The course will also cover debates about the role of ordinary people, legislatures, and judges in determining the content of constitutional law.
Instructor(s): E. Zackin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.394. Comparative Politics of the Middle East and North Africa. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the domestic, regional, and transnational politics of the Middle East and North Africa. The class is organized into three units. The first examines major armed conflicts— anti-colonial, intra-state, and inter-state—from 1948 through the 1990s. It uses these historical moments as windows onto key issues in Middle Eastern and North African political issues such as external intervention/occupation, human rights, sectarianism, social movements, and memory politics. Unit Two focuses on policy relevant issues such as democratization, minority populations, religion and politics, and gender. In Unit Three, students will explore the politics of the Arab Uprisings through critical reading and discussion of new (post-2011) scholarship on MENA states, organizations, and populations. Enrollment limited to Political Science and International Studies majors.
Instructor(s): S. Parkinson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.396. Capitalism and Ecology. 3.0 Credits.

Capitalism and Ecology focuses on the relations between capitalism and climate during the era of the Anthropocene. How do capitalist processes of fossil extraction, consumption, production and governance contribute to the pace of climate warming, glacier flows, the ocean conveyor system, species loss and other phenomena? What are the effects and the possible modes of political response? How do the nonhuman, self-organizing processes such as glaciers, oceans and climate change on their own as they also amplify the effects of capitalist emissions? The course combines texts on capitalism and activism with those by geoscientists on how the nonhuman systems work. Books by authors in the fields of political theory, geology, anthropology, economics, philosophy and ethology will be drawn upon. Authors such as Michael Benton, Brian Fagan, Hayek, Naomi Klein, Fred Hirsch, Fred Pearce, van Dooren and Connolly are apt to be read to engage these issues. A previous course in political theory is recommended. The class is organized around student presentations on assigned readings. Two papers, 10-12 pages in length. Extensive class discussion.
Instructor(s): W. Connolly
Area: Natural Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.397. States and Markets. 3.0 Credits.

The course offers an introduction to the relation between politics and economics by focusing on the interaction between the two most important institutions of the modern world: states and markets. Under what conditions do states and markets combine to promote or damage human welfare? Essential concepts, theories and cases of economic development will be examined.
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.398. Politics Of Good & Evil. 3.0 Credits.

The politics of good and evil places a set of classic myths into conversation with recent philosophical and political work on good and evil. The myths include the Book of Job, Genesis (J version), two dramas by Sophocles, a reading from Augustine, and Voltaire’s Candide. Texts by Nietzsche, William James and Connolly are then placed into conversation with each other and hose mythic texts. Kohlhberg’s The Sixth Extinction closes the class, allowing us to look again at the relevance of myth to today. This class is organized around “elemental theory” in which diverse existential stories jostle and disturb both each other and us. Previous work in theory is highly recommended. Assignments: A class presentation, two 10-12 page papers, extensive class discussion.
Instructor(s): W. Connolly
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.401. International Relations Theory. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar covers the main theoretical perspectives employed in the analysis of international politics, covering a variety of realist, liberal, and constructivist work. The strengths and weaknesses of different approaches will be assessed and contrasted with one another, with the goal being to provide students with a broad foundation on which to develop their own understandings. The course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates.
Instructor(s): S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.402. Environmental Racism. 3.0 Credits.

This is an undergraduate political theory seminar that addresses the disproportionate impact of environmental destruction on racially stigmatized populations. We shall examine the logics of power whereby the natural world is subjected to exploitation and domination, in tandem with the subordination of racial subjects historically identified as closer to nature. Likewise, we will explore political and theoretical challenges to environmental racism, such as those posed by indigenous communities, decolonial theory, and political movements contesting the intersection of racial inequalities and ecological crises.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.405. Food Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the politics of food at the local, national, and global level. Topics include the politics of agricultural subsidies, struggles over genetically modified foods, government efforts at improving food safety, and issues surrounding obesity and nutrition policy. Juniors, seniors, and graduate students only. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies.
Instructor(s): A. Sheingate
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.407. Geopolitics, Nuclear Weapons and World Order. 3.0 Credits.

Intensive examination of unresolved debates about the implications of nuclear weapons for world order, focusing on deterrence, strategy, arms control, multipolarity, proliferation, terrorism, and abolition, as well as roles of liberal, democratic, and constitutional political forms and popular public involvement. Readings from classic and contemporary sources.
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.408. Sovereignty: Historical Perspectives and Contemporary Issues. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the concept of sovereignty by examining its historical development and its use in international relations scholarship. Our discussion will also be informed by works in political theory and the international law literature. The course is open to advanced undergraduate students and graduate students.
Instructor(s): S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.412. Political Violence. 3.0 Credits.

An examination of the ways in which violence has been used to secure political ends. Topics include terrorism, assassination, genocide, coups, rebellions and war itself. Students examine what makes types of political violence unique and what unites them. (Formerly AS.190.372)
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.417. American Welfare State. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. Special attention to policy development over time in health care, pensions, taxes, and work and poverty.
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.420. Nuclear Power and World Order. 3.0 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth examination of evolving debates over world political order and nuclear deterrence, war-fighting, arms control, world government, proliferation, and terrorism.
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.424. Policy Disasters. 3.0 Credits.

Investigates the causes of large-scale policy disasters, examining the role of ideology, psychology, organization design and political incentives. Examples may be drawn from the Iraq War, Bay of Pigs, Hurricane Katrina, the U.S. Financial crisis, Shuttle Challenger disaster. economic development policy, privatization, and the Great Society. Limited to seniors or with permission of instructor. (CP / AP)
Instructor(s): S. Teles
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.425. The New Deal and American Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores how the New Deal, the fundamental moment in the post-Civil War United States, has structured politics and government across a variety of domains ever since. Topics include presidential leadership, executive power, political parties, labor, race, and the welfare state.
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.426. Science and Expertise in Global Politics. 3.0 Credits.

An in-depth examination of complex global problems that demand the effective use of scientific and expert knowledge in global governance. We will begin with a theoretical overview covering different perspectives on the role of knowledge and technology in global politics before looking in more detail at case studies drawn from environmental politics, nuclear management, colonial history, international political economy, UN peacekeeping, and more.
Instructor(s): B. Allan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.427. Political Economy of Japan and Korea. 3.0 Credits.

This upper-level seminar examines some of the major debates and issues of postwar Japanese and South Korean political economy. Topics include nationalism, gender politics, civil society, immigration, and US-Japan-South Korea trilateral relations.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.429. The Political Bases of the Market Economy. 3.0 Credits.

Although “the market” is conventionally understood as separate from “politics”, the modern market economy did not arise in a political vacuum. In fact, the very separation between the economy and politics is itself the product of a politically potent set of ideas. This course is an upper-division reading seminar on the origins and evolution of the modern market economy. Readings will include Smith, Marx, Weber, Polanyi, Keynes, Hayek, Friedman, Becker, and Foucault. Recommended course background: Introduction to comparative politics OR any college-level course in social or political theory.
Instructor(s): N. Jabko
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.430. Time and Punishment. 3.0 Credits.

“If you can’t do the time, don’t do the crime.” According to ask.com, this common expression was made popular in the 1970s by the theme song for the television show “Beretta.” Aside from amusing us with the irony that the star of “Beretta” was Robert Blake who was later charged with the murder of Bony Lee Bakely, the expression raises a profound issue: What is the relationship between punishment and time? This course will explore that question. Topics to be discussed include different philosophical understandings and experiences of time, views of mortality and fate, theories of punishment, specific punishments in the U.S. (including sentences of juveniles, life, death, and LWOP), as well as punishments that are not specifically meted out but are known to be the consequences of political, social, and economic circumstance. Students will read texts in criminology, political theory, philosophy, and jurisprudence, as well as a selection of Supreme Court cases, novels, and short stories. This writing intensive course is limited to undergraduates who have taken at least one “Classics of Political Thought” course (190.280, 190.281, 190.282, or 190.283).
Instructor(s): J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.431. Global Climate Governance. 3.0 Credits.

This course will offer an in-depth study of the history and politics of global climate governance. It will examine the central actors, agreements, and policy proposals that shape climate governance.
Instructor(s): B. Allan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.432. Topics in Global Security Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Intensive examination of catastrophic and existential risks posed by natural and technogenic sources (including nanotechnology, synthetic biology, cyberwar, artificial intelligence, asteroidal collision, climate change and space colonization) and their political implications
Prerequisites: Pre-reqs: AS.190.413 or AS.190.220
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.434. Does Israel Have a Future?. 3.0 Credits.

Israel is one of the only countries whose existence is openly challenged. This class will examine the future of Israel focusing on international and domestic threats to its continued existence as a Jewish democracy. Outside threats to be considered include nuclear attack and the growing international movement to delegitimize Israel. domestic challenges include demographic changes, the role of religion in governance, and doubts as to whether one can be a Jewish state and still be a democracy. Lessons from the destruction of the ancient Israelite kingdoms and from contemporary state deaths will be included. The course will conclude by considering efforts that Israel can undertake to meet the threats it faces.
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.435. Law and Literature. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the relationship between law and literature. As many have observed, law and literature have much in common as well as much to teach each other. Topics this course will discuss include practices of interpretation, issues of authority, the rule of law, and the power of narrative. In addition to reading essays by scholars in the field, students will read a selection of judicial opinions, short stories, novels, and plays.
Instructor(s): J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.436. Republican Orders and Sustainability. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.438. Violence and Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar will address the role of violence–both domestic and international–in political life. Though most claim to abhor violence, since the advent of recorded history, violence and politics have been intimately related. States practice violence against internal and external foes. Political dissidents engage in violence against states. Competing political forces inflict violence upon one another. Writing in 1924, Winston Churchill declared–and not without reason–that, "The story of the human race is war." Indeed, violence and the threat of violence are the most potent forces in political life. It is, to be sure, often averred that problems can never truly be solved by the use of force. Violence, the saying goes, is not the answer. This adage certainly appeals to our moral sensibilities. But whether or not violence is the answer presumably depends upon the question being asked. For better or worse, it is violence that usually provides the most definitive answers to three of the major questions of political life--statehood, territoriality and power. Violent struggle, in the form of war, revolution, civil war, terrorism and the like, more than any other immediate factor, determines what states will exist and their relative power, what territories they will occupy, and which groups will and will not exercise power within them.
Instructor(s): B. Ginsberg
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.439. Advanced Topics in Global Politics: Learning Through Research. 3.0 Credits.

Join a research team. In this course, students will explore topics in global politics and methods for the conduct of inquiry in the Johns Hopkins tradition of learning through research. Under the guidance of the professor, students will learn about a topic from existing primary and secondary sources, collect new empirical evidence, analyze the evidence, and contribute to research products. Recommended for students planning to write a thesis. Junior or Senior standing in Political Science or International Studies or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.441. Comparative European Politics. 3.0 Credits.

In comparison with other regions of the world, Europe can easily appear as a pacified and somewhat boring place. This course will question this stereotype through an examination of European politics in historical and cross-national perspective. From a historical perspective, Europe has been the crucible of modern politics. And to this day, Europe remains a locus of intense conflict as well as remarkably diverse experimentation. We will read seminal scholarly works as well as recent comparative politics literature on European politics. The goal is to understand and discuss central concepts that comparative politics scholars mobilize in the study of European politics across time and space. Topics will include: political, legal, and economic governance; the evolution of democracy, the welfare state, partisan politics, immigration, race, and religion; European integration and globalization.
Instructor(s): N. Jabko
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.442. Civil Society. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores classic and contemporary debates on the concept of civil society and critically examines its analytical value in light of recent developments. Topics include the relationship between civil society, the state, and markets, the role of civil society in development and democratization, social capital, and global civil society. This course is open to graduate students from any discipline. Advanced undergraduate students must obtain permission from the instructor and are expected to keep up with graduate students during class discussions.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.443. Politics of Outer Space. 3.0 Credits.

Intensive examination of the political aspects of human activities in outer space, past, present and future, with focus on militarization, earth-remote sensing, surveillance, navigation, resource exploitation, the Outer Space Treaty, and colonization.
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.444. Causes of Peace. 3.0 Credits.

Since 1945, the great powers have enjoyed their longest period of peace in history. Interstate conflict between lesser powers is also at an all time low. What accounts for this “long peace?” This course will look at various explanations including the spread of democracy , the proliferation of nuclear weapons, globalization, American hegemony, and fundamental changes in attitudes regarding the use of force. Students will present draft versions of their research papers during the last weeks of the course. Co-listed with AS.190.619
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.445. Power and Wealth: Sources, Dynamics and Linkages. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores theoretical approaches to the multiple relations between political power and economic power, including pluralism, Marxism, and historical institutionalism. Major empirical transformations will provide the motivation: the rise of modern states, capitalism and social classes in Early Modern Europe, the creation of highly unequal societies in post-colonial Latin America and Africa, the varieties of Welfare State in the golden age of advanced capitalism (1950-75), and the powerful rebirth of inequality in advanced economies for the last 25 years. Theories of sources and interactions of political and economic power will be coupled with accounts of the effects of power and wealth on macroscopic change, especially democratization and economic development. Open to juniors, seniors, and graduate students.
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.450. Power. 3.0 Credits.

Power is a -- if not the -- key concept of international relations, yet there is no single definition of power that is accepted by all scholars in the field. In this course we will critically examine definitions of power from classic and contemporary works of international relations, political science, and related areas of study.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.455. Comparative Racial Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This upper-level seminar surveys the major trends and approaches to the comparative study of race in political science and critically examines the link between race and politics. Topics include race and state formation, citizenship and national membership, immigration, racial regimes, and the political economy of race. Recommended background: Courses in comparative politics, political economy, immigration, and racial politics
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.471. The University and Society. 3.0 Credits.

In the 20th century, American universities became the envy of the world, leading in most categories of scholarly productivity and attracting students from every nation. In recent years, though, American higher education has come to face a number of challenges including rapidly rising costs, administrative bloat, corporatization and moocification. We will examine the problems and promises of American higher education, the political struggles within the university and the place of the university in the larger society. Upper classes and Grad Students only.
Instructor(s): B. Ginsberg; R. Kargon
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.475. Courts, Politics and Public Policy. 3.0 Credits.

Examines the causes of American legal change, with particular focus on the role of social movements, and whether and how legal change produces social change. Among the particular cases examined will be civil, prisoners' and women's rights.
Instructor(s): S. Teles
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.480. Planetary Interdependence and World Governments. 3.0 Credits.

Intensive exploration of alternative global political architectures for high levels of security, ecological and internet interdependence
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.481. Conservatism and Crime. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the evolution of conservative thought on crime and criminal justice from the 1960s to the present. We will focus in particular on how the subject of crime illuminates different strains of conservatism, reveals tensions between its values of liberty, authority and anti-statism, and shows the changing approach that conservative intellectuals have had to race.
Instructor(s): S. Teles
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.491. Game Theory in the Social Sciences. 3.0 Credits.

Strategic thinking is a fundamental component of many political and economic phenomena, from international wars and national elections to wage bargains and monopoly power. Game Theory is a set of ideas and techniques for analyzing strategic interactions and making predictions about its outcomes. This course provides an introduction to Game Theory and its main applications to relevant political and social outcomes. Juniors and Seniors Only.
Prerequisites: AS.110.106 or AS.110.108
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.498. Thesis Colloquium. 3.0 Credits.

Open to and required for Political Science majors writing a thesis. International Studies majors writing a senior thesis under the supervision of a Political Science Department faculty member may also enroll. Topics include: research design, literature review, evidence collection and approaches to analysis of evidence, and the writing process. The course lays the groundwork for completing the thesis in the second semester under the direction of the faculty thesis supervisor. Students are expected to have decided on a research topic and arranged for a faculty thesis supervisor prior to the start of the semester. Seniors. Under special circumstances, juniors will be allowed to enroll. Enrollment limit: 15.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett.

AS.190.499. Senior Thesis:International Relations/Political Science. 6.0 Credits.

Seniors also have the opportunity to write a senior research thesis. To be eligible to write this thesis, students must identify a faculty sponsor who will supervise the project. Once a faculty sponsor has approved a topic, students must enroll in a three credit independent study during the fall semester of their senior year. At the end of the fall semester, if the faculty sponsor determines that adequate progress has been made and the project warrants further work, the student may enroll in the senior thesis (AS.190.499) which will be worth 6 credits.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.501. Internship-Political Science. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.502. Political Science Internship. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.503. Internship-International Relations. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.504. Internship-International Relations. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.506. International Studies Internship. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.535. Independent Study - Freshmen. 3.0 Credits.

Permission required.
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.536. Independent Study-Freshmen. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.537. Independent Study-Sophomores. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.538. Independent Study-Sophomores. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.539. Independent Study-Juniors. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.540. Independent Study-Juniors. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.541. Independent Study-Seniors. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.542. Independent Study-Seniors. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.543. Independent Research. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.544. Independent Research. 0.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.550. Internship. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.592. Summer Internship. 1.0 Credit.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.598. Independent Study. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.599. Research - Summer. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): E. Chung; L. Spence; M. Crenson; R. Hsieh.

AS.190.601. Qualitative Research.

This class is designed to introduce students to qualitative methodology. Practically, students will gain first hand experience with qualitative research methods via research design, ethics review, in-depth interviewing, participant observation, and archival/primary source research. They will learn to deploy analytical techniques such as discourse analysis and process tracing. Students will also be asked to consider the merits of qualitative approaches more generally, and discuss the relative advantages of qualitative, experimental, and quantitative approaches. Questions that we will discuss include: What place should qualitative research have in a research design? Can qualitative research test hypotheses, or only generate them? Can qualitative research explain social phenomena, or only interpret them? What are the disadvantages and advantages of qualitative approaches compared to quantitative approaches? For what kinds of research questions are ethnographic techniques best suited? Is replicability possible for ethnographic field research? What criteria of evidence and analytical rigor apply on this terrain?
Instructor(s): A. Lawrence; S. Parkinson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.602. Introduction to Quantitative Political Science.

An introduction to measurement and data analysis in contemporary American political science. Measurement topics will include the formation of indices and cumulative scales. Analytic topics will topics include sampling variations, statistical association and causation, as manifested in contingency tables and correlation and regression. Emphasis will be on fundamental concepts and assumptions, and on comprehension and evaluation of the scholarly literature. Advanced undergraduates by permission only.
Instructor(s): R. Katz
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.603. Power.

Power is a -- if not /the/ -- key concept of international relations, yet there is no single definition of power that is accepted by all scholars in the field. In this course we will critically examine definitions of power from classic and contemporary works of international relations, political science, and related areas of study.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.605. Women in Dark Times.

A survey of contemporary female voices—feminist and nonfeminist—in political theory. Questions raised and addressed: How is power defined and distributed? What constitutes political action? What is the relationship of bodies to politics? Among others we will read Cristina Beltrán, Judith Butler, Jodi Dean, Bonnie Honig, and Melissa Lane.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett; J. Culbert.

AS.190.611. Feminist and Queer Theory.

Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): S. Chambers.

AS.190.612. Comparative Citizenship and Immigration Politics.

Graduate students only. Examines the contemporary political dynamics of migration, citizenship, and race concentrating on North America, Europe and East Asia. We will focus on how citizenship and immigration policies shape immigrant political identities, claims, and strategies as well as how immigrants impact public debates and policies in receiving societies.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.615. International Relations Theory.

This seminar covers the main theoretical perspectives employed in the analysis of international politics, covering a variety of realist, liberal, and constructivist work. The strengths and weaknesses of different approaches will be assessed and contrasted with one another, with the goal being to provide students with a broad foundation on which to develop their own understandings. Meets with AS.190.401
Instructor(s): S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.616. American Political Development.

An examination of state-building and nation-building throughout American political history. (AP)
Instructor(s): A. Sheingate.

AS.190.617. Romanticism and Radicalism.

A study of a group of European and American writers, including Schiller, Shelley, Emma Goldman, Walt Whitman, Georges Sorel, Carl Schmitt, Guy Debord and other Situationists, Georges Perec, Herbert Marcuse, Theodor Adorno, and contemporary artists and theorists of the aesthetic, in order to explore connections between romantic themes and the aspiration for a significant transformation of political life. What are the complex relations between artistic and revolutionary practice? What are the standards by which to assess the viability of romantic, counter-cultural, or eccentric artworks/texts/events?
Instructor(s): J. Bennett; W. Connolly
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.618. What Was/Is Fascism?.

An examination of texts on twentieth century fascist movements and societies in relation to twenty first century movements. What roles do capitalism, imperialism, racism, democracy, the media, global processes and planetary processes play in them? To what extent does the production and exploitation of resentiment shape their intensities? What rhetorical strategies mobilize such movements? What rhetorics and social movements to resist or retune such movements show promise? Texts by Hitler, Arendt, Neumann, Adorno, Marcuse, Deleuze and Kenneth Burke may be among those included. Perhaps the films “Our Hitler” and “The Conformist”, plus a couple of speeches by Donald Trump will be included. Conceptions to democracy first united to challenge fascist drive will also be explored.
Instructor(s): W. Connolly
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.619. Causes of Peace.

Since 1945, the great powers have enjoyed their longest period of peace in history. Interstate conflict between lesser powers is also at an all time low. What accounts for this “long peace?” This course will look at various explanations including the spread of democracy , the proliferation of nuclear weapons, globalization, American hegemony, and fundamental changes in attitudes regarding the use of force. Students will present draft versions of their research papers during the last weeks of the course.
Instructor(s): S. David.

AS.190.620. Juris-Fiction.

In Twilight of the Idols/The Anti-Christ, Nietzsche famously confessed, “I am afraid we are not rid of God because we still have faith in grammar.” Drawing from scholarship identified with the Law and Literature movement as well as philosophy, jurisprudence, literary theory, and political theory, this course will engage an on-going conversation about the capacity of language to invent and enforce the expectations, regulations, and ritual formulas we know as law. Readings will include texts by classical and contemporary scholars, including Arendt, Plato, Pierce, Nietzsche, and Nancy, as well as stories by Borges, Kafka, and Melville.
Instructor(s): J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.622. Contemporary International RelationsTheory.

This course will focus on recent work (from approximately the past 10 years) in International Relations Theory. Emphasis will be placed on contending schools of thought and often divergent means of determining what counts as good theory. In Fall 2014, we will focus on critical approaches to the global and the political, with a special emphasis on theories of borders, bodies, and the global-ness of cyberspace.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.623. Capitalism, Discipline, Debt the Anthropocene.

How do we rethink Capitalism in an age of Discipline, Debt, and the Anthropocene? This seminar draws upon a series of Left Nietzscheans to pursue that agenda. It starts with Nietzche’s examination of debt, guilt and subjectivity in The Genealogy, turns to work by Foucault, Deleuze, Esposito, and Lazzarato on capitalism, debt and molecular control, adds Klein and Connolly on capitalism and the Anthropocene, and returns to all of the above to explore the potential of critical social movements today. Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): W. Connolly.

AS.190.624. Postcolonial Ecologies and Planetary Temporalities.

This is an exploratory seminar in which we place recent work on postcolonial ecology and images of time into conjunction with geological and philosophical texts detailing a world of multiple, interfolding human and nonhuman temporalities. The task is to see how each set of readings can enrich and exert pressure upon the others with respect to theory and politics. Texts may include Rob Nixon, The Environmentalism of the Poor; Viveiros de Castro, The Relative Native: Indigenous Conceptual Worlds; Michael Benton, When Life Nearly Died; Donna Haraway, Staying With the Trouble; Deleuze and Guattari, What is Philosophy?; Connolly, Facing the Planetary; Glissant, The Poetics of Relation, Nabokov, A Forest of Time
Instructor(s): P. Brendese; W. Connolly
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.625. Theories-Comp Politics.

This seminar is intended for graduate students planning to take the comprehensive exam in comparative politics, either as a major or as a minor. In addition to exploring central methodological debates and analytic approaches, the seminar reviews the literature on state-society relations, political and economic development, social movements, nationalism, revolutions, formal and informal political institutions, and regime durability vs. transition. Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.627. Pragmatism in Politics.

After a long eclipse, the scholarly tradition of pragmatism has recently experienced a revival across the social sciences. The goal of this course is to take stock of this movement and to discuss the usefulness of pragmatism for the study of politics. The readings attempt to weave together classical and recent texts in philosophy, cultural theory, sociology, economics, science studies, as well as political science. We will begin with a survey of pragmatism’s core concepts and methods. Then we will discuss recent applications of the pragmatist approach in the social sciences. Finally, we will explore the links between pragmatism and three contemporary approaches.
Instructor(s): A. Sheingate; N. Jabko
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.628. Race and Segregated Time.

This graduate seminar examines how time is used as a vehicle of political power that perpetuates racial inequality. We will also explore how/whether thinking and acting in untimely ways can challenge white supremacy and further transracial democracy. Grad students only.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese.

AS.190.629. American Racial Politics.

Race is not a biological fact but rather a social construction. However, it is a social construction with very real consequences. Definitions of citizenship, allocation of state resources, attitudes about government and government policy, the creation of government policy, all shape and are shaped by race and racial classifications. Serving as a critical corrective to American politics treatments that ignore race, this class will examine how race functions politically in the United States. While not required, some knowledge of statistics is helpful.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.630. Politics of Territory and Boundaries.

This seminar will explore territorial dimensions of politics and political action, including the political construction of territorial space and the territorial construction of political space, and borders as spatial markers of fixity and flows. As supra-, sub, multi-, trans-, inter-, and pluri-national political arenas proliferate, how are they connected, institutionally and in practice? How are they structured by – and how do they structure – the actions of individuals and groups? How does location affect the nature of political authority? Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): M. Keck; R. Marlin-Bennett.

AS.190.631. Making Social Policy.

Examines American social policy in comparative perspective. Special attention to issues of poverty and inequality, and their relation to the political system.
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman.

AS.190.632. The Development of American Political Institutions.

This course explores institutional development in American national politics, from the Founding until the present. It traces parties, Congress, the presidency, bureaucracy, and courts, and also examines how those institutions have interacted with one another across American history. Throughout the course, we will consider how ideas, interests, procedures, and sequence together shape institutions as they collide and abrade over time. Finally, although it hardly covers the entire corpus across the subfield, the course is also designed to prepare students to sit for comprehensive examinations in American politics.
Instructor(s): A. Sheingate; D. Schlozman.

AS.190.635. Theories of Constitutional Governance.

This class is focused on the nature of constitutions and the way that they should and do work within a political system, with particular emphasis on the U.S. context. We will examine both normative and empirical arguments about the relationship between politics and constitutional law. More specifically, we will think about how societies and individual actors should make meaning out of constitutional texts, how they do seem to make meaning out of those texts, and the conditions that give rise to constitutional drafting and change. Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): E. Zackin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.637. Environment and Politics.

Grad students only.
Instructor(s): B. Allan; D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.639. Critical IR Theories.

Generally relegated to the last week or two on the standard IR theory syllabus, critical IR theories take center stage in this course. We explore the intellectual roots of clusters of critical theories, the foundational works for each cluster, and the current debate. The course will cover Feminist IR Theory, the Practice Turn, and New Materialist IR, among other perspectives.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett; S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.640. Modes of Political Persuasion.

An examination of influential texts in Euro-American political thought, with an eye toward what each has to say about the “how-to” of political persuasion: What techniques can leaders, citizens, and theorists deploy to foster allegiance or conversion to a particular model of politics and public life? How are the powers of words, images, and feelings, especially eros, invoked and inflected? Given that being persuaded of something may or may not induce a will to enact it, what techniques are available to jump the gap between profession of ideals and undertaking of action? Texts include Aristophanes' Women Celebrating the Thesmophoria; Plato's Phaedrus and Books II and III of Republic; Machiavelli's Prince, Whitman's "Calamus" poems, Freud's Civilization and Its Discontents, Foucault's writings on sexuality and ancient Greek ethical practices, and Beauvoir's Ethics of Ambiguity and "Must We Burn Sade.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.641. Political Theories of Violence.

The aim of this course is to explore a range of theories and images of violence, from bloody war, torture, and terrorism to the “everyday” violence of policing and disciplinary practices, to the violence of conceptual, linguistic, or figural representation. As we read contemporary and classic treatments of violence, we will ask: What constitutes violence? Does violence have specific modes of agency or is it an intensification of generally available modes of action? What is the relationship between violence and bodies, violence and representation, violence and social and psychic structures? Is there a relationship between violence and technology? Violence and the sacred? From whence the force of violence? Among others we will read Nietzsche, Freud, Foucault, Arendt, Schmitt, Agamben, Sorel, Benjamin, Derrida, Levinas, and Fanon. Grad students only
Instructor(s): J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.645. Black Politics.

Grad Students Only.
Instructor(s): L. Spence
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.646. Live and Let Die: Biopolitics, Governmentality and the Racial State of Exception.

Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): L. Spence; P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.647. Race and Memory in Politics, Theory and Literature.

This seminar will investigate various modes of theorizing experiences of race through a critical engagement of a range of literary and philosophical sources pertaining to African-American and Afro-diasporic populations. Specifically, we will explore the extent to which politically attuned approaches to literature and drama can disclose how memory and temporality function as vehicles of racial domination, resistance and identity formation. Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.648. Indigenous Political Theory.

This graduate seminar will examine a range of indigenous political theorists and critics of settler colonialism. In so doing, we will interrogate the role of liberal Anglo-centrism in contested theories and practices of sovereignty, property rights, freedom, equality, race, sexuality and nature. Likewise, we will investigate the contention that settler colonialism is acquisitive of territory in perpetuity, as opposed to being a moment in history, in order to assess the enduring political and theoretical impact of colonial legacies. Importantly, we shall explore how the relays between indigenous cosmologies and temporalities shape theories and practices of resistance, reason, identity and political imagination. Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): P. Brendese.

AS.190.650. The Theories and Politics of Rights.

Grad Students only.
Instructor(s): E. Zackin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.651. Policy Dynamics.

Policy dynamics is the study of changes of the political system in its entirety, from the point of view of the system's outputs--what government actually does, or fails to do. It is dynamic in that it seeks to explain changes in what matters governments feel can or must be addressed, the tools that are available to deal with problems, and the interactions of government and non-government actors that generate change. Particular emphasis will be placed on studying policy dynamics over long periods of time, including such post-enactment issues as implementation, policy feedback on political identities and group formation, and policy durability.
Instructor(s): S. Teles.

AS.190.653. Organizations.

Graduate students only. "Organizations are the fundamental building blocks of economic, social and political life. This course will examine how different disciplines (sociology, economics, political science) approach the problem of explaining how organizations operate, as well as exploring the structure and development of a very wide range of organizations (firms, interest groups, charitable foundations, universities, militaries, bureaucracies, international organizations, and professions).
Instructor(s): S. Teles
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.654. The Political Economy of Neoliberalism.

Grad students only.
Instructor(s): N. Jabko.

AS.190.656. Sovereignty: Historical Persepectives and Contemporary Issues.

This seminar provides an in-depth exploration of the concept of sovereignty by examining its historical development and its use in international relations scholarship. Our discussion will also be informed by works in political theory and the international law literature. The course is open to advanced undergraduate students and graduate students. Co-listed with AS.190.408
Instructor(s): S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.660. Jacques Rancière and Arthur Bentley.

This graduate seminar will conduct close readings of a wide swath of the writings of Jacques Rancière and Arthur Bentley, considering how each eschews the style and mode of argumentation of today’s “normative” political theory. Grad students only.
Instructor(s): S. Chambers
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.662. Technology and Politics.

Grad students only.
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.666. Political Economy Of Development.

Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): E. Chung.

AS.190.668. Nuclear Weapons and World Order.

Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.670. Capitalism, Marx and the Value-Form.

This seminar will explore the capitalist value-form (Wertform) by way of a reading of Marx and a number of value-form theorists. Grad students only.
Instructor(s): S. Chambers
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.675. Neoliberalism.

Readings on the history, theory, and politics of neoliberalism, from midcentury to the present.
Instructor(s): A. Burgin; N. Jabko
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.676. Field Survey of International Relations.

This course provides a scaffold for the study of international relations theory, organized historically and by major approaches. The focus is on close reading and discussion of exemplars of important bodies of theory. Intended for doctoral students with IR as their major or minor field. Graduate students only.
Instructor(s): R. Marlin-Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.678. Law and Politics.

As a field, Law and Politics has evolved from the study of constitutional law and judicial politics to the political behavior of judges and their associates to the study of law and society, the operation of law and courts “on the ground” in the international arena as well as in the United States, historical institutionalism, and the carceral state. In this graduate course, we will review some of the classic texts in the field, with a focus on the tension between legal institutions and democratic politics. In particular, we will examine how that tension is manifest in the foundations of the American political system and in critical reflection on contemporary practices of American democracy. Students will turn in response papers every week on the reading. In addition, there will be two 10-20 page papers due during the semester. Graduate Students Only.
Instructor(s): E. Zackin; J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.679. The Political Poetics of Walt Whitman and Henry Thoreau.

Examination of the works of Thoreau and Whitman with an eye toward how their texts engage in subjectivity-formation and the inducement of publics. What are the powers and limits of their practices of language, including myth-making, affirmations of nonhuman agencies, and nature-writing? Grad students only.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.681. Strategy in Politics.

Political scientists today increasingly recognize the importance of strategy in politics. Yet they often implicitly adopt a rationalist conception of strategy directly inspired by game theory. This course will discuss the usefulness of this conception, and explore the possibility that alternative conceptions of strategy might also (and perhaps better) illuminate what a strategy is in real-world politics. We will read texts from a variety of disciplines - political science/political economy, but also sociology, organization theory, psychology, and history. Graduate Students Only.
Instructor(s): N. Jabko
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.682. A Short History of Eccentric Theory: Lucretius, Spinoza, Kafka, Serres.

An examination of the political insights yielded by the distinctive modes of inquiry pursued by these four thinkers/writers.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.683. Research Seminar/Political Parties.

Instructor(s): R. Katz
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.684. ReReading Marx.

This graduate seminar will be based on the following working hypothesis: that the received readings of Marx in contemporary political theory over the past two decades have all been filtered by layers of interpretation provided by late 19th and early 20th century Marxism, mid 20th century Critical Theory, and late 20th century Analytical Marxism. We will work through, and slough off, some of those layers in order to go back and reread Marx. Grad students only.
Instructor(s): S. Chambers
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.686. The Institutions of Capitalist Democracy.

Instructor(s): N. Jabko
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.687. Philosophy and the Anthropocene.

How do philosophers such as Heidegger, Whitehead, Deleuze and Braidotti help us to think about the dynamics of the Anthropocene? What do anthropologists and geoscientists such as Anna Tsing, Bruno Latour, Jason Moore, Michael Benton, Jan Zalasiewics and Wally Broeker--teach those philosophies and us about the contemporary condition? Class presentations on assigned readings, seminar paper, and class discussions.
Instructor(s): B. Allan; W. Connolly
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.688. Micro- and Meso-Level Approaches to Political Violence.

How is violence organized, produced, and understood? This course will introduce graduate students to advanced scholarship on political violence and will encourage students to explore the relationship between violence, agency, and structure. Central themes include: mobilization and recruitment; the emergence and behavior of armed organizations (e.g. militant groups, pro-state militias); ethnic violence; civilian targeting; gender-based violence in war; election violence; and vigilantism. The class will challenge students to critically examine violence as an outcome, political process, and as an indicator of underlying relationships and social structures.
Instructor(s): S. Parkinson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.690. Statelessness.

Instructor(s): J. Culbert
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.691. Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century.

This course examines contemporary nuclear issues through the prism of international relations theory. Topics to be considered include the origins and effect of nuclear proliferation, nuclear terrorism, the challenge of “rogue” states, the robustness of deterrence, the viability of defense, and the prospects for disarmament. These issues will be looked at through the lens of Realism, Liberalism and Constructivism, as well as other approaches. Students will be required to engage in formal and informal debates in class, present a draft of their paper to their fellow students, and (in light of comments received) complete a major research paper on some topic related to nuclear weapons. Grad students only.
Instructor(s): S. David
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.693. Planetary Interdependence and World Goverments.

Intensive exploration of alternative global political architectures for high levels of security, ecological and internet interdependence.
Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.694. Comparative State Formation.

The course examines causes, effects and paths of state formation in history and across societies. Weberian and Marxist analyses of the emergence of the modern state in Western Europe are a necessary point of departure. To develop a stronger comparative perspective, however, the course will analyze theoretical approaches and historical studies on state formation in the Ancient World (Mesopotamia, Egypt and China) and in modern Latin America and Africa. The course will also examine whether variations in state formation have a systematic effect on state capacities and political regimes. Graduate Students Only.
Instructor(s): S. Mazzuca.

AS.190.695. Politics, Time and the Tragic.

What can tragic visions teach us today? What cosmological and ontological issues are posed to late modern life by tragic traditions? What conceptions of time and political aspiration can inhabit a tragic vision? What contending conceptions of politics grow out of them? This seminar starts with Hesiod’s Theogony, moves through the Sophocles Trilogy, examines attempts to rework the tragic by Friedrich Nietzsche, Bernard Williams, Judith Butler, Bonnie Honig, and James Baldwin, returns to these issues through King Lear, and explores again the issues that emerge through a close engagement with Deleuze’s philosophy and time in Cinema II.
Instructor(s): W. Connolly
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.697. Norm and Change in International and Comparative Perspective.

This seminar will explore the dynamics behind the origin and demise of foundational normative understandings that inform action in a variety of issue areas. Readings will be drawn from the international relations and comparative politics literatures, with attention focusing on the themes of power, discourse, and practice as well as on how these literatures relate to one another.
Instructor(s): N. Jabko; S. Schmidt
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.190.800. Independent Study.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.801. Independent Study II.

Instructor(s): D. Deudney
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.190.849. Dissertation Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.890. Independent Study.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.190.893. Political Science Practicum.

Instructor(s): R. Katz.

AS.191.102. Diasporas in World Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the role of diasporas - ethnic, religious, and migrant groups - in world politics. What impact do diaspora communities have on the foreign policy of their country of residence or country of origin? What is the involvement of diaspora communities in civil wars, ethnic conflicts, and conflict resolution? How does this kind of transnationalism affect international order?
Instructor(s): Y. Abramson.

AS.191.104. Covert Action in International Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines covert action from the Second World War up until the present. Covert action is any activity undertaken by a sponsor seeking to influence a target while remaining anonymous. We will be covering some of the more prominent examples of the use of assassinations, coup d’états bribery, blackmail, propaganda, election rigging, cyber-war, and economic sabotage. By the end of this course you should have a solid and detailed empirical knowledge of a large number of covert operations from around the world. You should be familiar with the definitions and categories for covert action and you should be able to engage with debates on the utility of covert action and the ethical and legal issues involved in using covert activities.
Instructor(s): T. Tutunji.

AS.191.106. Freshman Seminar: Mass Incarceration and American Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This freshman seminar examines how the United States became the world's leading jailer, the impact of mass incarceration on American politics, and the dynamics of reform. Points of emphasis include elections, federalism, and race.
Instructor(s): D. Dagan de Picciotto
Writing Intensive.

AS.191.201. Love in Politics, Politics in Love. 3.0 Credits.

In much of political science, political power is assumed to flow from fear. Using classic texts in political theory, this class will consider the existence of a different kind of political power, one flowing from love. The following questions will structure the course: What are the powers and forms of love? Are political bonds and loving bonds related? Class discussions will draw from a variety of sources, including readings by Hobbes, Nygren, Plato, Augustine, Rousseau, Engels, Jordan, and Berlant.
Instructor(s): M. Helsel
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.191.206. Violence, Fast and Slow. 3.0 Credits.

Is poverty a form of violence? What about lead contamination in drinking water? How about rising sea levels? Do abrupt forms of violence supervene on slower forms? Can political struggles around violence be fast and slow? Can peacekeeping efforts? In this class, we read about violence, fast and slow
Instructor(s): J. Mohorcich
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.222. Politics and Nature. 3.0 Credits.

Introduces students to contemporary discussions in environmental political thought by exploring the concepts “politics” and “nature” in Western political thought using films, novels, and traditional texts. Focusing on issues such as climate warming, decreases in species biodiversity, and human overpopulation, the course explores how various other moments in the Western political tradition conceived the relationship between politics and nature. The goal is to ask how insights from these other moments might help us today.
Instructor(s): Z. Reyna
Area: Humanities.

AS.191.335. Arab-Israeli Conflict. 3.0 Credits.

The course will focus on the origin and development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire, through World War I, The British Mandate over Palestine, and the first Arab-Israeli war (1947-1949). It will then examine the period of the Arab-Israeli wars of 1956, 1967, 1973, and 1982, the Palestinian Intifadas (1987-1993 and 2000-2005); and the development of the Arab-Israeli peace process from its beginnings with the Egyptian-Israeli treaty of 1979, the Oslo I and Oslo II agreements of 1993 and 1995, Israel's peace treaty with Jordan of 1994, the Road Map of 2003; and the periodic peace talks between Israel and Syria. The conflict will be analyzed against the background of great power intervention in the Middle East, the rise of political Islam and the dynamics of Intra-Arab politics, and will consider the impact of the Arab Spring.
Instructor(s): R. Freedman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.344. Belonging to Nature in the Anthropocene. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores debates in contemporary environmental political thought concerning humanity's relationship to nature in the Anthropocene. The Anthropocene refers to the era in which "human" activity becomes a force of "nature"–when the impact of human activity on natural processes manifests itself in the stuff of the Earth. For many of us, these planetary transformations are hardly noticeable in day-to-day life, but they are dramatic: we are living through the Earth's sixth mass extinction. What is our relationship to these transformations? Do we have the power to stop them, or at least to minimize their harmful effects? Course readings and films introduce multiple visions of the human/nature relationship and examine the responses they recommend to these and other questions. The political stakes of these visions are brought to light as we consider: How do visions of the human/nature relationship shape and texture core political concepts like freedom, agency, responsibility, and progress? What do they suggest about the strategies most likely to motivate action amid the uncertainty of the Anthropocene? How do these visions subtly (and not so subtly) relegate some to the realm of "nature" so that others can be classified as "human"?
Instructor(s): S. Erev
Writing Intensive.

AS.191.345. Russian Foreign Policy. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore the evolution of Russian Foreign Policy from Czarist times to the present. The main theme will be the question of continuity and change, as the course will seek to determine to what degree current Russian Foreign Policy is rooted in the Czarist(1613-1917) and Soviet(1917-1991) periods, and to what degree it has operated since 1991 on a new basis. The main emphasis of the course will be on Russia's relations with the United States and Europe, China, the Middle East and the countries of the former Soviet Union--especially Ukraine, the Baltic States, Transcaucasia and Central Asia. The course will conclude with an analysis of the Russian reaction to the Arab Spring and its impact both on Russian domestic politics and on Russian foreign policy.
Instructor(s): R. Freedman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.352. American Constitutionalism and War Making. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the issue of security in the United States beginning with the 1787 constitutional founding and moving into the modern era. We will examine the role of the United States in world politics with a special emphasis on how the United States, as well as the international system changed in the 20th century, as well as the domestic constitutional challenges this presented.
Instructor(s): R. Fried
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.191.362. Covert Action in International Relation. 3.0 Credits.

This course covers the origin and development of covert action from the 20th century till present. We will be examining detailed case studies of covert action from a variety of regions and time-periods. We will also be discussing the ethical and legal issues involved in using covert activities.
Instructor(s): T. Tutunji
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.191.365. U.S Constitutional Law - Civil Liberities. 3.0 Credits.

The course is designed to introduce students to the study of civil liberties as protected by the Constitution of the United States. The emphasis will be upon those rights incorporated into the Bill of Rights and made applicable to the states through the Fourteenth Amendment. Specifically, the course will examine freedom of speech and freedom of the press – as well as freedom of freedom of thought, belief, and association. In addition, the course will address the right to privacy, the rights of those accused of crimes, and the rights and protections secured under the two clauses of the First Amendment relating to religious liberty – the Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause
Instructor(s): S. Snell
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.191.372. Making Social Change. 1.5 Credits.

Aitchison Students Only.
Instructor(s): S. Strom; V. Williamson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.375. Thinking Organizationally about Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Aitchison Students Only.
Instructor(s): S. Teles
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.376. Public Policy Writing. 3.0 Credits.

Aitchison Students Only.
Instructor(s): P. Longman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.191.379. Thinking Strategically. 1.5 Credits.

Aitchison Students Only.
Instructor(s): K. Mueller
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.381. Education Policy. 1.5 Credits.

Aitchison Students only
Instructor(s): F. Hess.

AS.191.382. Thinking Economically. 3.0 Credits.

Aitchison Students Only.
Instructor(s): H. Boushey; T. Tucker
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.383. Visualizing Data. 1.5 Credits.

This course meets in Block two- October 24-December 12.
Instructor(s): G. Bullen
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.191.389. The Politics of Race and Ethnicity in the Postcolonial Society. 3.0 Credits.

The postcolonial society offers a unique terrain for the study of comparative racial politics, providing a setting for which racial and ethnic politics often take place between predominately non-white groups. In this course, students will examine contemporary understandings of the concepts of race and ethnicity and how they are deployed politically in the postcolonial society, enabling students to make deeper explications about the relationship between race, ethnicity and national inclusion as global phenomena that are the persistent and widespread legacies of colonialism, nationalism and white supremacy. Specifically, students will become familiar with the processes of colonization and decolonization--as well as postcolonial theories of resistance--that structure group politics today, drawing upon theoretical sources from Africa, Asia and the Caribbean. These theoretical and historical tools will be used to study racial and ethnic politics across a range of postcolonial cases, including Indonesia, Mauritius, Fiji, Trinidad, Colombia and Brazil.
Instructor(s): E. Thornton.

AS.191.402. Numbers, Pictures, Politics. 3.0 Credits.

Aitchison students only.
Instructor(s): L. Drutman
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Cross Listed Courses

History of Art

AS.010.382. The Politics of Display in South Asia. 3.0 Credits.

Through examining collecting, patronage, colonial exhibitions, and museums, this course examines how South Asia has been constructed in practices of display. Themes: politics of representation, spectacle, ethnography, and economies of desire related to colonialism and the rise of modernity. Cross-list with Anthropology, Museums and Society and Political Science.
Instructor(s): R. Brown
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Anthropology

AS.070.278. “Cutting (out) the Middleman” ?. 3.0 Credits.

Middleman are popularly conceived as a person who acts as an interface between two parties, usually for a fee. The figure of the middleman, however is seen in a negative light as an exploitative element. Rather than assume the middleman to be a given entity, this course takes a detour into ethnography, fiction and film to rethink how specific social milieus shape practices, politics and networks of mediation that exceed the physical figure itself. This course will thus, cut the middleman “out” of everyday life and draw mediation into our field of vision.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.294. Political Anthropology of Africa. 3.0 Credits.

The course will explore classical and contemporary ethnographies of the political in Africa, examining how their authors address issues of power, hierarchy and symbol. We will study various articulations of state, ethnicity and community that are analyzed by observing relations between power and resistance or between law, economy and violence through war, custom and ritual. The seminar will also address the way in which Africa has been constituted as a key source of the sub-field of political anthropology through colonial trajectories, postcolonial detours and the political imagination of the past and the future.
Instructor(s): J. Obarrio
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.333. Theologies of Political Life. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the relationship between modern political forms and theological traditions. Looking at developments both in the West and the postcolonial world, we will examine the multiple ways in which theological traditions have continued to inform how political life is conceived and pursued. In particular, we will focus on the relation between liberalism and the Christian tradition; the turn to messianism in critical theory; the transformation of the shari?a into a legal form; and its imbrication in anti-colonial politics
Instructor(s): S. Al-Bahloly
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.621. An Ontological Turn?.

Recent years have seen a number of ambitious and controversial efforts to find, in ontology, a means of surpassing the inherited humanism, culturalism, and essentialism of anthropology. This course will critically examine this proposition of a fundamental “turn” in our thinking, juxtaposing recent work on matters of perspectivism, materialism, relationality, and divinity with earlier attempts in anthropology to grasp being and becoming otherwise.
Instructor(s): A. Pandian.

History

AS.100.343. Diaspora, Nation, Race, and Politics. 3.0 Credits.

For millions of people across the globe, political fate in the 20th century was defined at the intersection of diaspora, race, and nation — and this may be true in the 21st century as well. This course, a collaborative effort involving a historian and a political scientist, explores the parallels and divergences in the deployment of these terms in nationalist and transnational mobilization, literature and aesthetics, and group identity formation in Eastern Europe, Africa and the New World of the Americas. Set against the backdrop of the fall of significant empires in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, we will explore themes of migration, human rights, the nation-state system, and racism through history, political sociology, and political and social theory. We will pay particular attention to the theoretically exemplary Jewish and Black experiences of diaspora, race, and nation, engaging both with how those experiences were specially shaped by the imposition of national and racial logics and with Black and Jewish politics and thought in relation to those categories. Readings include Max Weber, W. E. B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, Theodor Herzl, Hannah Arendt, Benedict Anderson, Rogers Brubaker, Andrew Zimmerman, Michele Mitchell, David Scott.
Instructor(s): K. Moss; M. Hanchard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.404. John Locke. 3.0 Credits.

Seminar style course in which John Locke’s major works will be read intensively, together with some of his contemporaries’ works, and select scholarly interpretations.
Instructor(s): J. Marshall
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.699. Neoliberalism.

Readings on the history, theory, and politics of neoliberalism, from midcentury to the present.
Instructor(s): A. Burgin
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Philosophy

AS.150.404. The Idea of Power. 3.0 Credits.

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations
Instructor(s): C. Lebron
Area: Humanities.

AS.150.462. Islamic Political Philosophy. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to the history of Islamic political philosophy, primarily focused on two flashpoints of encounter between the religion of Islam and other philosophical/political systems—an early one with ancient Greek philosophy (especially in the works of Plato and Aristotle), and a period of interface with modern Western secular political thought, from the late 19th century to present. Our goal will be to try to understand some of the varying responses in each period as Muslim thinkers seek authentic engagement with external and internal trends, both religious and philosophical. The focus will be on primary texts from philosophically engaged thinkers (who may or may not consider themselves philosophers).
Instructor(s): S. Ogden
Area: Humanities.

International Studies

AS.192.401. Political Violence. 2.0 Credits.

This class will function predominantly as a discussion seminar that uses the case of the Lebanese Civil War to examine the causes, duration, and dynamics of civil war as well as the debates surrounding foreign intervention and peacebuilding. Themes include: ethnic violence; economic explanations for civil war; civilian targeting; intra-rebellion dynamics; sexual and gender-based violence; election violence; occupation; peacekeeping; and the Responsibility to Protect.
Instructor(s): S. Parkinson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.192.402. Military Organizations in the Middle East and North Africa. 2.0 Credits.

This course will examine the diverse roles state and non-state military organizations play in MENA politics, economics, and society. Each week will use an organizational case study as a window into core themes such as military involvement in state economies, militia politics, or combatant discipline in war.
Instructor(s): S. Parkinson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

German & Romance Languages & Literatures

AS.211.174. Media of Propaganda. 3.0 Credits.

Today, promoting a particular political or personal point of view is not viewed as "propaganda," but rather as building a community of equally minded people. But where do we draw the line, and when does the use of a medium in service of a certain message become intrusive and misleading? What role do democracy and cultural values play in this use or abuse of media? In this class the term "propaganda" will be evaluated carefully and applied to such historical media case studies as the informational use of the radio in World War One, Leni Riefenstahl's Nazi propaganda films, the legendary success of advertisement campaigns in the 1950s and 1960s, the AIDS movement and other mobilization strategies from the 1980s to the 1990s, and the new values of friendship and propaganda in our current facebook nation.
Instructor(s): B. Wegenstein
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.341. Power and Resistance in French Political Thought. 3.0 Credits.

Even as a strong, divine-right monarchy emerged in France, following the Renaissance wars of religion, rebellious French thinkers never stopped questioning the foundations of power. They focused critically not only on the claims of authority issuing from the top, but also on the submissiveness of the governed and the reach of propaganda. This course examines how power shapes minds and bodies, from absolutism to the Revolution, to democratic laïcité. Readings include works by La Boétie, Montaigne, Loyseau, Bayle, Rousseau, Saint-Just, Maistre, Tocqueville, Foucault, Lefort, Rancière and the Assemblée Nationale. Readings and discussion in English.
Instructor(s): E. Russo
Area: Humanities.

AS.211.394. Brazilian Culture & Civilization. 3.0 Credits.

This course is intended as an introduction to the culture and civilization of Brazil. It is designed to provide students with basic information about Brazilian history, art, literature, popular culture, theater, cinema, and music. The course will focus on how indigenous Asian, African, and European cultural influences have interacted to create the new and unique civilization that is Brazil today. The course is taught in English, but ONE extra credit will be given to students who wish to do the course work in Portuguese. Those wishing to do the course work in English for 3 credits should register for section 01. Those wishing to earn 4 credits by doing the course work in Portuguese should register for section 02. The sections will be taught simultaneously. Section 01: 3 credits Section 02: 4 credits (instructor’s permission required)
Instructor(s): F. De Azeredo Cerqueira
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.212.341. Power and Resistance: Approaches to French Political Thought.. 3.0 Credits.

Even as a coherent, rational conception of state power emerged in France in as early as the Renaissance, French thinkers never stopped challenging the ways by which power justified itself in order to foster obedience and consensus. In so doing, they focused critically as much on the claims of sovereignty issuing from the top as on the willingness of the governed to submit to them. The course will examine the dialectic between the legitimation and delegitimation of power, from the Renaissance wars of religion to the Revolution and beyond: the haunting fear of the corruption and death of the political body; the notion of permanent crisis; the right to revoke the social contract; the reach of power in shaping minds and bodies. Readings may include works by La Boétie, Bodin, Bayle, Rousseau, Sade, Saint-Just, Constant, Maistre, Tocqueville, Foucault, Lefort and Rancière. Readings and discussion in English.
Instructor(s): E. Russo; W. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.212.470. Censorship in Language and Practice. From the Ancien Regime to Democracy. 3.0 Credits.

An exploration of the boundaries of acceptability when speaking about religion, government, sexuality and gender. Students will learn about the political, theological and legal basis of blasphemy and punishable behavior, and how they have changed from the time of divine-right monarchy to contemporary laicité. Selected readings ranging from the clandestine culture of free-thinkers and rakes in the 17th century, to the trials and causes célèbres of the Enlightenment, to modern-day democratic polemics.
Prerequisites: AS.210.302
Instructor(s): E. Russo
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.633. Hegel and Feminist Philosophy.

The seminar will explore to what extent Hegel can be read as contributing to a feminist philosophy. We will focus on Hegelian openings onto the emotional in Phenomenology of Spirit. In addition, we will study feminist philosophers who have drawn on or offered critical readings of Hegel (Irigaray, Butler, Cavarero, Malabou, and others). Co-listed with AS.190.633
Instructor(s): J. Bennett; K. Pahl
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.213.705. Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.

We will study key passages of The Phenomenology of Spirit from a queer-feminist perspective and engage with some of the feminist scholarship on Hegel
Instructor(s): K. Pahl
Area: Humanities.

AS.216.398. Zionism: Literature, Film, Thought. 3.0 Credits.

This course studies the relation between Israeli culture and Zionism. Based on a close reading of both literary and non-literary Zionist texts, we will explore the thematic, social and political aspects of the Zionist movement. The course focuses on primary sources and its main goal is to familiarize students with the history of Zionism and its influence on Israeli culture. In the last part of the semester we will investigate the different meanings of Post-Zionism through contemporary literary and non-literary texts as well as recent Israeli films.Students wishing to do additional work in Hebrew should enroll in section 2 where students will meet for an additional hour at a time TBD and will earn 4 credits for the course.
Prerequisites: Students may receive credit for AS.216.398 or AS.300.398, but not both.
Instructor(s): N. Stahl; Z. Cohen
Area: Humanities.

Sociology

AS.230.275. Revolution, Reform and Social Inequality in China. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores various aspects of social inequality in China during the Mao Zedong and the post-Mao reform eras. We will examine inequality within villages, the rural/urban divide, urban inequality, education and health policies, and gender and ethnic inequality. Each of these issue areas will be tackled analytically, but the aim is also to understand what it was/is like to live in China during and after the Mao era. Formerly offered as AS.230.321.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.318. State and Society in Modern India. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.
Instructor(s): R. Agarwala
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.357. Baltimore and Beyond. 3.0 Credits.

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Prerequisites: Students that took AS.360.357 may not take AS.230.357
Instructor(s): S. Deluca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.374. Poverty and Public Policy. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the causes and consequences of U.S. urban poverty, it's implications for health and wellbeing, and explores strategies for addressing it. We cover the major theoretical explanations scholars have advanced to explain the persistence of urban poverty including labor markets, residential segregation, welfare policy, family structure, and the criminal justice system. Within each topic area, students are introduced to a range of interventions aimed at alleviating urban poverty. Students will conduct a formal policy analysis of 20 pages and participate in a mock congressional hearing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Prerequisites: Students that took AS.360.372 may not take AS.230.374.
Instructor(s): K. Edin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

East Asian Studies

AS.310.305. Southeast Asia and US Security Strategy. 3.0 Credits.

This survey course is designed to introduce students to Southeast Asia -- the ten member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) plus Australia and New Zealand. Southeast Asia is an integral part of the broader region of East Asia and a geographic bridge to the Indian subcontinent (South Asia). Southeast Asia has been one of the great success stories in the saga of modernization and development of post-colonial Afro-Asia over the last six decades. Its resulting economic importance is matched by its strategic significance given the presence of imbedded jihadist networks and the emergence of China as a regional great power and aspirant superpower. Nevertheless, the region has been largely overlooked by senior foreign policy and defense officials in Washington. This course will equip students to fill that void by examining the region from the perspective of national security strategy -- broadly understood in its multiple dimensions. Students will be challenged to formulate some element of a viable U.S. national security strategy for the region.
Instructor(s): M. Ott
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.310.306. Domestic Politics of Contemporary China. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to China's contemporary political history and current political system. It helps students develop a critical understanding of China's governance institutions and processes, political economy, and state-society relations. The course focuses primarily on China's domestic politics but also covers China's changing role in Asia and the world.
Instructor(s): Y. Yang
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.307. Governance and Politics in China. 3.0 Credits.

A dramatic rise of popular protests in China today has spurred lively discussions about the causes, dynamics, and impact of these protests. This course will provide students with an opportunity to understand these issues by discussing the social, institutional and cultural background of protests, major forms of protest, social groups involved, government responses, and social implications of various kinds of protests. The first part of the course will explore significant socio-economic changes since 1978 and the effects of these changes on China’s social structure and stratification. This part will also examine changes in governance and political systems in the reform era and review important theories of contentious politics. The second part will examine protests by distinct social groups, including peasants, workers, homeowners, and ethnic minority groups, pro-democratic activists, among others. This part will identify similarities and differences in the demands and actions of different groups, introduce the major forms of popular resistance, and explore how the state deals with them accordingly. The course will conclude with discussion of the outcomes of social protests in China and make a cross-national comparison between protests in China and other authoritarian states. By taking China as an example, this course will enhance students’ knowledge about forms of popular contention and government responses in an authoritarian regime as well as help students develop analytical and critical thinking skills with regard to contentious politics.
Instructor(s): Y. Li
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.352. Current Issues in US-Asia Relations: A Practitioner's View. 3.0 Credits.

We will examine how major political events, players, norms and institutions have shaped US-Asia relations in the modern era.
Instructor(s): W. Konishi
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.600. Advanced Topics in East Asian Studies.

This interdisciplinary seminar gives graduate students in East Asian Studies opportunities to present and receive comments on their dissertation chapters, prospectuses, conference papers, and/or potential publications.
Instructor(s): E. Chung
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Interdepartmental

AS.360.247. Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.
Instructor(s): B. Morgan; K. Edin; V. Weaver
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.360.331. Methods for Policy Research. 3.0 Credits.

This course will introduce students to quantitative methods for studying social policy problems. Topics to be covered include descriptive statistics and sampling, correlation and causation, simple and multiple regression, experimental methods, and an introduction to cost-benefit analysis. The emphasis will be on the selection, interpretation and practical application of these methodologies in specific policy settings, rather than with formal proofs. Skills will be reinforced by hands-on exercises using statistical software. Over the course of the semester, students will critically analyze policy reports and empirical research in a range of policy areas and learn how to present this research to a non-specialist audience. Finally, we will discuss the pros and cons of quantitative vs. qualitative methodologies. The course will conclude with group presentations that draw on all these skills. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Instructor(s): B. Morgan
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.360.366. Public Policy Writing Workshop. 3.0 Credits.

This workshop is designed to hone the analytical and communications skills necessary for effective formulation and advocacy of public policy. Topics include how to develop op-ed pieces and other forms of advocacy journalism, memoranda, position papers, and grant proposals. The workshop puts special stress on how to make a clear and persuasive exposition of complex or counter-intuitive policy arguments in the market place of ideas, including the challenges of writing for popular journals and communicating to specific audiences both in and out of government. Students receive intensive individual instruction, including close editing of their work and advice on how to publish or promote it in the public sphere. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Instructor(s): P. Longman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.360.372. Poverty and Public Policy. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the causes and consequences of U.S. urban poverty, it's implications for health and wellbeing, and explores strategies for addressing it. We cover the major theoretical explanations scholars have advanced to explain the persistence of urban poverty including labor markets, residential segregation, welfare policy, family structure, and the criminal justice system. Within each topic area, students are introduced to a range of interventions aimed at alleviating urban poverty. Students will conduct a formal policy analysis of 20 pages and participate in a mock congressional hearing. Permission of instructor required.
Instructor(s): K. Edin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.360.380. Making America Social Policy. 3.0 Credits.

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Obama. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Program in Latin American Studies

AS.361.330. Latin America Otherwise: Voicing Dissent. 3.0 Credits.

This course proposes to look at various Latin American texts through an unconventional lens: that of dissent. Partly inspired by French philosopher Jacques Rancie?re (2001), we will take as a premise the idea of dissent not simply as a moment of protest or resistance, nor of the collective plea for rights, but the moment when already given or accepted ways of living and institutional forms are unexpectedly modified by subjects not previously recognized as political. We will draw from diverse materials, ranging from political theory texts, Latin American literature, the literature on development, to the experiences of various social movements in the region. Recommended Course Background: an introductory level course in International Studies, Political Science, Anthropology, or Sociology
Instructor(s): T. Zille
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Center for Africana Studies

AS.362.175. Freshman Seminar: Remembering the Black Power Movement. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores trends, developments, contradictions, and dilemmas related to the Black Power Movement. The objective of studying this historical movement is not to engage in nostalgia, but to think through and learn the lessons of this historic social movement. An active participant in the Black Power Movement as a university undergraduate and graduate student, I do not approach this subject merely as a set of interesting intellectual issues and dynamics that can be explored with complete dispassion and objectivity. Rather, I seek to examine critically some of the contradictions and dilemmas that I, too, was caught up in, seeking to come to grips with and clarify my own participation and activities. We study these historical events with the expectation of making a positive contribution to the future.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.340. Power and Racism. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates the impact of white supremacy and anti-black racism, as a global system of power, on the political development of the United States of America.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.344. Education Politics in Urban America. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar analyzes trends, developments, and future challenges related to the politics of urban public schooling with a concentration on community political dynamics and the struggle for equal educational opportunity and quality education. The course emphasizes the impact of socioeconomic class inequality, racial/ethnic conflict, and gender politics on the changing character of public school reform since the 1954 Supreme Court decision of Brown v. Board of Education. Cross-listed with Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality

AS.363.304. Love and Its Discontents. 3.0 Credits.

This course aims to familiarize students with a wide-range of feminist and queer conceptions of love as a political force. While reading theoretical texts and selections of poetry, students will be encouraged to interrogate the political implications of different conceptions of love, Eros, and desire.
Instructor(s): K. Glanz
Area: Humanities.

AS.363.395. Poetics and Politics of Sex: Intimacy and Its Discontents. 3.0 Credits.

Where might one turn for intimacy if its available forms are dissatisfying? What happens when politics authorizes certain forms of intimacy but not others? How might intimacies and their discontents lack a language to do them justice? This course explores problems with normative intimacies such as monogamy, family, and intimate publics. It covers issues such as optimism, ambivalence, trauma, queerness, war, and longing. It also explores how authors try to describe intimacy through different genres, such as poems, aphorisms, novellas, essays, and scholarly articles.
Instructor(s): C. Shomura
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://politicalscience.jhu.edu/directory/

Faculty

Chair

Adam Sheingate
American Politics, Comparative Politics

Professors

Adam Sheingate
American Politics, Comparative Politics

Samuel Chambers
Political theory, cultural politics

Jane Bennett
Political theory, American political thought, ecophilosophy.

William E. Connolly
Krieger-Eisenhower Professor: political theory, international relations.

Steven R. David
International relations, security studies, comparative politics.

Benjamin Ginsberg
David Bernstein Professor and Director of the Washington Center for the Study of Government: American government and politics, political development.

Richard Katz
Comparative Politics (parties, elections, European politics), American Politics

Renée Marlin-Bennett
International relations, political economy of information.

Associate Professors

Adria Lawrence
Aronson Associate Professor of International Studies and Political Science: Comparative politics, Middle Eastern and North African politics, colonialism, nationalism, conflict and collective action

Vesla Weaver
Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor and Assistant Research Professor: American Politics

Erin Chung
Charles D. Miller Associate Professor of East Asian Politics and co-director of the Racism, Immigration and Citizenship Program: comparative politics, East Asian politics, international migration, comparative racial politics.

Jennifer L. Culbert
Political theory, jurisprudence.

Daniel H. Deudney
International relations, political theory.

Nicolas Jabko
Comparative politics, international political economy, European politics.

Lester Spence
Black politics, race and politics, urban politics, American political behavior and public opinion.

Steven Teles
Social policy, law and public policy, political analysis.

Assistant Professors

Sarah Parkinson
Aronson Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Studies:Comparative politics, political violence, Middle East and North African politics, social network theory, qualitative methods, refugees

Bentley Allan
International relations, science and politics, global governance, global environmental politics.

P.J. Brendese
Political theory, comparative political thought, race and politics.

Sebastian Mazzuca
Political Economy, Comparative Politics, Latin American Politics and Economy

Daniel Schlozman
American politics, political parties, and the welfare state.

Sebastian Schmidt
Internaltional Relations, Security Studies

Emily Zackin
Constitutional law, American politics.

Professors Emeriti

Joseph Cooper
Legislative politics, executive-legislative relations, institutional theory.

Matthew A. Crenson
Urban government, American political development.

Joel B. Grossman
Constitutional law, law and politics, American politics.

Margaret Keck
Comparative politics, international relations (Latin American politics, the environment, social movement

Adjunct Faculty

Robert Freedman
Arab-Israeli politics and Russian politics.