Sociology

http://soc.jhu.edu/

The Department of Sociology concentrates on two broad areas at the graduate and undergraduate levels: Global social change, which focuses on cross-national, comparative research; and social inequality, which primarily focuses on family, education, work, race, gender, policy, and immigration.

These concentrations trace back to the department’s founding in 1959 by renowned American sociologist James Coleman. The department has since earned a reputation as one of most selective, personalized sociology departments in the U.S. Currently home to 17 faculty members including 2 Bloomberg Distinguished Professors, 36 graduate students, and roughly 70 undergraduates, the department offers a uniquely intimate scholarly atmosphere in which faculty and students interact and collaborate frequently.

Scholars in the department share a wide variety of interests and interdisciplinary partnerships. Students are given flexible parameters for their study, and several faculty members have been honored with joint appointments in other Johns Hopkins schools and divisions. The department shares a unique relationship with the Bloomberg School of Public Health, which offers faculty and students access to first-rate collaborations in fields such as population and demography, mental health and mental hygiene, and healthcare organization. The department is also proudly partnered with the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics and is committed to building and maintaining strong foundations in quantitative research methods.

Major in Sociology

A major in sociology offers undergraduates a variety of post-graduation opportunities. Graduates from the department have found positions in financial institutions, education, non-governmental organizations focusing on international development, research departments of major corporations, and local government social service agencies. Others continue to graduate school in sociology, public health, law, urban planning, and education. A major in sociology can also be combined with the pre-medical course sequence, resulting in a medical school candidate who is well versed in the hard science of the human body and the social science of the human experience. For more details, please visit http://soc.jhu.edu/undergraduate/.

Requirements for a B.A. Degree

(Also see Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree.)

The required courses for a major in sociology provide students with a fundamental understanding of sociological theory, methods, and social statistics. Beyond these core requirements, elective courses are offered on a range of important sociological themes, including gender and family, social structure and personality, education, race and ethnicity, immigration, political sociology, international development, and the evolution of a world social system. 

Core Courses
AS.230.101Introduction Sociology3.00
AS.230.202Research Methods for the Social Sciences3.00
AS.230.205Introduction to Social Statistics4.00
AS.230.213Social Theory3.00
AS.230.322Quantitative Research Practicum3
or AS.230.323 Qualitative Research Practicum
or AS.230.325 Global Social Change and Development Practicum
Sociology Electives *
Two sociology courses at any level6
Four sociology electives at the 300-level or above12
Additional Social Science Electives
Three non-sociology courses at any level carrying a social and behavioral sciences area designator in at least two other departments or programs9
*

One elective course may be fulfilled by combining 1 or 2 credit courses for a total of at least 3 credits.  All other elective courses must be at least 3 credit courses. Up to two of the six sociology electives and one of the three other social science electives may be independent study or independent research courses (at least 3 credits) supervised by Hopkins faculty. Only one course taken in the summer at JHU may apply towards the sociology electives.

All courses must be taken for a letter grade and a  grade of C or better is required. 

Foreign language study is not required, but it is strongly encouraged, especially for students considering graduate or professional study.

Sample Program

A typical program might include the following sequence of courses:

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.230.101Introduction Sociology3Lower-level sociology elective3
 Lower-level sociology elective3
  3  6
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.230.202Research Methods for the Social Sciences3"S" credit from non-sociology elective3
Upper-level sociology elective3AS.230.205Introduction to Social Statistics3
  6  6
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.230.213Social Theory3AS.230.322Quantitative Research Practicum3
Upper-level sociology elective3"S" credit from non-sociology elective3
  6  6
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Upper-level sociology elective3Upper-level sociology elective3
"S" credit from non-sociology elective3Upper-level sociology elective3
  6  6
Total Credits: 45

Senior Honors Program

The senior year Honors Program affords highly motivated and qualified students the opportunity to pursue, with faculty guidance, a research project of their own design. The Honors Program culminates in an honors thesis; a substantial work of original scholarship. Prerequisites and requirements for the program are as follows:

  • All the requirements of a traditional major in sociology.

  • Minimum 3.5 GPA in all sociology courses.

  • Declaration of intention to enroll in Senior Honors Program to faculty advisor by the end of the junior year.

  • At least two 300-level courses in sociology by the end of the junior year.

  • Enrollment in the year-long  AS.230.502 Senior Honors Program.

  • Completion and faculty approval of honors thesis.

 For more information on the Senior Honors Program, contact your faculty advisor.

Social Policy Minor

The Social Policy minor brings an interdisciplinary focus to the many social problems facing a city such as Baltimore and the nation as a whole, and encourages the search for policy solutions to those problems.

Global Social Change and Development Track

The Global Social Change and Development (GSCD) Track is geared towards students interested in understanding critical issues surrounding contemporary processes of globalization and international development. The track provides students with a sophisticated set of research and critical-thinking skills, prepares students for twenty-first century professions and helps them to become thoughtful global citizens. Ultimately, students pursuing the Global Social Change and Development track will receive a double major in both International Studies and Sociology.

Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD) Honor Society

In spring 2006, the Sociology department was awarded a chapter of the AKD sociology honor society. The chapter welcomed eleven new initiates that year, two faculty members, two new graduate students, and seven undergraduates. We now have over 70 members.

AKD is an open, democratic, international society of scholars dedicated to the ideal of Athropon Katamanthanein Diakonesein or “to investigate humanity for the purpose of service.” AKD seeks to acknowledge and promote excellence in scholarship in the study of sociology, the research of social problems, and other social and intellectual activities that will lead to improvement of the human condition. AKD was founded at the University of Southern California in 1920 and affiliated with the Association of College Honor Societies in 1967. There are more than 97,000 lifetime members and over 600 chapters of the Society. These are persons with academic records showing excellence in sociology.

Initiates receive a chapter pin, a certificate of membership, and a membership activation form. Members who submit completed activation forms receive a one-year subscription to Sociological Inquiry, the official journal of the Society, the Alpha Kappa Delta Newsletter, election materials, and other services. In addition, the Society sponsors student paper contests, provides honoraria for initiation speakers, provides funds for student travel to regional sociological meetings, funds research symposia, sponsors a distinguished lecture series at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, and contributes annually to the ASA Minority Scholarship Fund. AKD members wear AKD honor cords at graduation ceremonies. AKD chapters are important in the academic, professional, and social lives of student and faculty members. They provide opportunities for initiating and sharing activities in keeping with the purposes of the Society.

To be eligible for membership, majors must have at least junior year standing, an overall GPA of at least 3.0, a sociology GPA of at least 3.5, and have taken at least four courses in sociology.

Election to Alpha Kappa Delta is without regard to race, creed, or national origin. For more information, interested students should contact the AKD Faculty Chapter Representatives: Meredith Greif (mgreif1@jhu.edu) & Katrina McDonald (kmcdon@jhu.edu).

James S. Coleman Award

This award was established by the Department of Sociology in 1994 in honor of Dr. James S. Coleman, first chair of the department. The award is for outstanding academic achievement by a senior majoring in sociology.

The department’s primary educational goal is to train first-class sociology Ph.D.’s. The sociology graduate experience at Johns Hopkins is best characterized as a research apprenticeship – a careful blend of formal instruction, faculty-directed individual study, and supervised as well as self-initiated research. The department’s small size and specific concentrations yield a personalized course of study and close relationships with faculty members and fellow graduate students. The social climate is informal, and the mix of students and faculty, drawn from a wide variety of geographic and social backgrounds, constitutes a rewarding intellectual community. For more details, please visit http://soc.jhu.edu/graduate/.

Admissions

Applicants must submit an application fee, personal statement, GRE scores, all college transcripts, at least two (preferably three) letters of recommendation, and a sample of written work. International applicants must also submit a TOEFL score and a financial statement (FS-1G Form: Graduate International Student Notification [F-1/J-1]). Applicants should have a broad background in social science, especially sociology, economics, and psychology. Training in mathematics is encouraged. The department gives greatest weight to an applicant’s demonstrated ability and past performance. For more details, please visit http://soc.jhu.edu/graduate/admissions/.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

Core Curriculum
AS.230.600Introduction to Social Statistics
AS.230.602Theories of Society
AS.230.603Contemporary Social Theory
AS.230.604Linear Models for the Social Sciences
AS.230.608Proseminar In Sociology *
AS.230.643Sociological Analysis
Students are also required to take one of the following three methods courses as oart of their core course requirements:4
Research Designs for Causal Inference and Mixed Methods
Qualitative Research Methods: Domestic and International Fieldwork
Macro-Comparative Research
*

This fall semester course is taken during the first year. Faculty presentations introduce students to the substantive interests, research and professional background of the sociology faculty. It is graded pass/fail.

To count toward degree requirements, core curriculum courses other than the Trial Paper Research series of courses must be passed with a grade of B- or higher. After the core course requirement is satisfied, additional methods courses from the list above may be used to fulfill the nine-elective course requirement.

Electives

In addition to the core curriculum, graduate students must enroll in nine additional graduate-level courses, up to four of which may be taken outside of the department. All must be passed with a grade of B- or higher. While students are free to select these courses, the department strongly recommends that they be taken from diverse fields of specializations so as to maximize the breadth of exposure to core areas of sociology and other disciplines.

Teaching Assistantships

As part of their preparation for future academic work, graduate students are required to register for AS.230.811 Teaching Assistantship and serve as a teaching assistant for at least one semester.

Foreign Language

One of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree in sociology at Johns Hopkins University is a reading knowledge of a language other than English, and no student is exempt from this requirement. For a language to be eligible the student must show that

  1. a body of social scientific literature exists in the language, or
  2. the student must use this language to carry out dissertation field work or archival research for the dissertation.

The language test will evaluate comprehension of a social science document. Students are encouraged to complete the language requirement as soon as possible, but no later than the end of their third year.

Residence

A minimum of two consecutive semesters of full-time residence is mandatory for all degrees. However, at least six semesters of full-time residence is recommended by the department for completion of the core curriculum, electives, and completion of a research apprenticeship and a trial research paper. By the end of the fourth year in the program, the student is expected to have written a dissertation proposal and have defended it successfully before the appropriate examining committees.

Research Apprenticeship

AS.230.801 and AS.230.804

Students are required to develop practical research expertise through professional-level participation (data analysis, literature searches/reviews, non-routine data processing or coding, preparation and refinement of research instruments, and data/file management). This requirement is fulfilled by satisfactorily completing a Research Apprenticeship, which is required during the student’s first year of full-time graduate study in the department. The standard for certification is substantial research accomplishment as judged by the faculty supervisor.

Trial Research Paper

(AS.230.685, AS.230.690, AS.230.815, AS.230.816, AS.230.817)

The Trial Research Paper (TRP) affords students the experience of planning and executing a research project that leads to a scholarly paper.  The TRP is expected to be a serious, complete work of scholarship, suitable for conference presentation or journal submission. Work on the TRP generally will be done over three semesters with students registering for a total of five TRP courses. By the end of the fall semester of their second year, students should invite a faculty sponsor to supervise the design and execution of the TRP project. A TRP proposal must be approved by the faculty sponsor by the end of the spring semester of the second year. By the end of the fall semester of the third year, the faculty sponsor must approve a draft of the paper which will then be reviewed by another department faculty member. The faculty sponsor, at her or his discretion, may extend this deadline to the end of the intersession period following the fall semester. The faculty reviewer will evaluate the paper and, if necessary, recommend revisions that should be made before the paper is certified. The faculty sponsor will determine required revisions and must certify a final TRP by the end of the spring semester of the third year.

Dissertation

The student must propose and conduct original research presented in a dissertation suitable for publication. The department administers an oral examination which must be passed before the student is allowed to defend before a university board. The dissertation must then be defended either at a Graduate Board preliminary oral examination, based on the dissertation proposal, or at a Graduate Board final oral examination, based on the completed dissertation.

Special Programs

The department offers two special programs that coordinate activities in its two areas of concentration. Doctoral students may affiliate with one or both of these programs at their discretion. These programs function as fields of doctoral specialization within the Department of Sociology.

Program on Global Social Change (PGSC)

This concentration of graduate study focuses on cross-national, comparative research and long-term, world-scale social change. The goal of the program is to give students knowledge of the various theoretical perspectives in these areas, experience in data collection and analysis, and expertise in one or more substantive fields.

The program does not focus on a particular geographic area, although faculty members have conducted extensive research on Latin America, Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and Eastern and Southeastern Europe. Instead of a geographical approach, the emphasis is on issues of development and social change that cut across different countries and world regions. Examples are globalization and regionalization, labor and development, city systems and urban primacy, social movements and revolutions, state violence, migration and labor force formation, family structure and change, social structure and personality, and national and international stratification. Students enroll in a sequence of courses and seminars and participate actively in ongoing faculty projects dealing with one or more of the above issues.

In addition, the interdisciplinary character of graduate education at Johns Hopkins offers students ample opportunity to enroll in courses or collaborate in research of faculty in other departments. Faculty associates of the program include distinguished scholars in anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, and public health.

A graduate concentration is not required of Ph.D. students.

Program on Social Inequality (PSI)

This concentration of graduate study focuses on the causes and consequences of social inequality, the social processes that sustain it, and how social policies can reduce it. These questions are addressed in terms of class, gender, race, ethnicity, and immigration status/citizenship.

The program is designed to train students in the sociological analysis of social inequality among individuals and groups. This training includes course work in areas such as social stratification, the sociology of the family, the sociology of education, sociology of immigration, social structure and personality, social policy, and research design and methods. Students in the PSI program enroll in a sequence of courses and seminars and participate actively in ongoing faculty projects dealing with one or more of the above issues.

In addition, the interdisciplinary character of graduate education at Johns Hopkins offers students ample opportunity to enroll in courses or collaborate in research with faculty in other departments. Faculty associates of the program include distinguished scholars in anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, and public health.

A graduate concentration is not required of Ph.D. students.

Joint Program: Doctorate in Sociology and Master’s in Applied Mathematics and Statistics

The Department of Sociology, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, and the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Whiting School of Engineering, announce a joint program leading to a Ph.D. in Sociology and an M.A. or M.S.E. in Applied Mathematics and Statistics. The purpose of the joint program is to offer Sociology doctoral students an opportunity to acquire advanced statistical knowledge and applied research skills.

The joint program requirements include all the Ph.D. requirements in Sociology and the specially designed requirements for an M.A. or M.S.E. in Applied Mathematics and Statistics. For Sociology Ph.D. requirements, see the Sociology Ph.D. Students Handbook. Applied Mathematics and Statistics courses may substitute for AS.230.600 Introduction to Social Statistics and AS.230.604. Two options for fulfilling the requirements are available for an M.A. or M.S.E. in Applied Mathematics and Statistics. For both options, students are required to meet the Applied Mathematics and Statistics department’s computing requirement (fulfilled through EN.550.413 Applied Statistics and Data Analysis), the purpose of which is to ensure that students are able to effectively use computers to solve mathematical problems.

Note: All Joint Program students are required to complete Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training, which is in addition to the HIPPA training required for the sociology Ph.D.

For more information, please visit http://soc.jhu.edu/graduate/jointprogram/.

Facilities

Each resident graduate student is provided office or desk space to conduct his or her studies and research. In addition, the department has a computer lab with a network of computers and printers for graduate student use. Close working relationships exist with other JHU Centers & Programs which provide excellent opportunities for research training.

Financial Aid

The department strives to provide five years of financial aid for all students who are in good academic standing. Eligibility for financial aid in the fifth year ordinarily requires successful oral defense of the dissertation proposal by May 31, following their fourth year in the Ph.D. program.

The department has a number of assistantships that are awarded each year to graduate students in the Ph.D. program. Opportunities are also available for graduate students to work as salaried research assistants with members of the Sociology faculty and staff at associated research centers.

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.230.101. Introduction Sociology. 3.00 Credits.

Introduces students to basic sociological concepts and perspectives, and applies them to a variety of topics including family, work, and the dynamics of class, gender, and racial/ethnic inequalities in the United States and globally.
Instructor(s): A. Cherlin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.109. Freshman Seminar: Hot Topics in Education. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines current school reform initiatives and the controversies surrounding them through a sociological lens. Freshmen Only
Instructor(s): J. Burdick-Will
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.123. Trust and Altruism: Existence and Forms in Theory and Practice. 3.00 Credits.

Trust is often cited as necessary to the successful functioning of small groups, formal organizations, and democratic society. Altruism is a concept that is debated regarding its very existence – whether there is a sociological, biological, or other basis for saying it exists. Through interdisciplinary readings – primarily from sociology but also evolutionary biology, psychology, and philosophy – we will consider theories of trust and altruism, as well as claims about other mechanisms that can secure mutually beneficial cooperation. Case studies from families, education, neighborhood ecology, and on-line communities are featured. Freshmen only.
Instructor(s): S. Plank
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.127. Freshmen Seminar: Social Interaction. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces students to ways of seeing social interaction, from mundane acts like conversation and riding the bus to extraordinary events like riots, escape panics and battlefield atrocities. The course will employ a “hands on” approach in which students will DO and not just read about sociology. Locations in and around campus will serve as laboratories to observe (and instigate) interactions for analysis. Freshman Only.
Instructor(s): T. Nelson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.137. Special Opportunities in Undergraduate Learning: Exploring Baltimore: An Introduction to Urban Studies. 1.00 Credit.

Through an exploration of urban topics, this course will introduce students to data collection and analysis methods used in the social sciences. Students will discuss relevant research published by Johns Hopkins faculty in urban studies. Students will also gain an introduction to their adopted home, Baltimore, by collecting data and conducting field observations in different neighborhoods.
Instructor(s): M. Reese.

AS.230.147. Introduction to Islam and Islamicate Societies since 1800. 3.00 Credits.

This course is an introduction to contemporary Islam and Muslim societies from approximately 1800 to the present. Key themes will include the colonial encounter, state formation and reform, revolution, Islamic revival, and globalization. Reflecting Islam’s status as a world religion, the course will touch on developments around the Muslim-majority world and in the West.
Instructor(s): R. Calder
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.150. Issues in International Development. 3.00 Credits.

This course will provide an undergraduate level introduction to the study and practice, as well as the successes and failures, of international development. Students will be introduced to the various theoretical frameworks used to explain underdevelopment. Students will also explore the practice of development since the 1950s by examining specific strategies employed in Latin America, South Asia, East Asia, and Africa. Using a variety of country-specific case studies, students will have the opportunity to apply the theoretical and practical frameworks learned in the class to assess the successes and failures of real-life cases.
Instructor(s): M. Levien; R. Agarwala
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.152. Housing and Schools: The Social Contexts of Inequality. 3.00 Credits.

Where families live is still a major determinant of the quality of children’s schools, and this connection between residential location and educational opportunity plays a significant role in the perpetuation of social inequality. This course will examine recent research in housing and education to develop a critical understanding of the role of social inequality, public policy, and individual choices in shaping housing and school opportunities for families. The course will focus on the intersection of residential and educational choices, by examining housing and school interventions across a host of American cities, with a particular focus on how these issues operate in our own city of Baltimore at the end of the semester.
Instructor(s): A. Rhodes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.166. Chinese Migration in Modern World History 1500's-2000's. 3.00 Credits.

This interdisciplinary course applies theories of economic sociology to examine the effects of Chinese overseas migration on modern world economy from the sixteenth century to the contemporary era. It examines the contribution of overseas Chinese to the development of capitalism in the following junctures: the East-West economic integration in the pre-modern era, China's modern transformation after the Opium War (1839-1842), the making of US national economy in the early twentieth century, as well as the postwar economic miracles in the Pacific Rim, among others. Special Note: Fufills History requirement for GSCD track students.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.175. Chinese Revolutions. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces the origins, operation and impacts of five major revolutions in modern China between 1850 and 1950. These include the Taiping Rebellion, the republican revolutions, federalist and southern automatic movements, labor strikes as well as peasant rebellions. It draws on the existing historiography that examines China’s transition from an empire to a republic, impacts of western and Japanese influences to China, as well as the continuity and change of Chinese social organizations. Cross list with International Studies and East Asian Studies. Fulfills IS History requirement.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.202. Research Methods for the Social Sciences. 3.00 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide a sound introduction to the overall process of research and the specific research methods most frequently used by sociologists and other social scientists. Required for Sociology majors and IS GSCD track students.
Instructor(s): L. Hao
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.205. Introduction to Social Statistics. 4.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.
Prerequisites: Statistics Sequence restriction: students who have completed any of these courses may not register: EN.550.211 OR EN.550.230 OR EN.550.310 OR EN.550.311 OR EN.550.413 OR EN.550.420 OR EN.550.420 OR EN.550.420 OR EN.560.435 OR AS.280.345 OR AS.200.314 OR AS.200.315 OR EN.560.348;Statistics Sequence Restriction: Students who have completed EN.550.111 OR EN.550.113 may not enroll.
Instructor(s): S. Karatasli
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.208. Introduction to Race and Ethnicity. 3.00 Credits.

This course offers an historical overview of race and ethnicity in American society, and the processes that have led to ethnic and racial boundaries. We explore the social dynamics of racial/ethnic hostility and racial/ethnic protest movements. In addition, we examine how race and ethnicity have been used to justify segregation, domination and genocide, but also to create a sense of community, shared responsibility and belonging. Cross-listed with Africana Studies
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.213. Social Theory. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to classical sociological theories (with an emphasis on Marx, Weber, and Durkheim). Contemporary theoretical perspectives on social inequality, conflict, and social change are also explored. Emphasis is placed on understanding the theoretical constructs as well as on applying them in the analysis of current social issues. Special Note: Required for IS GSCD track students.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.217. Chinese Overseas in Global History. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the topics of Chinese overseas migration after the long sixteenth century. It investigates the following themes: First, the making of Chinese maritime frontier in the longterm trade and migration across the South China Sea and beyond; Second, economic functions of Chinese overseas networks in the East-West integration from the early modern era to the ongoing wave of globalization; Third, politics of identity and heritage in Chinese overseas communities. Course may not be taken by students that previously took AS.230.166.
Prerequisites: Course may not be taken by students that previously took AS.230.166.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.221. Global Social Change. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces students to issues of global social change, with a particular focus on the challenges of international development and the contemporary globalization process. Specific themes include world income inequality and global poverty, the rise of supranational organizations (e.g. WTO and EU) and their relations with sovereign states, anti-globalization activism, the rise of China and India in the global economy, and the origins as well as consequences of the current global economic crisis, among others. Lectures will be aided by documentary films and other multi-media materials. Special Note: Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only. Formerly offered as AS 230.353. Students who took AS.230.353 cannot take AS.230.221.
Prerequisites: Students who took AS.230.353 cannot take AS.230.221.
Instructor(s): H. Hung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.223. Housing and Homelessness in the United States. 3.00 Credits.

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.225. Population, Health and Development. 3.00 Credits.

This course will cover the major world population changes in the past century as well as the contemporary situation and projections for this century. Topics include rapid population growth, the historical and continuing decline of death and birth rates, contraceptive methods as well as family planning and child survival programs, population aging, urbanization, population and the environment and the demographic effects of HIV/AIDS
Instructor(s): S. Becker
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.228. Colonialism in Asia and Its Contested Legacies. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism in Asia, with special focus on the development of British Straits Settlements and Hong Kong as well as Japanese Taiwan. We will review the competing discourses about the impact of colonial dominations in these areas from the 1800s to the present-day. In the beginning of the era, the British built up the economic linkage between Hong Kong and Penang, Malacca as well as Singapore to sustain its dominance throughout the “Far East.” In the middle of the period, the expanding Japanese empire developed Taiwan as a footstep to compete with the British interests in South China and Southeast Asia. Hong Kong and the Straits Settlements, especially Singapore, became the contested terrain where two colonial powers vied for their influences in the region. The competition was not only about trade, but about the construction of a new East Asian regional order after the end of the Chinese hegemony. In the end of the period, the intervention of the US power in postwar Asia facilitated the retreat of the colonial establishments, British and Japanese ones included. The course that compares the colonial establishments and discourses on colonial legacies among the three areas points out that colonialism constituted an inalienable part of Asian history. Cross listed International Studies (CP) and East Asian Studies.Fufills History requirement for IS GSCD track students only.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.237. Sociology and Film. 3.00 Credits.

Do films merely mirror society, or do they in fact shape societal experience? This class will investigate these questions through a filmic analysis of sociological issues. We will consider both narrative and documentary films and use them to engage in sociological questions of class, race, and gender. We will discuss what the historical and current trends in film making and film subject say about society, and how these trends may in turn influence society.
Instructor(s): E. Talbert
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.244. Race and Ethnicity in American Society. 3.00 Credits.

Race and ethnicity have played a prominent role in American society and continue to do so, as demonstrated by interracial and interethnic gaps in economic and educational achievement, residence, political power, family structure, crime, and health. Using a sociological framework, we will explore the historical significance of race and its development as a social construction, assess the causes and consequences of intergroup inequalities and explore potential solutions.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.245. Inequality & Social Policy in U.S.A.. 3.00 Credits.

In the US and other industrialized countries, problems of income inequality and poverty have taken a sharp turn for the worst in recent years. The purpose of the course is to give students an opportunity to learn about the causes of this increasing inequality and poverty in US cities like Baltimore, and to explore the potential for public policies to rectify these problems. Students will read about the main theoretical and empirical perspectives on the issues; examine the relationship between inequality and class, gender and race; study the history and present shape of social policy in the US; and explore the consequences of particular initiatives for the status of the urban poor.
Instructor(s): A. Livingstone
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.253. Social Interaction. 3.00 Credits.

Interaction in small groups or in face-to-face situations (“microsociology”) is the sole focus of this course. Wherever possible, a “hands on” approach in which students do sociology and not just learn about others’ efforts is utilized. This will include field observations of public and semi-public spaces, recording and analyzing small group interaction, and participating in SIMSOC, an intense interactive simulation of society. Major conceptual approaches include symbolic interactionism, ethnomethodology and interaction ritual. Students that previously took AS.230.127 may not take this course.
Prerequisites: Students that previously took 230.127 may not take this course.
Instructor(s): T. Nelson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.255. Men and Women in Society. 3.00 Credits.

This course will explore what it means to be male or female through academic writings, fiction, and film. It will examine how genders are defined by individuals, cultures, and institutions, and how those meanings shape everyday life for men and women. Power, inequality, and intersections with race-ethnicity, class, and sexuality will be a primary focus. Theories of gender addressed will include those related to masculinity, social psychology, feminism, and intersectionality. Though the course will primarily consider the United States, gender in other countries and cultures will also be addressed. Cross-listed with WGS.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.265. Research Tools and Technologies for the Social Sciences. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to a range of software programs that are critical for conducting social scientific research in the 21st century. Students will develop competency in the use of computer programs for statistical analysis, database management, the creation of maps and timelines, and the presentation of research reports. The course uses examples from ongoing social science faculty research projects at Johns Hopkins on global inequality and international development. Required for GSCD track students
Instructor(s): M. Kang
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.275. Revolution, Reform and Social Inequality in China. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores various aspects of social inequality in China during the Mao Zedong and the post-Mao reform eras. We will examine inequality within villages, the rural/urban divide, urban inequality, education and health policies, and gender and ethnic inequality. Each of these issue areas will be tackled analytically, but the aim is also to understand what it was/is like to live in China during and after the Mao era. Formerly offered as AS.230.321.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.285. Maritime East Asia. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the transnational connections among merchants and migrants in the waters of East and Southeast Asia from a historical and comparative perspective. We will explore how diplomatic ties, long-distance trade and migration contributed to the making of cosmopolitan cities such as Quanzhou (Zayton), Malacca, Fort Zeelandia (Formosa), Batavia, Manila, Singapore and Hong Kong in the region from the tenth century onwards. The course will close with an examination of how the transnational connections are relevant to understand inter-state competition in Asia’s long twentieth century. Key subjects to be introduced include tribute trade system, trading diasporas, Euro-Chinese co-colonialism, pan-Asianism, as well as history and historiography of maritime silk road.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.293. Immigration in the United States. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines patterns and consequences of immigration at the national, state, and local level. Special attention will be given to changing racial and ethnic relations in American gateway cities, immigrants’ economic and cultural assimilation, the plight of the second generation, the importance of immigration policy in shaping the experiences of migrant groups, and public opinion on immigration.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.304. Social Organization and Social Control in Schools. 3.00 Credits.

We will ask: How do arrangements of tasks, rewards, roles, and opportunities in schools affect student learning, behavior, and sense of attachment? and In what ways are social control processes in schools related to the demands and dynamics of other institutions, particularly the family and the labor market? Before addressing these questions, we will define social organization and social control, and describe the forms (both intended and unintended) they take in schools.
Instructor(s): S. Plank
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.310. Becoming An Adult. 3.00 Credits.

While students may already be personally familiar with the subject matter, the course examines the sociological and psychological dimensions of this demographically dense period known as the transition to adulthood. Emphasizes life course theories of human development through readings of empirical work on adolescence, the transition to college, early employment and early family formation. Attention is paid to the ways class; gender; race and nationality influence the pathways, choices and outcomes of young people. A Statistics/ Sociology background is helpful, but not required.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.312. Education & Society. 3.00 Credits.

This course analyzes educational systems as social institutions and organizations. It gives particular attention to the often taken-for-granted ways that we structure learning in schools and their consequences for social inequality. To these ends, the course will examine classical institutional and organizational theory in sociology and evaluate these theories in their application to historical process of educational formation and the contemporary organization of K-12 schooling in the US.
Instructor(s): J. Burdick-Will
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.313. Space, Place, Poverty & Race: Sociological Perspectives on Neighborhoods & Public Housing. 3.00 Credits.

Is a neighborhood just a grouping of individuals living in the same place, or do neighborhoods have collective meanings and impacts on children and families? We will capitalize on research methodologies used to define and describe neighborhoods and their effects on economic and educational outcomes. These include case studies, census data, surveys, quasi/experimental data. Focus is on how research measures neighborhood effects and incorporates community level processes into models of social causation (e.g., social capital/control, community efficacy, civic engagement). Also examined: patterns in residential mobility, segregation, and preferences within black and white populations; development of housing policy in the U.S.; programs to determine how neighborhoods affect issues of social importance. Statistics and public policy background is helpful but not required.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.316. African American Family. 3.00 Credits.

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.318. State and Society in Modern India. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the complex, at times conflicting, relationship that has emerged between Indian seats of power from above and Indian expressions of society from below. Attention will be placed on the period between 1947 to the present.
Instructor(s): R. Agarwala
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.322. Quantitative Research Practicum. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides “hands on” research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Quantitative methods will be emphasized, as applied to census data, survey data and/or archival data. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. Juniors and seniors only. Sophomores require instructor's permission. Recommended Course Background: AS.230.205, AS.230.202
Instructor(s): J. Burdick-Will
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.323. Qualitative Research Practicum. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides hands on research experience applying sociological research tools and a sociological perspective to problems of substance. Qualitative observational and/or interviewing methods will be emphasized. Students will design and carry out a research project and write a research report. This course fulfills the research practicum requirement for the Sociology major.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.325. Global Social Change and Development Practicum. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides hands on research experience in the field of global social change and development. Students will participate in a collaborative research project analyzing the causes and consequences of the recent upsurge of protest around the world in comparison with previous historical waves of social unrest. The course fulfills the research practicum requirement for Sociology majors and is required for the GSCD track.
Prerequisites: AS.230.265 or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): B. Silver; S. Karatasli
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.332. Race, Racism & Racial Privilege. 3.00 Credits.

This course will examine the concepts of race, racism, racial privilege in contemporary America, and the West in general. Examples from other countries will be integrated as well. Historical contexts such as the colonialism, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement, and the post Civil Rights era will help to provide an understanding of the social, political, economic, and cultural forces processes that have constructed and shaped the concepts of race and the racialized subject over time.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.336. Family, Gender and Sexuality in China. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines social changes in China since the beginning of the People’s Republic (1949) through the lenses of family, gender and sexuality. The first half of the course focuses on understanding family institutions, women’s status, gender relations and sexualities in connection with major historical transitions between 1949 and the present. The second half includes readings and discussions around several thematic topics regarding family, gender and sexuality in contemporary China in the broader context of politics, economy, and social norms.
Instructor(s): Y. Dong
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.341. Sociology of Health and Illness. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces students to medical sociology, which is the application of the sociological perspective to health and health care. Major topics include stress, social epidemiology, and the social organization of health care.
Instructor(s): E. Agree
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.343. Political Sociology of Latin America. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides an overview of Latin America through its historical, economic, social, and political dimensions. Emphasis will be given to the analysis of social structures: class, race and ethnicity, and the contemporary social movements. The course begins with an overview of the pre-Columbian civilizations and colonial legacies that gave rise to the multiethnic societies and the ethnic conflicts which characterize contemporary Latin America.Cross-listed with Program in Latin American Studies and International Studies (CP)
Instructor(s): M. von der Heydt-Coca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.344. Health and Society in Contemporary China. 3.00 Credits.

This class examines the social and health consequences of systemic transformations in China, including collapse of the urban work-unit system, resurgence of infectious disease, and implementation of the One-Child Policy. Dean’s Teaching Fellowship; Cross listed with East Asian Studies, Public Health and International Studies.
Instructor(s): R. Core
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.345. Rising Inequality in Rich Countries. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines explanations for why inequality has increased in North America and Western Europe over the last 40 years. The course focuses on macro-level economic and political changes. Topics include deindustrialization, globalization, financial sector growth, welfare program cuts, and decreasing tax progressivity.
Instructor(s): D. Thompson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.346. Economic Sociology of Latin America. 3.00 Credits.

This course will offer an overview of Latin America’s economic reality as an intertwined process of economic and political domestic factors within the constraints of the world economy. Latin American development will be analyzed from a historical perspective. The first half of the semester the course will focus on the analysis of the economic developmental patterns starting in the middle of the 19thcentury to the populist era in the middle of the 20thcentury. In the second half of the semester, we will analyze in depth the contemporary neoliberal approach to development. Globalization is the force that drives economic, social and political processes in Latin America. The course will include case studies as well the social conflicts generated by the increasing polarization of the society. Students will be exposed to important sociological theories.
Instructor(s): M. von der Heydt-Coca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.355. Homelessness, Vacants and the Right to Housing. 3.00 Credits.

A Community Based Learning (CBL) course organized through the Center for Social Concern, we will collaborate with Housing Our Neighbors (HON) http://www.honbaltimore.org, a local organization comprised of people experiencing homelessness, allies and advocates promoting the human right to housing to examine and engage the vacant housing crisis in Baltimore. Students will be expected to participate in organizing and community sessions as well as ongoing research into the Baltimore vacant property market and ultimately seek to transform housing into a right for all people.
Instructor(s): D. Pasciuti
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.356. Contemporary African Social Movements. 3.00 Credits.

This course is a survey of contemporary social movements in sub-Saharan Africa. The course will begin with an introduction to social movement theory. Subsequent weeks will each focus on a different type of movement (e.g. independence movements, labor movements, women's movements, environmental movements, etc.) The limited coverage of African issues in the US media tends to focus on either catastrophes or on development projects that are driven by international NGOs and the governments of northern countries. Through this course, students will gain a clear understanding of the broad range of actions that African civil society is using to address social problems throughout the continent. Materials used will include academic analysis of movements, writings by movement participants themselves, and films. The course will also introduce students to the most widely used social movement theories. Because these theories have been largely developed by social scientists in northern countries, the students will be asked to assess their applicability to African movements. Through this critical application of social theory, students will investigate the specific possibilities and constraints facing social and political actors in contemporary Africa. Cross listed with Dean’s Teaching Fellowship, International Studies (CP) and Africana Studies.
Instructor(s): B. Scully
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.357. Baltimore and Beyond. 3.00 Credits.

This course uses the city of Baltimore as a lens through which to explore issues of urban inequality. We will focus on Baltimore's history of racial segregation and concentrated poverty, and its effect on the social and economic well-being of the city and its residents, with attention to education, employment, health and crime. Students will learn how to employ Census data, GIS approaches, and sociological research to inform questions about population change, inequality and the distribution of resources across the city and metropolitan region. Students will also work on one or more policy relevant studies based in Baltimore, including: a project on abandoned and vacant housing, a desegregation intervention, and a longitudinal study of inner city youth. Finally, students will become familiar with Baltimore City's programs and policy approaches to addressing the city's most pressing problems, and will design innovative and effective and innovative solutions as part of their course assignments. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Prerequisites: Students that took AS.360.357 may not take AS.230.357
Instructor(s): S. Deluca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.359. Research Seminar on Global Social Protest. 3.00 Credits.

This research seminar will be run as a collective research working group in which we will carry-out a research project on the waves ofsocial unrest around the world from the 19th century to present. The research project seeks to shed light on the recent (post-2008) global upsurge of labor and social unrest -- from the Arab Spring to Occupy Wall Street, from the anti-austerity movements roiling Europe to the wave of workers’ protests taking place in China (including the factories where Ipods, Ipads and Iphones are assembled) -- by comparing it with analogous historical periods since the early nineteenth century. We will document the spread and characteristics of this global wave as well as exploring its causes and consequences. The course will be devoted to the (i) theoretical discussions about major historical waves of social protest and labor unrest in the world, (ii) methodological discussions regarding data collection procedures using digital archives of historical newspapers (including reliability studies), (iii) data-coding, and (iv) substantive analysis of major waves of social protest. This course is suitable for students who are interested in deepening their understanding of the dynamics of global social protest as well as in deepening their experience with hands-on research on a topic of contemporary social and political relevance.
Prerequisites: AS.230.265 OR AS.230.325 OR permission of the instructor.
Instructor(s): S. Kumral
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.361. Class and Culture. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the intersection of social class and culture—both the popular culture of movies, TV, music, etc, and “culture” in the anthropological sense as the shared way of life of a people. The course is divided into three main sections: 1) concepts of class, culture and the ways in which they interact; 2) cultures of each major class within American society, beginning with the “Old” and “New Money” classes, the “New Class” of intelligentsia, the much-invoked Middle Classes, the shrinking Working Class, and continuing through the poverty-stricken Lower Classes; 3) issues of cultural consumption and production and their role in reproducing the class structure.
Instructor(s): T. Nelson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.362. Migration & Development. 3.00 Credits.

This course focuses on the relationship between international migration and development. The course first introduces theories of international migration, immigrant integration, and international development. Building on this foundation, we then examine how immigrants interact with their homeland and how sending country governments tap their diaspora to improve development outcomes. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.
Instructor(s): L. Hao; R. Agarwala
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.363. Sociology of Dispossession. 3.00 Credits.

The “grabbing” of land and natural resources has, in recent years, generated widespread political conflict across the Global South and put dispossession on the agenda of academics and policy-makers. Nevertheless, compared to other social relations—such as labor exploitation—dispossession has not been central to social scientific understandings of capitalism, the state, “development,” or politics. In this class, we will collectively explore the nascent field that we might call the sociology of dispossession. We will begin with existing theoretical approaches to the problem, and then proceed to challenge, reconstruct or supplant those theories as we consider a wide range of historical examples of dispossession—including the English enclosures, colonial plunder, large dams, mining, water privatization, Special Economic Zones, transnational agricultural investments, conservation projects, and climate-induced displacement. Students will write weekly reading responses and a final paper.
Instructor(s): M. Levien
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.364. Ethnic Violence in Comparative and Global Perspective. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides a framework for understanding and analyzing different forms of ethnic violence including ethnic riots, ethnic wars, and genocides around the world. Beginning with foundational texts on defining ethnic groups, we will examine causes and dynamics of ethnic mobilization and violence from different disciplines and perspectives. Throughout the course, we will explore texts that treat key themes in studies of ethnic violence including globalization, economic development, inequality, dismantling of the developmental state, migration, state formation and failure, conflict resolution, and democratization; focusing on various cases of ethnic violence in different regions including Eastern Europe, Basque Region, Turkey, Sudan, India, Sri Lanka, China, and historical cases like Northern Ireland. Fulfills Non-Western History (NWHIST) requirement for IS GSCD students only.
Instructor(s): S. Kumral
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.366. From Habeas Corpus to Eminent Domain: Urban Development and Urban Planning in Comparative-Historical Perspective. 3.00 Credits.

This course offers a broad survey of urban development in the United States by examining both the intended and unintended consequences of urban planning. Using a comparative-historical framework, issues of power, conflict, representation, participation, and planning within urban development and the American city will be addressed and critiqued with specific reference to Baltimore. Cross listed with International Studies (AP). Fufills History requirement for IS GSCD track students only.
Instructor(s): D. Pasciuti
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.367. Islamic Finance. 3.00 Credits.

Today, Islamic finance is a global industry comprising nearly $2 trillion in assets, with hubs from Kuala Lumpur to Dubai to London. But half a century ago, nothing called “Islamic finance” existed. So where did Islamic finance come from? Why is it growing so fast? And what does it mean for finance to be Islamic? We discuss the ban on riba in the Quran and hadith, finance in early and medieval Islamic societies, petrodollars and the birth of Islamic banking in the 1970s, the rise of Islamic capital markets since 2000, contemporary shariah-compliant financial structures, and the constitution of piety through financial practice.
Instructor(s): R. Calder
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.369. Sociology in Economic Life. 3.00 Credits.

This course discusses how geopolitics, technology as well as social differentiation (such as race, class and gender) shape the structure of economic actions. Special attention will be paid to patterns of state-business relationship, labor processes, migrant economy, globalization and international division of labor.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.371. Sociology of Rock. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the history and dynamics of rock music using key concepts and perspectives from sociology. The course is divided into four sections, each of which examines the phenomenon of rock music from a different analytical perspective. The first section on the origins of rock looks at the confluence of developments in post-war America, especially in terms of race, class and generational change, which produced this new musical form. The second section, “Rock as Cultural Production,” looks at all aspects of the rock “field,” not just artists and audiences but record labels, stores, DJ’s and radio stations, the music press and journalists, performance venues. The third section examines rock as a force for social change and protest from the 1960s until present, and the final section examines the performative aspects of rock as a kind of “interaction ritual” with its own microsociological dynamics.
Instructor(s): T. Nelson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.372. Social Protest in Contemporary China. 3.00 Credits.

This class introduces popular resistance in post-1978 China, examining its socioeconomic, political, and cultural background, various types of protests by multiple social groups, and outcomes of protests. Cross listed with Dean's Teaching Fellowship.
Instructor(s): Y. Li
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.373. Urban Sociology. 3.00 Credits.

This course will explore the growth and development of urban areas, and how cities create, influence, and perpetuate social and economic inequalities. It will explore how the community environment shapes social interactions, identities, and attitudes. Specific topics will include urban poverty, residential segregation, housing, crime, and health.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.374. Poverty and Public Policy. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the causes and consequences of U.S. urban poverty, it's implications for health and wellbeing, and explores strategies for addressing it. We cover the major theoretical explanations scholars have advanced to explain the persistence of urban poverty including labor markets, residential segregation, welfare policy, family structure, and the criminal justice system. Within each topic area, students are introduced to a range of interventions aimed at alleviating urban poverty. Students will conduct a formal policy analysis of 20 pages and participate in a mock congressional hearing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Prerequisites: Students that took AS.360.372 may not take AS.230.374.
Instructor(s): K. Edin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.375. Nations, States, and Boundaries. 3.00 Credits.

This course explores the historical origins and development of the modern global political order based on sovereign nation-states, the crisis of this order through the twentieth century, as well as the unraveling of this order at the turn of the twenty-first century. We will focus on how dominant political organizations in the changing world order (such as states, political parties, and transnational governing bodies) have been shaped by different social forces (such as classes and ethnic groups) and vice versa. Topics covered include rise and fall of modern nationalism, formation of regional and global governing structures, “civilizational” turn of global politics, waves of separatism and redrawing of nation’s boundaries after the Cold War, politics of immigration and citizenship, among others.
Instructor(s): H. Hung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.376. Sociology of Religion. 3.00 Credits.

This course addresses two primary questions: What social elements influence the varieties of religious belief, organization and action? What are the consequences of these forms of religious expression for both individuals and for society? In addition to readings and exams, students will also attend two different religious services over the course of the semester.
Instructor(s): T. Nelson
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.377. Colonialism and Anti-Colonialism. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar examines the theories and historiography of colonialism and anti-colonial movements. It focuses on the establishment of the colonial division of labor, comparative colonialism, identity formation, and nationalism as well as anti-colonial movement.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.379. Undergraduate Research Seminar. 3.00 Credits.

Seminar for Sociology students writing senior honor theses and conducting pre-approved independent research projects. Juniors and Seniors Sociology majors only. Permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): M. Levien
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.380. Poverty and Social Welfare Policy. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the causes and consequences of U.S. poverty and explores strategies for addressing it, with some comparisons to other rich nations. We cover the major theoretical explanations scholars have advanced to explain the persistence of poverty and inequality including labor markets, residential segregation, welfare policy, family structure, and the criminal justice system. Within each topic area, students are introduced to contemporary policy approaches aimed at alleviating poverty, and evaluations of these approaches.
Instructor(s): K. Edin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.381. Sociology of the Middle East and North Africa. 3.00 Credits.

This course takes a sociological approach to the contemporary Middle East and North Africa. Topics include urbanization and demographic change; rentier welfare states and the global political economy of oil; women in higher education and the labor force; the 2011 Arab Spring; conflict in Syria, Libya, and Yemen; Amazigh (Berber) identity in northwest Africa; Israel-Palestine; “Dubai, Inc.” and the sociology of migrant labor; neoliberal Islamic politics in Turkey; cinema and everyday life in Iran; conservative monarchy in Morocco and Saudi Arabia; and the role of the United States in the MENA region. Students will give presentations, write memos, and submit two papers. One aim of the course is to turn students into clear, polished academic writers and thinkers.
Instructor(s): R. Calder
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.383. Courts, Housing, and the City: A Research Seminar on Social Justice in Baltimore. 3.00 Credits.

This course will join an existing survey of the Housing Court in Baltimore City by the Public Justice Center (PJC) of Maryland to examine the role and process of evictions in the Baltimore civil litigation system. The course will examine the history of housing in Baltimore and the changing role of the courts in housing rights and law from the mid-20th century to the present. Working with the PJC’s Human Right to Housing Project, students will be expected to participate in the survey collection process by attending Rent Court and participating in the data collection process, followed by cleaning and analysis of the data. Counts as American Politics/Sociology of the United States for GSCD Track.
Prerequisites: AS.230.205 AND AS.230.265 or permission of instructor
Instructor(s): D. Pasciuti
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.384. Global Urbanism: Planet of Slums or World Cities?. 3.00 Credits.

Cities are at the forefront of a range of global governance challenges. This course will address the relationship between development and the political and economic structure of the world economy in the built environment of the city. By drawing upon both classical texts about cities (do they still work for us, what can they account for) and on a diverse literature on cities and slums, we will focus our attention to the contemporary challenges faced in cities both in the more developed and in the developing world. Through a variety of disciplinary perspectives we will try to understand the underlying social and economic changes and the profound transformations under way throughout the global urban world. Fulfills IR or CP requirement for International Studies students and Political Sociology (IR or CP) for GSCD track. (Formerly AS.191.349)
Instructor(s): D. Pasciuti
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.385. Schooling, Racial Inequality and Public Policy in America. 3.00 Credits.

After examining alternative explanations for why individuals obtain different amounts and types of educational training, the course focuses on how an individual’s family background and race affect his or her trajectory through the educational system. The course covers the specific challenges that have confronted urban schooling in America since the 1960s, including the classic literature on the effects of school and community resources on student achievement as well as the development and later evaluation of school desegregation policies. The course also considers case studies of current policy debates in the US, such as housing segregation and school resegregation, voucher programs for school choice, and the motivation for and consequences of the establishment of state-mandated testing requirements. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed upon the alternative modes of inquiry and writing which opposing scholars, policymakers, and journalists use to address these contentious topics.
Instructor(s): S. Morgan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.388. Sociology of the Family. 3.00 Credits.

Sociological perspectives on contemporary family life, including marriage and divorce, cohabitation, single parenthood, same sex partnerships, children’s wellbeing, balancing work and family responsibilities, domestic violence, and government policy toward families.
Instructor(s): A. Cherlin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.391. Theories of International Development. 3.00 Credits.

This course will cover major theoretical approaches to the study of development. We will begin with foundational political economic texts (including those of Adam Smith, Karl Marx, and Karl Polanyi). After setting the historical context of decolonization, we will then proceed to cover major theoretical approaches to the study of development in the past sixty years, including: modernization theory, dependency and world systems analysis, state-centered approaches, neo-institutionalism, the capabilities approach, political-ecology, post-development, feminism, the Washington consensus, social capital, experimental economics, and contemporary sociological reconstructions of Marx, Smith and Polanyi. Cross listed with International Studies (IR); fulfills IS Economics requirement for GSCD track students only.
Instructor(s): M. Levien
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.395. Contemporary Social Theory. 3.00 Credits.

This course will examine how major social theorists of the 20th century advanced upon the “classical” social theories of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. As they grappled with the historical events and social concerns of the 20th century—the Russian revolution and its degeneration into Stalinism, the failure of communist movements in the West, the rise and fall of fascism and Nazism, the consolidation of capitalist democracies and welfare states, the emergence of anti-colonial movements in the “Third World,” and the persistence of race, gender and sexuality as forms of domination—social theorists provided novel answers to classical questions of social theory: 1) what is the structure of modern society, how does it change, and how is it reproduced?; 2) what is the relation between social structures and ideas, knowledge, and subjectivity?; and 3) what are the conditions of possibility for human freedom? Theorists to be covered include Antonio Gramsci, Franz Fanon, W.E.B. Dubois, Georg Lukacs, Talcott Parsons, Herbert Marcuse, Jurgen Habermas, Louis Althusser, Pierre Bourdieu, Michel Foucault, Nancy Fraser, Patricia Hill Collins, Judith Butler, and Henri Lefebvre. In addition to understanding and comparing the theories, we will try to use them to understand contemporary societies.
Instructor(s): M. Levien
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.396. Politics and Society. 3.00 Credits.

This seminar surveys texts that treat key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the relationship between political and economic power, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, the nation-state and nationalism, states and war, states and welfare, sources of authority, ideology and political contention, social movements, and social revolutions. Fulfills Comparative Politics for International Studies.
Prerequisites: AS.230.213 or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.399. Economic Development in Comparative Perspective. 3.00 Credits.

This course reviews the evolution of the literature on economic development over the past half-century and evaluates its strengths and weaknesses in light of developmental experiences in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Course lectures are by Dr. Brian Van Arkadie, an economist with decades of experience in the international development field including as a consultant for the World Bank, the United Nations Development Program and to numerous governments ranging from Tanzania and Uganda to Egypt and Vietnam.
Instructor(s): B. Silver; B. Van Arkadie
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.400. Social Policy Seminar. 3.00 Credits.

This course is designed for students who have completed either the Baltimore or Washington intensive semesters of the Social Policy Minor. The students will make presentations and pursue joint projects based on what they have learned during the intensive semesters concerning key social policy issues.
Instructor(s): A. Cherlin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.405. Neoliberalism. 3.00 Credits.

Neoliberalism, a political project that seeks to subject all aspects of social life to free market force, has ascended to orthodoxy in developed and developing countries alike over the last four decades. This course is a reading seminar focused on some of the key classic and cutting-edge original texts that critically examine and debate the origins, socio-political impacts, and crisis of the neoliberal project. It will cover such topics as the genealogy of the neoliberal idea, neoliberal state, informalization of works, neoliberal cities, rise of the one percent, and global governance. Class will be a mix of lecture and seminar-style discussions. Requirements include reading memo, class presentation, and a term paper.
Instructor(s): H. Hung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.407. Comparative Labor Movements Research Seminar. 3.00 Credits.

Research-oriented coruse on the dynamics of labor and social movements from global and comparative-historical perspective.
Prerequisites: AS.230.265 AND AS.230.325
Instructor(s): S. Karatasli
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.415. Social Problems in Contemporary China. 3.00 Credits.

In this course we will examine contemporary Chinese society, looking at economic development, rural transformation, urbanization and migration, labor relations, changes in class structure and family organization, health care, environmental problems, governance, and popular protest. The course is designed for both graduate and undergraduate students. Undergraduates must have already completed a course about China at Hopkins. Cross-listed with East Asian Studies.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.435. The China Boom. 3.00 Credits.

This course addresses the origins, global impacts, and demise of China’s economic ascendancy as a world economic and political powerhouse at the turn of the twenty-first century. The course will cover the historical origins of the China boom and impacts of the boom on global political economic order. It will also address the social-political imbalances within China that contribute to the global financial crisis and recent slowdown of the Chinese economy. Particular topics include late imperial and Maoist legacies’ relation to contemporary economic growth, stages of China’s capitalist development, China’s outward investment in the developing world, formation and limits of US-China economic symbiosis, and China’s participation in global governance, among others.
Instructor(s): H. Hung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.440. Port Cities and Historical Capitalism in Maritime Asia. 3.00 Credits.

The goal of the seminar is to examine the prospects and limits of understanding the incorporation of Asia in the capitalist world-system from the prism of oceanic connections. The theoretical thrust of this course is to develop but also to adapt Janet Abu-Lughod emphasis on the connections across port cities and littoral in the Afro-Eurasian continents before the long sixteenth century in her Before European Hegemony. But instead of looking at a port city as its adjacent hinterland polity’s gateway to global trade in the premodern era, the course examines the multifarious coast-hinterland relationships. The readings are organized by a chronological order, which begins with the historical maritime silk road between the third and thirteenth centuries, and will be followed by Asian port cities in the European age of empire and postwar American-led Cold War Structure, as well as the present-day Chinese New Silk Road Diplomacy. Students are expected to select an issue of regional tensions and to analyze its historical root.
Instructor(s): H. Kuo
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.460. Research Seminar on Stratification in the Modern World Economy: 1600-2014. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines stratification in the modern world economy from the 16th century to today, covering classical and contemporary theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the hierarchical structure of the capitalist world economy (including Baranko Milanovic, Thomas Pikkety, Andre Gunder Frank, Giovanni Arrighi, Christopher Chase-Dunn, P. Korzeniewicz and T. Moran, W. W. Rostow). Students will be expected to recreate and extend these empirical studies and engage in a quantitative discussion of theories of global inequality and development. In doing so, we will discuss how methodological choices, research designs, choice of indicators and inequality measures affect the outcomes and conclusions of this research. Using this theoretical and empirical background, the course will engage key questions on the contemporary and historical conditions of world inequality such as; has world income inequality been increasing or decreasing over time? Do we see stability or change in the hierarchical structure of the capitalist world economy? What are the consequences for contemporary rise of China and recent global financial meltdown for world income inequality? What will stratification in the world economy look like in the 21st century? Counts as IR/Global Sociology or Economics/Economic Sociology for GSCD Track.
Prerequisites: AS.230.150 AND AS.230.265 or permission of instructor
Instructor(s): D. Pasciuti; S. Karatasli
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.500. Independent Study. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.501. Research Assistantship. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): H. Hung; K. McDonald; L. Hao; S. Morgan.

AS.230.502. Senior Honors Program. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.506. Independent Research. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.507. Internship. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.508. Internship. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): A. Cherlin; H. Hung; L. Hao; M. Levien; S. Morgan.

AS.230.597. Independent Research. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.598. Summer Internship. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.599. Independent Study. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): J. Andreas; K. McDonald; M. Levien; T. Nelson.

AS.230.600. Introduction to Social Statistics.

This course will introduce students to the application of statistical techniques commonly used in sociological analysis. Topics include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, confidence intervals, chi-square, anova, and regression analysis. Hands-on computer experience with statistical software and analysis of data from various fields of social research.
Instructor(s): S. Karatasli
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.602. Theories of Society.

Intensive readings from classical theorists (including Marx, Weber, and Durkheim) form the core of this course. Emphasis is placed on exploring the utility of social theory for formulating important sociological questions and conceptualizing social research.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas.

AS.230.603. Contemporary Social Theory.

This course will explore several important traditions in contemporary social theory, including structural-functionalism, micro-interactionism, exchange and rational choice, post-structuralism, discourse and narrative analysis, and efforts by recent theorists to extend, synthesize, supplement, and revise Marx and Weber’s explanations of inequality, group conflict, and macro-level social change, including world systems analysis.
Instructor(s): M. Levien.

AS.230.604. Linear Models for the Social Sciences.

A seminar in multiple regression (least squares and alternative estimation procedures) with a focus on sociological problems and software applications. Extensions to hierarchical linear models will be included. Graduate students should have completed AS.230.600 or the equivalent. Undergraduates only admitted with instructor's permission, and AS.230.205 or equivalent. Recommended Course Background: AS.230.205, AS.230.600 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): S. Morgan.

AS.230.605. Categorical Data Analysis.

This course provides the students with a set of statistical tools to understand and interpret social science research dealing with categorical dependent variables and to prepare students to apply these models in their own research. The models covered in the course include logit, probit, Poisson, and log-linear models, as well as multi-level models of categorical dependent variables.
Instructor(s): L. Hao
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.607. Labor in the World System.

This is an intensive reading seminar on working class formation from a comparative, historical and global perspective, including theoretical and empirical (case study) readings on changes over time in labor process, labor markets, and labor movements. We will build on a range of local case studies to establish spatial and temporal patterns, and discuss the connections between these global patterns and the dynamics of historical capitalism.
Instructor(s): B. Silver.

AS.230.608. Proseminar In Sociology.

Individual one-hour presentations by faculty members will introduce students to the faculty’s substantive interests and research styles.
Instructor(s): B. Silver.

AS.230.609. Dissertation Seminar.

Advanced seminar for PhD students who are preparing their dissertation proposals or writing their dissertations. Sociology graduate students only.
Instructor(s): L. Hao.

AS.230.611. World-Historical Sociology.

In this seminar we will read key texts in comparative sociology. The topics covered are cross-national sociology, comparative national development, comparing world-systems, the modern world-system, globalization, and social movements.
Instructor(s): H. Hung.

AS.230.612. Seminar on Social Inequality.

This seminar attempts a broad survey of sociological theorizing and research on social stratification and the role of social institutions in generating and mitigating inequality.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca.

AS.230.614. Seminar On The Family.

A discussion-oriented seminar focused on major recent writings on the family, in both the developed and developing nations.
Instructor(s): A. Cherlin.

AS.230.615. Sem:Panel Data Analysis.

Instructor(s): L. Hao.

AS.230.616. Researching Race, Class, & Gender.

This advanced graduate seminar is designed to help graduate students sort out whether they are headed for careers as race, gender, or class specialists. We will review major sociological work in these sub-fields and work to determine what common elements of these publications makes them a stand out in the discipline. Then students will be asked to craft projects of their own.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald.

AS.230.617. Seminar on Immigration.

In-depth reading and discussion of theories and research on immigration to the U.S. theoretical issues include international migration, immigration, and assimilation. Research topics include: the impact of U.S. immigration laws on immigrant inflows and stocks, self-selection of immigrants, the impact of immigration on the native-born population, and the adaptation of the first and second generations. The course focuses on immigration since 1965 and its related controversies and debates.
Instructor(s): L. Hao.

AS.230.623. Causal Inference.

This course introduces strategies for estimating causal effects from a counterfactual perspective, uniting the potential outcome model with causal graph methodology. After an examination of the primary features of the counterfactual perspective and criteria for causal effect identification, the course will consider data analysis techniques such as matching, regression from a potential outcome perspective, inverse probability of treatment weighting, instrumental variable estimators of local average treatment effects, and estimation via exhaustive mechanisms.
Instructor(s): S. Morgan.

AS.230.624. Educational Inequality and Social Context.

This course engages students in the study of educational inequality through in depth readings on poverty, culture, the family, neighborhoods and public policy.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca.

AS.230.625. Seminar on International Development.

This seminar offers a graduate level introduction to the theoretically guided study of national development. The first part of the course analyzes the development theories that dominated the first four decades of the development effort. The second half of the course examines more recent perspectives that have attempted to fill the intellectual void left by the demise of the development paradigm. Throughout the seminar, discussions and readings will focus on the intellectual history of the development theories: What are the relevant questions to ask and what are the appropriate units of analysis for the study of social and political change? What forces have propelled transformations across the world? What explanatory power do the theories hold for our future?
Instructor(s): R. Agarwala.

AS.230.633. 21st Century Capitalism.

TBD
Instructor(s): B. Silver; C. Nealon.

AS.230.634. 21st Century Capitalism II.

Permission of instructor required.
Instructor(s): B. Silver; C. Nealon.

AS.230.635. PGSC Research Seminar.

Working seminar focusing on new research in the field of comparative and world-historical sociology. Sociology graduate students or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): B. Silver.

AS.230.636. Research Designs for Causal Inference and Mixed Methods.

This course is designed to help students think critically, theoretically, and empirically about issues in design of sociological research that aims to answer causal questions and incorporate mixed methods approaches. Specifically, we will focus on: 1) Understanding causal inference and the objectives of social science; 2) Learning the types of validity in research designs; 3) Becoming familiar with the elements of experimental research design, such as treatment, observation and assignment; 4) Comparing and contrasting experimental and quasi-experimental designs and their applications for the study of social processes and social problems; 5) Understanding designs that employ mixed methods to answer questions of social and policy importance . The course will give a general overview of the challenges of causal inference, but we will focus on research in a few specific areas, such as education and urban sociology, for the sake of consistent, coherent examples. Sociology/Statistics background is helpful, but not required.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca.

AS.230.638. 21st Century Capitalism IV.

Instructor(s): B. Silver; C. Nealon.

AS.230.641. Urban Youth and Inequality.

Popular television shows and news media cast stark images of urban youth that range widely from notorious corner boys and controversial teen moms, to the celebrated examples of those writers, athletes and artists who beat the impossible odds of their backgrounds. This course takes a more systematic look at this population, with a sociological focus on the demography and social processes that characterize the transition to adulthood for disadvantaged youth growing up in America's cities. We will also examine the role of family, neighborhood, schools and peers in affecting the transition from high school to work and college, early family formation, and participation in risky behavior. Previous and contemporary policy approaches to addressing inequality among these young adults will also be explored.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca.

AS.230.642. Advanced Topics in Education Research.

Instructor(s): S. Plank.

AS.230.643. Sociological Analysis.

An intensive analysis of a wide range of sociological studies, designed to acquaint the student with how sociologists deal with important theoretical issues, using a variety of methods and sources of data. Particular attention will be paid to the logical coherence of the studies and to the fit between data and interpretation.
Instructor(s): H. Hung
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.644. Reading Capital @150.

Instructor(s): B. Silver; S. Karatasli
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.645. PSI Research Seminar.

Seminar focusing on new research in the study of social inequality, with an emphasis on education, neighborhoods, race, family dynamics, health and social policy. Sociology graduate students or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca.

AS.230.647. Agrarian Change.

This course will explore questions related to historical and contemporary trajectories of agrarian change. It begins with classical theoretical debates on the distinctiveness of peasantries and their prospects under capitalism. It will then turn to major themes of agrarian change in the twentieth century: modes of production, class polarization and differentiation, peasant wars, moral economies, everyday resistance, collectivization and decollectivization, food regimes, and depeasantization. It will conclude with new themes in agrarian change, with a particular emphasis on contemporary forms of land dispossession and repossession. The course will be structured as a reading-intensive research seminar.
Instructor(s): M. Levien.

AS.230.649. Qualitative Research Methods: Domestic and International Fieldwork.

This course discusses the conceptualization of qualitative research involving fieldwork, and the collecting, analyzing, and reporting of sociological field data in both domestic and international settings. Data collection techniques such as intensive interviewing, participant-observation, document analysis, and ethnography are included. The course also covers the logic of qualitative inquiry, choosing research sites and cases, engaging archival sources, judging the validity and reliability of data, and software-based data analysis.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald; R. Calder
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.650. Macro-Comparative Research.

The course examines methods of studying long-term, large-scale social change. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are covered.
Instructor(s): B. Silver.

AS.230.651. Political Sociology.

This seminar surveys key problems of political sociology including the rise of the modern state, the origins and nature of liberal democracy, the relationship between political and economic power, the nation-state model and nationalism, ideology and political contention, collective identity, and collective action.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.674. Political Economy of India.

This course is designed to critically engage political economy questions in contemporary India. The course will focus on the post-colonial era. A basic understanding of India’s contemporary political economy is required.
Instructor(s): R. Agarwala
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.675. Arrighi General Seminar: Practical Ethics.

Instructor(s): B. Silver; C. Nealon; C. Westcott.

AS.230.685. TRP PROPOSAL SEMINAR.

This seminar includes all members of the second year cohort of sociology graduate students. Class meetings will provide feedback and guidance as students develop proposals for their Trial Research Papers. The course will also include a series of professional developments seminars. For Sociology PhD students only.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas.

AS.230.690. TRP PRESENTATION SEMINAR.

This seminar includes all members of the third year cohort of sociology graduate students. Class meetings will provide feedback and guidance as students revise the final drafts of their Trial Research Papers. For Sociology PhD students only.
Instructor(s): J. Andreas.

AS.230.800. Independent Study.

Sec. 01 - Morgan Sec. 02 - Hung Sec. 03 - Cherlin Sec. 04 - Hao Sec. 05 - Levien Sec. 06 - McDonald Sec. 07 - Greif Sec. 08 - Andreas Sec. 09 - Edin Sec. 10 - DeLuca Sec. 11 - Silver Sec. 12 – Agarwala Sec. 13 – Agree Sec. 14 – Nelson Sec. 15-Burdick-Will Sec. 16--Calder
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.801. Research Assistantship.

Sec. 01 - Morgan Sec. 02 - Hung Sec. 03 - Cherlin Sec. 04 - Hao Sec. 05 - Levien Sec. 06 - McDonald Sec. 07 - Greif Sec. 08 - Andreas Sec. 09 - Edin Sec. 10 - DeLuca Sec. 11 - Silver Sec. 12 – Agarwala Sec. 13 – Agree Sec. 14 – Nelson Sec. 15-Burdick-Will Sec. 16--Calder
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.802. Dissertation Research.

Sec. 01 - Morgan Sec. 02 - Hung Sec. 03 - Cherlin Sec. 04 - Hao Sec. 05 - Levien Sec. 06 - McDonald Sec. 07 - Greif Sec. 08 - Andreas Sec. 09 - Edin Sec. 10 - DeLuca Sec. 11 - Silver Sec. 12 – Agarwala Sec. 13 – Agree Sec. 14 – Nelson Sec. 15-Burdick-Will Sec. 16--Calder
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.804. Research Apprenticeship.

Sec. 01 - Morgan Sec. 02 - Hung Sec. 03 - Cherlin Sec. 04 - Hao Sec. 05 - Levien Sec. 06 - McDonald Sec. 07 - Greif Sec. 08 - Andreas Sec. 09 - Edin Sec. 10 - DeLuca Sec. 11 - Silver Sec. 12 – Agarwala Sec. 13 – Agree Sec. 14 – Nelson Sec. 15-Burdick-Will Sec. 16--Calder
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.810. Dissertation Fellowship Semester.

Sec. 01 – Morgan Sec. 02 – Hung Sec. 03 – Cherlin Sec. 04 – Hao Sec. 05 – Levien Sec. 06 – McDonald Sec. 07 – Greif Sec. 08 – Andreas Sec. 09 – Edin Sec. 10 – DeLuca Sec. 11 – Silver Sec. 12 – Agarwala Sec. 13 - Agree Sec. 14 – Nelson Sec.15--Burdick-Will Sec.16--Calder
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.811. Teaching Assistantship.

Sec. 01 - Morgan Sec. 02 - Hung Sec. 03 - Cherlin Sec. 04 - Hao Sec. 05 - Levien Sec. 06 - McDonald Sec. 07 - Greif Sec. 08 - Andreas Sec. 09 - Edin Sec. 10 - DeLuca Sec. 11 - Silver Sec. 12 – Agarwala Sec. 13 – Agree Sec. 14 – Nelson Sec. 15-Burdick-Will Sec. 16--Calder Sec. 17--Pasciuti Sec. 18--Von Der Heydt-Coca Sec. 19--Upadhyay
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.815. Trial Research Paper I.

Sec. 01 - Morgan Sec. 02 - Hung Sec. 03 - Cherlin Sec. 04 - Hao Sec. 05 - Levien Sec. 06 - McDonald Sec. 07 - Greif Sec. 08 - Andreas Sec. 09 - Edin Sec. 10 - DeLuca Sec. 11 - Silver Sec. 12 – Agarwala Sec. 13 – Agree Sec. 14 – Nelson Sec. 15-Burdick-Will Sec. 16--Calder
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.816. Trial Research Paper II.

Sec. 01 - Morgan Sec. 02 - Hung Sec. 03 - Cherlin Sec. 04 - Hao Sec. 05 - Levien Sec. 06 - McDonald Sec. 07 - Greif Sec. 08 - Andreas Sec. 09 - Edin Sec. 10 - DeLuca Sec. 11 - Silver Sec. 12 – Agarwala Sec. 13 – Agree Sec. 14 – Nelson Sec. 15-Burdick-Will Sec. 16--Calder
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.817. Trial Research Paper III.

Sec. 01 - Morgan Sec. 02 - Hung Sec. 03 - Cherlin Sec. 04 - Hao Sec. 05 - Levien Sec. 06 - McDonald Sec. 07 - Greif Sec. 08 - Andreas Sec. 09 - Edin Sec. 10 - DeLuca Sec. 11 - Silver Sec. 12 – Agarwala Sec. 13 – Agree Sec. 14 – Nelson Sec. 15-Burdick-Will Sec. 16--Calder
Instructor(s): Staff.

AS.230.820. Sociology Research Practicum.

This course is for graduate students in the PhD program in Sociology to obtain graduate credit for work off campus that provides training and the development of skills in teaching and/or research. Before the practicum is begun, the graduate student must identify a sponsoring faculty member or seek permission from the student’s faculty advisor. The faculty member or adviser must sign a form that certifies that graduate credit will be granted, verifies the nature of the work to be performed by the student and explains how the practicum helps to fulfill the degree requirement. Once completed, the sponsoring faculty member or adviser submits a grade of pass or fail for the student. This course may be used for Curricular Practical Training (CPT).
Instructor(s): Staff.

Cross Listed Courses

East Asian Studies

AS.310.204. Rural Development in Asia. 3.00 Credits.

We will examine the transformation of the Asian countryside from the beginning of the twentieth century up until the present by looking at agrarian structure, economic and social development, collectivization and decollectivization, rural industrialization, agribusiness, sustainable agriculture, and rural unrest. Course materials combine theoretical readings with empirical case studies. While theoretical readings examine global processes involving Asia and elsewhere, case studies cover several Asian countries, with an emphasis on China and India.
Instructor(s): B. Gurel
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.310.307. Governance and Politics in China. 3.00 Credits.

A dramatic rise of popular protests in China today has spurred lively discussions about the causes, dynamics, and impact of these protests. This course will provide students with an opportunity to understand these issues by discussing the social, institutional and cultural background of protests, major forms of protest, social groups involved, government responses, and social implications of various kinds of protests. The first part of the course will explore significant socio-economic changes since 1978 and the effects of these changes on China’s social structure and stratification. This part will also examine changes in governance and political systems in the reform era and review important theories of contentious politics. The second part will examine protests by distinct social groups, including peasants, workers, homeowners, and ethnic minority groups, pro-democratic activists, among others. This part will identify similarities and differences in the demands and actions of different groups, introduce the major forms of popular resistance, and explore how the state deals with them accordingly. The course will conclude with discussion of the outcomes of social protests in China and make a cross-national comparison between protests in China and other authoritarian states. By taking China as an example, this course will enhance students’ knowledge about forms of popular contention and government responses in an authoritarian regime as well as help students develop analytical and critical thinking skills with regard to contentious politics.
Instructor(s): Y. Li
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Interdepartmental

AS.360.247. Introduction to Social Policy: Baltimore and Beyond. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in economics, political science and sociology relevant to the study of social problems and the programs designed to remedy them. It will address the many inequalities in access to education and health care, unequal treatment in the criminal justice system, disparities in income and wealth, and differential access to political power. The focus will be on designing effective policies at the national and local level to address these pressing issues. This course is open to all students, but will be required for the new Social Policy Minor. The course is also recommended for students who are interested in law school, medical school, programs in public health, and graduate school in related social science fields. This course does not count as one of the required courses for the Economics major or minor, but it is required for the Social Policy Minor. Cross list with Sociology, Economics and Political Science. Freshman, Sophomore and Juniors only.
Instructor(s): B. Morgan; D. Schlozman; S. Deluca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.360.372. Poverty and Public Policy. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the causes and consequences of U.S. urban poverty, it's implications for health and wellbeing, and explores strategies for addressing it. We cover the major theoretical explanations scholars have advanced to explain the persistence of urban poverty including labor markets, residential segregation, welfare policy, family structure, and the criminal justice system. Within each topic area, students are introduced to a range of interventions aimed at alleviating urban poverty. Students will conduct a formal policy analysis of 20 pages and participate in a mock congressional hearing. Permission of instructor required.
Instructor(s): K. Edin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.360.380. Making America Social Policy. 3.00 Credits.

This course analyzes the distinctive US welfare state in historical and comparative perspective. We begin with a survey of the policy context, an historical overview from the poorhouses through the Great Society, and a tour of welfare states across the rich democracies. We then survey developments – and explain the actual workings of policy – across jobs, education, welfare, pensions, and health care. We explore the institutional and political factors behind their divergent trajectories through conservative revival and the age of Obama. Students will write a seminar paper exploring policy development over time in a program or area of their choosing. Enrollment restricted to Social Policy minors only.
Instructor(s): D. Schlozman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.360.387. Cities, Crime, and the Constitution. 3.00 Credits.

This course is meant to introduce students to the profound challenge of crime in American cities and to the opportunities and obstacles to address it. From gangs, gun violence, and the narcotics trade to crimes targeting vulnerable populations like children and the elderly, the course will survey the breadth and character of criminal enterprises in cities like Baltimore. Students will confront vexing questions raised by contemporary criminal justice practices relating to race, poverty, privacy, and policing. Students will also examine whether institutional reform in the areas of juvenile justice, conviction integrity, fairness in sentencing, and reentry reflect the Constitution’s promise of equal justice for all.
Instructor(s): Staff
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Program in Latin American Studies

AS.361.130. Introduction to Latin American Studies. 3.00 Credits.

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of Latin America, analyzing political and cultural aspects, chronologically organized. We will begin studying the origins of the multi–ethnic societies, starting with the ancient civilizations and their transformation under colonization. It is important to understand the survival of cultural traits among indigenous peasants today in the countries that were the cradle of ancient civilizations: Mexico, Guatemala and the Andean countries. In the republican era the course will focus on the classical Caribbean dictators in the first half of the 20th century and their reflection in the literature, comparing the historical reality with the magic representation in the work of Garcia Marquez. The course will scrutinize the most important revolutions in the continent: the Mexican, Cuban and Bolivian revolutions and the geopolitics of USA in the Americas. Weekly lectures related to the assigned reading will focus on specific periods, topics and regions. After each lecture, we will review the material, connecting specific details from the readings with the more theoretical aspects provided in my lecture. The course has a website where the PowerPoint presentations will be posted. Students are encouraged to post their questions, comments and suggestions on the web after their readings. Students will be given a study guide for each lecture, which will be the basis for the exams. Our perspective on Latin America will be enhanced by a selection of few films related to the topics.
Instructor(s): M. von der Heydt-Coca
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Center for Africana Studies

AS.362.111. Introduction to African American Studies. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to Africana Studies is designed to introduce you to the core concepts, theories, and thinkers of the black diaspora by means of a “keyword” approach. Each week we will focus on one keyword and the way it both shapes and is shaped by the African diaspora from the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade to the middle of the twentieth century. I argue that much of the modern project, the assembly of instituitions, ideas, interests, and identities, is a product of the brutal encounter between Europe, the Americas, and Africa. It is my hope that by the end of this course we will know more about how this encounter helped to construct modernity, and we will also know a bit more about how this encounter helped shape responses to it.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://soc.jhu.edu/directoryindex/faculty/

Faculty

Chair

Beverly J. Silver
Historical capitalism, comparative and world-historical research methods, global inequality and development, labor and social movements.

Professors

Andrew J. Cherlin
Benjamin H Griswold lll Professor of Public Policy; sociology of the family, demography, social policy.

Kathryn Edin
Bloomberg Distinguished Professor; poverty, inequality, social policy.

Lingxin Hao
Sociology of the family, public policy, immigration, social inequality, sociology of education, quantitative methodology.

Stephen L Morgan
Bloomberg Distinguished Professor; education, inequality, demography, and methodology.

Associate Professors

Rina Agarwala
International development, gender, labor, migration, globalization, India.

Joel Andreas
Post 1949 Chinese society, transitions to and from socialism, industrial democracy, education and class reproduction.

Stefanie A. DeLuca
Sociology of education, sociology of neighborhoods, life course studies.

Ho-Fung Hung
Global political economy, contentious politics, nationalism, and social theory.

Katrina Bell McDonald
Sociology of the family, gender/ethnic identity, race and social class.

Assistant Professors

Julia Burdick-Will
Urban sociology, education, stratification.

Ryan Calder
Economic sociology, political sociology, political economy, Middle East, Southeast Asia, Globalization, finance, Islamic banking, Islamic jurisprudence.

Meredith Greif
Race, urban sociology, and health in developing countries.

Michael Levien
Political and developmental sociology.

Professors Emeriti

Karl L. Alexander
Academy Professor in The Academy at JHU/KSAS, sociology of education, social stratification

Melvin L. Kohn
Academy Professor in The Academy at JHU/KSAS; social structure and personality, cross-national comparative analysis, social class and stratification, sociology and social psychology of work.

Joint Appointments

David M. Altschuler
Adjunct Associate Professor (Institute for Policy Studies) Bloomberg School of Public Health; de-institutionalization and community-based services, delinquency and criminal justice, voluntary organizations and philanthropy, social policy.

Stanley Becker
Professor, Bloomberg School of Public Health; demography.

Joyce Epstein
Research Professor, School of Education (Center for Social Organization of Schools); sociology of education, evaluation research, social psychology.

Kelly Gebo
Adjunct Assistant Professor, School of Medicine; medical sociology and mental health.

Gail Geller
Professor, School of Medicine; ethical, social and cultural implications of genetic advances in the adult, pediatric and family contexts.

Thomas A. LaVeist
Professor, Bloomberg School of Public Health; medical sociology, mortality, health services, aging.

Vicente Navarro
Professor, Bloomberg School of Public Health; health and social policy, international health, health care policy.

Katherine Smith
Associate Professor, Bloomberg School of Public Health; social determinants of health behavior.

Marc Stein
Assistant Professor, School of Education; neighborhoods, school choice, academic acheivement.

Research Professor/Lecturers

Emily Agree
Research Professor; gerontology demography.

Magda von der Heydt
Senior Lecturer (Latin American Studies Program); socio-economic history of Latin America, developmental processes.

Huei-ying Kuo
Senior Lecturer/Assistant Research Scientist; Chinese diasporic business networks, Japanese and British imperialism, as well as Chinese nationalism in East and Southeast Asia.

Sydney van Morgan
Director of International Studies/Senior Lecturer

Timothy Nelson
Senior Lecturer/Associate Research Scientist; low income non-custodial fathers, congregational studies, African-American religion.