Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality

http://anthropology.jhu.edu/wgs/index.html

The Program for the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality works to catalyze intellectual discussions—at Johns Hopkins, in Baltimore, and beyond—in which gender and sexuality concerns play important roles.

We are a forum that brings together undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty from different departments who share an interest and a need to address and interrogate their research fields from a queer, feminist, or otherwise gender- and sexuality-inflected perspective.

The activities of the program integrate teaching and research on all levels. Most importantly, the program encourages and supports initiatives for research projects, events, and curriculum developments emerging from all parts of the JHU campus—undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty alike.

WGS brings new scholarship into conversation on campus in three main ways. First, the program sponsors a seminar series that brings speakers from academia and the broader community to Johns Hopkins University. Second, we organize workshops each semester around multiyear themes, such as “Affect and Emotion” and “Medical Humanities.” Finally, we bring renowned scholars and public figures to the Homewood campus through our annual Visiting Distinguished Professorship. Recent visiting professors have included Karen Barad (University of California-Santa Cruz), Joan Wallach Scott (Institute for Advanced Studies), Trinh-Minh Ha (University of California-Berkeley), and Michael Warner (Yale University).

WGS offers an undergraduate minor that enables students to devote a portion of their education to the study of women, gender, sexuality, and related issues. WGS also offers research fellowships for undergraduate and graduate students. Graduate students also have the opportunity to design and teach a course.

Through both interdisciplinary and specialized courses, students are encouraged to develop critical and comparative approaches to the study of gender and sexuality—often in interaction with related issues such as race, class, global health, and violence. Courses in the program are taught by prominent faculty members from across the disciplines and are cross-listed through a variety of departments. New courses are added frequently.

WGS also offers an undergraduate Seminar/Practicum, where students combine volunteer work in a local social service agency with a seminar that explores the connections between social justice and academic inquiry.

Minor Requirements

Students can receive a minor in women, gender, and sexuality by completing six one-semester courses. The following courses constitute the WGS core curriculum (363 prefix); they are offered every year:

  • Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
  • Feminist and Queer Theory
  • Gender and Sexuality Beyond the Global West
  • Poetics and Politics of Sex
  • Health, Medicine, Gender, and Sexuality
  • Internship/Practicum (offered in collaboration with the JHU Center for Social Concern, the internship-practicum combines academic work with volunteer experience)

Students are asked to complete at least two courses from the core WGS curriculum and may choose among the courses cross-listed with other departments for the remaining four. No more than two courses can be lower level (100 or 200). Students must earn a C- or better in all minor requirements and courses may not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Please direct inquiries about the undergraduate minor to Katrin Pahl.

Minor Requirements *
Two core courses (selected from the following):6
Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
Thirty Years of AIDS: Fatigue, Failure and Fantasies
Feminist and Queer Theory
Black Women, Feminism and Activism
The Poetics and Politics of Sex
Gender, Sexuality, and Religion: Muslim (In)Visibilities
Worshiped Goddesses, Worshiping Women: Femininity, Religion, and Mythology in Ancient Greece
Internship/Practicum: Critical Theory and the Possibility of Social Justice
Any course with the number 363.XXX
Four additional Women, Gender and Sexuality courses **12
Total Credits18
*

At least four 300- or 400-level courses are required for the minor. 

While core courses offered in recent years are listed as options, not all courses listed as core courses will be offered on a regular basis and some may have been offered only once. They are listed to provide examples of the types of courses that may be offered. 

**

 These are either courses cross-listed with the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality or courses AS.363.xxx.

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

AS.363.201. Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality. 3.0 Credits.

This course offers an introduction into the fields of Women’s Studies, Gender Studies, and Sexuality Studies. It explores why we need these fields of inquiry, how they have emerged historically, what some of the major and most interesting contributions are and where we might go from here. The course is meant as a preparation for the other WGS core courses.
Instructor(s): E. Ender
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.363.300. Thirty Years of AIDS: Fatigue, Failure and Fantasies. 3.0 Credits.

This course is designed to study the emergence of the concept of "AIDS Fatigue" that is being used to describe the current moment of this epidemic. Cross-listed with Anthropology
Instructor(s): V. Saria
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.301. Feminist and Queer Theory. 3.0 Credits.

This course will encourage encounters with a number of concepts from a critical gendered perspective, including: sameness/difference, identity politics, race/gender, loyalty, security, queer ethics, and queerness in media.
Instructor(s): K. Goktepe
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.302. Queer Identity?. 3.0 Credits.

What does "queer" mean? And who gets to say? This course examines tensions, ambiguities, and contradictions that have emerged in popular, political, and theoretical discourses over the past 25 years.
Instructor(s): J. Chilton
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.363.303. Feminism and Queer Theory: "The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House. 3.0 Credits.

As a Black lesbian woman, Lorde denounced white feminism for being complicit with patriarchy by not acknowledging marginal women’s experiences as a source of strength and creativity. Inspired by the title and impetus of Lorde’s essay, this course seeks to ask what happens when we start seeing the world through unfamiliar, alternative, tools or sensibilities? What different pictures of critique—ones that don’t merely focus on replacing the master’s house with other strong edifices—are allowed to emerge? With these questions in mind, the main objective of this course is to expose us to alternative sensibilities and ways of thinking offered by voices that experience gender and sexuality beyond conventional Western norms and counter-norms.
Instructor(s): T. Zille
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.304. Love and Its Discontents. 3.0 Credits.

This course aims to familiarize students with a wide-range of feminist and queer conceptions of love as a political force. While reading theoretical texts and selections of poetry, students will be encouraged to interrogate the political implications of different conceptions of love, Eros, and desire.
Instructor(s): K. Glanz
Area: Humanities.

AS.363.315. Genes, Gender and Reproduction in 20th Century America. 3.0 Credits.

Using the tools of historiography, anthropology and cultural studies, this course will discuss 20th and 21th century debates about gender, genetics and reproduction, family, bioethics and biomedical technology.
Instructor(s): M. Schmidt
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.316. Health, Medicine, Gender, and Sexuality: Gender, Sexuality, and AIDS in Africa. 3.0 Credits.

This course uses historical sources to connect constructions of gender and sexuality in Africa from the pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial periods to the epidemiology, politics, and culture of the AIDS epidemic.
Instructor(s): J. Cummiskey
Area: Humanities, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.325. Black Women, Feminism and Activism. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore the intersection of race, gender/ sexuality and class in regards to activism and social justice by considering black feminist thought and the experiences of black women activists in the 20th century.
Instructor(s): A. Davis
Area: Humanities.

AS.363.326. Capitalism and Gender. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores a range of critical work relating capitalism to gender, sex, and sexuality: from theoretical accounts of witchcraft, marriage, and prostitution at the birth of capitalist social relations, to classic feminist debates around housework and reproduction, to contemporary thought on affect, finance, and the global dimensions of women’s labor. As a centerpiece to the course we will read sections from Capital, interrogating the place of gender in Marx’s text while developing a grasp of its arguments and influence.
Instructor(s): C. Westcott
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.327. Gender and Sexuality beyond the Global West: Feminism and Homosexuality in the Islamic World. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores the emerging discourses on gender and sexuality in Islam. As minorities, women and homosexuals developed a shared interest in exegetic tools challenging the dominant narratives that shaped a so-called Muslim tradition. We will investigate disruptive narratives that take place within theological debates but we will also grapple with discourses that have been produced on women and homosexuals in the Islamic world. We will deal with the question of imposing on Muslims a specific conception - that a good amount of scholars have identified as being western - of homosexuality and feminism. A set of questions will guide us through our readings: does sexuality constitute an identity or refer to a practice? Should equality be reduced to identity or can it be understood differently? Are agency and freedom best manifested through subversion and opposition?
Instructor(s): L. Ferhat
Area: Humanities.

AS.363.328. Beyond the Global West: Gender/Sexuality, Post-colonialism & Global Capitalism: Feminist Inquiries from Asian Perspectives. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines gender and sexuality issues in both East and South Asian Societies and situates subject matters in the broader contexts of post-colonialism, state formation, revolution and global capitalism.
Instructor(s): Y. Dong
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.333. The Poetics and Politics of Sex. 3.0 Credits.

A History of Pornography. This course traces several problematics in the history of Anglophone pornography from the nineteenth century to the present: contested sexual knowledge; pornography's reinforcement of or challenges to existing power relations; and cultural and legal determinations over and regulations of pornographic material. Treating pornography as a dynamic cultural construct, it considers historically contingent meanings of pornographic representation across a variety of media.
Instructor(s): L. Pepitone
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.363.334. The Poetics and Politics of Sex: Gender and Sexuality in Twentieth Century European Empires. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores themes around sexuality and empire in nineteenth and twentieth century European empires, including (but not limited to) the gendered policies of colonial regimes, how colonialism encouraged ideal forms of femininity and masculinity, and nationalist feminisms in the era of independence.
Instructor(s): S. Rahnama; S. Stewart
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.340. Costumes and Masquerades of the Self. 3.0 Credits.

An introduction to some of the fundamental texts and concepts of gender theory through the study of representations, literary and art historical, of dress. From cross-dressing in Shakespeare and George Sand, Baudelaire’s Dandy, to Woolf’s notion of “frock consciousness,” Hwang’s Mr. Butterfly, and Cindy Sherman’s parodies. Theoretical readings in Barthes, Laqueur, Lacan, Garber, Butler, Potts, Lee.
Instructor(s): E. Ender
Area: Humanities.

AS.363.341. The Making of Modern Gender. 3.0 Credits.

Gender as we know it is not timeless. Today, gender roles and the assumption that there are only two genders are contested and debated. With the binary gender system thus perhaps nearing its end, we might wonder if it had a beginning. In fact, the idea that there are two sexes and that they not only assume different roles in society but also exhibit different character traits, has emerged historically around 1800. Early German Romanticism played a seminal role in the making of modern gender and sexuality. For the first time, woman was considered not a lesser version of man, but a different being with a value of her own. The idea of gender complementation emerged, and this idea, in turn, put more pressure than ever on heterosexuality. In this course, we will trace the history of anatomy and explore the role of literature and the other arts in the making and unmaking of gender.
Instructor(s): K. Pahl
Area: Humanities.

AS.363.350. Gender, Sexuality, and Religion: Muslim (In)Visibilities. 3.0 Credits.

“Muslim (In)Visibilities” focuses on gender and sexuality through Orientalism. It considers representations of Muslim bodies within popular Western discourses and what such (in)visibilities are productive of.
Instructor(s): M. Banahi
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.395. Poetics and Politics of Sex: Intimacy and Its Discontents. 3.0 Credits.

Where might one turn for intimacy if its available forms are dissatisfying? What happens when politics authorizes certain forms of intimacy but not others? How might intimacies and their discontents lack a language to do them justice? This course explores problems with normative intimacies such as monogamy, family, and intimate publics. It covers issues such as optimism, ambivalence, trauma, queerness, war, and longing. It also explores how authors try to describe intimacy through different genres, such as poems, aphorisms, novellas, essays, and scholarly articles.
Instructor(s): C. Shomura
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.363.410. Worshiped Goddesses, Worshiping Women: Femininity, Religion, and Mythology in Ancient Greece. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the Greek goddesses and heroines and the ways in which women worshipped them in antiquity, using an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating literary, iconographical, and archaeological evidence.
Instructor(s): S. Stern.

AS.363.417. Internship/Practicum: Critical Theory and the Possibility of Social Justice. 4.0 Credits.

This course combines a weekly seminar with 4 hours per week in a Baltimore social justice organization, coordinated by the JHU Center for Social Concern. Class discussions draw on readings in ethnography and feminist, queer and critical race studies to address topics such as; race, class and gender inequality, neoliberal development, health, institutional violence and politically engaged research.
Instructor(s): A. Krauss
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.363.418. Internship Practicum: Feminist Ethnographic Methods and Social Justice Organizations. 3.0 Credits.

This course is for students who are working with social justice organizations. It will introduce students to ethnographic research that is informed by feminist methodologies of listening, care, ethics, and structural analysis. Methods will be oriented to the “inside” and “outside” of organizations.“Inside” the organization might refer to listening to marginalized voices, examining the place of bureaucracy and paperwork, and engaging with activist research and records. Reaching beyond the organization proper, we will learn to analyse localities, and less tangible zones such as social media, political networks, and the state.
Instructor(s): M. Sehdev
Area: Humanities.

AS.363.420. Stories of Hysteria. 3.0 Credits.

Hysteria, an elusive and polymorphous disease associated with the female body, was first diagnosed in Greek Antiquity. When, in the late nineteenth-century, Sigmund Freud decided to study it, he made discoveries that shaped in a decisive way the new science of psychoanalysis and offered new foundations for discussions of what we might now call “psychosomatic illness.” Though rarely diagnosed nowadays, hysteria provides a fascinating introduction to medical, clinical, social, and ethical questions connected to gender that have lost none of their relevance. We will study fictional narratives from the 18th century to the present as if they were case-studies -- as a way of appraising hysteria’s changing and provocatively volatile definitions across time and in different cultural frameworks. Among our topics: trauma and PTSD, the concept of repression, masculinities, women and madness, and, above all, transformations in gender roles and identities in the modern era. In addition to selected readings of medical and historical materials available on Blackboard, texts for study are: The Nun (Diderot), Trilby (du Maurier), Fragment of a Case of Hysteria (Freud), Regeneration (Barker), The Icarus Girl (Oyeyemi), Redeployment (Klay).
Instructor(s): E. Ender
Area: Humanities.

AS.363.601. WGS Graduate Colloquium.

Presenting new scholarship and art, the WGS Graduate Colloquium will catalyze intellectual discussions in which gender and sexuality concerns play important roles. The seminar includes lectures by invited speakers and a film series. Graduate students are encouraged to develop critical and comparative approaches to the study of gender and sexuality—often in interaction with related issues such as race, class, violence, law, medicine, art, and emotionality. This seminar can be taken for credit or audit.
Instructor(s): K. Pahl; T. Shepard
Area: Humanities.

Cross Listed Courses

Classics

AS.040.140. Gender and Sexuality in Early Greece and the Eastern Mediterranean. 3.0 Credits.

In this course we will explore evidence and interpretations of gender and sexuality in the region of the Aegean and eastern Mediterranean during the third and second millennia BCE. Material investigated will include the “snake goddess” figures from Minoan Crete, anthropomorphic figurines from the Cyclades and Cyprus, wall paintings, etc. In each case we will consider the history of interpretation as well as investigate the objects’ archaeological and sociocultural contexts. Discussion topics will include representational ambiguity, the specific materialities of objects, and their possible roles in activities construing gender. The course will incorporate material from the JHU Archaeological Museum.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.142. Spartacus, Caesar, and Cleopatra: Notorious Characters from Roman History and Hollywood Cinema. 3.0 Credits.

Since the invention of cinema, the ancient world has been an important vehicle for both lavish visual spectacles and the exploration of contemporary social issues. This course analyzes the depiction of the infamous figures of the late republic in both ancient sources and modern media, to examine how ancient Rome and contemporary America have used these characters to contemplate race, class, gender, and imperialism.
Instructor(s): G. Gessert
Area: Humanities.

AS.040.218. Celebration and Performance in Early Greece. 3.0 Credits.

Surviving imagery suggests that persons in Minoan and Mycenaean societies engaged in various celebratory performances, including processions, feasts, and ecstatic dance. This course explores archaeological evidence of such celebrations, focusing on sociocultural roles, bodily experience, and interpretive challenges.
Instructor(s): E. Anderson
Area: Humanities.

English

AS.060.205. Feminist Fiction: Violence, Sex and Gender. 3.0 Credits.

This course will start with passages from Lysistrata and the Book of Judges, and have as a running concern the overlapping structures of violence, race and gender. Novels will include the following pairs: Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea, The Bluest Eye and Bastard Out of Carolina, The Handmaid’s Tale and Octavia Butler’s novella Bloodchild.
Instructor(s): M. Favret
Area: Humanities.

AS.060.319. Values and Gender in Nineteenth-Century British Literature. 3.0 Credits.

The course considers how nineteenth-century British authors—including Ruskin, Gaskell, Eliot, and Wilde—engage and oppose various sets of values in their representations of gender.
Instructor(s): M. Flaherty
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.060.320. Icons of Feminism. 3.0 Credits.

This course looks at four crucial figures who have haunted feminist thought and responses to feminism over the centuries. Sappho, known as the first female poet, remains an enigmatic icon of feminine desire and creativity; Antigone, the daughter of Oedipus and the heroine of Sophocles’s play Antigone, still inspires feminist analyses of women’s relationship to law, the state and civil society; and Joan of Arc, the militant maid of Orleans, troubles thinking about women and violence as well as women, religion and spirituality. The last figure is Mary Wollstonecraft, often cited as the first modern feminist. The course will examine literary works written about these iconic figures, as well as contemporary feminist writing about their influence and viability as models for the future of feminism.
Instructor(s): M. Favret
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.060.348. Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury. 3.0 Credits.

An exploration of the achievements and investments of one of the most influential coteries in the history of Britain. In addition to delving into key fictions by Virginia Woolf, we will examine novels by Leonard Woolf and E. M. Forster, art criticism by Roger Fry and Clive Bell, biographical essays by Lytton Strachey, economic writings by John Maynard Keynes, and poetry by T. S. Eliot.
Instructor(s): D. Mao
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.060.388. Old World/New World Women. 3.0 Credits.

The course considers the transatlantic writing of three women in the early modern period, Anne Bradstreet, Aphra Behn, and Phillis Wheatley. We will consider issues of identity, spatiality, religion, commerce, enforced labor, sexuality, race, and gender, along with literary tradition, formal analysis and poetics. We will read a good deal of these early women writers. Foremost in our mind will be the question of how perceptions of space and time are mediated through the global experiences of early modernity.
Instructor(s): S. Achinstein
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.060.398. Obscenity and the Law in 20th-Century Literature. 3.0 Credits.

In order to log on to JHU’s GuestNet you must “agree that your activities on the Guest Network shall not…[among other things] be obscene.” But what is obscene? What does the law determine as obscene today, and how has that determination changed over the past century? These questions will lead us to considerations of publicity and privacy, morality and standards of decency. This course will examine artworks and performances in a variety of media that have been publicly accused of indecency or obscenity. We will read legal judgments of obscenity and discuss their implications for figures such as Wilde, Joyce, Miller, Ginsberg, Bruce, Carlin, Prince, 2 Live Crew, and others.
Instructor(s): J. Chilton
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Film and Media Studies

AS.061.323. Masculinities. 3.0 Credits.

Prereq: One Core Course Or Permission From tap dancer to gangster, assassin to anguished teen, versions of the male in film from the silent era to the present. Cross-listed with Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
Instructor(s): L. Bucknell
Area: Humanities.

AS.061.389. Women Making Movies (Europe). 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to some of the most exciting female directors of the 20th century, asking how gender shaped the production and reception of their films. Do particular directors attribute any significance to the fact of being a woman? Does a director's gender shape her choice of subject or how she represents it? Does wider knowledge of works directed by women change our sense of the canon and authorship? Covers non-U.S. films, strongly encouraged for FMS majors and minors. Cross-listed with WGS. No pre-requisite.
Instructor(s): L. Mason
Area: Humanities.

AS.061.391. Love and Film. 3.0 Credits.

In this course, we explore different understandings of "love" and the way that film has dealt with the concept as a medium. We explore a variety of approaches to the question of "love" - from the agapic to the familial to the romantic - through a series of interdisciplinary readings ranging from philosophy to anthropology. We will also equally explore the question of how film has engaged with the question of love as a concept, and what depictions of human affection - from the general to the personal - it has offered us. Screenings are required for this course. $40 Lab fee. Cross-listed with Study of Women, Gender and Sexuality
Instructor(s): M. Ward
Area: Humanities.

AS.061.393. Violent Attractions. 3.0 Credits.

Violence, ritualized and anarchic, celebrated and deplored in popular film from silent era melodrama and slapstick comedy to contemporary sports, crime, and combat films. Twice-weekly screenings; oral presentation; two essays, 6 & 12 pp. Lecture Wednesday 4:30-7pm, Screenings Monday/Tuesday 7:30-10pm. Lab fee: $40
Instructor(s): L. Bucknell
Area: Humanities.

AS.061.397. French Masculinities. 3.0 Credits.

Examines changing ideals of masculinity in France after 1960 as they found expression on film, rooting the work of iconic stars and directors in their cultural, political and historical contexts.
Instructor(s): L. Mason
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

Anthropology

AS.070.179. Child Adoption and Family Making. 3.0 Credits.

The course takes child adoption as a starting point to critically explore how kinship and family are connected to legal practices, technological innovations, and broader historical, political, and socio-economic processes. Dean’s Prize Freshman Seminar
Instructor(s): A. Reyes Kipp
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.070.327. Poverty's Life: Anthropology of Health & Economy. 3.0 Credits.

Medicine, economics, and ethics have profoundly shaped debates on poverty. This course analyzes these debates and tracks the relationships between body, economy, and the everyday. How can anthropological reasoning and methods inform approaches to health and economic scarcity and insecurity?
Instructor(s): C. Han
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.070.385. From Sexual Nature to Sexual Politics. 3.0 Credits.

This course traces anthropological concern with questions of sexuality. Students will explore anthropological notions of primitive promiscuity, cultural configurations of the correspondence between sex, procreation, and birth, and ideas about sexual rites of passage. The course will end with a discussion of sexual politics in Euro-America and public concern over HIV/AIDS. The course draws on the work of Freud, Malinowski, Meade, Herdt, Povinelli, Rubin, Bersani and Halperin. Cross-listed with Women Gender Studies
Instructor(s): A. Goodfellow
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

History

AS.100.201. Freshman Seminar: Prostitution in a Global Perspective, 1750-2012. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines topics such as the 'medical model' of prostitution regulation, the rise of international anti-prostitution, and the responses of modern nationalists to sex work in a global context.
Instructor(s): S. Stewart
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.311. National Pastimes: Sports, Culture, and American History. 3.0 Credits.

National Pastimes examines the development of sports in the United States over the course of the 20th century with a particular interest in the relationship between sports and politics as well as issues of race, gender, sexuality and class.
Instructor(s): A. Davis
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.327. Gender and Sexuality in Reformation and Counter-Reformation Europe. 3.0 Credits.

This course will discuss the centrality of gender, sexuality, and gendered rhetoric to the genesis and development of the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation in Europe.
Instructor(s): J. Keene
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.333. Global Public Health Since World War II. 3.0 Credits.

Globalization has dramatically reshaped the world economy, providing great advantages to some but leaving poor nations to struggle with hunger, disease and death on a daily basis. This course explores the impact of globalization on public health in the developed and the developing nations since 1945. Cross-listed with Public Health Studies
Instructor(s): B. Morgan; L. Galambos
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.357. Panic and Liberation: The Politics of Sex in 20th Century Europe. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the 20th century history of sexual attitudes, desires, behaviors, identities, communities, and movements in Western Europe (most notably, Germany, France, and the United Kingdom).
Instructor(s): T. Shepard
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.372. The Victorians. 3.0 Credits.

This course focuses on the politics of everyday life, consumption, intimate relations, and concepts of the self in Britain and its empire in the long nineteenth century. We devote particular attention to visual culture, entertainment, and the built environment. Course themes include popular nationalism; class differences; gender and body politics; and imperial expansion and racial thought.
Instructor(s): L. Pepitone
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.100.397. U.S. Histories Male and Female. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar will be devoted to exploring gender differences as they have been expressed in a sequence of autobiographies and autobiographical fiction set in a shifting social and historical context.
Instructor(s): M. Ryan
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.424. Women & Modern Chinese History. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the experience of Chinese women, and also how writers, scholars, and politicians (often male, sometimes foreign) have represented women’s experiences for their own political and social agendas. Cross listed with East Asian Studies.
Instructor(s): T. Meyer-Fong
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.426. Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe. 3.0 Credits.

Witchcraft, magic, carnivals, riots, folk tales, gender roles; fertility cults and violence especially in Britain, Germany, France, and Italy.
Instructor(s): J. Marshall
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.498. History of the Family & Gender in the United States. 3.0 Credits.

Topics include: history of emotions; politics of sexuality and marriage; impact of race, ethnicity, and class on family life; women and gender inequality. Primarily colonial era through the early twentieth century, with some attention to contemporary politics of family, gender, and sexuality.
Instructor(s): T. Ditz
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.100.635. Topics in European Imperial History.

This graduate reading course covers key topics in European Imperial History, c. 1600-1900.
Instructor(s): G. Paquette
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Near Eastern Studies

AS.130.105. Freshman Seminar: Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll in Ancient Egypt. 3.0 Credits.

This seminar explores the social roles of sexuality, alcohol, other drugs, music, fragrance, and sensuality in secular and religious areas of Egyptian life, largely but not exclusively during the New Kingdom, ca. 1500 to 1000 B.C. The ancient attitudes towards these elements will be explored through the ancient textual sources in translation and the artistic representations.
Instructor(s): B. Bryan
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.130.330. The Garden of Eden. 3.0 Credits.

References to the story of the Garden of Eden can be found in every significant issue of our time, from sex to politics, from race to the environment. The course will examine the story itself as well as how it's been interpreted, leading up to today. Enthusiastic participation required.
Instructor(s): E. Robbins
Area: Humanities.

History of Science & Technology

AS.140.304. Medicine for and by Women in Early Modern Europe. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine women's role in early modern European medicine through the reading of early modern medical texts written for or by women. The course is meant for students interested in women's history, the history of medicine, European history.
Instructor(s): G. Pomata
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.350. Disability in 20th century America: Rights, Restrictions, Reproduction. 3.0 Credits.

Is disability a biological fact or determined by culture? This class discusses different ideas of difference in the context of disability rights, professional power, reproductive technology and bioethics. Cross-listed with Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality
Instructor(s): M. Schmidt
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.140.353. Women, Health, and Medicine in Modern America. 3.0 Credits.

This course explores women's interactions with science, medicine, and health in the late-19th and 20th century United States. It is framed by an interest in medicialization, sex/gender, and feminism. Cross-listed with Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality.
Instructor(s): D. Stillwell
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.140.381. History of Reproduction. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates the history of reproduction in American medicine, science, politics, and culture. It explores changing ideas about reproductive bodies, sexuality, and the family as well as practices of contraception, conception, and childbirth.
Instructor(s): B. Gurtler
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Philosophy

AS.150.404. The Idea of Power. 3.0 Credits.

The Idea of Power surveys seminal texts in the history of political thought on the nature, promise, and dangers of political and social power; it also critically engages contemporary texts on race and gender power relations
Instructor(s): C. Lebron
Area: Humanities.

Economics

AS.180.252. Economics of Discrimination. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines labor market discrimination by gender, race and ethnicity in the United States. What does the empirical evidence show, and how can we explain it? How much of the difference in observed outcomes is driven by differences in productivity characteristics and how much is due to discrimination? How have economists theorized about discrimination and what methodologies can be employed to test those theories? What has been the impact of public policy in this area; how do large corporations and educational institutions respond; and what can we learn from landmark lawsuits? The course will reinforce skills relevant to all fields of applied economics, including critical evaluation of the theoretical and empirical literature, the reasoned application of statistical techniques, and analysis of current policy issues.
Prerequisites: AS.180.102
Instructor(s): B. Morgan
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Political Science

AS.190.605. Women in Dark Times.

A survey of contemporary female voices—feminist and nonfeminist—in political theory. Questions raised and addressed: How is power defined and distributed? What constitutes political action? What is the relationship of bodies to politics? Among others we will read Cristina Beltrán, Judith Butler, Jodi Dean, Bonnie Honig, and Melissa Lane.
Instructor(s): J. Bennett; J. Culbert.

Psychological & Brain Sciences

AS.200.204. Human Sexuality. 3.0 Credits.

Course focuses on sexual development, sexuality across the lifespan, gender identity, sexual attraction and arousal, sexually transmitted disease, and the history of commercial sex workers and pornography. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Enrollment is limited to Senior Majors & Minors in Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychology; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.
Corequisites: Students may enroll in both AS.200.204 and AS.290.420, but cannot do so in the same semester.
Instructor(s): C. Kraft
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

German & Romance Languages & Literatures

AS.211.318. Women in Pre-Modern French Literature. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the changes in the relationship of women to literature in France up to the French Revolution from several points of view: (1) What were the social and intellectual contexts of gender distinctions? (2) How did men writing about women differ from women writing about women? (3) How were these questions affected by the changing norms of literary production? Texts by Marguerite de Valois, Mme. de Sévigné, Molière, Mme. de Lafayette, Prévost, Diderot, Rousseau, Mme d'Épinay and Revolutionary memorialists
Instructor(s): W. Anderson
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.211.364. Drama Queens: Opera, Gender, and the Poetics of Excess. 3.0 Credits.

What is a drama queen? According to the Oxford English Dictionary, a drama queen is “a person who is prone to exaggeratedly dramatic behaviour” and “a person who thrives on being the centre of attention.” While drama queens exist among us, the world of opera is certainly one of their ideal environments. Echoing back to their tragic fates, the powerful voices of Dido, Medea, Violetta, and Tosca never ceased to affect their empathetic public. In fact, excess and overreactions are two main features of the operatic experience both on stage and in the audience. By focusing on the ways in which operatic characters are brought to life, the course explores the social, political, and gender dynamics that inform the melodramatic imagination. Students will have the opportunity to attend live HD broadcasts of Verdi’s La Traviata and Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin from the Metropolitan Opera. No musical skills required.
Instructor(s): E. Refini
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.212.362. Ecrire l'héroïsme au féminin [Writing Heroism in the Feminine]. 3.0 Credits.

How can we define a heroine? What distinguishes heroines from mere female protagonists? Who are the main heroines to have marked the French literary tradition? This course examines how writers have transformed the notion of heroism inherited from Ancient Greece and Rome to lend it different and distinctly gendered shapes in the figure of the female hero: bravery, scandal, crime, sacrifice, nationalism. Focus will be placed on the evolution of the concept from the 17th century to the end of the 20th century in novels and plays by Racine, Madame de Lafayette, Prevost, Balzac, Maupassant, Anouilh, Wittig, and Condé. Recommended Course Background: AS.212.333 or AS.212.334.
Instructor(s): L. Cariou
Area: Humanities.

AS.212.644. Libertinage: entre révolte et fantasme.

The prerevolutionary libertine novel, starring at its center the character of the libertine, is the one most iconically associated with the French novel and with notions of transgressive “Frenchness,” intended both for national use and for export. In the wake of the pioneering work of René Pintard (Le Libertinage érudit dans la première moitié du 17e siècle, 1943) libertinage was emancipated from the fictional realm and promoted to a category of intellectual and cultural history. Yet recent critics have contested the use of this label, arguing that the historical individuals who were so called were a heterogeneous collection who had nothing in common apart from their marginality, which was in turn stigmatized or valorized. The purpose of this course is to examine critically the relationship between fictional and historical libertines, the many overlaps between the “transgressive” and the “erudite” communities, the role they played in the emergence of the “radical” Enlightenment and scientific materialism, their subversive use of language, the fluctuation between protective strategies of equivocation and the audacity of parrêsia. Readings from trial documents, pamphlets, correspondence, novels and essays, by G. C. Vanini, François Garasse, Antonio Rocco, Théophile de Viau, Descartes, Cyrano de Bergerac, Dassoucy, Bayle, Boyer d’Argens, Voltaire, Sade, Diderot, Laclos.
Instructor(s): E. Russo.

AS.212.783. Diderot, Power and Representation.

A reading of some of Diderot's major works in light of his struggle to break out of imposed and self-imposed hierarchies of style and manner, and to reframe or reform radically the relationship between ethics, politics, sexuality, gender and the arts. Special emphasis on Diderot's self-representation as arbiter of taste, mediator and mentor.
Instructor(s): E. Russo
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.213.310. Classic German Theater. 3.0 Credits.

Taught in German. In this seminar we will read some of the most important plays of German literature, by Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Kleist, and Büchner. We will explore questions about the role of the theater toward the education of mankind in the spirit of the enlightenment. We will examine how tragedy is reconfigured around the context of the bourgeois family. We will study historical practices of stage production as well as modern filmic and theatrical productions. Finally, we will prepare an informal staging of a play.
Prerequisites: AS.210.361
Instructor(s): K. Pahl.

AS.213.318. The Making of Modern Gender. 3.0 Credits.

Taught in English. Gender as we know it is not timeless. Today, gender roles and the assumption that there are only two genders are diligently contested and debated. With the binary gender system thus perhaps nearing its end, we might wonder if it had a beginning. In fact, the idea that there are two sexes and that they not only assume different roles in society but also exhibit different character traits, has emerged historically around 1800. Early German Romanticism played a seminal role in the making of modern gender and sexuality. For the first time, woman was considered not a lesser version of man, but a different being with a value of her own. The idea of gender complementation emerged, and this idea, in turn, put more pressure than ever on heterosexuality. In this course, we will explore the role of literature and the other arts in the making and unmaking of gender.
Instructor(s): K. Pahl
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.321. Bodies and Pleasures. 3.0 Credits.

Taught in English. This course traces a literary history of sexuality from the Middle Ages to contemporary women’s writing. We will analyze how sexual pleasure changed over time. In particular, we will discuss what role literature plays in the reproduction and transformation of bodily pleasures. The course explores how the pleasures of bodies are imagined in and through literature, but also whether words are bodies that give pleasure and perhaps even have their own pleasures. Authors discussed will include Boccaccio, Cleland, Rousseau, Schlegel, Kleist, Hoffmann, Novalis, Arnim, Büchner, Freud, Rilke, Kafka, Rich, Foucault, Kristeva, Cixous, Giddens, and Winterson.
Instructor(s): K. Pahl
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.350. Wie wir begehren. 3.0 Credits.

Taught in German. Human desire and sexuality proves of vital concern in German-speaking countries: from the invention by German sexologists of much of the terminology still in use today to the so-called sexual revolution in the late sixties to new perspectives on the topic today. We will study film, fiction and non-fiction. Recommended Background: AS.210.362
Instructor(s): K. Pahl
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.359. Kleist. 3.0 Credits.

Heinrich von Kleist was one of the most intriguing literary figures of the early nineteenth century in Germany. Neither Classicist nor Romanticist, he developed a unique style that combines such different elements as complex rhythmicality, drastic imagery, and philosophical precision. His novellas, plays, and nonfiction prose explore questions of gender, colonialism, the tragic, and of innocence and double dealing. Among the texts we will read together are "The Betrothal in St. Domingo" (Kleist’s literary response to the Haitian revolution), "Penthesilea" (the play about lovers who can find each other only in war ends in a splatter scene), and "Marquise of O" (the story of a woman whose father rejects her because she finds herself pregnant, and yet she has no memory of the sexual intercourse that must have led to her current situation). Language of Instruction: German
Prerequisites: Pre-req: AS.210.362
Instructor(s): K. Pahl
Area: Humanities.

AS.213.668. Kleist.

This seminar will explore the narrative, dramatic, theoretical and quasi-journalistic work of Heinrich von Kleist along two lines of inquiry. We will read his literary experiments as reactions to the major shift in the sex-gender system and the new deployment of sexuality in the eighteenth century. We will discuss his unique role in the production, communication and interpretation of feeling across narrative and theater.
Instructor(s): K. Pahl.

AS.214.171. Freshman Seminar: Witchcraft and Demonology in Renaissance Europe. 3.0 Credits.

Who were the witches? Why were they persecuted for hundreds of years? Why were women identified as the witches par excellence? How many witches were put to death? (Answer: 30-40,000, between about 1400 and 1800.) What traits did European witchcraft share with witch-mythologies in other societies? After the witch-hunts ended, how did “The Witch” go from being “monstrous” to being “admirable” and even “sexy”? Answers are found in history and anthropology, but also in literature, folklore, music, and the visual arts. After an introduction to ancient and medieval witchcraft, we will study European witch-persecution between 1400 and 1800. The second half of the course will concentrate on artistic representations of witches in media ranging from manuscripts to movies, concentrating on Italy, France, Spain, and Germany.
Instructor(s): W. Stephens
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.214.376. Warrior Women from Ancient Times to Game of Thrones. 3.0 Credits.

This course will trace the origins of the warrior woman from ancient times through today's pop culture and reflect on the multiplicity of its social, cultural, and political ramifications.
Instructor(s): J. Gomez
Area: Humanities.

AS.215.353. Women Writing in Latin America: Prose and Poetry by Sor Juana, Mistral, Lisoba, Pizarnik, Castellanos, and other poets. 3.0 Credits.

The first objective of the course is to train students in close reading and analysis of literary texts. The second objective is to read prose and poetry by some of the canonical texts in the Latin American tradition written by women. Taught in English.
Instructor(s): S. Castro-Klaren
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.215.422. Amor y romanticismo en una novela y tres películas. 3.0 Credits.

Lectura en contexto histórico cultural de la novela del novelista argentino Andrés Neuman, El viajero de siglo (Premio Alfaguara 2009). La obra será estudiada en detalle en el contexto de la música del romanticismo europeo y el pensamiento filosófico y moral sobre el amor y la pasión. Cuatro cintas de la directora Jane Campion serán igualmente estudiadas: : The Piano (1993), The Portrait of a Lady (1996), Holy Smoke (1999) and Bright Star 2009. Curso impartido enteramente en español
Prerequisites: AS.210.311 AND AS.210.312
Instructor(s): E. Gonzalez
Area: Humanities.

Sociology

AS.230.223. Housing and Homelessness in the United States. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.225. Population, Health and Development. 3.0 Credits.

This course will cover the major world population changes in the past century as well as the contemporary situation and projections for this century. Topics include rapid population growth, the historical and continuing decline of death and birth rates, contraceptive methods as well as family planning and child survival programs, population aging, urbanization, population and the environment and the demographic effects of HIV/AIDS
Instructor(s): S. Becker
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.255. Men and Women in Society. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore what it means to be male or female through academic writings, fiction, and film. It will examine how genders are defined by individuals, cultures, and institutions, and how those meanings shape everyday life for men and women. Power, inequality, and intersections with race-ethnicity, class, and sexuality will be a primary focus. Theories of gender addressed will include those related to masculinity, social psychology, feminism, and intersectionality. Though the course will primarily consider the United States, gender in other countries and cultures will also be addressed. Cross-listed with WGS.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.310. Becoming An Adult. 3.0 Credits.

While students may already be personally familiar with the subject matter, the course examines the sociological and psychological dimensions of this demographically dense period known as the transition to adulthood. Emphasizes life course theories of human development through readings of empirical work on adolescence, the transition to college, early employment and early family formation. Attention is paid to the ways class; gender; race and nationality influence the pathways, choices and outcomes of young people. A Statistics/ Sociology background is helpful, but not required.
Instructor(s): S. Deluca
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.316. African American Family. 3.0 Credits.

This course is an examination of sociological theories and studies of African-American families and an overview of the major issues confronting African-American family life. The contemporary conditions of black families are explored, as well as the historical events that have influenced the family patterns we currently observe. Special attention will be given to social policies that have evolved as a result of the prominence of any one perspective at a given point in time.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.324. Gender and International Development. 3.0 Credits.

This course employs a comparative perspective to examine the gendered impact of international development experiences and policies. Students will discuss the historical evolution of how the concept of gender has been constructed, conceptualized, and integrated into international development theory and practice. The course will also examine how greater international development. In particular, we will examine structural theories of poverty reduction, individual theories of power and processes of stratification at the household and family level. Specific issue areas will include the globalization, class and work political participation and social movements. Cross-listed with International Studies (CP, IR). Fulfills Economics requirement for IS GSCD track students only.
Instructor(s): R. Agarwala
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.336. Family, Gender and Sexuality in China. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines social changes in China since the beginning of the People’s Republic (1949) through the lenses of family, gender and sexuality. The first half of the course focuses on understanding family institutions, women’s status, gender relations and sexualities in connection with major historical transitions between 1949 and the present. The second half includes readings and discussions around several thematic topics regarding family, gender and sexuality in contemporary China in the broader context of politics, economy, and social norms.
Instructor(s): Y. Dong
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.230.370. Housing and Homelessness in the United States. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the role of housing, or the absence thereof, in shaping quality of life. It will explore the consequences of the places in which we live and how we are housed. Consideration will be given to overcrowding, affordability, accessibility, and past and existing housing policies and their influence on society. Special attention will be given to the problem of homelessness.
Prerequisites: Students may not have previously taken AS.230.223.
Instructor(s): M. Greif
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.388. Sociology of the Family. 3.0 Credits.

Sociological perspectives on contemporary family life, including marriage and divorce, cohabitation, single parenthood, same sex partnerships, children’s wellbeing, balancing work and family responsibilities, domestic violence, and government policy toward families.
Instructor(s): A. Cherlin
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.230.616. Researching Race, Class, & Gender.

This advanced graduate seminar is designed to help graduate students sort out whether they are headed for careers as race, gender, or class specialists. We will review major sociological work in these sub-fields and work to determine what common elements of these publications makes them a stand out in the discipline. Then students will be asked to craft projects of their own.
Instructor(s): K. McDonald.

Biophysics

AS.250.351. Reproductive Physiology. 2.0 Credits.

Focuses on reproductive physiology and biochemical and molecular regulation of the female and male reproductive tracts. Topics include the hypothalamus and pituitary, peptide and steroid hormone action, epididymis and male accessory sex organs, female reproductive tract, menstrual cycle, ovulation and gamete transport, fertilization and fertility enhancement, sexually transmitted diseases, and male and female contraceptive methods. Introductory lectures on each topic followed by research-oriented lectures and readings from current literature.
Instructor(s): B. Zirkin
Area: Natural Sciences.

Public Health Studies

AS.280.225. Population, Health and Development. 3.0 Credits.

This course will cover the major world population changes in the past century as well as the contemporary situation and projections for this century. Topics include rapid population growth, the historical and continuing decline of death and birth rates, contraceptive methods as well as family planning and child survival programs, population aging, urbanization, population and the environment and the demographic effects of HIV/AIDS.
Prerequisites: Students who have taken AS.230.225 may not take AS.280.225.
Instructor(s): S. Becker
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

AS.280.422. Health Equity and Disparities: Addressing Complex Global Health Challenges. 3.0 Credits.

In this course, students will be supported and challenged to develop a personal understanding of and perspective on global health equity and disparities, and acquire a toolbox of frameworks and strategies to use in addressing them. Students will have the opportunity to be exposed to numerous examples and case studies to gain experience in assessing and addressing issues of equity in the complex, real-¬life problems such as those they will be facing as public health profess ionals. Students will review major historical and contemporary global and national initiatives to address equity issues in the health sector, including global declarations and reports as well as policies and programs that have been developed to achieve improvements in health equity in specific contexts. Application of this historical and practical knowledge and their own perspectives to new and complex situations will be fostered throughout the course. Basic knowledge of biostatistics and epidemiology and courses on global health or international public health issues recommended pre-requisites. Juniors/Seniors Only. Gordis Teaching Fellowship course
Instructor(s): M. Schleiff
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Behavioral Biology

AS.290.420. Human Sexual Orientation. 3.0 Credits.

This course will examine the historical and current theories of sexual orientation and sexual variation development by examining the biological, psychological and social contributing factors that influence the development of sexual orientations and variations along with treatment and modification of problematic sexual behaviors. Please note that the use of electronic devices is not permitted during this class, in order to promote the full interactive potential of this engaging seminar-style offering. Students may enroll in both AS.200.204 and AS.290.420, but cannot do so in the same semester. Enrollment is limited to Senior Majors & Minors in Behavioral Biology; Biology; Cognitive Science; Medicine, Science & the Humanities; Molecular & Cellular Bio; Neuroscience; Psychology; Public Health; Sociology; Study of Women, Gender, & Sexuality.
Corequisites: Students may enroll in both AS.200.204 and AS.290.420, but cannot do so in the same semester.
Instructor(s): C. Kraft
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Humanities Center

AS.300.133. Freshmen Seminar: Women of Epic Fame in Literature and Drama, 800 BCE-1650 CE. 3.0 Credits.

From Homer's Odyssey to Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, powerful women who achieve their ends by working from within the system are often overlooked or not fully explored. Our readings and discussions will foreground these women of fiction, while we also consider the social conditions of their living contemporaries. Readings will include: Homer’s Odyssey (Penelope); Virgil’s Aenead (Dido); Dante’s Inferno (Beatrice); Milton's Paradise Lost (Eve), and several accounts of Cleopatra in plays by Shakespeare and his contemporary women writers. Cross listed with Theater Arts, Writing Seminars, and WGS.
Instructor(s): T. Tower
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.300.317. The Russian Novel. 3.0 Credits.

Russian authors began writing novels in the shadow of counterparts in Western Europe, and thus had the chance to experiment with the form and scope of genres and themes they found in European literature: Alexander Pushkin’s novel in verse Eugene Onegin pays homage to Byron’s Don Juan and satirizes Richardson’s Pamela; Mikhail Lermontov’s nested stories A Hero of Our Time owes a debt to Romantic and gothic fiction, and Nikolai Gogol’s Dead Souls brings Dante’s Inferno to the Russian provinces. From these literary forefathers emerged the likes of Feodor Dostoevsky and Leo Tolstoy, who made a lasting impact on world literature with their psychological and philosophical novels. This course examines the Russian novel in its historical and cultural context alongside contributions of Russian literary criticism in defining novel form and genre.
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.300.324. Cinema of the 1930s: Communist and Capitalist Fantasies. 3.0 Credits.

Comedy and musical comedy film flourished in the USA during the Great Depression as well as in the USSR during the Stalinist Great Terror. This course will compare films of the era in a variety of genres (musical, epic, Western, drama), examining the intersections between politics and aesthetics as well as the lasting implications of the films themselves in light of theoretical works on film as a medium, ethics and gender.
Instructor(s): A. Eakin Moss
Area: Humanities.

AS.300.363. Reading Judith Shakespeare: poetry and drama by women writers in Elizabethan England (ca 1558-1650). 3.0 Credits.

Virginia Woolf's account of the thwarted career of Shakespeare's hypothetical sister, Judith (in A Room of One's Own) frames our reading of plays and poetry by Shakespeare and contemporary women writers, including Isabella Whitney, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Sidney, Aemelia Lanyer, Mary Wroth, and others. Students will create fictional biographies of “Judith Shakespeare” and her literary accomplishments. Cross listed with English, Theater Arts, Writing Seminars, and WGS.
Instructor(s): E. Patton
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.300.365. Desire in the Fin de siècle. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the obsession with desire at the turn of the 20th century in literature, drama, philosophy and social thought and its implications for notions of self and community in modernity. We will read comparatively across European, Russian and American cultures, including Stoker's Dracula, Hamsun's Hunger, plays by Chekhov, Strindberg, Ibsen, Wilde, and stories by Tolstoy, Gorky, Chopin and Larsen.
Instructor(s): A. Eakin Moss
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.300.371. The Modernist Novel: James, Woolf, and Joyce. 3.0 Credits.

The purpose of this course is to survey works by three of the greatest, most relentless innovators of the twentieth century – Henry James, Virginia Woolf, and James Joyce -- who explored and exploded narrative techniques for depicting what Woolf called the “luminous halo” of life. Selected works include: "The Beast in the Jungle," The Portrait of a Lady, Jacob’s Room, Mrs. Dalloway, To the Lighthouse, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Ulysses.
Instructor(s): Y. Ong
Area: Humanities.

AS.300.372. Dance and the Russian Avant-Garde. 3.0 Credits.

This course will explore the relationship between art and dance during the explosion of artistic creativity at the time of the Russian Revolution (1900s-1920s) as well as the influence of the Russian Avant-Garde on modern dance and theories of movement through the 20th century. We will examine how dance both gave physical form to aesthetic, philosophical and political ideas and catalyzed new forms of thinking about the human body and modern spaces. Lecture and discussion of readings and screenings will be paired with a weekly movement workshop in the dance studio that will introduce students to different forms and theories of avant-garde and modernist dance and movement theory. No prior dance experience or knowledge of Russian is required.
Instructor(s): A. Eakin Moss; C. Dinapoli
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

East Asian Studies

AS.310.115. Ghost Tales from China and Japan, 14th-19th Centuries. 3.0 Credits.

We cannot express our own experience of death – only imagine life after death. How did people in the past conceptualize the world of the dead? Ghost tales will teach us what we imagine as the experience of dead and life after death. This course aims to introduce students to a variety of ghost stories in Late Imperial China and Tokugawa Japan and connect their literary imagination of the dead to the cultural, socio-historical, and religious context of each society as well as to the broad East Asian tradition of supernatural narratives. While we also touch upon earlier traditions on narrating the dead, most of the stories in class readings are from the Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) dynasties of China, and the Tokugawa period (1600-1868) of Japan. Key issues include family, gender, sexuality, body, medicine and many more. Although we will also take a look at visual and theatrical representations of the dead, we will primarily focus on literary texts about ghostly phenomena. Film screenings required. All readings are in English.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.116. Romantic Love in Chinese Literature. 3.0 Credits.

This course aims to introduce students to a variety of literary texts featuring romantic love from the 9th to the mid-20th centuries in China. The target materials cover a wide range of literary products from Bo Juyi’s court poem to the modern Shanghai novella by the woman writer Zhang Ailing (Eileen Chang). As we read romance in a variety of narrative forms such as fiction, drama, and poetry, we will examine changing ideas about marriage, love, sexuality, family, emotion, and morality within the literary discourse as well as in society. Thus, students are expected to connect various literary texts about romance to their socio-historical, literary, and political surroundings. At the same time, we will discuss the shifting significance of romance for writers and reading public and consider how literary texts formed ideas about romance in society. The course is organized chronologically and thematically. Reading assignments are all in English.
Instructor(s): F. Joo
Area: Humanities.

AS.310.310. Women and Gender in East Asian Religions. 3.0 Credits.

This course examines the complexities of gender and the role that women have played in the religions of China, Korea, and Japan. It explores two main types of content: 1) religious discourse on women and gender through doctrines, scriptures, narratives, myths, and legends; and 2) the practices, beliefs, and lives of real women through historical cases, including those of nuns, laity, sovereigns and family members. Organized in chronological order, the course begins with early sources across East Asia and finishes in contemporary times. Readings and assignments emphasize the analysis of primary sources, complemented by secondary works for historical and cultural context. Students will end the course with a research paper focused on a topic of their choice.
Instructor(s): C. Carter
Writing Intensive.

Center for Africana Studies

AS.362.204. Women in African History. 3.0 Credits.

Selected readings written by or about notable African women from the 17th century to the present. Themes explored include slavery, power and religion, economics, health and politics.
Instructor(s): P. Romero
Area: Humanities
Writing Intensive.

AS.362.340. Power and Racism. 3.0 Credits.

This course investigates the impact of white supremacy and anti-black racism, as a global system of power, on the political development of the United States of America.
Instructor(s): F. Hayes
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://anthropology.jhu.edu/wgs/directory.html

Faculty

Directors

Todd Shepard
Director

Katrin Pahl
Director

School of Arts & Sciences

Sam Chambers
Associate Professor, Political Science

Jennifer Culbert
Associate Professor, Political Science

Clara Han
Associate Professor, Anthropology

Anne Eakin Moss
Assistant Professor, Humanities Center

Christopher Nealon
Professor, English

Johns Hopkins of School of Medicine

Jeremy Greene
Associate Professor, History of Medicine

Assistant Professor

Clara Han
M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor (Anthropology).

Professor

Christopher Nealon
Ph.D., Professor (English).