Geography and Environmental Engineering

http://engineering.jhu.edu/dogee/

The Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering is concerned with the improved understanding and description of environmental problems including questions of pollutant fate and transport, water resources engineering, environmental chemistry, geomorphology, drinking water and wastewater treatment, ecosystem dynamics, and technology, society, and environmental change. Drawing from a number of disciplines and approaches, elements within these systems are examined, and interconnections among elements are explored. The department represents a unique opportunity for undergraduate education through our environmental engineering major, a geography major, three minors, and for advanced graduate education, research, and interdisciplinary collaboration. Some broadly defined examples of subjects collaboratively studied by our faculty and students are listed below.

  • Engineering processes to alleviate environmental problems. This requires knowledge of both natural processes and engineering design. The former addresses phenomena that are basic to understanding how engineering can help solve environmental problems. The latter involves the application of such understanding to problem solutions.
  • Surficial, atmospheric and subsurface processes involving interactions of chemical, biological, and hydrological processes in the environment.
  • Application of engineering solutions in the context of the public decision making process including economic, social, and administrative factors.
  • Analysis of interrelationships between engineering and administrative decisions and cultural, institutional, and governmental sectors of society, especially in the urban environment.

Engineering designs and public decisions must rest upon a sound knowledge of fundamental scientific processes as well as economic policy and social science. Research and study are focused on both basic, and the applied aspects of environmental problems. Interdisciplinary work is necessary, combining, for example, the basic sciences, engineering, and environmental economics. Because of its diversity of interests and association with other departments of the university, the department can offer a broad range of graduate programs based on the natural, social, and engineering sciences.

Department Areas of Interest, Study, and Research

The following areas of interest help illustrate the depth and breadth of academic and research opportunities available through the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering. This list is far from complete. The interests and expertise of students and faculty within the department are continually expanding and changing. Students are encouraged to work with their advisors to build upon these areas of interest to construct a program that best suits their interests and professional goals and includes sufficient depth and rigor. Unique combinations of course work and research experience make it possible for students to identify and address issues in new, imaginative ways.

The Environmental Engineering area of interest is concerned with issues that involve water and wastewater treatment, transport and fate of contaminants in natural and engineered environments, hazardous and solid waste management, hydrology, and environmental fluid dynamics. Current research efforts are directed to:

  • applying biological, chemical, and physical processes to treatment of contaminants in drinking water or wastewaters;
  • evaluating colloidal stability in natural and engineered systems;
  • exploring contaminant transport and interphase transfer, and the influence of these processes on chemical or biological transformations; and
  • examining heat and mass transport and scaling mechanics at the land-atmosphere interface.

The Water and Air Resources Engineering area of interest is concerned with the occurrence, movement, and management of water and air through and above the surface of the Earth. This area involves many faculty in the department and has close interactions with faculty and students throughout Hopkins including those in the Center for Environmental and Applied Fluid Mechanics. Research in this area currently deals with:

  • surface hydrology and groundwater;
  • the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere and surface and subsurface waters;
  • water supply, distribution, and risk analysis;
  • measurement and modeling of turbulent environmental flows;
  • mathematical modeling of subsurface and atmospheric transport phenomena;
  • movement of water and chemicals in the vadose zone and in water supply aquifers;
  • the impact of climate change on water resources; and
  • river system dynamics.

The Environmental Chemistry area of interest is devoted to understanding the chemical and biological reactions and mobility of contaminants in natural environments and engineered aquatic systems. Research is focused on

  • identifying chemical and biological constituents of aquatic environments that catalyze, inhibit, or react with organic and inorganic contaminants;
  • exploring how protonation, complex formation, sorption, and partitioning affect rates of contaminant transformation;
  • examining interconnections between physical, chemical, and biological phenomena affecting contaminants; and
  • developing structure-property and structure-reactivity relationships that provide a basis for predicting transformation and fate.

The goal of the area of interest in Systems Analysis and Economics for Public Decision Making is to develop competence in the modeling and analysis of public policy alternatives and private sector responses to those policies. To achieve this goal, students typically emphasize economics or systems analysis or a blend of these two disciplines. Those emphasizing economics undertake specialized training in resource economics, microeconomic theory, cost-benefit analysis, public finance, and econometrics. Example applications include the economics of public works, water and energy pricing and regulation, demand forecasting, natural resource valuation, and public utility financing. Students focusing on systems analysis take courses in the mathematics of optimization and decision analysis, including linear and non-linear programming, integer programming, stochastic programming, simulation, Bayesian analysis, and multiobjective decision making. Example applications include water resources management, siting of urban and regional facilities for services and/or distribution, pollution management, simulation of market responses to environmental policies, and integrated assessment of climate policy and impacts.

The Geomorphology, Hydrology, and Ecology area of interest promotes the fundamental understanding of processes at the Earth’s surface. Research is presently focused on:

  • physical dynamics of tidal freshwater wetland evolution;
  • land use impacts on forest dynamics;
  • sediment transport, channel dynamics, and benthic ecology in rivers;
  • acquisition of metals by plants, fungi, and bacteria;
  • estuarine paleoecology; and
  • maintenance and flushing flows in mountainous rivers.

The Technology, Society, and Environmental Change area of interest focuses primarily on the relationships among social organization, technological and industrial change, the production of space and place, government policy and environmental outcomes. Substantive domains of inquiry include:

  • globalization and regional/local processes of economic, political, and cultural change. In particular, this entails grappling in particular with the behavior of multinational corporations and governments and the regional/local consequences of technological changes and institutional activities and decision making. Comparative studies of industrial transformations and their social and environmental consequences are emphasized.
  • urbanization and regional growth and decay. This involves the study of spatial differentiation in population distributions and their well-being arising out of the spatial mobilities of capital and labor, shifts in industrial structure, and processes of technological and cultural change. Comparative studies of urbanization processes—particularly Baltimore’s—are encouraged; and
  • the dynamics of environmental and social change. This requires consideration of philosophic, economic, and broad-based cultural backgrounds to environmental problems. Issues such as environmental justice, environmental ethics, and a critical application of appropriate knowledge (scientific, economic, cultural) for environmental decision making are strongly emphasized.

Facilities

Student and staff offices and laboratories are located in Ames and Krieger halls. A large teaching laboratory is equipped for biological and chemical examination of water and wastewater. Laboratories for research and teaching provide opportunities for research involving chemistry and microbiology. These include a number of environmental control rooms along with research opportunities involving sediment transport as well as pilot scale process investigations. Excellent facilities and instrumentation for atmospheric field studies exist, including laser radar for aerosols, fast response turbulence instruments, and radiation meters. Students also have access to treatment plants and other municipal and state facilities that may be useful in conducting research, as well as to vehicles and boats for field trips and field research of all types. Extensive computer facilities are available both in the department and in the university as a whole.

Financial Aid

The department maintains a large and continuing program of financial aid for graduate students, including tuition scholarships, fellowship awards, research assistantships, and teaching assistantships. Financial aid is granted on the basis of merit, and criteria for consideration for these awards include academic excellence, professional or research experience, and career commitment to the field. Continued support is subject to the student’s performance, availability of research or TA funds, and requisite staffing of current projects. Ph.D. students receive priority for full financial support. Pending available funding, partial tuition fellowships are offered to qualified master’s students. Ph.D. applicants are nominated by the department for consideration for fellowships. The department often can offer one or more departmental fellowships to help support the most qualified Ph.D. applicants for their first year of study.

Furthermore, many students within the department have been awarded graduate research fellowships available to Ph.D. and Masters students through programs administered by the National Science Foundation and the Environmental Protection Agency. Graduate fellowships are also available for underrepresented minority students in the engineering and natural science fields through the GEM Consortium. Additionally, the Johns Hopkins Environment, Energy, Sustainability & Health Institute (E²SHI) invites applications for one-year fellowships of up to $25,000 to support Johns Hopkins University doctoral students pursuing interdisciplinary research in environment, energy, sustainability, or health topics. Qualified students are strongly recommended to apply for these fellowships during the fall of the final year prior to beginning graduate studies, as many programs have November or December deadlines.

 

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The Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering offers:

  • an undergraduate Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Environmental Engineering
  • four focus areas within the environmental engineering major:
    • Environmental Management and Economics
    • Environmental Engineering Science
    • Environmental Transport
    • Environmental Health Engineering
  • an undergraduate Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Geography
  • two focus areas within the Geography major:
    • Human Geography
    • Physical Geography
  • three minors:
    • a minor in environmental engineering
    • a minor in environmental sciences
    • a minor in engineering for sustainable development
  • a five-year combined (B.S./M.S. or B.S./M.S.E.) program.

As part of these minor programs, or as part of other programs of the student’s own design, the department offers electives in such areas as ecology, geomorphology, water and wastewater pollution treatment processes, environmental systems analysis, and environmental policy studies.

Major in Environmental Engineering

The mission of our undergraduate program is to provide students with a broadly based yet rigorous education in the fundamental subjects central to the field, in a milieu that fosters development of a spirit of intellectual inquiry and the problem-solving skills required to address the open-ended issues characteristic of the real world.

Our B.S. program provides a strong foundation in the physical, chemical, and biological sciences, as well as in mathematics, engineering science, and engineering design. It is broad and flexible enough to accommodate students with a variety of interests in environmental engineering. This training should provide an ideal preparation for future employment in business or industry or for subsequent training at the graduate level, either in environmental engineering or in a field such as environmental law, public health, or medicine.

Program Objectives

The B.S. in Environmental Engineering degree program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

The Program in Environmental Engineering educates students to think critically, communicate clearly, and collaborate effectively as they apply the fundamental scientific principles of engineering to environmental problems. We emphasize the importance of intellectual growth, professional ethics, and service to society. Our graduates are prepared to be successful:

  • engineering professionals in private and governmental organizations, and
  • students in the best graduate programs.

Our department is noted for our students’ exceptionally high pass rate of the “Fundamentals of Engineering” (FE) exam offered by the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES).

Focus Areas within the Environmental Engineering (EE) Major

Students must select among four different focus areas:

  • Environmental Management and Economics
  • Environmental Engineering Science
  • Environmental Transport
  • Environmental Health Engineering

With the assistance of a faculty advisor, each student will plan a curriculum suited to his or her ultimate career goals. The program also encourages and supports individual study and research. Program requirements total 125 credits.

Mathematics with a focus on applications (19 credits)

Required Courses:
AS.110.108Calculus I4
AS.110.109Calculus II4
AS.110.202Calculus III4
or AS.110.211 Honors Multivariable Calculus
EN.550.291Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
or AS.110.302 Differential Equations and Applications
An advanced course (300-level or higher) in probability and statistics. The Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics offers a number of suitable courses. x3
Total Credits19

Basic Science (BS) (24-25 credits)

Required courses:
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4
or AS.171.107 General Physics for Physical Sciences Majors (AL)
AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Majors II4
or AS.171.108 General Physics for Physical Science Majors (AL)
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1
AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II1
One year of introductory chemistry (i.e. AS.030.101 Introductory Chemistry I and AS.030.102 Introductory Chemistry II )6
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I1
AS.030.106Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II1
EN.570.205Ecology3
An additional course in the biological sciences such as: AS.020.151 General Biology I, or EN.570.328 Geography & Ecology of Plants3
Note: Premedical Students could substitute:
Biochemistry
Cell Biology
Biochemistry Laboratory
Cell Biology Lab
Premedical students should also take additional chemistry courses as electives, such as:
Organic Chemistry I
Organic Chemistry II
Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab
Total Credits24

Humanities and Social Sciences (HS) (18 credits)

A minimum of six courses totaling 18 credits in Humanities or Social Sciences. The six courses must include:

  1. one advisor-approved course that specifically develops writing skills (e.g., a how to write class),
  2. EN.570.334 Engineering Microeconomics, and
  3. four additional Humanities and Social Sciences courses with at least two at the 300-level or higher. EN.570.404 Political Ecology  and/orEN.570.406 Environmental History can be taken as part of these requirements.

Please note that the writing course will fulfill one of the two writing intensive courses required by the university.

Note: most medical schools require a year of English literature and/or composition.

Required course:
EN.570.334Engineering Microeconomics3
Elective examples for DoGEE:3
Political Ecology
Environmental History
Writing course examples:
AS.220.105Fiction/Poetry Writing I3
or AS.220.106 Fiction/Poetry Writing II
AS.220.146Introduction to Science Writing3
AS.220.202Introduction to Non-Fiction: Matters of Fact3
Either AS.060.113 or AS.060.114; both cannot be counted for H/S credit.
AS.060.113Expository Writing x3
or AS.060.114 Expository Writing
Total Credits18

General Engineering (GE) (16 credits)

Required courses:
EN.570.108Introduction Environmental Engineering3
An introductory course in computing, such as:
EN.570.210Computation/Math Modeling3
A course in thermodynamics, such as:
EN.540.203
  & EN.510.312
Engineering Thermodynamics
   and Thermodynamics/Materials
3-6
or EN.530.231 Mechanical Engineering Thermodynamics
A course in Statics, such as:
EN.560.201Statics & Mechanics of Materials4
or EN.530.201 Statics and Mechanics of Materials
EN.570.351Introduction to Fluid Mechanics3
Total Credits16-19

Design Experience and Engineering Laboratory (Senior Design) (D) (9 credits)

Required courses:
EN.570.305Environmental Engineering Systems Design4
EN.570.419Environmental Engineering Design I2
EN.570.421Environmental Engineering Design II3
Total Credits9

The Design and Synthesis sequence is a five-credit project course (2 credits fall semester, 3 credits spring semester) and involves a comprehensive study of the engineering design process from problem definition to final design. The course involves team projects that include written and oral presentations. Students will form small teams that will work with local companies or government agencies in executing the project. Prerequisite: senior standing in Environmental Engineering.

Environmental Engineering Requirements (26 credits)

Required courses: (15 credits)
EN.570.239Emerging Environmental Issues3
EN.570.301Environmental Engineering Fundamentals I3
EN.570.302Water & Wastewater Treatment3
EN.570.304Environmental Engineering Laboratory3
EN.570.353Hydrology3
Total Credits15

Environmental Engineering Electives (12 credits):

Students take at least two courses from one of the following focus areas, and at least one course from two of the other focus areas. Courses to be selected in consultation with advisor. Changes in courses must be accompanied by a Waiver/Substitution Form.

Environmental Management and Economics x
EN.570.418/.618Multiobjective Programming and Planning3
EN.570.496Urban and Environmental Systems3
EN.570.497Risk and Decision Analysis3
EN.570.490Solid Waste Engineering and Management3
EN.570.491Hazardous Waste Engineering and Management3
Environmental Engineering Science
EN.570.411Engineering Microbiology4
EN.570.442Environmental Organic Chemistry3
EN.570.443Aquatic Chemistry3
EN.570.460Environmental Colloidal Phenomena3
Environmental Transport
EN.530.328Fluid Mechanics II3
EN.570.423Principles of Geomorphology4
EN.570.432Sediment Transport & River Mechanics3
EN.570.657Air Pollution
Environmental Health Engineering
AS.280.350Fundamentals of Epidemiology4
PH.221.624 *
PH.182.638 *
PH.182.626 *
PH.182.640 *
PH.182.627 *
PH.182.615 *
PH.182.622 *
PH.188.680 *
PH.182.625 *
x

Note: 600-level courses require permission of instructor

*

 These courses are offered on the Bloomberg School of Public Health campus. For more information: http://www.jhsph.edu/courses

Technical Electives (TE) (minimum of 12 credits)

(selected in consultation with an advisor)

At least three Engineering, Quantitative Studies, or Natural Sciences at or above the 300-level, subject to approval by the department totalling at least 12 credits.

Technical electives must fulfill the following requirements:

  1. TEs must total 12 credits of advanced 300-level Engineering, Quantitative Studies, or Natural Sciences courses, and
  2. must be approved by the department. (For ABET requirements at least one from: Solid Waste; Hazardous Waste; Air Pollution; Environmental Health Engineering, if not satisfied as part of the Environmental Engineering electives.) Up to six credits of independent study or research may be applied toward engineering requirements (e.g., EN.570.501 Undergraduate Research/EN.570.502 Undergraduate Research, EN.570.505 Undergraduate Independent Study, or  Senior Thesis). Note earlier comments for premedical majors.

It is strongly recommended that students take additional advanced classes in computing and numerical methods. EE students are strongly encouraged to take at least one course in organic chemistry (e.g., AS.030.205 Organic Chemistry I). The organic chemistry course will meet the TE requirement.

Guidance for Technical Electives for the EE Major

Technical electives are intended to provide students with courses with technical content and extend mastery in appropriate subject matter.

  • TEs require use of fundamental science or mathematics, have appropriate prerequisites (e.g., university-level calculus, physics, chemistry, or other N or Q courses) and generally at a 300-level or higher.
  • TEs must have the appropriate level of rigor which is defined as encompassing both of the following requirements:
    • 5-10 homework assignments; and
    • a culminating project (final project, group project, paper) or final examination. Lecture-only classes (no homework or exams) will not qualify as a TE for the EE major.
  • TEs require accumulation and depth of analytical skill or knowledge. In general, this precludes survey courses or courses that have no technical prerequisites that are taught by multiple professors or a series of guest lecturers, or cover a broad spectrum of a topic instead of building mastery in one area.

Exceptions are possible only with the approval of either the Departmental Chair or Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Sample EE Program (Focus Area: Environmental Engineering Science)

Note: This program is based on the assumption that students have not previously completed A.P. courses in calculus, physics, chemistry, etc.

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.110.108Calculus I (Physical Sciences and Engineering (M))4AS.110.109Calculus II (Physical Sciences and Engineering (M))4
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I (BS)3AS.030.102Introductory Chemistry II (BS)3
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I (BS)1AS.030.106Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II (BS)1
EN.570.108Introduction Environmental Engineering (GE)3AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I (BS)4
HS Elective3AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I (BS)1
 EN.570.210Computation/Math Modeling (GE)3
  14  16
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.550.291Linear Algebra and Differential Equations (M)4AS.110.202Calculus III (Calculus of Several Variables (M))4
AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Majors II4EN.510.312Thermodynamics/Materials (GE)3
AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II (BS)1EN.570.239Emerging Environmental Issues (EER)3
EN.560.201Statics & Mechanics of Materials (GE)4HS Elective 23
EN.570.205Ecology (BS)3HS Elective 33
  16  16
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.570.301Environmental Engineering Fundamentals I (EER)3Probability/Statistics (M)3
EN.570.305Environmental Engineering Systems Design (D)4AS.020.151General Biology I (BS)3
EN.570.334Engineering Microeconomics (HS Elective 4)3EN.570.302Water & Wastewater Treatment (EER)3
EN.570.351Introduction to Fluid Mechanics (GE)3EN.570.304Environmental Engineering Laboratory (EER)3
Environmental Engineering or Technical Elective (EEE or TE)3HS Elective 53
 Environmental Engineering or Technical Elective (EEE or TE)3
  16  18
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.570.353Hydrology (EER)3EN.570.421Environmental Engineering Design II (D)3
EN.570.419Environmental Engineering Design I (D)2HS Elective 6 (HS)3
Environmental Engineering or Technical Elective (EEE or TE)3Environmental Engineering or Technical Elective (EEE or TE)3
Environmental Engineering or Technical Elective (EEE or TE)3Environmental Engineering or Technical Elective (EEE or TE)3
Environmental Engineering or Technical Elective (EEE or TE)3Environmental Engineering or Technical Elective (EEE or TE)3
  14  15
Total Credits: 125

Math (M) = 19 credits; Humanities and Social Sciences (HS) = 18 credits; Basic Science (BS) = 24 credits; General Engineering (GE) = 16 credits; Environmental Engineering Requirement (EER) = 15 credits; Environmental Engineering Electives (EEE) = 12 credits; Technical Electives (TE) = 12 credits; Design (D) = 9 credits

Minor in Environmental Engineering

Environmental engineers play particularly pivotal roles as professionals who bridge the gap between understanding complex scientific concepts and helping to formulate public policies that affect the environment. Environmental engineering has become an important aspect of engineering practice in most engineering fields, and the discipline spans the professional spectrum from the private sector through governmental agencies to academia. An undergraduate minor in environmental engineering allows engineering students to pursue an interest in this field and to incorporate aspects of environmental engineering into careers in other engineering disciplines.

Students in any undergraduate major in the Whiting School of Engineering are eligible for admission to the environmental engineering minor program. Students will work with an advisor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering to develop a program that meets the requirements for the minor and is consistent with the educational requirements of their major field of engineering study.

Requirements of the EE minor program consist of:

  • a set of required core science and mathematics courses, already common to civil and chemical engineering majors;
  • four required courses in environmental engineering (total of 12 credits, listed below); and
  • two elective courses, one taken at the freshman or sophomore level, and the other taken at the junior or senior level.

Core Courses (EE Minor)

Advanced placement credits and/or equivalent courses in other schools or departments are acceptable, subject to advisor approval.

AS.110.108Calculus I4
AS.110.109Calculus II4
AS.110.202Calculus III4
or AS.110.211 Honors Multivariable Calculus
EN.550.291Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3
AS.030.102Introductory Chemistry II3
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I1
AS.030.106Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II1
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4
or AS.171.107 General Physics for Physical Sciences Majors (AL)
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1
AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II1
Required Courses (total of 12 credits)

Required Courses (EE Minor)

A total of 18 credits are required in addition to the previously specified core.

EN.570.301Environmental Engineering Fundamentals I3
EN.570.302Water & Wastewater Treatment3
EN.570.304Environmental Engineering Laboratory3
EN.570.305Environmental Engineering Systems Design4

Note: EN.500.200 is not strictly required for students who are willing to undertake additional effort toward obtaining basic skills in these areas; see the instructor if you have specific concerns.

Elective Courses

(Total of 6 credits) one course from each of two groups is required. Double counting of these courses with specified required courses in the student’s major is not allowed. Substitution for one required course may be possible under special circumstances, with explicit approval of the environmental engineering minor advisor. Additional course electives are possible but require approval of the environmental engineering minor advisor.

Group A3
Introductory courses at the freshman and sophomore level. One course required.*
Introduction Environmental Engineering
Ecology
Emerging Environmental Issues
Geography & Ecology of Plants
General Biology I
The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology
Group B x3
Hydrology
Engineering Microbiology
Principles of Geomorphology
Environmental Organic Chemistry
Aquatic Chemistry
Physical and Chemical Processes
Environmental Colloidal Phenomena
Solid Waste Engineering and Management
Hazardous Waste Engineering and Management
Chemical Structure and Bonding w/Lab
Organic Chemistry I
Physical Chemistry I
Geochem Earth/Environmen
Kinetic Processes
Transport Phenomena I
Probability & Statistics for the Physical Sciences & Engineering
Total Credits6

 

x

 Engineering science courses that are developed for juniors and seniors and also introductory graduate-level courses. One course is required.

For further information, contact Dr. William P. Ball, EE Minor Coordinator, 410-516-5434, bball@jhu.edu, or Adena Rojas, Senior Academic Program Coordinator, 410-516-5533, arojas@jhu.edu.

Minor in Environmental Sciences

The environmental sciences minor has been developed to encourage and facilitate studies in environmental sciences by students completing degrees in the other science and engineering disciplines. The environmental sciences (ES) minor requires:

  • completion of a set of courses in the core sciences,
  • two introductory courses dealing with the environment, and
  • three or more upper-level environmental sciences courses, as described.

Core Sciences (ES Minor)

Because of the interdisciplinary nature of environmental science, it is important that professionals from various areas of expertise acquire a common language and set of core concepts to make discussion and cooperation possible. The following courses represent the minimum set of requirements:

Mathematics (12 credits)
AS.110.108Calculus I4
AS.110.109Calculus II4
At least one of the these four courses:4
Linear Algebra
Honors Linear Algebra
Calculus III
Honors Multivariable Calculus
Differential Equations and Applications
Linear Algebra and Differential Equations
Biology (3 credits)
One course, such as:
AS.020.151General Biology I4
Physics (10 credits)
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4
or AS.171.107 General Physics for Physical Sciences Majors (AL)
AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Majors II4
or AS.171.108 General Physics for Physical Science Majors (AL)
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1
AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II1
Chemistry (13 credits)
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I1
AS.030.106Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II1
Total Credits31

Environmental Sciences

Students must take two introductory courses dealing with the environment and three or more of the upper-level environmental science courses on the following lists:

Introductory Courses (6 credits)
Introduction to Engineering for Sustainable Development
Ecology
Emerging Environmental Issues
Freshman Seminar: Sustainable + Non-Sustainable Resources
The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology
The Dynamic Earth Laboratory
Upper-Level Courses (9 credits)
Emerging Environmental Issues
Environmental Engineering Fundamentals I
Water & Wastewater Treatment
Geography & Ecology of Plants
Hydrology
Engineering Microbiology
Sediment Transport & River Mechanics
Environmental Inorganic Chemistry
Environmental Organic Chemistry
Aquatic Chemistry
Physical and Chemical Processes
Biological Process of Wastewater Treatment
Environmental Colloidal Phenomena
Hazardous Waste Engineering and Management
Aqueous Geochemistry
Geobiology
Isotope Geochemistry
Planetary Tectonics and Geodynamics
Sedimentary Geology
Geochem Earth/Environmen

Pairing a Major with the ES Minor

Many of the most creative and productive advances in environmental sciences in recent years have come from scientists trained in traditional disciplines (biology, chemistry, geology, physics, and engineering) who have devoted themselves to the study of environmental problems. Completion of the degree requirements of a traditional discipline provides depth and rigor that, when supplemented with additional academic training in environmental science, can be applied to professional work in a variety of environmental subjects, as the following examples show:

Biological Processes

Response of ecosystems to change, microbial degradation of pollutants, biogeochemical cycling of greenhouse gases. Illustrative majors: Biology, Biomedical Engineering, Biophysics, Biochemical Engineering.

Physical Processes

Erosion of hillslopes, rivers, and coastlines; sediment production, transport, and fate; groundwater, movement of contaminant plumes; oceanography; atmospheric physics; aerosol formation; global warming. Illustrative majors: Civil Engineering, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Earth and Planetary Sciences.

Environmental Chemistry

Environmental fate of pollutants, water and waste water treatment, geochemistry, atmospheric chemistry, ozone depletion, acid rain. Illustrative majors: Chemistry, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering.

Environmental Systems

Environmental modeling, risk assessment, environmental systems design, pollution control strategies. Illustrative majors: Civil Engineering, Applied Mathematics and Statistics.

Faculty Advising

A faculty advisor is assigned to each student in the environmental sciences minor program to assist in planning his/her academic program and to approve the choice of courses to satisfy the minor. Faculty advisors are available in the following areas:

Biological Processes: Edward J. Bouwer
Physical Processes: TBD
Environmental Chemistry: Alan T. Stone
Environmental Systems: Ben Hobbs
Human Geography: Erica J. Schoenberger

 

Minor in Engineering for Sustainable Development

Engineers will be increasingly called upon to help devise solutions to the tremendous problems of poverty, inequality, and social and environmental dislocation that afflict major parts of the globe in the 21st century. Working as an engineer in this context involves negotiating highly complex social, economic, and political realities and dealing with a wide range of institutions and actors, including national and local governments, multilateral lenders such as the World Bank, diverse non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and local communities. It also increasingly involves working in interdisciplinary teams with social scientists, public health and medical workers, humanitarian aid workers, bankers, politicians, and the like. “Sustainable” development implies a development path that is socially equitable, culturally sensitive, and environmentally appropriate over a multi-generational time frame. The minor in Engineering for Sustainable Development exposes engineering students to some of the key issues related to development, methods of information-gathering in diverse and difficult settings, and working effectively with non-engineers on complex problems.

The minor encompasses seven courses. The core course is EN.570.110 Introduction to Engineering for Sustainable Development. Five additional courses will be selected in a program devised in consultation with the minor advisor.

Of the Five Additional Courses

  • Three must be grouped around a specific theme, region or within a specific discipline. Themes might include, for example, public health, environment, or economic development. Regions include Africa, Latin America, or Asia. Disciplinary concentrations might be in Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Public Health, or Sociology.
  • Three of the courses must be at the 300-level or above.
  • One of the courses must cover methods for gathering and evaluating information in a development context.
Examples include:
AS.070.219Anthropology & Public Action3
AS.070.319Logic of Anthropological Inquiry3
AS.070.347Anthropology and Public Action3
AS.280.345Public Health Biostatistics4
AS.280.350Fundamentals of Epidemiology4
AS.230.202Research Methods for the Social Sciences3

Bachelor of Arts in Geography

Geographical knowledge constitutes a vital store of information concerning the distribution over the earth’s surface of those environmental conditions (both naturally occurring and anthropogenic) essential to support an immense diversity of human life and activity.

The study of Geography focuses on understanding how physical, biotic, social, and economic processes are perpetually reshaping environments and landscapes in ways either favorable or unfavorable for different life forms in general and for different and distinctive kinds of human occupancy and culture in particular. Geographical education seeks to instill a deep appreciation of the grand diversity of ways in which the peoples of the earth have learned to use and modify their environments creatively. It also focuses on the environmental problems that arise in association with such processes of modification. While geography in general looks to maintain a strong bond between physical and human dimensions of landscape formation, specialization within that general framework is also encouraged.

Human Geography is primarily concerned with the detailed specification of the economic, social, political, and cultural processes that lead to the substantive modification of natural environments through the draining of marshes, the damming of rivers, the development of agriculture, mining, and industry, and the construction of human settlements. It is also crucially concerned with the forms of interaction (trade, communications, capital flows, and migrations) between people over space and the effects of such interactions upon the people of the world. The barriers to interaction (political boundaries, for example, and the acquisition by human populations of strong senses of local, regional, and territorial identity) are likewise a key topic for examination.

Physical geography is primarily concerned with those physical processes—climatic, ecological, geological, hydrological—which have shaped and which continue to shape the earth’s surface, creating distinctive physical and ecological conditions for different life forms. Training in physical geography aims to build sufficient technical expertise to handle a wide range of environmental problems concerning the atmosphere, the Earth, and the hydrosphere, with special emphases upon water, surficial processes, and ecology.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

(See also General Requirements for Departmental Majors and Writing Requirement sections.)

The B.A. in geography offers a broad background in the sciences (particularly biological and ecological), the social sciences, and the humanities. All geography majors must fulfill the general university requirements and take four   fundamental courses in geography. They may then choose a concentration in either physical or human geography. In addition to these courses focused on their special interest, they may freely select electives to fill the 120 credit hours required for the B.A. degree. Students work closely with their faculty advisor to create a program that fulfills their individual academic objectives and includes sufficient depth and rigor.

Focus Areas within the Geography Major

Students may select between two different focus areas within the geography major:

Human Geography

Requirements

  • AS.230.202 Research Methods for the Social Sciences and AS.230.205 Introduction to Social Statistics, or EN.550.111 Statistical Analysis I-EN.550.112 Statistical Analysis II, (or the equivalent).
  • And knowledge of one foreign language at the intermediate level.
  • at least four appropriate introductory courses (12 or more credits) are also required in such fields as anthropology, economics, humanities, political science, and sociology.
  • a minimum of nine courses (about 27 credits) at or above the intermediate level in their field of major interest (in consultation with the geography advisor).

The aim here is to enable students to build their own combination of departmental courses and courses from relevant cognate disciplines. Someone specializing in economic geography, for example, might include courses on natural resources, society and environment, environmental economics, and political ecology combined with courses in anthropology, political science, sociology, or economics. A student interested in urban geography might combine course work in the department with courses in the humanities, in political science, or in urban economics, while taking advantage of the seminar-internship on urban policy in a government department or with a community organization. A student interested in environmental issues could work across the physical-human divide and combine course work in ecology and geology with seminars on environmental policy, ethics, and philosophy. Someone specializing in cultural geography could combine work on the social and geographical landscape with courses in social and cultural anthropology.

Physical Geography

The major with a focus area in physical geography consists of four parts:

  1. mathematics,
  2. the basic natural sciences,
  3. those sciences directly related to the student’s area of specialization, such as environmental chemistry, physical geography, or biogeography, and
  4. courses which focus on the environment itself: the atmosphere, earth, and hydrosphere.

Requirements

  • AS.110.202 Calculus III;EN.550.310 Probability & Statistics for the Physical Sciences & Engineering (or the equivalent).
  • at least four appropriate introductory courses (12 or more credits) are also required in such fields as chemistry, biology, geology, or physics.
  • a minimum of eight courses (about 24 credits) at the intermediate level in their field of major interest (in consultation with their geography minor advisor).

Undergraduates with an interest in environmental chemistry, for example, would take fundamental courses such as organic chemistry, biochemistry, and thermodynamics, while those oriented toward the earth sciences would take courses in petrology, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and other aspects of geology. For a student interested in biogeography—dealing with the spatial pattern of plants, the role of environmental factors in influencing those distributions, and the effect of changes in vegetation on the landscape—the department offers courses in plant geography, ecology, and paleoecology.

Program in Public Decision Making

Undergraduates majoring in geography may satisfy departmental requirements through the program in Systems Analysis and Economics for Public Decision Making. In addition to prerequisites from other departments (e.g., EN.550.361 Introduction to Optimization-EN.550.362 Introduction to Optimization II and AS.180.101 Elements of Macroeconomics-AS.180.102 Elements of Microeconomics), students in this program take at least four courses from the public decision making curriculum, including EN.570.495 Mathematical Foundations For Public Decision Making and EN.570.493 Economic Foundations For Public Decision Making.

 

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The department welcomes applicants with backgrounds in the sciences, engineering, or in the liberal arts interested in applying their specialized knowledge to the pressing problems of human interaction with the environment. These fundamental backgrounds can be enlarged upon while students develop their special interests in the department. Students can select courses suited to a particular field of interest. Once they have mastered fundamentals, they have complete freedom to study in related fields. Independent study and vigorous exchange of ideas in seminars and laboratory are indispensable parts of each student’s program. The department emphasizes study in related fields of natural and social sciences because of the importance of adapting the latest scientific information and methods for research and practice, and because the fundamental sciences are most effectively mastered at an educational institution. Research and teaching are integral parts of the graduate training program.

Graduates of the department have found jobs in university departments of civil and environmental engineering, economics, biology, chemistry, geography, and geology; in federal, state, and municipal government; in private industry; and in private research and consulting organizations.

Requirements for Advanced Degrees

Course work requirements for the master’s degree and doctorate are generally flexible. Former training and experience and the special field of interest influence the development of each student’s program of advanced study.

No 100-level or 200-level courses can be counted toward the credit requirements for master’s degrees.

Proficiency in one foreign language is required for all degree candidates in Human Geography. Based on the nature and need of students’ educational and research programs, faculty advisors may require proficiency in one foreign language for an M.A. or a Ph.D. degree. There is no language requirement for the M.S.E. degree.

Ph.D. Degree

The goals for students in the Ph.D. program are

  • to develop reasoning skills that can be applied to new and unanticipated issues;
  • learn how to pose questions and answer them in a logical manner;
  • acquire a depth of understanding and technical knowledge in a particular study area, on par with others worldwide; and
  • make a significant contribution to our understanding in this particular study area. The emphasis in the Ph.D. degree is upon a sound foundation in the fundamentals required in a given area with considerable flexibility in course selection determined by the interests and background of each graduate student. The doctoral student must take the equivalent of about two full academic years of formal course work. Roughly half of this is done in the principal subject, and the rest is chosen from allied fields. The minimum residence requirement is two consecutive semesters registered as a full-time student.

All students must pass departmental and Graduate Board oral examinations for the doctorate. Usually these examinations are taken after two years of academic work. Research leading to the dissertation should make an original contribution to the chosen field of specialization, and the result must be worthy of publication. A final dissertation defense that involves an open seminar and a closed oral examination is required of all DoGEE doctoral students.

Master of Science (M.S.) Degree

The M.S. degree is open to students with undergraduate degrees in engineering, mathematics, biology, chemistry, physics, geology, and other scientific disciplines. The M.S. degree program includes the following requirements:

  • a minimum of 30 credits including no more than 1 credit of seminar, 1 credit of intersession course work, and 6 credits of independent research counting toward the 30 credits.
  • at least 50% of the required 30 credits must come from courses within the department.
  • students are permitted to apply up to two classes with a grade of “C” toward their degree.
  • up to two semesters of AAP or EP courses can be taken and counted to receive a master’s degree as long as there is sufficient rigor as deemed by the advisor. Students must have written consent from advisor (an email will suffice) prior to signing up for the course.

M.S. students have the option to complete an independent research project, submitted as a formal essay. A minimum of two semesters is required to complete the M.S. degree without the research project option. Three to four semesters are typically required to complete the degree with a research project.

M.S. students are strongly recommended to take as prerequisites for the M.S. program mathematics through differential equations and computing skills. Additionally, M.S. students who choose to follow Contaminate Fate and Transport, Environmental Process Engineering, and Water Resources Engineering concentrations are encouraged to take an introductory fluid mechanics course. Whether introductory fluid mechanics will count towards an M.S. student’s graduation credits is decided on a case-by-case basis by the department. Each individual’s program of study is planned by the student in consultation with department faculty and must be approved by the faculty advisor.

Concentrations for the M.S. Degree

Environmental Science

This concentration provides a broad yet rigorous background for environmental professionals. Using the department’s areas of interest, study, and research as guides and in consultation with their advisors, M.S. students can construct their own concentration that complements and expands their interests and professional goals. Additionally, M.S. students can choose to follow or pull from the M.S.E. concentration tracks: Fate & Transport, Environmental Management and Economics, Environmental Process Engineering, and Water Resources Engineering.

Environmental Science and Policy

This concentration is similar to Environmental Science but includes economics and systems courses. Four courses are recommended in environmental science, including the following:

EN.570.445Physical and Chemical Processes3
EN.570.446Biological Process of Wastewater Treatment3
EN.570.448Physical and Chemical Processes II3

M.A. and M.S. students pursuing this program who do not have prior background in environmental engineering can substitute EN.570.301 Environmental Engineering Fundamentals I and EN.570.302 Water & Wastewater Treatment in lieu of the courses suggested above.

The other environmental science courses should be chosen from the following:

EN.570.411Engineering Microbiology4
EN.570.442Environmental Organic Chemistry3
EN.570.443Aquatic Chemistry3
EN.570.491Hazardous Waste Engineering and Management3

Four courses are required in environmental policy, including:
EN.570.493Economic Foundations For Public Decision Making3
EN.570.495Mathematical Foundations For Public Decision Making3
Choose one of the following:
Intro To Urban Policy
Urban Policy Internship
The Policy Process
Risk and Decision Analysis
Environmental Policy Analysis
The final two courses would be a project or electives in environmental science, engineering, policy, or systems that are appropriate to the student’s goals.

Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.) Degree

The M.S.E. degree is open to students with an ABET-accredited undergraduate engineering degree or demonstrated equivalent. The M.S.E. degree program includes the following requirements:

  • a minimum of 30 credits including no more than 1 credit of seminar, 1 credit of intersession course work, and 6 credits of independent research counting toward the 30 credits.
  • at least 50% of the required 30 credits must come from courses within the department.
  • students are permitted to apply up to two classes with a grade of “C” toward their degree.
  • 5-6 required courses and 4-5 recommended elective courses depending on concentration (Note: In order to substitute an alternate course for a recommended elective, students must receive written approval from their advisor).
  • prerequisites (required) for the M.S.E. program includes mathematics through differential equations and computing skills.
  • up to two semesters of AAP or EP courses can be taken and counted to receive a master’s degree as long as there is sufficient rigor as deemed by the advisor. Students must have written consent from advisor (an email will suffice) prior to signing up for the course.

 The M.S.E. program is typically a nine month program based on course work alone. However, M.S.E. students have the option to complete an independent research project, submitted as a formal essay or group project report. An M.S.E. degree with significant research components will usually require three to four semesters for completion and is generally intended for those students planning to work in engineering practice. Each individual’s program of study is planned by the student in consultation with department faculty and must be approved by the faculty advisor. M.S.E. students select from the concentrations below.

Recommended Electives Note: It is strongly advised to select elective courses from the list of recommended electives appropriate for each concentration. In order to substitute an alternate course for a recommended elective, students must receive written approval from their advisor.

Concentrations for the M.S.E. Degree

Contaminant Fate and Transport

This concentration emphasizes understanding of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena that affect the movement and transformation of pollutants in the environment.

Required courses:
EN.570.411Engineering Microbiology4
EN.570.441Environmental Inorganic Chemistry3
EN.570.442Environmental Organic Chemistry3
EN.570.443Aquatic Chemistry3
EN.570.452Exper Meth Env Eng Chem4
One course in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, or engineering mathematics, such as:
Mathematical Foundations For Public Decision Making
Urban and Environmental Systems
Financial Market Research
Applied Math For Enginee
Recommended electives include:
EN.570.375Groundwater3
or EN.570.412 Landscape Hydrology and Watershed Analysis
EN.570.446Biological Process of Wastewater Treatment3
EN.570.460Environmental Colloidal Phenomena3
EN.570.657Air Pollution
EN.570.686Multiscale Flow & Transport

Environmental Process Engineering

This concentration involves the analysis and design of processes of water treatment, waste treatment, and environmental remediation, and includes a solid grounding in the chemical, biological, and physical principles underlying treatment and remediation technologies.

Required courses:
EN.570.411Engineering Microbiology4
EN.570.443Aquatic Chemistry3
EN.570.445Physical and Chemical Processes3
EN.570.446Biological Process of Wastewater Treatment3
EN.570.448Physical and Chemical Processes II3
EN.570.452Exper Meth Env Eng Chem4
One course in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, or engineering mathematics, such as:
Financial Market Research
Mathematical Foundations For Public Decision Making
Urban and Environmental Systems
Applied Math For Enginee
Additional Requirements: an introductory fluid mechanics course. If this prerequisites is lacking, it can be taken as part of the course of study, but the credits will not be counted toward the 30-credit requirement.

Recommended electives include:
At least one course in Geomorphology, Hydrology, or Ecology 3
At least one course in Systems Analysis and Economics3
EN.570.442Environmental Organic Chemistry3
EN.570.460Environmental Colloidal Phenomena3
EN.570.491Hazardous Waste Engineering and Management3

Water Resources Engineering

This concentration combines a solid grounding in environmental fluid mechanics and hydrology with electives in modeling, water development planning, policy, and contaminant fate and transport.

Required courses:
EN.570.353Hydrology3
EN.570.375Groundwater3
or EN.570.412 Landscape Hydrology and Watershed Analysis
EN.570.395Principles of Estuarine Environment: Chesapeake Bay3
AS.270.405Modeling the Hydrological Cycle3
EN.570.426Geomorphic and Ecologic Foundations of Stream Restoration3
one course in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, or engineering mathematics, such as:
Financial Market Research
Applied Math For Enginee
Mathematical Foundations For Public Decision Making
Urban and Environmental Systems
Additional requirements: an introductory fluid mechanics course. If this prerequisites is lacking, it can be taken as part of the course of study, but the credits will not be counted toward the 30-credit requirement.

 

Recommended electives include:
At least one course in Systems Analysis or Economics
Economic Foundations For Public Decision Making
Risk and Decision Analysis
EN.570.423Principles of Geomorphology4
EN.570.432Sediment Transport & River Mechanics3
EN.570.443Aquatic Chemistry3
EN.570.445Physical and Chemical Processes3
EN.570.686Multiscale Flow & Transport

Environmental Management and Economics

This concentration focuses on using models of physical and economic systems to analyze and improve the design of public policies and environmental control systems.

Required courses:
EN.570.493Economic Foundations For Public Decision Making3
EN.570.495Mathematical Foundations For Public Decision Making3
EN.570.496Urban and Environmental Systems3
EN.570.497Risk and Decision Analysis3
EN.570.608Data Analytics for Engineering, Policy Analysis and Management
EN.570.659Environmental Policy Analysis

Recommended electives include:
At least one course in physical, chemical, or biological processe
EN.570.607Energy Policies & Plan Models
EN.570.618Multiobject Programming and Planning
EN.570.676Stochastic Programming

 

*

Or other environmental economics course.

M.A. Degree

The M.A. degree is open to students with undergraduate degrees in social sciences or the humanities. It requires:

  • a minimum of 30 credits including no more than 1 credit of seminar, 1 credit of intersession course work, and 6 credits of independent research counting toward the 30 credits.
  • at least 50% of the required 30 credits must come from courses within the department.
  • students are permitted to apply up to two classes with a grade of “C” toward their degree.
  • up to two semesters of AAP or EP courses can be taken and counted to receive a master’s degree as long as there is sufficient rigor as deemed by the advisor. Students must have written consent from advisor (an email will suffice) prior to signing up for the course.

In addition to these course credits, M.A. students have the option to complete an independent research project, submitted as a formal essay. Students can focus on one of the department’s areas of interest, study, or research or construct their own program that complements and expands their undergraduate experience; three semesters are typically required to complete the degree. Each program of study is planned by the student in consultation with department faculty and must be approved by the faculty advisor.

 

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For current course information and registration go to https://isis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

EN.570.108. Introduction Environmental Engineering. 3 Credits.

Overview of environmental engineering including water/air quality issues, water supply/ wastewater treatment, hazardous/solid waste management, pollution prevention, global environmental issues, public health considerations/environmental laws, regulations and ethics.Cross listed with Public Health Studies.
Instructor(s): H. Alavi
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.109. Environment & Society: Towards Sustainability. 3 Credits.

An introduction to understanding sustainability, with a focus on identifying and implementing solutions for a world of increasing needs and limited resources.
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.110. Introduction to Engineering for Sustainable Development. 3 Credits.

Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.130. Climate, Environment and Society. 3 Credits.

Climate change will put major stress on the environment and society. Some predict wars over water and climate-induced mass migration. What can the past teach us about how we cope or fail to cope with climate change? What do we think the future holds and what do we think we can do about it? The class involves reading, discussion, debate and research. Freshman only.
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.147. Adam Smith & Karl Marx. 3 Credits.

Smith and Marx are iconic figures in the history of political economic thought, often cited, rarely read. They are positioned as polar opposites in highly consequential debates about how society should be ordered. In this class, we will read and discuss their work, closely and carefully. We concentrate on the two iconic texts – The Wealth of Nations and Capital, Vol. 1 – but also explore some of their less well-known writings. Freshmen Only.
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.205. Ecology. 3 Credits.

Introduction to processes governing the organization of individual organisms into populations, communities, and ecosystems. Interactions between individual organisms, groups of organisms, and the environment, including adaptation, natural selection, competition.
Instructor(s): G. Brush
Area: Natural Sciences.

EN.570.210. Computation/Math Modeling. 3 Credits.

An introduction to the use of computers in developing mathematical models. A structured approach to problem definition, solution, and presentation using spreadsheets and mathematical software. Modeling topics include elementary data analysis and model fitting, numerical modeling, dimensional analysis, optimization, simulation, temporal and spatial models. Recommended Course Background: AS.110.108 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): P. Wilcock
Area: Engineering, Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences.

EN.570.222. Environment and Society. 3 Credits.

Humans make their living in the environment. How we do that changes nature and changes us. This class explores human impacts on the environment, how we have thought about our relationship to nature over the millennia, and contemporary environmental discourses.
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger.

EN.570.239. Emerging Environmental Issues. 3 Credits.

Scientific principles underpinning environmental issues, with an emphasis on potential impacts of anthropogenic perturbation on human and ecosystem health. Recommended Course Background: two semesters of Chemistry.
Instructor(s): A. Roberts
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.285. Understanding Aid: Anthropological Perspectives for Technology-Based Interventions. 3 Credits.

This course combines anthropological perspectives with the discussion and examination of technology–based interventions in the field of development and aid policies, with particular focus on activities related to water resources, sanitation, and hygiene. Readings and discussions analyze some of the theoretical, historically rooted, and practical issues that challenge those who hope to provide effective aid. A key aim of this course is to provide students with better understanding of cultural, social, environmental and economic issues relevant to technical intervention in developing countries.
Instructor(s): E. Cervone; W. Ball
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.301. Environmental Engineering Fundamentals I. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals and applications of physical and chemical processes in the natural environment and engineered systems. This class will cover material balances, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics, vapor pressure, dissolution, sorption, acid-base reactions, transport phenomena, reactor design, water quality, and environmental implications of nanotechnology.
Instructor(s): K. Chen
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.302. Water & Wastewater Treatment. 3 Credits.

Theory and design of water and wastewater treatment processes including coagulation, sedimentation, filtration, adsorption, gas transfer, aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment processes, disinfection, and hydraulic profiles through treatment units.
Prerequisites: EN.570.301 or permission required.
Instructor(s): W. Ball
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.304. Environmental Engineering Laboratory. 3 Credits.

Introduction to laboratory measurements relevant to water supply and wastewater discharge, including pH and alkalinity, inorganic and organic contaminants in water, reactor analysis, bench testing for water treatment, and measurement and control of disinfection by-products. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.210 or Instructor Permission; Corequisite: EN.570.302.
Instructor(s): A. Roberts
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.305. Environmental Engineering Systems Design. 4 Credits.

Techniques from systems analysis applied to environmental engineering design and management problems: reservoir management, power plant siting, nuclear waste management, air pollution control, and transportation planning. Design projects are required.
Instructor(s): J. Ellis
Area: Engineering, Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences.

EN.570.310. Unraveling Error: Moral Explorations of Technology. 3 Credits.

In this course we will explore the concept of error as a way of thinking through the fundamental moral problems posed by technology. We will unpack how technologies have created new ways of living that pose both new possibilities and new challenges to established value systems. We will critically think through the notion of technological progress in relation to error, through specific cases such as disasters, climate change and global inequalities. And we will examine moral decision making in engineering ethics and how it is rooted in different ways of understanding and considering (or ignoring) error and its consequences.
Area: Humanities, Engineering
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.312. Projects in Appropriate and Sustainable Technology. 1 Credit.

Corequisite: EN.570.311
Corequisites : EN.570.311
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger; W. Ball.

EN.570.320. Topics on Appropriate and Sustainable Technology for Developing Communities. 1 Credit.

Lectures, readings and discussions on general and location-specific issues related to collaborative student projects about appropriate technology-based interventions. Focus is on improving student understanding about some of the environmental, social, health, and economic issues relevant to the development of sustainable technical interventions for under-developed communities and about the role of engineers in designing, planning, implementing, and evaluating such interventions.
Instructor(s): W. Ball
Area: Engineering, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.321. Practicum on Appropriate and Sustainable Technology for Developing Communities. 2 Credits.

Permission required Academic and practical support for students working on engineering projects in developing countries. Readings and discussions on general and location-specific issues related to collaborative student projects about appropriate technology-based interventions.
Instructor(s): W. Ball
Area: Engineering, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.322. Projects in Appropriate and Sustainable Technology. 1 Credit.

Corequisite: EN.570.311
Instructor(s): W. Ball.

EN.570.328. Geography & Ecology of Plants. 3 Credits.

Patterns of aquatic and terrestrial plant species; historical changes in patterns using paleobotanical techniques; emphasis on biological and physical mechanisms controlling the patterns; the role of climate and man on plant distributions; several field trips; project required.
Instructor(s): G. Brush
Area: Natural Sciences.

EN.570.334. Engineering Microeconomics. 3 Credits.

This course uses a calculus-based approach to introduce principles of engineering economics and microeconomics (demand and production theory) and their uses in engineering decision making. Recommended Course Background: AS.110.202
Instructor(s): B. Hobbs
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.351. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Introduction to the use of the principles of continuity, momentum, and energy to fluid motion. Topics include hydrostatics, ideal-fluid flow, laminar flow, turbulent flow. Recommended Course Background: Statics, Dynamics, and AS.110.302
Instructor(s): W. Marr
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.353. Hydrology. 3 Credits.

The occurrence, distribution, movement, and properties of the waters of the Earth. Topics include precipitation, infiltration, evaporation, transpiration, groundwater, and streamflow. Analyzes include the frequency of floods and droughts, time-series analyzes, flood routing, and hydrologic synthesis and simulation. Recommended Course Background: AS.110.302, EN.570.351
Instructor(s): C. Harman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.375. Groundwater. 3 Credits.

This introductory course emphasizes the fundamental principles governing the movement of water and contaminants in groundwater systems. Topics include groundwater hydraulics, well hydraulics, groundwater recharge, and solute transport. Prerequisites: EN.550.291/AS.110.302; Corequisites: EN.570.351
Instructor(s): M. Hilpert.

EN.570.395. Principles of Estuarine Environment: Chesapeake Bay. 3 Credits.

Topics include the physical, chemical, and biological components of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem from the time it started to form some 10,000 to 12,000 years ago, when sea level began to rise as the continental glaciers receded; the geology, geomorphology, and biology of the watershed drained by the estuary; relationships between the watershed and the estuary through the millennia and the effect of climate, geomorphology, and humans on the ecology of the ecosystem and its economic productivity.
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.401. Ecosystems Ecology. 3 Credits.

This course compares the geography, biological structure, economics, history and dynamics of a number of terrestrial and marine ecosystems. The effect of human and natural disturbance, including climate on the evolution of the ecosystem s will be considered. Designs for restoration and maintenance of ecosystems within the context of climate change and societal organizations will be studied. Sources will include historical and paleoecological records as well as results from the National Science Foundaion Long Term Ecological Studies of Ecosystems (the LTER program).
Area: Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.402. Practicum on Appropriate and Sustainable Technology for Developing Communities. 2 Credits.

Suggested: Microeconomics, Introductory Statistics and Optimization.
Instructor(s): W. Ball
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.403. Ecology. 3 Credits.

This is a graduate level of EN.570.205; Addtional Writing Requirements.
Instructor(s): G. Brush
Area: Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.404. Political Ecology. 3 Credits.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.405. History of Environmental Thought. 3 Credits.

Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.406. Environmental History. 3 Credits.

Environmental history explores the interactions between social change and environmental transformation, or the ways in which societies modify landscapes and are themselves affected by geological, climatological and changing ecological conditions. Topics include the relationship between climate change and human evolution, the environmental impacts of market-based commodity production and regional economic specialization; the relationship between urbanization and environmental change; how warfare affects and is affected by environmental conditions.
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.407. Comparison of Environmental Challenges and Governance in China and the US. 3 Credits.

In cooperation with the School of the Environment at Nanjing University, Nanjing, China, this course will study China’s environmental challenges and governance in the context of America’s own environmental challenges and governance system. Case studies will involve greenhouse gas emissions and a comparison of water quality issues in Tai Lake and the Chesapeake Bay. We will consider how developments may shape business, government, and culture, and the ways in which China and America may learn from one another. The class sessions will be conducted in part “live,” in part by teleconference with Nanjing University, and in part by web (including communications with Nanjing University students and faculty). The objectives for the course are to 1) Provide students with basic information and concepts-of law, business, and governance needed to understand 21st century environmental governance challenges; 2) Provide students exposure to important environmental problems facing both China and America; 3) Provide students with alternative frameworks needed to sift through and understand the wealth of information about environmental challenges and opportunities faced by China in the globalized world; and 4) Encourage students to learn to observe and think independently about how to frame and address questions of China environmental challenges and governance which may be key to the 21st century.
Instructor(s): E. Bouwer; H. Alavi
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.411. Engineering Microbiology. 4 Credits.

Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry as related to environmental pollution and water quality control processes, biogeochemical cycles, microbiological ecology, energetics and kinetics of microbial growth, and biological fate of pollutants.
Instructor(s): E. Bouwer
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.412. Landscape Hydrology and Watershed Analysis. 3 Credits.

The purpose of this class is to understand the landscape-scale controls on the fluxes of water and waterborne materials through watersheds. This class differs from the Hydrology and Hydrologic Modeling classes in its focus on data analysis, and its embrace of the complexity of real landscapes. There will be significant quantitative components to the material taught, but emphasis will be on developing a greater sense of the way that landscapes “function”, and how this function is related to real-world issues of water resources and pollution. Students will gain an understanding of how climate, geologic and ecologic setting, and human impacts control the partitioning of water between different fates, the flowpaths through the landscape and the storage and residence time of water. They will also learn conceptual and practical tools for analyzing hydrologic and other landscape data, and integrating this data in a holistic approach to watershed analysis. The class will be of interest for students intending to go into watershed or landscape management, and anyone wishing to pursue research in hydrology, geomorphology or ecology at landscape and watershed scales. The class will include at least one field trip to an instrumented watershed. GIS skills will be an advantage but are not required. Recommended Course Background: AS.270.405 or EN.570.353 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): C. Harman
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.418. Multiobjective Programming and Planning. 3 Credits.

Public sector problems are typically characterized by a multiplicity of objectives and decision makers. This course presents a relatively new area of systems analysis which is useful for such problems: multiobjective programming or vector optimization theory. The fundamental concepts are developed and various methods are presented, including multiattribute value and utility theory. Undergraduate level of EN.570.618. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.495 or Permission Required.
Instructor(s): J. Williams
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.419. Environmental Engineering Design I. 2 Credits.

Through general lectures and case study examples, this course will expose students to some of the non-technical professional issues that they will face as professional engineers and in their second-semester senior design project.
Instructor(s): E. Bouwer
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.421. Environmental Engineering Design II. 3 Credits.

Engineering design process from problem definition to final design. Team projects include written/oral presentations. Students will form small teams that work with local companies or government agencies in executing the project. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.302, EN.570.352, and EN.570.419
Instructor(s): B. Hobbs; E. Bouwer; P. Wilcock
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.423. Principles of Geomorphology. 4 Credits.

Analysis of the factors responsible for the form of the landscape. The concept of the cycle of erosion is discussed primarily in terms of the principles that govern the processes of erosion. Climate, conditions of soil formation, and the distribution of vegetation are considered as they relate to the development of landforms. Recommended Course Background: AS.270.220 or permission required.
Instructor(s): P. Wilcock
Area: Natural Sciences.

EN.570.426. Geomorphic and Ecologic Foundations of Stream Restoration. 3 Credits.

Principles from hydrology, sedimentation engineering, geomorphology, and ecology applied to design and assessment of stream restoration. Watershed context, design alternatives, uncertainty, ecological response. Field trips, design exercises, and project assessment.
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.428. Problems in Applied Economics Research. 3 Credits.

This course brings the principles of economic theory to bear upon particular problems in the fields of economics, finance and public policy. Micro, macro and international problems, from both the private and public sectors, are addressed. A heavy emphasis is placed on research and writing. Students learn how to properly conduct substantive economic research, utilizing statistical techniques and lessons from economic history. Findings are presented in the form of either memoranda or working papers. Exceptional work may be suitable for publication through the Johns Hopkins Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health, and the Study of Business Enterprise.
Prerequisites: EN.660.203
Instructor(s): S. Hanke
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.432. Sediment Transport & River Mechanics. 3 Credits.

Sediment entrainment, transport, and deposition; the interaction of flow and transport in shaping river channels. Review of boundary layer flow; physical properties of sediment; incipient, bed-load, and suspended- load motion; bed forms; hydraulic roughness; velocity and stress fields in open channels; scour and deposition of bed material; bank erosion; size, shape, planform, and migration of river channels. Techniques of laboratory, theoretical, and numerical modeling are developed and applied to problems of channel design, restoration, and maintenance. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.351
Instructor(s): P. Wilcock
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.441. Environmental Inorganic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Advanced undergraduate/graduate course that explores the chemical transformations of elements of the periodic table. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and mechanistic tools needed to address the multiple chemical species and interfaces that are present in natural waters and water-based technological processes are emphasized. Ligand exchange, metal ion exchange, adsorption/desorption, precipitation/dissolution, electron and group transfer reactions, and other concepts from coordination chemistry will be covered. Applications include elemental sources and sinks in ocean waters, reactive transport in porous media, weathering and soil genesis, nutrient and toxic element uptake by organisms, water treatment chemistry, and rational design of synthetic chemicals.
Instructor(s): A. Stone
Area: Natural Sciences.

EN.570.442. Environmental Organic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Advanced undergraduate/graduate course focusing on examination of processes that affect the behavior and fate of anthropogenic organic contaminants in aquatic environments. Students learn to predict chemical properties influencing transfers between hydrophobic organic chemicals, air, water, sediments, and biota, based on a fundamental understanding of intermolecular interactions and thermodynamic principles. Recommended Course Background: AS.030.104 or permission required.
Instructor(s): A. Roberts
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.443. Aquatic Chemistry. 3 Credits.

Equilibrium speciation of natural waters, biofluids, and engineered systems. Electrolyte solutions, acids and bases, complex formation, precipitation and dissolution, oxidation and reduction. Recommended Course Background: One year of both Chemistry and Calculus.
Instructor(s): A. Stone
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.445. Physical and Chemical Processes. 3 Credits.

The application of basic physical and chemical concepts to the analysis of environmental engineering problems. Principles of chemical equilibrium and reaction, reaction engineering, interphase mass transfer, and adsorption are presented in the context of process design for unit operations in common use for water and wastewater treatment. Topics addressed include mass balances, hydraulic characteristics of reactors, reaction kinetics and reactor design, gas transfer processes (including both fundamentals of mass transfer and design analysis), and adsorption processes (including both fundamentals of adsorption and design analysis).
Prerequisites: EN.570.301 AND EN.570.302 or permission of instructor
Instructor(s): W. Ball
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.446. Biological Process of Wastewater Treatment. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals and application of aerobic and anaerobic biological unit processes for the treatment of municipal and industrial wastewater. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.411
Instructor(s): E. Bouwer
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.448. Physical and Chemical Processes II. 3 Credits.

Fundamentals and applications of physical and chemical processes used in water and wastewater treatment. This class will cover particle interactions, coagulation, flocculation, granular media filtration, membrane processes, and emerging water treatment processes. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.445 or Permission Required.
Instructor(s): K. Chen
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.449. Social Theory for Engineers. 3 Credits.

Engineers work in a social context. This course addresses a number of questions about that social context. How should we understand how societies come about, how they evolve,and why the rules of the game are what they are? What is the relationship between the individual and society, what does it mean to be 'modern,' are there different forms of rationality? How might all this impinge on what it means to be an engineer?
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.452. Exper Meth Env Eng Chem. 4 Credits.

An advanced laboratory covering principles of modern analytical techniques and their applications to problems in environmental sciences. Topics include electrochemistry, spectrometry, gas and liquid chromatography. The course is directed to graduate students and advanced undergraduates in engineering and natural sciences.
Prerequisites: EN.570.443
Instructor(s): A. Stone
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.460. Environmental Colloidal Phenomena. 3 Credits.

This class will introduce fundamental concepts of colloidal and interfacial phenomena and apply them to natural and engineered aquatic systems. This course will also include topics related to the environmental applications and implications of nanotechnology. Modern measurement techniques employed in the laboratory to study colloidal behavior and interfacial interactions will be discussed. Lab demonstrations will be conducted and students will be given opportunities to review research papers related to topics covered in class. Topics include: Brownian motion and diffusion, size and surface characterization, electric double layer, electrokinetic phenomena, DLVO theory, Non-DLVO forces, aggregation, deposition, modern measurement techniques in the laboratory, fate and transport of engineered nanoparticles in the environment, and environmental applications of nanotechnology (e.g., sensors, remediation, antimicrobial agents).
Instructor(s): K. Chen.

EN.570.465. Water Resource Dev. 3 Credits.

Perm. Req'd. An attempt to review utilization and development of water in diverse environments beginning with early irrigation systems revealed by archaeology including those in the Middle East, Asia, and Latin America.
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.470. Applied Econ & Finance. 3 Credits.

This course focuses on company valuations, using the proprietary Hanke-Guttridge Discounted Free Cash Flow Model. Students use the model and data from financial statements filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission to calculate the value of publicaly-traded companies. Using Monte Carlo simulations, students also generate forecast scenarios, project likely share-price ranges and assess potential gains/losses. Stress is placed on using these simulations to diagnose the subjective market expectations contained in current objective market prices, and the robustness of these expectations. During the weekly seminar, students’ company valuations are reviewed and critiqued.
Prerequisites: EN.660.203
Instructor(s): S. Hanke
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.487. Financial Market Research. 3 Credits.

This course investigates the workings of financial, foreign exchange, and commodity futures markets. Research is focused on price behavior, speculation, and hedging in these markets. Extensive research and writing is required. Exceptional work may be suitable for publication through the Johns Hopkins Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health, and the Study of Business Enterprise.
Prerequisites: EN.660.203
Instructor(s): S. Hanke
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.490. Solid Waste Engineering and Management. 3 Credits.

This course covers advanced engineering and scientific concepts and principles applied to the management of municipal solid waste (MSW) to protect human health and the environment and the conservation of limited resources through resource recovery and recycling of waste material.
Instructor(s): H. Alavi
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.491. Hazardous Waste Engineering and Management. 3 Credits.

This course addresses traditional and innovative technologies, concepts, and principles applied to the management of hazardous waste and site remediation to protect human health and the environment.
Instructor(s): H. Alavi
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.492. Department Seminar - Undergraduates. 1 Credit.

Undergraduates only with permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): K. Chen.

EN.570.493. Economic Foundations For Public Decision Making. 3 Credits.

This course includes an exposition of intermediate level price theory, combined with a survey of applications to the analysis of public sector decisions. Theoretical topics include demand, supply, the function and behavior of the market, and introductory welfare economics. Recommended Course Background: AS.180.101-AS.180.102, AS.110.202 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): B. Hobbs; T. Coleman
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.495. Mathematical Foundations For Public Decision Making. 3 Credits.

A collection of systems analytic techniques which are frequently used in the study of public decision making is presented. Emphasis is on mathematical programming techniques. Primarily linear programming, integer and mixed-integer programming, and multiobjective programming. Recommended Course Background: AS.110.106-AS.110.107/AS.110.109
Instructor(s): J. Williams
Area: Engineering, Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences.

EN.570.496. Urban and Environmental Systems. 3 Credits.

The mathematical techniques learned in EN.570.305 and EN.570.495 are applied to realistic problems in urban and environmental planning and management. Examples of such problems include the siting of public-sector and emergency facilities; natural areas management, protection and restoration; solid waste collection, disposal, and recycling; public health; the planning and design of energy and transportation systems; and cost allocation in environmental infrastructure development.
Instructor(s): J. Williams
Area: Engineering, Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences.

EN.570.497. Risk and Decision Analysis. 3 Credits.

This course introduces the methods of probabilistic risk and decision analysis. Topics will include risks in daily life, public attitudes towards risk, fault trees, event trees, decision trees, utility functions, risk attitude, and value of information calculations. Recommended Course Background: Introductory Statistics.
Instructor(s): S. Guikema
Area: Engineering, Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences.

EN.570.501. Undergraduate Research. 3 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.570.502. Undergraduate Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.570.505. Undergraduate Independent Study. 3 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.570.506. Maryland Department of the Environment Independent Study. 3 Credits.

This independent study within the MDE's Water Management Administration (WMA) will engage the student in scientific/policy literature and data research and management, field investigations, or evaluation of emerging issues and innovative approaches to surface and ground water protection and drinking water management, wastewater management, wetlands and non-point source pollution control. Each independent course will focus on a scientific, regulatory or policy topic designed to further the mission of the administration, which is to protect the public health and the aquatic environment. The student will be assigned to a WMA engineer, scientist or project manager to develop a course of study. Hours can be tailored to accommodate student's schedule.
Instructor(s): E. Bouwer.

EN.570.507. Independent Study: Baltimore City Energy Office. 3 Credits.

This Independent Study within Baltimore City's Energy Office will engage students in local energy policies, energy initiatives, data and City operations. Interns will have the chance to apply optimization and modeling skills to one of many projects. These projects can include: • Measurement and verification of performance contracts with energy service contractors • Collection of data from City operated co-generation and solar plants and developing operation models • Analyzing energy usage data from City buildings and making recommendations As part of an independent student project, students will be required to submit a final report and present their findings to the City. Hours can be tailored to accommodate student's schedule but a minimum of 10 hours per week during the semester is required. Permission required.
Instructor(s): E. Bouwer.

EN.570.590. Internship-Summer. 1 Credit.

Instructor(s): G. Brush.

EN.570.597. Research-Summer. 3 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.570.599. Independent Study. 0 - 3 Credit.

Instructor(s): C. Norman.

EN.570.601. IGERT Water, Climate and Health Colloquium.

Recommended Course Background: Microeconomics, Introductory Statistics, and Optimization.
Instructor(s): G. Brush.

EN.570.602. IGERT-Water, Climate & Health-Capstone.

Instructor(s): G. Brush.

EN.570.605. Interdisciplinary Research Practice in Sustainability and Health.

Through the application of interdisciplinary research methods and skills to case studies in environmental sustainability and health, the course will provide hands-on training in the management, coordination, and practice of interdisciplinary research. The goal is to enable doctoral students to work effectively on interdisciplinary research and prepare them for professional success in an increasingly interdisciplinary funding environment. This course will be in the format of a weekly seminar and laboratory and is open to all Johns Hopkins University doctoral students from any School. No prior knowledge of sustainability or public health is required.
Instructor(s): A. Monopolis; B. Hobbs.

EN.570.607. Energy Policies & Plan Models.

Methods for optimizing operation and design of energy systems and for analyzing market impacts of energy and environmental policies are reviewed, emphasizing both theory and solution of actual models. Review of linear and nonlinear programming and complementarity methods for market simulation. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.493 and EN.570.495 or equivalent.
Instructor(s): B. Hobbs.

EN.570.608. Data Analytics for Engineering, Policy Analysis and Management.

Data analytics is the use of computational statistics and data mining to draw insights and build predictive models based onlarge data sets. As data becomes more prevalent in across many different areas of importance in engineering, policy analysis, and management, analytics is becoming an increasingly important topic. This course assumes a working knowledge of regression and statistics and builds from this to introduce modern data analytics. This course covers major classes of methods beyond linear regression, including additive models, tree-based models, Bayesian networks, boosting, bagging, and model averaging. The course focuses on the application and interpretation of the methods while also providing an understanding of the underlying basis and theory behind them. Assignments, exams, and the term project are primarily data-driven analytic exercises. Recommended Course Background: EN.550.420 and EN.550.430 or equivalent (by approval of instructor).
Instructor(s): S. Guikema
Area: Engineering, Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences.

EN.570.611. Natural Resource Economics.

Development of the economic theory of depletable and renewable private and common property natural resources, including those which may be recyclable or storable.

EN.570.612. Infrastructure Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis.

This course will be a mix of seminar-style guided discussions and student presentations and lectures on specific topics based on the current research literature in the field. It will give an overview of the infrastructure systems that form the basis for health, security, and economic prosperity in the developed world and give an overview of some of the most pressing infrastructure challenges in the developing world. The focus will be on quantitative modeling of infrastructure performance, sustainability, and resilience for supporting infrastructure management and policy decision-making. Suggested: Microeconomics, Introductory Statistics, and Optimization.
Instructor(s): S. Guikema
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.618. Multiobject Programming and Planning.

Public sector problems are typically characterized by a multiplicity of objectives and decision makers. This course presents a relatively new area of systems analysis which is useful for such problems: multiobjective programming or vector optimization theory. The fundamental concepts are developed and various methods are presented, including multiattribute value and utility theory. Graduate level of EN.570.418. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.495 or Permission Required.
Instructor(s): J. Williams
Area: Engineering.

EN.570.630. Proposal and Thesis Writing Workshop.

We will analyze examples of excellent proposals in different disciplinary idioms and write multiple drafts of dissertation proposals and thesis or dissertation chapters.
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.633. Stochastic Simulation and Game Theory.

This course provides an introduction to stochastic simulation and game theory. It covers a mix of the theoretical background and the practical use of these two methods. The stochastic simulation portion of the covers both discrete even and time step methods. It also covers random number generators, analysis of output, comparison of systems, variance reduction techniques, and linkages between simulation and optimization. The game theory portion of the course provides an introduction to the basic types of games: static games of complete information, dynamic games of complete information, static games of incomplete information, and dynamic games of incomplete information. Several case studies are covered.
Instructor(s): S. Guikema.

EN.570.634. Foundational Literature of Risk and Decision Analysis.

This course will be a guided reading, discussion, and assessment of the foundational literature from the fields of risk and decision analysis. We will read work by authors such as Ramsey, Savage, Raiffa, Laplace, and others that have established the foundations on which the fields are built. The goal is to provide Ph.D. students with a strong foundation in the field and an understanding of the literature underlying the development of the field. PhD students or permission of instructor.
Prerequisites: EN.570.497
Instructor(s): S. Guikema.

EN.570.645. Reaction Mechanisms in Environmental Organic Chemistry.

Detailed investigation of mechanisms of abiotic and biochemical transformations of organic pollutants in natural and engineered environments. Recommended Course Background: EN.570.442.
Instructor(s): A. Roberts
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.570.646. Water Quality and Treatment: Global Issues and Solutions.

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the theory and concepts necessary to understand the factors that affect water quality and to design unit operations and processes for water and wastewater treatment, including sedimentation, coagulation, filtration, adsorption, disinfection, biological treatment, sludge handling and disposal. Students will be introduced to the organic, inorganic and biological contaminants that affect water quality, the relevant water quality regulations that ensure water safety, and appropriate treatment techniques for remediating contaminants. Students will apply this understanding toward the quantitative design and sizing of engineered facilities for water and wastewater treatment. Using a team-based semester project, students will learn to collaborate within interdisciplinary teams and share technical information and ideas with others. Background information will first be delivered via lectures and presentations, followed by open-ended problems, and culminating in the team design project. To the extent possible, the design portion of the course will include green, sustainable design options.This course will appeal to engineers and non-engineers, as the design of sustainable solutions for remediating the world’s deteriorating water sources is of interest to the IGERT students in engineering, science, and public health. The course structure is appropriate for students of any science-related background, and the interdisciplinary team format for the semester design project will take advantage of the diverse science backgrounds of the students in the IGERT cohorts. Undergraduates with department permission.
Instructor(s): W. Ball.

EN.570.647. Mass Transfer in Environmental Engineering.

EN.570.657. Air Pollution.

The course consists of an introduction to the fundamental concepts of air pollution. Major topics of concern are aspects of atmospheric motion near the earth’s surface; basic thermodynamics of the atmosphere; atomospheric stability and turbulence; equations of mean motion in turbulent flow, mean flow in the surface boundary layer; mean flow, turbulence in the friction layer; diffusion in the atmosphere; statistical theory of turbulence; plume rise. Emphasis is place upon the role and utility of such topics in a systems analysis context, e.g., development of large and mesoscale air pollution abatement strategies. Comparisons of the fundamental concepts common to both air and water pollution are discussed.
Instructor(s): J. Ellis.

EN.570.659. Environmental Policy Analysis.

Instructor(s): C. Norman
Writing Intensive.

EN.570.661. Applied Math For Enginee.

This course presents a broad survey of the basic mathematical methods used in the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations: linear algebra, power series, Fourier series, separation of variables, integral transforms.
Instructor(s): M. Hilpert.

EN.570.676. Stochastic Programming.

Instructor(s): J. Ellis.

EN.570.680. Environment and Society.

This class addresses a range of questions, including: Why do we not act in our own best interests in the environment? How are environmental discourses developed and how do they relate to environmental policies? How do environmental politics and policy in the US compare with other countries?
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences.

EN.570.686. Multiscale Flow & Transport.

The scope of this course is to quantitatively describe flow and transport processes in porous media on a variety of length scales ranging from the molecular to the field scale. Phenomena investigated include single-phase and multiphase flow, solute transport, and chemotaxis. We will derive and/or motivate the governing dynamic equations and discuss mathematical and computational methods to solve these equations. This course addresses audiences from environmental and chemical engineering as well as the hydrological sciences. The course will give an introduction to the necessary mathematical and computational methods.
Instructor(s): M. Hilpert.

EN.570.701. Professional Presentation and per review Skills in Systems Analysis and Modeling.

Area: Engineering.

EN.570.800. Independent Study.

Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.570.801. Doctoral Research.

Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.570.803. Master's Research.

Investigation of an environmental engineering and chemistry problem and preparation of project report.
Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.570.805. Masters Internship.

Instructor(s): W. Ball.

EN.570.813. Seminar: Geomorphology.

EN.570.841. Department Seminar - Graduate.

Instructor(s): K. Chen.

EN.570.850. Graduate Independent Study.

Instructor(s): M. Hilpert; S. Guikema; W. Ball.

EN.570.873. Public Systems and Economics Seminar.

Instructor(s): B. Hobbs; S. Guikema.

EN.570.881. Environmental Engineering Seminar.

Instructor(s): E. Bouwer.

Cross Listed Courses

Anthropology

AS.070.285. Understanding Aid: Anthropological Perspectives for Technology-Based Interventions. 3 Credits.

This course combines anthropological perspectives with the discussion and examination of technology–based interventions in the field of development and aid policies, with particular focus on activities related to water resources, sanitation, and hygiene. Readings and discussions analyze some of the theoretical, historically rooted, and practical issues that challenge those who hope to provide effective aid. A key aim of this course is to provide students with better understanding of cultural, social, environmental and economic issues relevant to technical intervention in developing countries.
Instructor(s): E. Cervone; W. Ball
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

Public Policy

AS.195.477. Intro To Urban Policy. 3 Credits.

Perm. Req’d. 195.477 & 195.478 must be taken together by undergraduates Cross-listed with Political Science, Sociology, Public Health Studies, and Geography and Environmental Engineering
Instructor(s): S. Newman
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.195.478. Urban Policy Internship. 3 Credits.

195.478 & 195.477 must be taken together by undergraduates Cross-listed with Political Science, Sociology, Public Health Studies, and Geography and Environmental Engineering
Instructor(s): S. Newman
Writing Intensive.

Earth & Planetary Sciences

AS.270.205. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis. 3 Credits.

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.
Instructor(s): X. Chen
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

AS.270.320. The Environment and Your Health. 3 Credits.

This course surveys the basic environmental health sciences (toxicology, risk assessment), current public health issues (hazardous waste, radon, water-borne diseases) and emerging global health threats (global warming, ozone depletion, sustainability).
Area: Natural Sciences.

Public Health Studies

AS.280.335. The Environment and Your Health. 3 Credits.

This course surveys the basic concepts underlying environmental health sciences (toxicology, exposure assessment, risk assessment), current public health issues (hazardous waste, water- and food-borne diseases), and emerging global health threats (global warming, built environment, ozone depletion, sustainability). Public Health Studies, Global Environmental Change and Stability, and Earth and Planetary Science majors have 1st priority for enrollment. Your enrollment may be withdrawn at the discretion of the instructor if you are not a GECS, PHS, or EPS major.
Prerequisites: (Students may not have taken AS.270.320)
Instructor(s): M. Trush
Area: Natural Sciences.

Interdepartmental

AS.360.147. Adam Smith and Karl Marx. 3 Credits.

Freshmen Seminar. This freshmen seminar examines the ideas of Smith, the greatest proponent of the free market, and Marx, his most radical critic. Freshmen only.
Instructor(s): E. Schoenberger; P. Jelavich
Area: Humanities, Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

AS.360.528. Problems in Applied Economics. 3 Credits.

Permission Required. This course brings the principles of economic theory to bear upon particular problems in the fields of economics, finance and public policy. Micro, macro and international problems, from both the private and public sectors, are addressed. A heavy emphasis is placed on research and writing. Students learn how to properly conduct substantive economic research, utilizing statistical techniques and lessons from economic history. Findings are presented in the form of either memoranda or working papers. Exceptional work may be suitable for publication through the Johns Hopkins Institute for Applied Economics, Global Health, and the Study of Business Enterprise.
Instructor(s): S. Hanke
Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences
Writing Intensive.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://engineering.jhu.edu/dogee/people/faculty.html

Faculty

Chair

Edward J. Bouwer
Abel Wolman Professor of Environmental Engineering: environmental engineering, environmental microbiology, waste treatment.

Professors

William P. Ball
Professor: environmental engineering, contaminant fate and transport.

Grace S. Brush
Professor: ecology, plant geography.

J. Hugh Ellis
Professor: environmental systems.

Steve H. Hanke
Professor: applied micro- and macroeconomics and finance.

Benjamin F. Hobbs
Theodore K. and Kay W. Schad Professor of Environmental Management: energy and environmental systems, engineering and economics.

A. Lynn Roberts
Professor: environmental chemistry.

Erica J. Schoenberger
Professor: economic geography, environment, society and technology, environmental history.

Alan T. Stone
Professor: environmental and aquatic chemistry.

Associate Teaching Professor

Hedy V. Alavi
Associate Teaching Professor, Program Chair, EP Environmental Engineering, Science, and Management: environmental engineering, hazardous and solid waste engineering and management.

Professor Emeritus

John J. Boland
Professor Emeritus: environmental economics and policy.

Research Professor Emeritus

Eugene D. Shchukin
Research Professor Emeritus: colloid and surface science.

Assistant Professors

Kai Loon Chen
Assistant Professor: physiochemical processes, particle interaction.

Seth Guikema
Assistant Professor: Probabilistic systems modeling techniques, risk analysis, uncertainty modeling, infrastructure modeling, and decision making under uncertainty.

Ciaran Harman
Assistant Professor: watershed hydrology, geomorphology.

Sarah Preheim
Assistant Professor: environmental microbiology, microbial ecology, bioinformatics

Associate Research Professor

Justin C. Williams
Associate Research Professor: environmental and urban systems.

Joint, Part-Time, and Visiting Appointments

Joseph Katz
Professor (Mechanical Engineering): experimental fluid mechanics, development of advanced diagnostics techniques.

Charles Meneveau
Professor (Mechanical Engineering): environmental fluid mechanics, engineering, turbulence.

Marc B. Parlange
Adjunct Professor: hydrology, environmental fluid mechanics, atmospheric interactions.

Andrea Prosperetti
Professor (Mechanical Engineering): fluid mechanics, bubble mechanics, numerical simulations.

Kellogg Schwab
Associate Professor (Environmental Health Engineering, Bloomberg School of Public Health): environmental public health, pathogen microbiology.