Materials Science and Engineering

http://materials.jhu.edu/

Materials are essential to the construction of any engineering structure, from the smallest integrated circuit to the largest bridge. In almost every technology, the performance, reliability, or cost is determined by the materials used. As a result, the drive to develop new materials and processes (or to improve existing ones) makes materials science and engineering one of the most important and dynamic engineering disciplines.

The central theme of materials science and engineering is that the relationships among the structures, properties, processing, and performance of materials are crucial to their function in engineering structures. Materials scientists seek to understand these fundamental relationships and use this understanding to synthesize new materials or develop new processes for producing existing ones. Materials engineers design or select materials for particular applications and develop improved processing techniques. Since materials scientists and engineers must understand the properties of materials as well as their applications, the field is inherently interdisciplinary and draws on aspects of almost every other engineering discipline as well as physics, chemistry, and, most recently, biology. Because the field encompasses so many different areas, it is often categorized according to types of materials (metals, ceramics, polymers, and semiconductors) or to their applications (biomaterials, electronic materials, magnetic materials, or structural materials).

The department prepares students for successful careers in materials science and engineering, for advanced study in science or engineering, and for professional education in other fields. The goal of the undergraduate program is to provide a rigorous and comprehensive curriculum in materials science and engineering as well as in mathematics, basic sciences, humanities, and social sciences. Our low student-to-faculty ratio allows students close contact with faculty in both classroom and research environments, as well as with other students and researchers in the department. The student is encouraged to proceed at his or her own rate and to participate in interdisciplinary, interdepartmental, and interschool programs. In the tradition of Johns Hopkins, all of our undergraduate students participate in research, often beginning in their sophomore year, working closely with faculty and graduate students.

In recognition that biomaterials and nanotechnology represent two of the most rapidly developing areas of materials science and engineering, the Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers challenging specializations in biomaterials or nanotechnology within its undergraduate program.

The field of biomaterials is concerned with the science and engineering of materials in biology and medicine. Engineering materials are increasingly used in applications such as drug delivery and gene therapy, scaffolds for tissue engineering, replacement body parts, and biomedical and surgical devices. Biomaterials is an inherently interdisciplinary field that requires deep understanding of the properties of materials in general, and the interactions of materials with the biological environment. The Biomaterials concentration is designed to provide a firm grounding in the physics, chemistry, and biology of materials, as well as breadth in general engineering, mathematics, humanities, and social science. In addition, students are encouraged to gain hands-on experience in biomaterials research laboratories. The program seeks to educate students to reach the forefront of leadership in the field of biomaterials engineering. While the fundamental principles of materials science still apply, a complete understanding of biomaterials and their interactions with biological environments requires a greater degree of specialization than the standard undergraduate curriculum provides. In recognition of completion of the Biomaterials concentration, a student may elect to have his or her academic transcript annotated to indicate a specialty in biomaterials.

Nanotechnology advances the utilization of materials and devices with extremely small dimensions. Nanotechnology is a visionary field, as micro and nanostructured devices impact all fields of engineering, from microelectronics (smaller, faster computer chips) to mechanical engineering (micromotors and actuators) to civil engineering (“smart,” self-healing nanocomposite materials for buildings and bridges) to biomedical engineering (biosensors and tissue engineering). Materials science is central to nanotechnology because the properties of materials can change dramatically when things are made extremely small. This observation is not simply that we need to measure such properties or develop new processing tools to fabricate nanodevices. Rather, our vision is that the wide (and sometimes unexpected!) variety of phenomena associated with nanostructured materials allow us to envision radically new devices and applications that can only be made with nanostructured materials. The Nanotechnology concentration encompasses a curriculum designed to train students in the fundamental interdisciplinary principles of materials science including physics and chemistry, and also to expose students to the forefront of nanomaterials research through elective classes as well as research laboratories. Students in the Nanotechnology concentration will be well-prepared for successful careers in materials engineering across a wide range of disciplines. In recognition of completion of the Nanotechnology concentration, a student may elect to have his or her academic transcript annotated to indicate a specialty in nanotechnology.

The graduate curriculum provides students with a broad yet thorough grounding in the fundamentals of materials science and engineering. After completing the core curriculum, students pursuing master and Ph.D. degrees take advanced courses that will allow them to work at the forefront of knowledge in their chosen specialty. Those desiring to conduct original research and advance the frontiers of knowledge pursue a master’s essay and/or Ph.D. thesis. To this end, the department has an outstanding and wide-ranging research program, with particular emphasis on nanomaterials, thin films, metastable materials, biomaterials, computational materials science, and materials characterization.

Facilities

The teaching and research facilities of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering are located in Maryland and Krieger halls on the Homewood campus. Our central facilities include the Surface Analytical Laboratory, with advanced tools for the chemical characterization of solid surfaces; the Scanning Electron Microscopy Laboratory; the X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory; the Laboratory for Thin Film Deposition; and facilities for sample preparation, optical microscopy, and mechanical testing. Individual research groups have established laboratories with advanced facilities for materials processing, nanotechnology, and materials characterization. Through collaboration with other departments and national laboratories, students and faculty also have access to a variety of other facilities necessary for world-class research.

Back to top

Mission Statement

Materials play a central role in the performance and reliability of virtually every technology and living organism.  The central theme of materials science and engineering is that the relationships between the structure, properties, processing, and performance of materials are crucial to their function.  Materials scientists seek to understand these fundamental relationships, synthesize new materials, develop improved processes for making materials, and understand the role of materials in the functioning of biological organisms.  The wide range of problems addressed makes materials science one of the most highly interdisciplinary and dynamic engineering disciplines.

The Materials Science & Engineering faculty strives to maintain the Johns Hopkins University tradition of training a small number of students of the highest quality.  We measure our success by the impact our graduates have on the scientific and engineering communities.  Our program is designed to provide a solid foundation for future career development for students with diverse career aspirations.

Program Objectives

Our current program educational objectives are stated as follows:

Graduates of the Materials Science and Engineering Program:

1. Pursue careers that include advanced graduate studies in materials science and engineering or careers in related areas of science and engineering or professional disciplines that benefit from an understanding of materials science and engineering such as medicine, business or law.

2. Employ elements of the research process in their careers including the use of:

  • critical reasoning to identify fundamental issues and establish directions for investigation
  • creative processes to define specific plans for problem solution
  • analytical thought to interpret results and place them within a broader context.

Student Outcomes

At completion of the degree program, students in Materials Science and Engineering will have:

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering (to solve problems related to materials science and engineering)
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data (using statistical, computational or mathematical methods)
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability – the design process
  4. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability – recognition of constraints within design
  5. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  6. an ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems
  7. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  8. an ability to communicate effectively (writing)
  9. an ability to communicate effectively (oral presentation)
  10. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context
  11. a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  12. a knowledge of contemporary issues
  13. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice
  14. the ability to apply advanced science (such as chemistry and physics) and engineering principles to materials systems
  15. the ability to integrate understanding of the scientific and engineering principles underlying the four major elements: structure, properties, processing, and performance related to material systems appropriate to the field
  16. the ability to apply and integrate knowledge from each of the above four elements of the field to solve materials selection and design problems
  17. the ability to utilize experimental, statistical and computational methods consistent with the program educational objectives

Requirements for the B.S. Degree

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers a program leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree. The B.S. for the Materials Science and Engineering degree program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org. The student must meet the general university requirements for the chosen degree as well as the departmental requirements, and must complete the program approved by the student’s advisor.

An anticipated individual program of study designed to meet the university and department requirements for the B.S. degree, as well as to reflect the student’s interest, should be filed as early as possible during the student’s residence. The faculty advisor’s signature is required on all course registration and course change forms. As changes are made in the program, it shall be the student’s responsibility to see that a revised program is filed with the advisor. Each student must have an approved program on file no later than the semester before he/she expects to graduate.

General university requirements include (see also General Requirements for Departmental Majors for more information):

  • Complete program of study outlined by track or concentration (standard track, biomaterials concentration, or nanotechnology concentration).
  • Fulfill the university writing requirement; two writing intensive courses, at least 3 credits each.
  • Fulfill 75 credits earned in courses coded Engineering, Quantitative Studies, or Natural Science.
  • At least 30 credits of this must be counted Natural Science (N) or Quantitative Studies (Q) with no course counted twice.
  • At least 30 additional credits must be taken outside of Engineering (E) area, excluding prerequisites for the major.
  • Fulfill 18 credits of courses coded (H) or (S)
  • Take a minimum of 126 credits.

To meet the course requirements for the B.S. degree in Materials Science and Engineering, the student must complete a minimum of 126 credits, distributed as follows:

Materials Science Core Classes *30
Upper Level Materials Science Classes *12
Basic Sciences & Engineering **28
Mathematics **20
Humanities (H) or (S) **18
Science & Engineering Electives ***9
Unrestricted Electives ****9
Total Credits126
*

The 42 credits of materials science courses must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.

**

All courses must be passed with a letter grade of C- or higher

***

Three courses of 200- level or above in engineering, natural sciences or mathematics.

Letter grade of C- or higher required if taken for letter grade; S required if taken S/U

****

 Letter grade of C- or higher require if taken for letter grade; S required if taken S/U

A student who has taken Foundations of MSE may count it toward one unrestricted elective.

In addition to the degree program in Materials Science and Engineering, students may elect to complete specialized concentrations in biomaterials or nanotechnology. Whether a student chooses to pursue studies following the standard track, the Biomaterials concentration or the Nanotechnology concentration, the course work specified for the degree will provide a firm grounding in the principles of materials science and engineering.

Three B.S. Degree Options are Offered by the Department of Materials Science and Engineering

Standard Track

The Standard Track is intended for those students with general materials science interests. It permits the student to tailor the degree program to specific interests by allowing a broad range of choices for upper-level science and engineering electives.

Biomaterials Concentration

Biomaterials is an exciting and rapidly developing field. Engineered materials are increasingly used in medical applications (such as drug delivery, gene therapy, scaffolds for tissue engineering, replacement body parts, and biomedical and surgical devices) while an understanding of structure-property relationships in natural biomaterials may lead to improved interventions for a wide variety of diseases and injuries. Because it is highly interdisciplinary (involving elements of materials science, engineering, biology, chemistry and medicine), biomaterials as a discipline requires a deep understanding of the properties of materials in general, and the interactions of materials with the biological environment in particular.

The biomaterials concentration is designed to provide a broad basis in the fundamentals of materials science and engineering, as well as a particular emphasis on the principles and applications of biomaterials. While the fundamental principles of materials science still apply, a complete understanding of biomaterials and their interactions with biological environments requires a greater degree of specialization than the standard undergraduate curriculum provides. The biomaterials curriculum includes topics such as biomimetic materials, natural biomaterials, host responses to biomaterials, biocompatibility, and applications of biomaterials, particularly in tissue engineering, drug delivery, and medical devices and implants. Our goal is to train students who can apply these principles to the development of novel materials that benefit human health.

To receive commendation for completion of the Biomaterials concentration, the student must complete three electives, whose subject matter is some aspect of Biomaterials, Molecules and Cells as a Science & Engineering elective, a biomaterials laboratory course, and complete a biomaterials-related senior design project.  Approval of electives must be made by a student's academic advisor prior to taking the courses, and approval of the senior design project must be pre-approved by the senior design instructor.

Nanotechnology Concentration

Nanotechnology advances the utilization of materials and devices with extremely small dimensions. Nanotechnology is a visionary field, as micro- and nano-structured devices impact all fields of engineering, including microelectronics (smaller, faster computer chips), mechanical engineering (micromotors and actuators), civil engineering (“smart”, self-healing nanocomposite materials for buildings and bridges), and biomedical engineering (biosensors and tissue engineering).

Materials science is central to nanotechnology because the properties of materials can change dramatically when things are made extremely small. This observation is not simply that we need to measure such properties or develop new processing tools to fabricate nanodevices. Rather, our vision is that the wide (and sometimes unexpected) variety of phenomena associated with nanostructured materials allow us to envision radically new devices and applications that can only be made with nanostructured materials. The nanotechnology concentration encompasses a curriculum designed to train students in the fundamental interdisciplinary principles of materials science, including physics and chemistry, and also to expose students to the forefront of nanomaterials research through elective classes and research laboratories. In recognition of completion of the Nanotechnology concentration, a student may elect to have his or her academic transcript annotated to indicate a concentration in nanotechnology.

To receive commendation for completion of the Nanotechnology concentration, the student must complete three electives, whose subject matter is some aspect of Nanotechnology, a nanomaterials laboratory course, and complete a nanotechnology-related senior design project.  Approval of electives must be made by a student’s academic advisor prior to taking the courses, and approval of the senior design project must be pre-approved by the senior design instructor.

 Detailed description of the B.S. program (course credits in parenthesis):

Detailed Description of the B.S. Program

Materials Science Core Classes (30 credits)
Must be passed with a letter grade of C or higher.
EN.510.311Structure of Materials3
EN.510.312Thermodynamics/Materials3
EN.510.313Mechanical Properties of Materials3
EN.510.314Electronic Properties of Materials3
EN.510.315Physical Chemistry of Materials II3
EN.510.316Biomaterials I3
EN.510.428
EN.510.429
Material Science Laboratory I
and Materials Science Laboratory II
6
EN.510.433
EN.510.434
Senior Design Research
and Senior Design/Research II
6
or EN.510.438
EN.510.439
Biomaterials Senior Design I
and Biomaterials Senior Design II
or EN.510.440 Nanomaterials Senior Design I & EN.510.441 Nanomaterials Senior Design II
or 510.445 MSE Design Team II and 510.446 MSE Design Team II - Semester 2 or 510.447 MSE Design Team leader and 510.448 MSE Design Team Leader Semester 2
Upper Level materials science electives each 300 level or higher.12
Basic Sciences and Engineering (28 credits)
Must be passed with a letter grade of C- or higher. Both 030.101 and 030.102 may substitute for 510.101. Students are required to take both semesters of Intro. Chem Lab.
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4
AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Majors II4
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1
AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II1
EN.510.101Introduction to Materials Chemistry3
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I1
AS.030.106Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II1
AS.030.205Organic Chemistry I4
AS.030.225Introductory Organic Chemistry Lab3
EN.510.202Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers3
EN.660.363Leadership & Management in Materials Science and Engineering3
Mathematics (20 credits)
Must be passed with a letter grade of C- or higher
AS.110.108Calculus I4
AS.110.109Calculus II (For Physical Sciences and Engineering)4
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1.00
AS.110.201Linear Algebra4.00
AS.110.302Diff Equations/Applic4
Humanities (H or S) (18 credits)
Must be passed with a letter grade of C- or higher (or S if the grade system is S/U). Introductory language courses, even if not with H or S designator, can substitute for H designated courses.18
Science and Engineering Electives (9 credits)9
Three courses of 200- level or above in engineering, natural sciences, or mathematics. At least one of the three electives must be from another department in the Whiting School of Engineering to ensure exposure to another engineering field. Must be passed with a letter grade of D or higher. For the Biomaterials concentration, one of the three electives must be 580.221: Molecules and Cells (4 credits) (students can substitute Cell Biology and Biochemistry for Molecules and Cells). For other students, a possible choice is 530.201: Statics and Mechanics (4 credits).
Unrestricted Electives (9 credits)
Must be passed with a letter grade of D or higher. A student who has taken both 030.101 and 030.102 may count one of them toward one unrestricted elective.9
Total Credits Required for Graduation: 126
Biomaterials Concentration: 127 Credits
*

Courses in other departments with an emphasis on the structure, properties, or processing of materials may be counted as materials science electives. A list of approved electives appears in the department’s Undergraduate Advising Manual (available from a student’s academic advisor). All 400-level or higher classes required in the Biomaterials and Nanotechnology concentrations will be counted toward satisfying the upper-level materials science electives requirement.

**

Students are encouraged to also take the 1-credit introductory 510.109 Materials Science & Engineering for the 21st Century.  

***

For the Biomaterials concentration, EN.580.221 Molecules and Cells must be passed with a grade of C or higher.

****

A student who has taken both 030.101 and 030.102 may count one of them toward one unrestricted elective.

Sample Undergraduate Programs for Materials Science and Engineering

Standard Track

(For a student beginning with Calculus I)

Year 1
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3AS.030.102Introductory Chemistry II3.00
AS.110.108Calculus I4AS.030.106Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II1
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I1AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Majors II4
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II1
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1AS.110.109Calculus II (For Physical Sciences and Engineering)4
EN.510.106Foundations of Materials Science Engineering3EN.510.202Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers3
 Unrestricted Elective3
  16  19
Year 2
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.510.311Structure of Materials3EN.510.312Thermodynamics/Materials3
AS.030.205Organic Chemistry I4EN.510.316Biomaterials I3
AS.110.202Calculus III4EN.550.291Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
Math /Sci/Eng elective3EN.550.310Probability Statistics for the Physical and Information Sciences Engineering4
H/S Elective3H/S elective3
  17  17
Year 3
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.510.315Physical Chemistry of Materials II3EN.510.314Electronic Properties of Materials3
EN.510.313Mechanical Properties of Materials3EN.510.429Materials Science Laboratory II3
EN.510.428Material Science Laboratory I3H/S elective3
EN.660.363Leadership Management in Materials Science and Engineering3Unrestricted Elective3
Math/Sci/Eng elective3Math/Sci/Eng elective3
  15  15
Year 4
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.510.433Senior Design Research3EN.510.434Senior Design/Research II3
510.4## - MSE elective3510.4## - MSE elective3
510.4## - MSE elective3510.4## - MSE elective3
Unrestricted elective3H/S elective3
H/S elective3H/S elective3
  15  15
Total Credits: 129

Biomaterials Concentration

(For a student beginning with Calculus I)

Year 1
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3AS.030.102Introductory Chemistry II3
AS.110.108Calculus I4AS.030.106Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II1
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I1AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Majors II4
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II1
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1AS.110.109Calculus II (For Physical Sciences and Engineering)4
EN.510.106Foundations of Materials Science Engineering3EN.510.202Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers3
  16  16
Year 2
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.510.311Structure of Materials3EN.510.312Thermodynamics/Materials3
AS.030.205Organic Chemistry I4EN.510.316Biomaterials I3
AS.110.202Calculus III4EN.550.291Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
EN.580.221Molecules and Cells (This Math/Sci/Eng elective is required for Biomaterials Concentration)4EN.550.310Probability Statistics for the Physical and Information Sciences Engineering4
H/S Elective3H/S Elective3
  18  17
Year 3
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.510.315Physical Chemistry of Materials II3EN.510.314Electronic Properties of Materials3
EN.510.313Mechanical Properties of Materials3EN.510.429Materials Science Laboratory II3
EN.510.428Material Science Laboratory I3H/S Elective3
EN.660.363Leadership Management in Materials Science and Engineering3Unrestricted Elective3
Math/Sci/Eng Elective3Math/Sci/Eng Elective3
  15  15
Year 4
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.510.438Biomaterials Senior Design I3EN.510.439Biomaterials Senior Design II3
510.4## - MSE Elective (e.g. Biomolecular Materials)3510.4## - MSE Elective (e.g. Biomaterials Lab)3
510.4## - MSE Elective (e.g. Chemistry & Physics of Polymers)3H/S Elective3
510.4## - MSE Elective (e.g. Biomaterials II)3H/S Elective3
H/S Elective3Unrestricted Elective3
  15  15
Total Credits: 127

Nanotechnology Concentration

(For a student beginning with Calculus I)

Year 1
FallCreditsSpringCredits
AS.030.101Introductory Chemistry I3AS.030.102Introductory Chemistry II3
AS.110.108Calculus I4AS.030.106Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II1
AS.030.105Introductory Chemistry Lab I1AS.171.102General Physics: Physical Science Majors II4
AS.171.101General Physics:Physical Science Major I4AS.173.112General Physics Laboratory II1
AS.173.111General Physics Laboratory I1AS.110.109Calculus II (For Physical Sciences and Engineering)4
EN.510.106Foundations of Materials Science Engineering3EN.510.202Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers3
  16  16
Year 2
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.510.311Structure of Materials3EN.510.312Thermodynamics/Materials3
AS.030.205Organic Chemistry I4EN.510.316Biomaterials I3
AS.110.202Calculus III4EN.550.291Linear Algebra and Differential Equations4
EN.530.201Statics and Mechanics of Materials4EN.550.310Probability Statistics for the Physical and Information Sciences Engineering (H/S Elective)4
H/S elective3H/S Elective3
  18  17
Year 3
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.510.315Physical Chemistry of Materials II3EN.510.314Electronic Properties of Materials3
EN.510.313Mechanical Properties of Materials3EN.510.429Materials Science Laboratory II3
EN.510.428Material Science Laboratory I3H/S Elective3
EN.660.363Leadership Management in Materials Science and Engineering3Unrestricted Elective3
Math/Sci/Eng Elective3Math/Sci/Eng Elective3
  15  15
Year 4
FallCreditsSpringCredits
EN.510.440Nanomaterials Senior Design I3EN.510.441Nanomaterials Senior Design II3
510.4## - MSE Elective (e.g. Nanomaterials Lab)3510.4## - MSE Elective (e.g. Micro Nano Materials & Devices)3
510.4## - MSE Elective (e.g. Materials Characterization)3510.4## - MSE Elective (e.g. Nanoparticles)3
Unrestricted elective3H/S Elective3
H/S Elective3H/S Elective3
  15  15
Total Credits: 127
*

Students are encouraged to take this course and count it as an unrestricted elective.

Financial Aid

Information about scholarships and other sources of financial assistance for undergraduates is available from Student Financial Services. In addition, the faculty employs a number of undergraduates as laboratory assistants to help with various aspects of their individual research programs.

Back to top

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) offers three graduate degrees: the Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy), the M.S.E. (Master of Science in Engineering), and the M.M.S.E. (Master of Materials Science and Engineering). The Ph.D. and the M.S.E. can be completed on either a full-time or part-time basis. Financial aid is available only for students admitted to the full-time Ph.D. program. The M.S.E. degree may be completed either with or without an essay, as described below.

Hopkins undergraduate students are encouraged to consider completing both the B.S. degree and the M.S.E. degree in a total of five years. This five-year, dual degree option offers additional preparation for the pursuit of Ph.D. programs and careers in materials science and engineering. Students are encouraged to consult their undergraduate advisors to gain information on M.S.E. programs at Hopkins, as well as third- and fourth- year course selections best suited to the pursuit of the M.S.E. degree.

The M.M.S.E. is a terminal master’s degree offered through Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals (EP) of the Whiting School of Engineering. The degree program consists of 10 courses offered primarily in the evening. Students interested in this program should apply through the EP Office, 410.516.2300 or www.ep.jhu.edu.

Admission

To be admitted to graduate study in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, students must submit credentials sufficient to convince the faculty that they have the potential to successfully complete the program requirements. Under the new GRE test, applicants should take the General Test package containing the Mathematical Reasoning test.

Hopkins undergraduate students who plan to pursue a M.S.E. degree in their fifth year are encouraged to submit an application early in their fourth year of study.

A graduate student pursuing a Ph.D. degree with the Department of Materials Science and Engineering who is funded by the department as a teaching assistant or research assistant may not enroll simultaneously in a master’s program in another department, unless he or she receives written approval from his or her advisor, the DMSE Graduate Program Committee, and the department chairman.

Advising and Review of Student Performance

Each graduate student will normally have one or more faculty advisors. Students who are entering the M.S.E. program and plan to pursue a degree without an essay will be assigned an academic advisor. Students who are entering the M.S.E. program and plan to pursue a degree with an essay will be advised by their research advisor. Students who are entering the Ph.D. program will be advised by their research advisor. Students with a research advisor in another department will be assigned an academic advisor from among the full-time faculty in the department. Student progress will be assessed regularly by the faculty advisor(s) and the Graduate Program Committee. Students are expected to remain in regular communication with their faculty advisor(s).

Each student’s progress will be reviewed annually by the Graduate Program Committee, in consultation with the student’s advisor(s). To assist in this evaluation, students are required to submit a form (available from the academic program coordinator) detailing progress toward completion of the degree requirements. This form must be signed by the student’s advisor(s) and filed with the Graduate Program Committee each year. The department must be convinced that all academic requirements have been satisfied by the candidate before a recommendation to confer a graduate degree is passed on to the University Graduate Board.

Grade requirements for graduate course work differ according to the degree program, as described below. All graduate students are required to maintain an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher; failure to do so will ordinarily be cause for dismissal from the program. Independent research courses will not be counted toward completion of course requirements.

The department believes that teaching experience is important to professional growth; therefore, a student may be required to serve as a teaching assistant during his or her academic career.

Requirements for the M.S.E. Degree with Essay

(8 courses)

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.) with Essay is awarded subject to the recommendation of the student’s advisor and departmental approval, based on satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

Three core courses in Materials Science and Engineering
EN.510.601Structure of Materials3.00
EN.510.602Thermodynamics of Materials3.00
EN.510.603Phase Transformations of Materials3.00
Select one of the following:
Mechanical Properties of Materials
Electrical, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials
Polymer Chemistry & Biology
Four advanced (400 level or higher) elective courses in materials science and engineering or related fields *
A master's essary or journal publication is required
*

Elective courses in materials science and engineering or related fields, subject to the following rules:

  • Up to two of the elective courses may be taken from within the Engineering for Professionals (EP) program.
  • Up to two of the elective courses can be business courses.
  • Any elective taken from outside the department (including EP courses) requires prior approval of the Graduate Program Committee.
  • With approval of the Graduate Program Committee, the student can transfer up to two graduate courses from another institution. Students desiring such credit must make the request in writing to the Graduate Program Committee by the end of the first semester after matriculation. This request must include a description of the course, a course syllabus, and documentation of the grade received.   Please note that transfer coursework grades do not count towards calculation of the GPA.
  • With approval of the Graduate Program Committee, current or former Hopkins undergraduates can count two courses (400 level or higher) to both their B.S. and M.S.E. requirements.
  • A grade of C or better must be achieved in each course to obtain credit.
  • A overall grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained, and a grade point average of a 3.0 is required to earn the degree at the end of the program.
  • Attendance is required at the weekly Graduate Student Seminar and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering Seminar.
**

A master’s essay or journal publication is required. A Master's essay must be approved by one faculty reader and confirm to the requirements of the Graduate Board. For a journal publication a student must submit to the Graduate Program Committee an article describing his or her original research that has been published (or accepted for publication) in an archival, peer-reviewed technical journal. The student must be the primary author of the article.

Admission to the M.S.E. program is through the standard graduate admissions process. The typical duration of the program is 21 months. The student’s transcript will reflect a “Master of Science in Engineering with Essay.”

Requirements for the M.S.E. Degree without Essay

(10 courses)

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.) is awarded subject to the recommendation of the student’s advisor and departmental approval, based on satisfactory completion of the following requirements:

Three core courses in Materials Science and Engineering
EN.510.601Structure of Materials3.00
EN.510.602Thermodynamics of Materials3.00
EN.510.603Phase Transformations of Materials3.00
Select one of the following:
Mechanical Properties of Materials
Electrical, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials
Polymer Chemistry & Biology
Six advanced (400-level or higher elective courses in materials science and engineering or related fields. *
*

Six advanced (400-level or higher) elective courses in materials science and engineering or related fields, subject to the following rules:

  • Up to two of the elective courses may be taken from within the Engineering for Professionals (EP) program.
  • Up to two of the elective courses can be business courses.
  • Any elective taken from outside the department (including EP courses) requires prior approval of the Graduate Program Committee.
  • With approval of the Graduate Program Committee, the student can transfer up to two graduate courses from another institution. Students desiring such credit must make the request in writing to the Graduate Program Committee by the end of the first semester after matriculation. This request must include a description of the course, a course syllabus, and documentation of the grade received. Please note that transfer coursework grades do not count towards calculation of the GPA.
  • All electives will need prior approval from the Graduate Program Committee.
  • A grade of C or better must be achieved in each course to obtain credit.
  • A overall GPA of 3.0 must be maintained, and a GPA of 3.0 is required to earn the degree at the end of the program.
  • Attendance is required at the weekly Graduate Student Seminar and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering Seminar.
  • Up to two of the elective courses may be Graduate Research in Materials Science (EN.510.807), which may be taken in any session (Fall, January, Spring, or Summer). Note that 117 hours or research per course are required for credit.

Admission to the M.S.E. program is through the standard graduate admissions process. The typical duration of the program is 12 months. The student’s transcript will reflect a “Master of Science in Engineering.”

Requirements for the Ph.D. degree

To receive the degree of Ph.D., the candidate must fulfill the requirements below. The department must be satisfied that all academic requirements have been satisfied by the candidate before a recommendation will be made to the University Graduate Board to confer the Ph.D. degree.

  1. Successful completion of four required courses in materials science and engineering.
     
    EN.510.601Structure of Materials3.00
    EN.510.602Thermodynamics of Materials3.00
    EN.510.603Phase Transformations of Materials3.00
    EN.510.615Physical Properties of Materials3.00

    Each of the four required courses must be passed with a letter grade of B- or higher. If a student receives a grade of C+ or lower in a required course, the student may re-take the course once to achieve a grade of B- or higher. Receipt of grades of C+ or lower in two or more required courses will ordinarily be cause for dismissal from the program without the opportunity to re-take those courses.

    In addition, the student must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 or better in the four required courses. If the student’s GPA falls below 3.0, the student must re-take one or more of the required courses and earn higher grade(s). Upon doing so the prior grade(s) in those course(s) are replaced and not counted toward the GPA.

    The four required courses must be successfully completed (meeting the grade and GPA requirements above) no later than the start of the student’s third year after matriculation; failure to do so will result in dismissal from the program. Exception: A student who fails to meet the requirements above due to a low grade in a single required course, and who has not had an opportunity to re-take that course during the first two years, will be permitted to re-take that one course in the third year.

    Students who have completed prior graduate-level coursework similar to EN.510.601 Structure of Materials, EN.510.602 Thermodynamics of Materials or EN.510.603 Phase Transformations of Materials may petition the Graduate Program Committee to waive one of these required courses. Alternatively, students with undergraduate degrees in Materials Science may petition the Graduate Program Committee to waive the Physical Properties course. However, only one of the four required courses can be waived. If approved, the course that has been waived will not be counted toward calculation of the GPA as described above. Written requests for such waivers must be submitted to the Graduate Program Committee no later than the end of the first semester after matriculation.  Please note that transfer coursework grades do not count towards calculation of the GPA.
  2. Successful completion of three advanced (600-level or higher) elective courses in materials science and engineering or a related field.

    Elective courses must be completed with a grade of C or higher, but there is no cumulative GPA requirement. A list of approved electives is available from the Academic Program Coordinator. Students wishing to use a course not on this list must submit a request to the Graduate Program Committee no later than the end of the first week of the semester in which the course is taken. Students who have completed prior graduate-level coursework may petition the Graduate Program Committee to waive one of the required elective courses.

    Graduate research (EN.510.807-EN.510.808), part-time graduate courses (from Engineering for Professionals in WSE or Advanced Academic Programs in KSAS), and seminars (courses with less than three contact hours per week) will not be counted toward completion of PhD course requirements. Undergraduate courses (400-level or lower) will not be counted unless they are cross-listed as graduate level, 600 or higher. Independent study courses may be used with prior approval of the Graduate Program Committee.

    Students who have completed prior graduate-level coursework may petition the Graduate Program Committee to waive one of the required elective courses. Written requests for such waivers must be submitted to the Graduate Program Committee no later than the end of the first semester after matriculation.

    In some cases an advisor may require a student to complete additional coursework, beyond the four required courses and three electives described above.
  3. Teaching Assistant Requirement.

    Students in their second year in the department will be required to act as teaching assistant for two courses.
  4. Successful completion of a comprehensive oral examination covering fundamentals of materials science and engineering. The comprehensive examination tests knowledge in each of the subjects listed below:

    –Structure of materials
    –Thermodynamics of materials
    –Phase transformations in materials

    In each of the three subject areas, students may be asked questions related to the properties of materials. The depth of required knowledge regarding properties of materials will match the level of knowledge presented in the Physical Properties of Materials class.

    Successful completion of the comprehensive exam requires satisfactory performance on all areas tested; there are no partial or conditional passes.

    The comprehensive exam is offered semiannually, usually immediately prior to the fall and spring semesters. A student who fails the exam on the first try may make a second attempt, but the exam must be successfully completed no later than the start of the third year following matriculation. Failure to do so will result in dismissal from the program.
  5. An oral presentation of a proposal for a research project to form the basis of the candidate’s dissertation.

    The dissertation proposal must be presented at a department seminar no later than the end of the third year following matriculation. A written version of the dissertation proposal must be submitted to a faculty committee consisting of the student’s faculty advisor and two other faculty members (to be selected in consultation with the advisor) no later than two weeks prior to the oral presentation. A brief closed session between the student and the committee shall follow the presentation, at which the committee members will ask questions about and provide comments on the proposed plan of research. Additional private discussions may be required by one or more committee members. The thesis proposal is also an examination, with the committee testing the candidate’s depth of knowledge in his or her area of specialization (and not simply on the specific proposed research).
  6. Completion of an original research project, documented in a dissertation that is defended by the candidate in a public presentation.

    Candidates must write a dissertation conforming to university requirements that describes their work and results in detail. A public defense of the dissertation is required, and will be followed by a closed examination session. The committee for the closed examination shall consist of five faculty members, approved by the Graduate Program Committee, with at least two members being from outside the department. The outcome of the closed examination will be decided by majority vote of the committee. Because the closed examination session fulfills the university Graduate Board Oral (GBO) examination requirement, all procedures pertaining to GBOs as established by the University Graduate Board must be followed.

    The committee may impose certain conditions (e.g. changes to the dissertation) for the candidate to meet prior to final certification that he or she has passed the exam. For this reason, the thesis defense must be scheduled for a date at least two months prior to any personal or university deadline for graduation. A complete draft of the dissertation must be submitted to all committee members no later than two weeks prior to the defense.

    The dissertation in its final form must be read and approved in writing by two members of the committee (the advisor and one other member to be chosen by the committee as a whole).

Financial Aid

Fellowships of various forms are available for full-time graduate students, including tuition remission fellowships, teaching fellowships, and additional stipend fellowships.

Research assistantships are available to support full-time graduate students who work with individual professors on their research contracts and grants.

Back to top

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

EN.510.101. Introduction to Materials Chemistry. 3.00 Credits.

Basic principles of chemistry and how they apply to the behavior of materials in the solid state. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and crystal structure is developed. Attention is given to characterization of atomic and molecular arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors, and polymers (including proteins). Examples are drawn from industrial practice (including the environmental impact of chemical processes), from energy generation and storage (such as batteries and fuel cells), and from emerging technologies (such as biomaterials). Students may receive credit for AS.030.103 or EN.510.101, but not both.
Prerequisites: Students may receive credit for AS.030.103 or EN.510.101, but not both.
Instructor(s): P. Mcguiggan
Area: Natural Sciences.

EN.510.103. Foundations of Nanotechnology. 3.00 Credits.

This course will be a survey of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology from an interdisciplinary point of view. Topics covered will include a general introduction to the nanoworld, fabrication, characterization and applications of hard and soft nanomaterials, as well as examining nanotechnology in terms of its societal, ethical, economic and environmental impact.
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.105. Chocolate: Intro to Materials Science. 1.00 Credit.

This course will introduce students to some basic concepts in materials science including phase diagrams, crystallization, and various characterization techniques, all through the close examination of chocolate. Students will have the opportunity to try some of their own experiments to see these processes in action. This course is directed toward freshman or sophomore engineering and natural science students with no background in these topics. Love of chocolate is a must.
Instructor(s): J. Dailey
Area: Natural Sciences.

EN.510.106. Foundations of Materials Science & Engineering. 3.00 Credits.

Basic principles of materials science and engineering and how they apply to the behavior of materials in the solid state. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and crystal structure is developed. Attention is given to characterization of atomic and molecular arrangements in crystalline and amorphous solids: metals, ceramics, semiconductors and polymers (including proteins). The processing and synthesis of these different categories of materials. Basics about the phase diagrams of alloys and mass transport in phase transformations. Introduction to materials behavior including their mechanical, chemical, electronic, magnetic, optical and biological properties.
Instructor(s): E. Ma
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.107. Modern Alchemy. 3.00 Credits.

Can you really turn lead into gold? Converting common substances into useful materials that play important roles in today’s technologies is the goal of many modern scientists and engineers. In this course, we will survey selected topics related to modern materials, the processes that are used to make them as well as the inspiration that led to their development. Topics will include the saga of electronic paper, the sticky stuff of gecko feet and the stretchy truth of metal rubber.
Instructor(s): J. Spicer
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.109. Materials Science & Engineering for the 21st Century. 1.00 Credit.

Through this course, students are introduced to the basic tenants of the field of materials science and engineering and important aspects of career development. Discussions will cover the range of career options in the field, the opportunities to engage with cutting edge research and technology at JHU, the skills that practitioners require and the ethical conundrums that engineering professionals navigate. Only available to Materials Science & Engineering freshmen and engineering undecided freshmen.
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.136. MSE Design Team I. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for freshmen majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE freshmen working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. Materials Science & Engineering Freshman Only. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.106, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor.
Instructor(s): H. Mao; O. Wilson; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.201. Introductory Materials Science for Engineers. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the structure, properties, and processing of materials used in engineering applications. After beginning with the structure of materials on the atomic and microscopic scales, this course explores defects and their role in determining materials properties, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations, and ways in which structure and properties can be controlled through processing. Previously: Introduction to Engineering Materials.
Instructor(s): E. Ma
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.202. Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers. 3.00 Credits.

This course will introduce students to the basics of programming in the MATLAB environment. Students will build skills in algorithmic problem solving by programming assignments regarding a range of biological and non-biological materials systems. Students will learn to write function definitions and deploy basic operations of selection and iteration as well as MATLAB specific vectorization methods and the construction of graphical user interfaces. Applications may include materials structure, phase equilibrium, propagating reactions, and other relevant scientific and engineering applications.
Instructor(s): M. Falk
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.236. MSE Design Team I. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for sophomores majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE freshmen working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. Materials Science & Engineering Sophomores Only. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.106, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor.
Instructor(s): H. Mao; O. Wilson; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.311. Structure of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

First of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course seeks to develop an understanding of the structure of materials starting at the atomic scale and building up to macroscopic structures. Topics include bonding, crystal structures, crystalline defects, symmetry and crystallography, microstructure, liquids and amorphous solids, diffraction, molecular solids and polymers, liquid crystals, amphiphilic materials, and colloids. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.
Prerequisites: ( ( AS.110.106 AND AS.110.107 ) OR ( AS.110.108 AND AS.110.109 ) ) AND ( ( EN.510.101 ) OR ( AS.030.101 AND AS.030.102 ) ) AND ( ( AS.171.101 OR AS.171.103 OR AS.171.107 ) AND ( AS.171.102 OR AS.171.104 OR AS.171.108 ) )
Instructor(s): T. Hufnagel
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.312. Thermodynamics/Materials. 3.00 Credits.

Second of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course examines the principles of thermodynamics as they apply to materials. Topics include fundamental principles of thermodynamics, equilibrium in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, thermodynamics of multicomponent systems, phase diagrams, thermodynamics of defects, and elementary statistical thermodynamics. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.
Instructor(s): M. Ulmschneider
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.313. Mechanical Properties of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

Third of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course is devoted to a study of the mechanical properties of materials. Lecture topics include elasticity, anelasticity, plasticity, and fracture. The concept of dislocations and their interaction with other lattice defects is introduced. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.
Prerequisites: EN.510.311
Instructor(s): J. Spicer
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.314. Electronic Properties of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

Fourth of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course is devoted to a study of the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials. Lecture topics include electrical and thermal conductivity, thermoelectricity, transport phenomena, dielectric effects, piezoelectricity, and magnetic phenomena. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.
Prerequisites: EN.510.311
Instructor(s): P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.315. Physical Chemistry of Materials II. 3.00 Credits.

Fifth of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course covers diffusion and phase transformations in materials. Topics include Fick's laws of diffusion, atomic theory of diffusion, diffusion in multi-component systems, solidification, diffusional and diffusionless transformations, and interfacial phenomena. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.
Prerequisites: EN.510.311 AND EN.510.312
Instructor(s): T. Mueller
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.316. Biomaterials I. 3.00 Credits.

Sixth of the Introduction to Materials Science series, this course offers an overview of principles and properties of biomedical materials. Topics include properties of materials used in medicine, synthesis and properties of polymeric materials, polymeric biomaterials, natural and recombinant biomaterials, biodegradable materials, hydrogels, stimuli-sensitive materials, and characterizations of biomaterials. This course contains computational modules; some prior knowledge of computer programming is needed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers) or equivalent.
Instructor(s): H. Mao
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.335. MSE Design Team I. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the first half of a two-semester course sequence for freshmen, sophomores, and juniors majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.101, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses.
Instructor(s): H. Mao; O. Wilson; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.336. MSE Design Team I. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for juniors majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering (MSE). This course provides a broad exposure to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE juniors working with a team leader and seniors on the team, apply their general knowledge in MSE to develop the solution to open-ended problems. Materials Science & Engineering Freshman Only. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.106, EN.510.109, or equivalent courses. *The team will meet 150 minutes per week at a time to be designated by the instructor.
Prerequisites: EN.510.335
Instructor(s): H. Mao; J. Spicer; O. Wilson; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.400. Introduction to Ceramics. 3.00 Credits.

This course will examine the fundamental structure and property relationships in ceramic materials. Areas to be studied include the chemistry and structure of ceramics and glasses, microstructure and property relationships, ceramic phase relationships, and ceramic properties. Particular emphasis will be placed on the physical chemistry of particulate systems, characterization, and the surface of colloid chemistry of ceramics. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311, EN.510.312, or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): P. Mcguiggan
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.403. Materials Characterization. 3.00 Credits.

This course will describe a variety of techniques used to characterize the structure and composition of engineering materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers, composites and semiconductors. The emphasis will be on microstructural characterization techniques, including optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermal analysis and surface analytical techniques, including Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Working with the JHU museums, we will use the techniques learned in class to characterize historic artifacts.
Instructor(s): P. Mcguiggan
Area: Natural Sciences.

EN.510.405. Materials Science of Energy Technologies. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the science and engineering of contemporary and cutting-edge energy technologies. Materials Science and Mechanical Engineering fundamentals in this area will be complemented by case studies that include fuel cells, solar cells, lighting, thermoelectrics, wind turbines, engines, nuclearpower, biofuels, and catalysis. Students will consider various alternative energy systems, and also to research and engineering of traditional energy technologies aimed at increased efficiency, conservation, and sustainability. Recommended Course Background: undergraduate course in thermodynamics.
Instructor(s): J. Erlebacher
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.407. Biomaterials II: Host response and biomaterials applications. 3.00 Credits.

This course focuses on the interaction of biomaterials with the biological system and applications of biomaterials. Topics include host reactions to biomaterials and their evaluation, cell-biomaterials interaction, biomaterials for tissue engineering applications, biomaterials for controlled drug and gene delivery, biomaterials for cardiovascular applications, biomaterials for orthopedic applications, and biomaterials for artificial organs. Also listed as EN.510.607.
Instructor(s): H. Mao
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.409. Melting, Smelting, Refining and Casting. 3.00 Credits.

This is a laboratory class on metal formation, an area that underlies almost all other technologies. We will examine extraction of metals from ore, refining of metals. The kinetics of melting and solidification will be explored in the context of casting and forming.
Prerequisites: EN.510.311 AND EN.510.312 AND EN.510.313 AND EN.510.315
Instructor(s): T. Hufnagel
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.412. Introduction to and Applicaitons of Scanning Probe Microscopy. 3.00 Credits.

Scanning Probe Microscopy has emerged as one of the premier techniques to characterize surfaces. This course will give an overview of the family of SPM techniques including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) and Kelvin probe microscopy. In each of these applications, the theory of operation, measurement and imaging techniques, and experimental limitations will be discussed. Also listed as 510.632.
Instructor(s): P. Mcguiggan
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.415. The Chemistry of Materials Synthesis. 3.00 Credits.

Many of the latest breakthroughs in materials science and engineering have been driven by new approaches to their synthesis, which has allowed the preparation of materials with fanciful structures and fascinating properties. This advanced course will explore synthetic approaches to multifunctional and nanostructured materials, ranging from opals to complex polymers to nanowires and quantum dots . Applications include electronics, energetics, and drug delivery. Participants will gain sufficient familiarity with synthesis options to be able to design research programs that rely on them. Emphasis will be placed on broad strategies that lead to material functionality, rather than detailed step-by-step sequences. Some topics will be selected “on the fly” from the most exciting current literature.
Instructor(s): H. Katz
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.418. Electronic and Photonic Processes and Devices. 3.00 Credits.

This course is intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students and will cover the fundamentals and properties of electronic and optical materials and devices. Subject matter will include a detailed and comprehensive discussion of the physical processes underlying modern electronic and optical devices. Detailed descriptions of modern semiconductor devices such as lasers and detectors used in optical communications and information storage and processing will be presented. Also listed as EN.510.618/EN.510.418.
Instructor(s): T. Poehler
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.419. Physical Metallurgy. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of metals and alloys. Starting from fundamentals (phase diagrams and phase transformation kinetics), we will explore how the structure of metals and alloys can be manipulated by thermomechanical processing to achieve desired properties. Detailed examples will be drawn from several alloy systems, including steels, aluminum, and titanium. A theme of the course will be the impact of materials processing and materials selection on the environment, including considerations of lightweight materials and processing techniques for minimizing energy consumption.
Instructor(s): E. Ma
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.420. Stealth Science & Engineering. 3.00 Credits.

The goal of stealth engineering is the creation of objects that are not easily detected using remote sensing techniques. To achieve this end, engineered systems of materials are arrayed to alter the signature of objects by reducing energy returned to remote observers. This course will provide an introduction to the general principles behind signature reduction by examining the mathematics and science behind basic electromagnetic and acoustic transport processes. Specific topics will include energy absorbing materials, anti-reflection coatings, wave guiding and scattering, metamaterials and adaptive screens. Co-listed with EN.510.640
Instructor(s): J. Spicer
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.421. Nanoparticles. 3.00 Credits.

Nanoparticles - one-dimensional materials with diameters of nearly atomic dimension - are one of the most important classes of nanostructured materials because their unusual properties that often differ significantly from bulk materials. This course will explore the synthesis, structure and properties of nanoparticles. Applications of nanoparticles in medicine, optics, sensing, and catalysis will be discussed, with an emphasis will be on metal nanoparticles and semiconductor quantum dots.
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.422. Micro and Nano Structured Materials & Devices. 3.00 Credits.

Almost every material’s property changes with scale. We will examine ways to make micro- and nano-structured materials and discuss their mechanical, electrical, and chemical properties. Topics include the physics and chemistry of physical vapor deposition, thin film patterning, and microstructural characterization. Particular attention will be paid to current technologies including computer chips and memory, thin film sensors, diffusion barriers, protective coatings, and microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices.
Instructor(s): E. Ma; H. Katz
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.424. Physical Science of Paper. 3.00 Credits.

An exploration of paper’s past, present, and possible future from the physical science and engineering perspectives. Includes an in-depth analysis of the defining physical, chemical, and electronic properties of paper since its origins in China as early as 202 BCE and the periodic technological innovations that improved quality, lowered price, and expanded use. Applications include paper as a medium for historic and artistic works, packaging, transformer insulation, architectural elements, medical diagnostics, and printed sensors. Topics include technologies such as email and e-books which may disrupt traditional paper formats, environmental concerns of industrial manufacture, transferrable knowledge from pulping such as the manufacture of feeds and fuels from cellulosic biomass, and paper’s legacy as found in cultural heritage artifacts and their conservation. Recommended: AS.030.205 Organic Chemistry I
Prerequisites: EN.510.101 OR (AS.030.101 AND AS.030.102)
Instructor(s): J. Baty
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.426. Biomolecular Materials I - Soluble Proteins and Amphiphiles. 3.00 Credits.

This course will examine the fundamental structure, interactions, and function relationship for biological macromolecules. The course will emphasize experimental methods and experimental design, and the physics behind human disease. Topics will include micellization, protein folding and misfolding, and macromolecular interactions. Recommended Course Background: EN.580.221 Co-listed with EN.510.621
Instructor(s): K. Hristova; M. Herrera-Alonso
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.427. Chemistry of Nanomaterials. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces the fundamental principles necessary to understand the behavior of materials at length scales larger than atoms or molecules with applications in chemistry and materials science. This course will explore topics such as nanoparticle synthesis and self assembly, ordered porous materials, catalysis, nanostructured thin films, and solar energy conversion. Size dependent properties of nanomaterials will be discussed. Co-listed with EN.510.661.
Instructor(s): A. Hall
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.428. Material Science Laboratory I. 3.00 Credits.

This course focuses on characterizing the microstructure and mechanical properties of structural materials that are commonly used in modern technology. A group of A1 alloys, Ti alloys, carbon and alloy steels, and composite materials that are found, for example, in actual bicycles will be selected for examination. Their microstructures will be studied using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of these same materials will be characterized using tension, compression, impact, and hardness tests. The critical ability to vary microstructure and therefore properties through mechanical and heat treatments will also be demonstrated and investigated in the above materials. Restricted to Materials Science & Engineering juniors only
Prerequisites: Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.;Prerequisites: EN.510.311 and EN.510.313
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.429. Materials Science Laboratory II. 3.00 Credits.

This laboratory concentrates on the experimental investigation of electronic properties of materials using basic measurement techniques. Topics include thermal conductivity of metal alloys, electrical conductivity of metals/metal alloys and semiconductors, electronic behavior at infrared wavelengths, magnetic behavior of materials, carrier mobility in semiconductors and the Hall effect in metals and semiconductors. Lab Assignment is by Professor. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311 or Permission Required.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.430. Biomaterials Lab. 3.00 Credits.

This laboratory course concentrates on synthesis, processing and characterization of materials for biomedical applications, and characterization of cell-materials interaction. Topics include synthesis of biodegradable polymers and degradation, electrospinning of polymer nanofibers, preparation of polymeric microspheres and drug release, preparation of plasmid DNA, polymer-mediated gene delivery, recombinant protein synthesis and purification, self-assembly of collagen fibril, surface functionalization of biomaterials, cell culture techniques, polymer substrates for cell culture, and mechanical properties of biological materials. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.407
Prerequisites: Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.
Instructor(s): K. Hristova
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.433. Senior Design Research. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the first half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research. During this semester, students join ongoing graduate research projects for a typical 10-12 hours per week of hands-on research. Classroom activities include discussions, followed by writing of research pre-proposals (white papers), proposals, status reports and lecture critiques of the weekly departmental research seminar. Co-listed with EN.510.438 and EN.510.440
Prerequisites: Prereq: EN.510.311 and 510.312 and EN.510.428 and 510.429
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.434. Senior Design/Research II. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring or double majoring in materials science and engineering. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311-EN.510.312, EN.510.428-EN.510.429, and EN.510.433 Meets with EN.510.439, EN.510.441, EN.510.446, and EN.510.448
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.435. Mechanical Properties of Biomaterials. 3.00 Credits.

This course will focus on the mechanical properties of biomaterials and the dependence of these properties on the microstructure of the materials. Organic and inorganic systems will be considered through a combination of lectures and readings and the material systems will range from cells to bones to artificial implants. Same course as 510.635.
Instructor(s): T. Weihs
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.437. Biosensor Materials and Mechanisims. 3.00 Credits.

Recent advances in biosensor technology are poised to revolutionize health care, enabling faster and more personalized diagnoses and recommendations. Biosensors are also increasingly important to public health, security, industry, and environmental science. This course will cover the materials, processes, and signaling mechanisms in use and anticipated for future developments in biosensors. Techniques such as electrochemistry, fluorescence, plasmonics, and enzymatic amplification will be discussed, and materials including nanowires, nanoparticles, organic semiconductors, and templated materials will be covered. Detection of nucleic acid sequences, proteins, carbohydrates, pharmaceuticals, and microorganisms will be emphasized. Same course as EN.510.637.
Instructor(s): H. Katz
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.438. Biomaterials Senior Design I. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the first half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring in materials science and engineering with the Biomaterials Concentration. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research with a focus on biomaterials. During this semester, students join ongoing graduate research projects for a typical 10-12 hours per week of hands-on experiences in design and research. Classroom activities include discussions, followed by writing of research pre-proposals (white papers), proposals, status reports and lecture critiques of departmental research seminars. Co-listed with EN.510.440 and EN.510.433
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.439. Biomaterials Senior Design II. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring in materials science and engineering with the Biomaterials Concentration. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research with a focus on biomatreials. During this semester, verbal reporting of project activities and status is emphasized, culminating in student talks presented to a special session of students and faculty. Students also prepare a poster and a written final report summarizing their design and research results. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311-EN.510.312, EN.510.428-EN.510.429, and EN.510.433 or 510.438 or 510.440 Meets with EN.510.434, EN.510.441, EN.510.446, and EN.510.448
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.440. Nanomaterials Senior Design I. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the first half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring in materials science and engineering with the Nanotechnology Concentration. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research with a focus on nanotechnology and nanomaterials. During this semester, students join ongoing graduate research projects for a typical 10-12 hours per week of hands-on experiences in design and research. Classroom activities include discussions, followed by writing of research pre-proposals (white papers), proposals, status reports and lecture critiques of departmental research seminars. Co-listed with EN.510.433 and EN.510.438
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.441. Nanomaterials Senior Design II. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the second half of a two-semester sequence required for seniors majoring in materials science and engineering with the Nanotechnology Concentration. It is intended to provide a broad exposure to many aspects of planning and conducting independent research with a focus on nanotechnology and nanomatreials. During this semester, verbal reporting of project activities and status is emphasized, culminating in student talks presented to a special session of students and faculty. Students also prepare a poster and a written final report summarizing their design and research results. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.311-EN.510.312, EN.510.428-EN.510.429, and EN.510.433 or 510.438 or 510.440 Meets with EN.510.434, EN.510.439, EN.510.446, and EN.510.448
Instructor(s): O. Wilson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.442. Nanomaterials Lab. 3.00 Credits.

The objective of the laboratory course will be to give students hands on experience in nanotechnology based device fabrication through synthesis, patterning, and characterization of nanoscale materials. The students will use the knowledge gained from the specific synthesis, characterization and patterning labs to design and fabricate a working nanoscale/nanostructured device. The course will be augmented with comparisons to microscale materials and technologies. These comparisons will be key in understanding the unique phenomena that enable novel applications at the nanoscale. DMSE Seniors or permission of the instructor.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.
Instructor(s): E. Ma; J. Erlebacher; O. Wilson; P. Mcguiggan
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.443. Chemistry and Physics of Polymers. 3.00 Credits.

The course will describe and evaluate the synthetic routes, including condensation and addition polymerization, to macromolecules with varied constituents and properties. Factors that affect the efficiencies of the syntheses will be discussed. Properties of polymers that lead to technological applications will be covered, and the physical basis for these properties will be derived. Connections to mechanical, electronic, photonic, and biological applications will be made. Also listed as EN.510.643. Recommended Course Background: Organic Chemistry I and one semester of thermodynamics.
Instructor(s): H. Katz
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.445. MSE Design Team II. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the first half of a two-semester course sequence for senior students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides a broad experience to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE seniors, working with a team leader and a group of freshmen, sophomores, and seniors, apply their knowledge in their track area to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.101, EN.510.311, EN.510.312, EN.510.428, EN 510.429.
Instructor(s): H. Mao; O. Wilson; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.446. MSE Design Team II. 3.00 Credits.

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for senior students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides a broad experience to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting (3 to 6 students on each team). In this course, MSE seniors, working with a team leader and a group of freshmen, sophomores, and seniors, apply their knowledge in their track area to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE. Materials Science & Engineering Seniors Only. Recommended Course Background: EN 510.101, EN 510.311, EN 510.312, EN 510.428, EN 510.429. Meets with EN.510.434, EN.510.439, EN.510.441 and EN.510.448.
Prerequisites: EN.510.445
Instructor(s): H. Mao; J. Spicer; O. Wilson; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.447. MSE Design Team Leader. 4.00 Credits.

This course is the first half of a two-semester course sequence for students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides a leadership experience to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting. In this course, MSE seniors assemble and lead a student team consisting of 3 to 6 students, apply their knowledge in their track area, and develop leadership skills to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.101, EN.510.311, EN.510.312, EN.510.428, EN 510.429.
Instructor(s): H. Mao; O. Wilson; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences
Writing Intensive.

EN.510.448. MSE Design Team Leader. 4.00 Credits.

This course is the second half of a two-semester course sequence for students majoring or double majoring in MSE. This course provides a leadership experience to various aspects of planning and conducting independent research in a team setting. In this course, MSE seniors assemble and lead a student team consisting of 3 to 6 students, apply their knowledge in their track area, and develop leadership skills to generate the solution to open-ended problems encountered in MSE. Materials Science & Engineering Seniors Only. Recommended Course Background: EN 510.101, EN 510.311, EN 510.312,EN. 510.428, EN 510.429. Meets with EN.510.434, EN.510.439, EN.510.441, and EN.510.446
Prerequisites: EN.510.447
Instructor(s): H. Mao; J. Spicer; O. Wilson; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.456. Introduction to Surface Science. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to the structure and properties of solid surfaces. Topics include Gibbsian and gradient thermodynamics of surfaces; crystallography and structure of free solid surfaces; characterization methods; surface mobility and phase transitions; gas-solid interactions; crystal growth; electronic structure; solid-solid surfaces; thin film epitaxy. Co-listed with EN.510.656. Recommended course background: EN.510.311, EN.510.312, EN.510.313, EN.510.314, EN.510.315 or instructor permission.
Instructor(s): R. Cammarata
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.457. Materials Science of Thin Films. 3.00 Credits.

The processing, structure, and properties of thin films are discussed emphasizing current areas of scientific and technological interest. Topics include elements of vacuum science and technology; chemical and physical vapor deposition processes; film growth and microstructure; chemical and microstructural characterization methods; epitaxy; mechanical properties such as internal stresses, adhesion, and strength; and technological applications such as superlattices, diffusion barriers, and protective coatings. Co-listed with EN.510.657
Instructor(s): T. Weihs
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.459. Physics & Properties of Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials. 3.00 Credits.

This course is intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students and will cover the fundamentals and properties of low dimensional nanomaterials. Subject matter will include a detailed and comprehensive discussion of the physics and physical properties of solids confined in either one, two or three directions. Features examined for these low dimensional materials will include electronic structure, electrical transport, vibrational and thermal transport in low dimensional systems such as graphene, carbon nanotubes, quantum wires, semiconductor and metal nanoparticles. Co-listed with EN.510.659.
Instructor(s): T. Poehler
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.501. Undergraduate Research/Material Science. 3.00 Credits.

Student participation in ongoing research activities. Research is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and often in conjunction with other members of the research group.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.
Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.510.502. Research in Materials Science. 0.00 - 3.00 Credits.

Student participation in ongoing research activities. Research is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and often in conjunction with other members of the research group.
Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.510.503. Independent Study/Materials Science. 3.00 Credits.

Individual programs of study are worked out between students and the professor supervising their independent study project. Topics selected are those not formally listed as regular courses and include a considerable design component.
Instructor(s): O. Wilson; R. Cammarata.

EN.510.504. Independent Study. 0.00 - 3.00 Credits.

Individual programs of study are worked out between students and the professor supervising their independent study project. Topics selected are those not formally listed as regular courses and include a considerable design component.
Instructor(s): A. Hall; P. Searson; T. Hufnagel.

EN.510.511. Group Undergraduate Research/Material. 3.00 Credits.

Student participation in ongoing research activities. Research is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and often in conjunction with other members of the research group. This section has a weekly research group meeting that students are expected to attend.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.
Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.510.597. Research-Summer. 3.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.510.601. Structure of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the structure of inorganic and polymeric materials. Topics include the atomic scale structure of metals, alloys, ceramics, and semiconductors; structure of polymers; crystal defects; elementary crystallography; tensor properties of crystals; and an introduction to the uses of diffraction techniques (including X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy) in studying the structure of materials. Recommended Course Background: undergraduate chemistry, physics, and calculus or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): T. Hufnagel.

EN.510.602. Thermodynamics of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the classical and statistical thermodynamics of materials. Topics include the zeroth law of thermodynamics; the first law (work, internal energy, heat, enthalpy, heat capacity); the second law (heat engines, Carnot cycle, Clausius inequality, entropy, absolute temperature); equilibrium of single component systems (free energy, thermodynamic potentials, virtual variations, chemical potential, phase changes); equilibrium of multicomponent systems and chemical thermodynamics; basics of statistical physics (single and multiple particle partition functions, configurational entropy, third law; statistical thermodynamics of solid solutions); and equilibrium composition-temperature phase diagrams. Recommended Course Background: undergraduate calculus, chemistry, and physics or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): M. Falk.

EN.510.603. Phase Transformations of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

This course presents a unified treatment of the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations from phenomenological and atomistic viewpoints. Phase transformations in condensed metal and nonmetal systems are discussed. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.601 and EN.510.602
Instructor(s): J. Erlebacher.

EN.510.604. Mechanical Properties of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the properties and mechanisms that control the mechanical performance of materials. Topics include mechanical testing, tensor description of stress and strain, isotropic and anisotropic elasticity, plastic behavior of crystals, dislocation theory, mechanisms of microscopic plasticity, creep, fracture, and deformation and fracture of polymers. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.601
Instructor(s): E. Ma.

EN.510.605. Electrical, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

An overview of electrical, optical and magnetic properties arising from the fundamental electronic and atomic structure of materials. Continuum materials properties are developed through examination of microscopic processes. Emphasis will be placed on both fundamental principles and applications in contemporary materials technologies. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.601
Instructor(s): J. Spicer.

EN.510.606. Polymer Chemistry & Biology. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the chemical and biological properties of organic and inorganic materials. Topics include an introduction to polymer science, polymer synthesis, chemical synthesis, and modification of inorganic materials, biomineralization, biosynthesis, and properties of natural materials (proteins, DNA, and polysaccharides), structure-property relationships in polymeric materials (synthetic polymers and structural proteins), and materials for biomedical applications. Recommended Course Background: undergraduate chemistry and biology or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): M. Herrera-Alonso.

EN.510.607. Biomaterials II: Host response and biomaterials applications. 3.00 Credits.

This course focuses on the interaction of biomaterials with the biological system and applications of biomaterials. Topics include host reactions to biomaterials and their evaluation, cell-biomaterials interaction, biomaterials for tissue engineering applications, biomaterials for controlled drug and gene delivery, biomaterials for cardiovascular applications, biomaterials for orthopedic applications, and biomaterials for artificial organs. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.606. Also listed as EN.510.407
Instructor(s): H. Mao.

EN.510.608. Electrochemistry. 3.00 Credits.

Thermodynamics of electrochemical interfaces, including electrochemical potential, the Nernst equation, ion-solvent interactions, and double layer theory. Charge transfer kinetics for activation and diffusion controlled processes. Analysis of kinetics at various electrodes, including redox reactions, metal-ion electrodes, and semiconductor electrodes. Electroanalytical techniques are discussed, including those related to bioelectrochemistry and semiconductor electrochemistry. Selected reactions of technological importance are evaluated, including the hydrogen evolution reaction, oxygen reduction, electrodeposition, and energy generation and storage. Recommended Course Background: introductory chemistry or permission of instructor.
Instructor(s): P. Searson.

EN.510.611. Solid State Physics. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to solid state physics for advanced undergraduates and graduate students in physical science and engineering. Topics include crystal structure of solids; band theory; thermal, optical, and electronic properties; transport and magnetic properties of metals, semiconductors, and insulators. The concepts of solid state principles in modern electronic, optical, and structural materials are discussed. Cross-listed with Electrical and Computer Engineering.
Instructor(s): T. Poehler.

EN.510.612. Solid State Physics. 3.00 Credits.

Basic solid state physics principles applied to modern electronic, optical, and structural materials. Topics discussed will include magnetism, superconductivity, polymers, nano-structured materials, electronic effects, and surface physics. For advanced undergraduates and graduate students in physical science and engineering. Recommended Course Background: EN.510.611
Instructor(s): T. Poehler.

EN.510.615. Physical Properties of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

A detailed survey of the relationship between materials properties and underlying microstructure. Structure/property/processing relationships will be examined across a wide spectrum of materials including metals, ceramics, polymers and biomaterials, and properties including electrical, magnetic, optical, thermal, mechanical, chemical and biocompatibility.
Instructor(s): P. Mcguiggan
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.618. Electronic and Photonic Processes and Devices. 3.00 Credits.

This course is intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students and will cover the fundamentals and properties of electronic and optical materials and devices. Subject matter will include a detailed and comprehensive discussion of the physical processes underlying modern electronic and optical devices. Detailed descriptions of modern semiconductor devices such as lasers and detectors used in optical communications and information storage and processing will be presented. Also listed as EN.510.618/EN.510.418.
Instructor(s): T. Poehler.

EN.510.621. Biomolecular Materials I - Soluble Proteins and Amphiphiles. 3.00 Credits.

Structure and function of cellular molecules (lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, and carbohydrates). Structure and function of molecular machines (enzymes for biosynthesis, motors, pumps). Protein synthesis using recombinant nucleic acid methods. Advanced materials development. Interactions of biopolymers, lipid membranes, and their complexes. Mean field theories, fluctuation and correlation effects. Self assembly in biomolecular materials. Biomedical applications. Characterization techniques. Structure and function of cellular molecules (lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, and carbohydrates). Structure and function of molecular machines (enzymes for biosynthesis, motors, pumps). Protein synthesis using recombinant nucleic acid methods. Advanced materials development. Interactions of biopolymers, lipid membranes, and their complexes. Mean field theories, fluctuation and correlation effects. Self assembly in biomolecular materials. Biomedical applications. Characterization techniques. Co-listed with EN.510.426.
Instructor(s): K. Hristova; M. Herrera-Alonso
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.624. X-Ray Scattering, Diffraction and Imaging. 3.00 Credits.

An introduction to the uses of X-rays for structural characterization of materials. Topics include: X-ray scattering by atoms; kinematic and dynamical theories of diffraction; Fourier series and transform methods; scattering by liquids and amorphous solids; coherent X-ray diffraction, scattering, and imaging; and modern X-ray sources (synchrotron radiation and X-ray free-electron lasers). Recommended Course Background: EN.510.601 or permission of the instructor.
Instructor(s): T. Hufnagel.

EN.510.630. Molecular Simulation of Materials. 3.00 Credits.

Learn the fundamentals necessary to design and implement computer simulations on the molecular level. This course focuses on two widely used techniques: molecular-dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation. Both are introduced in the context of a review of the basic theoretical background. This class will cover the specifics of handling molecular interactions using empirical potentials, applying proper boundary conditions and simulating various equilibrium ensembles and non-equilibrium systems. Lectures will address how to extract transport coefficients, atomic scale correlations and local stresses and strains from simulation data, and computational issues such as algorithmic complexity and efficiency. The final weeks of the course will focus on new and cutting-edge advances in these methods.
Instructor(s): M. Falk
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.631. Physical Metallurgy. 3.00 Credits.

This course examines the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of metals and alloys. Starting from fundamentals (phase diagrams and phase transformation kinetics), we will explore how the structure of metals and alloys can be manipulated by thermomechanical processing to achieve desired properties. Detailed examples will be drawn from several alloy systems, including steels, aluminum, and titanium. A theme of the course will be the impact of materials processing and materials selection on the environment, including considerations of lightweight materials and processing techniques for minimizing energy consumption. Prerequisite: EN.510.311-312 Same course as EN.510.419.
Instructor(s): E. Ma.

EN.510.632. Introduction to and Applications of Scanning Probe Microscopy. 3.00 Credits.

Scanning Probe Microscopy has emerged as one of the premier techniques to characterize surfaces. This course will give an overview of the family of SPM techniques including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) and Kelvin probe microscopy. In each of these applications, the theory of operation, measurement and imaging techniques, and experimental limitations will be discussed. Also listed as EN.510.412
Instructor(s): P. Mcguiggan
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.633. Computational Materials Design. 3.00 Credits.

This course will cover the use of computational methods to discover and design materials for new technologies. Topics addressed will include structure prediction, materials informatics, and the calculation of material properties from first principles using methods such as density functional theory. Participants will gain hands-on experience with modern computational techniques.
Instructor(s): T. Mueller
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.634. Simulation of Biomolecules and Membranes. 3.00 Credits.

This class will provide an overview of methods for molecular simulation of biomolecules and membranes. We will study methods for atomic detail molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. After discussing basic algorithms such as integrators, thermostats, and barostats, we will study how biomolecules are chemically parameterized to accurately capture their conformational equilibria. This knowledge will then be used to build, simulate, and analyse a molecular model of a membrane protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The simulation will be used to understand how these methods can be used to obtain insights into the molecular mechanisms of protein function.
Instructor(s): M. Ulmschneider
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.635. Mechanical Properties of Biomaterials. 3.00 Credits.

This course will focus on the mechanical properties of biomaterials and the dependence of these properties on the microstructure of the materials. Organic and inorganic systems will be considered through a combination of lectures and readings and the material systems will range from cells to bones to artificial implants. Same course as 510.435
Instructor(s): T. Weihs
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.637. Biosensor Materials and Mechanisims. 3.00 Credits.

Recent advances in biosensor technology are poised to revolutionize health care, enabling faster and more personalized diagnoses and recommendations. Biosensors are also increasingly important to public health, security, industry, and environmental science. This course will cover the materials, processes, and signaling mechanisms in use and anticipated for future developments in biosensors. Techniques such as electrochemistry, fluorescence, plasmonics, and enzymatic amplification will be discussed, and materials including nanowires, nanoparticles, organic semiconductors, and templated materials will be covered. Detection of nucleic acid sequences, proteins, carbohydrates, pharmaceuticals, and microorganisms will be emphasized. Same course as EN.510.437.
Instructor(s): H. Katz
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.640. Stealth Engineering. 3.00 Credits.

The goal of stealth engineering is the creation of objects that are not easily detected using remote sensing techniques. To achieve this end, engineered systems of materials are arrayed to alter the signature of objects by reducing energy returned to remote observers. This course will provide an introduction to the general principles behind signature reduction by examining the mathematics and science behind basic electromagnetic and acoustic transport processes. Specific topics will include energy absorbing materials, anti-reflection coatings, wave guiding and scattering, metamaterials and adaptive screens. Co-listed with EN.510.420.
Instructor(s): J. Spicer
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.643. Chemistry and Physics of Polymers. 3.00 Credits.

The course will describe and evaluate the synthetic routes, including condensation and addition polymerization, to macromolecules with varied constituents and properties. Factors that affect the efficiencies of the syntheses will be discussed. Properties of polymers that lead to technological applications will be covered, and the physical basis for these properties will be derived. Connections to mechanical, electronic, photonic, and biological applications will be made. Also listed as EN.510.443. Recommended Course Background: Organic Chemistry I and one semester of thermodynamics.
Instructor(s): H. Katz
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.656. Introduction to Surface Science. 3.00 Credits.

Introduction to the structure and properties of solid surfaces. Topics include Gibbsian and gradient thermodynamics of surfaces; crystallography and structure of free solid surfaces; characterization methods; surface mobility and phase transitions; gas-solid interactions; crystal growth; electronic structure; solid-solid surfaces; thin film epitaxy. Co-listed with EN.510.456. Recommended course background: EN.510.311, EN.510.312, EN.510.313, EN.510.314, EN.510.315 or instructor permission.
Instructor(s): R. Cammarata.

EN.510.657. Materials Science of Thin Films. 3.00 Credits.

The processing, structure, and properties of thin films are discussed emphasizing current areas of scientific and technological interest. Topics include elements of vacuum science and technology; chemical and physical vapor deposition processes; film growth and microstructure; chemical and microstructural characterization methods; epitaxy; mechanical properties such as internal stresses, adhesion, and strength; and technological applications such as superlattices, diffusion barriers, and protective coatings. Co-listed with EN.510.457
Instructor(s): T. Weihs.

EN.510.659. Physics & Properties of Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials. 3.00 Credits.

This course is intended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students and will cover the fundamentals and properties of low dimensional nanomaterials. Subject matter will include a detailed and comprehensive discussion of the physics and physical properties of solids confined in either one, two or three directions. Features examined for these low dimensional materials will include electronic structure, electrical transport, vibrational and thermal transport in low dimensional systems such as graphene, carbon nanotubes, quantum wires, semiconductor and metal nanoparticles. Co-listed with EN.510.459.
Instructor(s): T. Poehler
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.510.661. Chemistry of Nanomaterials. 3.00 Credits.

This course introduces the fundamental principles necessary to understand the behavior of materials at length scales larger than atoms or molecules with applications in chemistry and materials science. This course will explore topics such as nanoparticle synthesis and self assembly, ordered porous materials, catalysis, nanostructured thin films, and solar energy conversion. Size dependent properties of nanomaterials will be discussed. Co-listed with EN.510.427
Instructor(s): A. Hall
Area: Engineering.

EN.510.801. Materials Research Seminar. 1.00 Credit.

The Graduate Research Seminar in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering provides a forum for students to present their latest research results in a formal seminar setting. The course encourages discussion between students in varying disciplines in order to establish new collaborations and develop the shared vocabulary required for interdisciplinary materials science research. Permission Required.
Instructor(s): J. Erlebacher.

EN.510.802. Materials Research Seminar. 1.00 Credit.

Instructor(s): J. Erlebacher.

EN.510.803. Materials Science Seminar. 1.00 Credit.

The Materials Science Seminar exposes students to a wide array of internationally recognized speakers who discuss topics of cutting-edge Materials Science research. Speakers are selected both to overlap research interests within the department and to expose students to broader trends in contemporary Materials Science.
Instructor(s): J. Erlebacher.

EN.510.804. Materials Science Seminar. 1.00 Credit.

Meets with EN.510.434, EN.510.439, EN.510.441, EN.510.446, and EN.510.448.
Instructor(s): J. Erlebacher.

EN.510.807. Graduate Research In Materials Science. 3.00 - 20.00 Credits.

Individual programs of study are worked out between students and the professor supervising their independent study project. Topics selected are those not formally listed as regular courses and include a considerable design component.
Instructor(s): J. Erlebacher.

EN.510.808. Graduate Research. 3.00 - 20.00 Credits.

Instructor(s): J. Erlebacher.

Cross Listed Courses

Physics & Astronomy

AS.171.321. Introduction to Space, Science, and Technology. 3.00 Credits.

Topics include space astronomy, remote observing of the earth, space physics, planetary exploration, human space flight, space environment, orbits, propulsion, spacecraft design, attitude control and communication. Crosslisted by Departments of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Recommended Course Background: AS.171.101-AS.171.102 or similar; AS.110.108-AS.110.109.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.
Instructor(s): J. MacKenty; S. McCandliss
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

Electrical & Computer Engineering

EN.520.627. Photovoltaics and Energy Devices. 3.00 Credits.

This course provides an introduction to the science of photovoltaics and related energy devices. Topics covered include basic concepts in semiconductor device operation and carrier statistics; recombination mechanisms; p-n junctions; silicon, thin film, and third generation photovoltaic technologies; light trapping; and detailed balance limits of efficiency. Additionally, thermophotovoltaics and electrical energy storage technologies are introduced. A background in semiconductor device physics (EN.520.485, or similar) is recommended.
Instructor(s): S. Thon.

Institute for NanoBio Technology

EN.670.619. Fundamental Physics and Chemistry of Nanomaterials. 3.00 Credits.

This course will cover the physics and chemistry relevant to the design, synthesis, and characterization of nanoparticles. Topics include nanoparticle synthesis, functionalization, surface engineering, and applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. The properties of semiconductor quantum dots and magnetic nanoparticles will be reviewed along with techniques for nanoparticle manipulation, particle tracking, and bio-microrheology. Patterning tools including soft lithography, optical lithography, e-beam lithography, and template lithography will be discussed. Electron and scanning probe microscopy will be reviewed. Cross-listed with Materials Science & Engineering and Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering.
Instructor(s): Staff.

For current faculty and contact information go to http://materials.jhu.edu/index.php/people/

Faculty

Chair

Jonah Erlebacher
Professor: Nanostructured materials, self-organization and pattern formation, computational maerials science, kinetics of shape change, ultra-high vacuum processing, nanoporous metals, fule cells and energy.

Professors

Robert C. Cammarata
Structure, properties, and processing of thin films and nanostructured materials, thermodynamics and mechanics of surfaces, mechanical behavior of materials, nanoindentation testing, stresses in thin films, novel electrochemical deposition methods, computer simulations, transport and assembly of nanowires in solution.

Michael Falk
Professor: Theoretical and computational research investigating materials processes far from equilibrium: deformation, failure and fracture in non-crystalline materials such as metallic glasses; reactive materials, interactions of stress and diffusion in energy storage materials; mixing processes that accompany frictional sliding and wear

Kalina Hristova
Biomolecular materials, structure and function of cellular membranes, membrane proteins, self-assembly of biological amphiphiles, protein-lipid interactions, protein synthesis, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence.

Todd C. Hufnagel
Structure and properties of amorphous alloys; mechanical behavior of metals, polymers, and biomaterials; use of synchrotron radiation for in situ studies of deformation and phase transformations in materials; electron microscopy.

Howard E. Katz
Professor: organic, hybrid, nanostructured, and interfacial materials in electronic and photonic devices; organic materials synthesis, thin film fabrication and patterning; novel architectures for devices, sensors, and circuits; host-guest chemistry, material responses to high electric fields; organic nonlinear optiocs; nanoparticles in biosystems; materials for physical science education.

Evan Ma
Nonequilibrium processing and metastable materials, thermodynamics and kinetics of phase transformations, atomic level structures and polymorphs in metallic glasses and chalcogenide glasses, mechanical properties of amorphous and nanocrystalline metals, mechanics of small-volume materials, in situ TEM, phase-change alloys for data storage and memory applications.

Hai-Quan Mao
Professor: Nanomaterials, electrospinning, nanofibers, biomimetic matrix, stem cell expansion and differentiation, nerve regeneration, micellar nanoparticle, therapeutic delivery, biodegradable polymers.

Peter C. Searson
Biomaterials, nanomedicine.

James B. Spicer
Ultrafast phenomena, laser interactions with materials, nanostructured composite materials, sensor physics, laser-based materials processing, elastic and anelastic materials properties, intelligent materials processing, near-field optical and microwave techniques.

Timothy P. Weihs
The study of exothermic reactions in layered materials and their applications, processing and characterization of thin films, mechanical testing of metals and biological materials, nanoindentation studies.

Assistant Professors

Margarita Herrera-Alonso
Structure-property relationships of biodegradable polymers, polymer synthesis, graft copolymers, nanoparticles and nanomaterials, kinetics of self-assembly, delivery of drugs and imaging agents.

Tim Mueller
Computational materials discovery and design.

Martin Ulmschneider
Assistant Professor: Protein assembly and function in lipid bilayer membranes; Algorithm and parameter development for atomic detail molecular simulation; Synthetic biology and the de novo design of membrane active peptides and proteins

Professor Emeritus

Robert E. Green Jr.
Materials science, nondestructive characterization, ultrasonics, acoustic emission, X-ray diffraction, radiography, topography and tomography, synchrotron radiation, electro-optical systems, light-sound interactions, mechanical properties, thermography, sensors, process control.

Research Professor

Theodore O. Poehler
Electronically conducting polymers, organic charge transfer compounds, materials for optical Information processing, and semiconductors.

Associate Research Professor

Patricia M. McGuiggan
Adhesion, tribology, tribocharging, atomic force microscopy, interfacial phenomena, wetting, interferometry, polymer and ceramic materials.

Assistant Research Professor

John Baty
Paper conservation, heritage science.

Lecturer

Orla Wilson
Synthesis of nanostructured materials, specifically metallic and bimetallic nanoparticles in the 2-20 nm size range; electron, confocal and scanning-probe microscopies as characterization tools; applications of nano-structured materials as homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, novel optical security devices, and nanovectors for targeted drug delivery.

Joint, Part-Time, and Visiting Appointments

Kit Bowen
E. Emmet Reid Professor (Chemistry): experimental chemical physics-photoelectron spectroscopy of negative ions, structure and dynamics of gas phase, weakly bound molecular clusters.

Collin Broholm
Gerhard H. Dieke Professor (Director, Institute for Quantum Matter) Physics & Astronomy: experimental condensed matter physics

Chia-Ling Chien
Jacob L. Hain Professor of Physics (Physics & Astronomy): Fabrication of experimental studies of structural, electronic, magnetic, and super-conducting properties of nanostructured solids; magneto-electronics, manipulation of small entities in low Reynolds number regime, biosensing.

Michael Edidin
Professor (Biology): membrane organization and dynamics, immunology studied with nanoparticles and advanced microscopy.

Jaafar El-Awady
Assistant Professor: Multiscale materials modeling, damage and fracture mechanisms of materials in mechanical design, material degradation in extreme environments, nano-materials and structures, impact dynamics and wave propagation.

Jennifer H. Elisseeff
Professor (Biomedical Engineering): tissue engineering, biomaterials, cartilage regeneration.

D. Howard Fairbrother
Professor (Chemistry): surface chemistry, electron induced deposition of nanostructured materials, environmental health and safety of nanomaterials.

Sharon Gerecht
Associate Professor (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering): biomaterials, stem cells, biomimetic hydrogels, vascular differentiation, angiogenesis, regenerative medicine, hypoxia, microfluidics.

Somnath Ghosh
Professor (Civil Engineering): computational mechanics with focus on materials analysis, characterization and processing, including simulation and design.

David Gracias
Professor (Chemical & Biomolecular Enginering): micro and nanotechnology, surface science, metamaterials, complex systems, nanoelectrics, nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, drug delivery and microfluidics.

Warren Grayson
Assistant Professor (Biomedical Engineering): Tissue engineering, stem cells, bioreactors, biomaterials, orthopaedics

Jordan Green
Assistant Professor (Biomedical Engineering): cellular engineering, nanobiotechnology, biomaterials, controlled drug delivery and gene delivery.

Kevin J. Hemker
Professor (Mechanical Engineering): mechanical behavior of materials, transmission on electron microscopy, high temperature alloys, thermal barrier coatings, nanocrystalline materials and materials for MEMS.

Robert Ivkov
Visiting Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology (JHU School of Medicine): development, characterization, and use of nanomaterials to target cancer and to enhance the effectiveness of other therapies such as radiation. A specific area of research includes the study and development of selective heating with magnetic nanoparticles

Lynne Jones
Associate Professor (Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine): biomaterials, osteonecrosis pathogenesis and treatment, total joint arthroplasty, bone graft materials

Rangaramanujam Kannan
Professor: Ophthalmology, JHU School of Medicine

Feilim MacGabhann
Assistant Professor: computational modeling of growth factor-receptor networks, personalized medicine; individualized medicine; experimental studies of interindividual variation, therapeutic cardiovascular remodeling, novel methods for data visualization and automated image analysis, computational models of virus-host interactions.

Tyrel McQueen
Assistant Professor (Chemistry): Solid State and Inorganic Chemistry/Condensed Matter Physics

Thao (Vicky) Ngyuen
Assistant Professor (Mechanical Engineering): Biomechanics: mechanical behavior, growth and remodeling of fibrous soft tissues. Constitutive Modeling: thermomechanics, viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity of shape memory polymers and polymer composites. Fracture Mechanics: fracture and failure of rate dependent materials.

K.T. Ramesh
Alonzo G. Decker Jr. Professor of Science and Engineering (Mechanical Engineering): Nanomaterials, planetary impact, dynamic failure mechanisms, shock, impact, and wave propagation, high-strain-rate behavior of materials, injury biomechanics, constitutive and failure modeling.

John D. Tovar
Professor (Chemistry): materials-oriented synthetic organic chemistry, electrochemistry, pi-conjugated and conducting polymers, supramolecular chemistry, organic electronics, biomimetic electronic materials.

Tza-Huei (Jeff) Wang
Professor (Mechanical Engineering): BioMEMS and microfluidics, single molecule manipulation and detection, nano/micro scale fabrication, conformational dynamics of biomolecules.

Denis Wirtz
Theophilus Halley Smoot Professor (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering): cell adhesion and migration, cell mechanics, cysto-skeleton physics, receptor-ligand interactions, cancer bioengineering, progeria, particle tracking methods.