NanoBioTechnology

http://inbt.jhu.edu

The Institute for NanoBioTechnology (INBT) at Johns Hopkins University is an exceptionally diverse, multidisciplinary team of faculty, researchers, and students uncovering new knowledge and creating innovative technologies at the interface of nanoscience, engineering, and medicine. Launched in 2006, INBT aims to revolutionize research by fostering a collaborative environment among engineers, scientist, and clinicians to pioneer new ways to solve some of thcomplex challenges in healthcare and the environment. The Institute brings together experts from the Bloomberg School of Public Health, School of Medicine, Whiting School of Engineering, Applied Physics Lab, and Krieger School of Arts and Sciences to fulfill their research, education, outreach, and translation initiatives. INBT collaborates with major industry partners through it's Corporate Partnership Program, to help move emerging technologies from laboratory to marketplace, as well as provide a vehicle for open exchange between Hopkins researchers and students with their counterparts in industry. Their headquarters are located in 100 Croft Hall on the Homewood campus, with laboratory facilities and research teams located at several Johns Hopkins locations. Examples of INBT research include the development of new tools and techniques to probe biological systems at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels, to provide new insight into the mechanisms of disease, and the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic platforms for improved diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of disease. These are achieved through their three research focused platforms: Engineering for Cancer Therapies, Diagnostic Tools Engineered for Early Detection, and Stem Cells and Regenerative Engineering. 

INBT education programs foster the next wave of nanobiotechnology innovations. Goals include training scientists and engineers who work between the physical sciences/engineering fields and life sciences/medical fields, as well as creating an entrepreneurial environment. INBT offers a Certificate of Advanced Study in Nanobiotechnology for students who complete 13 lecture/tutorial/laboratory courses along with at least eight semesters of research from their home department. The Nanotechnology for Cancer Research program trains students to study and model cancer motility and the biophysical forces involved in metastasis. Additionally, research opportunities exist through INBT’s summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) and International Research Experience for Students (IRES), both funded by NSF. 

The Nano-Bio Certificate of Advanced Study is recognized by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation as an innovative new approach to multidisciplinary training, integrating research and education. It combines traditional disciplinary coursework and laboratory training with peer-to-peer teaching, co-advising and professional development.

Certificate students have the opportunity to:

  • earn an accredited Certificate of Advanced Study (CAS) in Nanobiotechnology (for students who complete 13 lecture/tutorial/laboratory courses along with at least eight semesters of research from their home department)
  • work towards earning a PhD from participating departments such as Biomedical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Physics (application and acceptance to one of these PhD program is required separately and in advance of an application for the CAS above).  All Science and Engineering students are encouraged to apply.
  • be co-advised by faculty experts from outside as well as inside your specialty
  • work in a variety of lab setting and build collaborative skills

Program Requirements

Nano-Bio certificate students take two core courses and one lab course. They learn alongside other INBT students in cross-disciplinary journal clubs. To enhance their graduate experience, they attend professional development seminars and present research at the annual Nano-Bio Symposium. Students are given the opportunity to participate in research collaborations with industry partners.

  • Students must complete the Nanobiotechnology certificate program course requirements.
  • Students are expected to present their research at the annual INBT research symposium.
  • Students must also complete all PhD requirements in their home departments.

Eligibility / How to Apply

Prospective students must apply to and be accepted by a participating department before pursuing this certificate program. For additional information, contact Camille Mathis at cmathis@jhu.edu.

For current course information and registration go to https://sis.jhu.edu/classes/

Courses

EN.670.495. Animation in Nanotechnology & Medicine. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): M. Rietveld; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.670.497. Animation in Nanotechnology & Medicine. 3.0 Credits.

This course involves the use of animation to visualize scientific processes in nanotechnology and medicine. Animation is becoming an increasingly important tool in both research and education, especially in fields such as nanobiotechnology that involve complex processes and occur at multiple length scales. Understanding of the subject matter is gained through interaction with faculty and graduate students in research groups in the Institute for NanoBioTechnology at Hopkins. The course follows the basic animation pipeline from concept to post production.
Instructor(s): M. Rietveld.

EN.670.502. INBT Undergraduate Research. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

Student participation in ongoing research activities. Research is conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and often in conjunction with other members of the research group.
Prerequisites: Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class.
Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.670.609. Communication for Scientists and Engineers. 1.0 Credit.

Developing communications skills is a vital part of the training process to prepare scientists and engineers for successful careers. The course’s goal is to provide participants with fundamental training in science communication, focusing on how to present science to a non-expert audience. Students will reach this objective through reading, writing, and classroom activities. Conciseness and clarity are valued in scientific fields, so an emphasis will be on quality rather than quantity of writing. Topics covered generally include: communicating with your target audience, communicating on the web and social media, the editing process, communication resources, and more.
Instructor(s): G. Wadas
Writing Intensive.

EN.670.612. INBT Research Practicum. 1.0 Credit.

Research practicum for INBT Co-Op MSE students.
Instructor(s): H. Mao; S. Gerecht
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.670.615. Introduction to NanoBio Tutorial. 1.0 Credit.

Students in the INBT training grant programs study and present topics in nanotechnology applied to biology from the scientific literature.
Instructor(s): P. Searson.

EN.670.616. Introduction to NanoBio Tutorials II. 1.0 Credit.

Ph.D. students and postdoctoral fellows in the HHMI/IGERT/PSOC/CCNE/CNTC training programs study and present topics in nanotechnology for biology and medicine.
Instructor(s): P. Searson.

EN.670.618. Nanobio Tutorials. 1.0 Credit.

As a follow-up to Intro to NanoBio Tutorials, INBT training grant students will conduct extensive article reviews on topics related to the research being conducted in their labs (i.e., nanoparticles synthesis, quantum dots, cancer, etc.). Topics will also be related to nanotechnology applied to biology from scientific literature. Students will present literary reviews,discussions and formal presentations on articles as they relate to research or projects they wish to partake in. Recommended Course Background: EN.670.615/EN.670.616
Instructor(s): P. Searson.

EN.670.619. Fundamental Physics and Chemistry of Nanomaterials. 3.0 Credits.

This course will cover the physics and chemistry relevant to the design, synthesis, and characterization of nanoparticles. Topics include nanoparticle synthesis, functionalization, surface engineering, and applications in diagnostics and therapeutics. The properties of semiconductor quantum dots and magnetic nanoparticles will be reviewed along with techniques for nanoparticle manipulation, particle tracking, and bio-microrheology. Patterning tools including soft lithography, optical lithography, e-beam lithography, and template lithography will be discussed. Electron and scanning probe microscopy will be reviewed. Cross-listed with Materials Science & Engineering and Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering.
Instructor(s): Staff.

EN.670.621. NanoBio Laboratory. 3.0 Credits.

This course introduces students to concepts and laboratory techniques in nanobiotechnology. The focus of the laboratory is on nanoparticle carriers for drug delivery and markers for imaging. The laboratory involves the synthesis of nanoparticles using solution phase techniques and characterization by optical techniques such as dynamic light scattering and absorbance spectroscopy. Strategies for functionalization of nanoparticles are covered with focus on methods for attaching biomolecules. The basic aspects of cell culture and optical microscopy techniques will be covered. Nanoparticles functionalized with a drug or gene will be used to perform transfection experiments and compared to standard techniques.
Instructor(s): H. Mao.

EN.670.622. Advanced NanoBio Tutorials. 1.0 Credit.

As a follow-up to NanoBio Tutorials, INBT training grant students will present scientific articles and reviews related to their current research project. Topics will also be related to nanotechnology applied to biology from scientific literature. At this time all students should be assigned a project and be able to engage participating students in their field of study. Recommended Course Background: EN.670.615, EN.670.616, EN.670.618, EN.670.619, and Introduction to NanoBio Tutorials and NanoBio Tutorials.
Instructor(s): P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.670.623. Advanced NanoBio Tutorials II. 1.0 Credit.

INBT training grant students only. Recommended Course Background: EN.670.615, EN.670.616, EN.670.618, and EN.670.619
Instructor(s): P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.670.624. NanoBio Tutorials: Special Topics I. 1.0 Credit.

This course is to allow students pursuing a certificate in nanobiotechnology the opportunity each week to review and present on special research topics. The papers and discussions will cover the latest developments in various researches. Recommended Course Background: EN.670.615, EN.670.616, EN.670.618, EN.670.619, EN.670.622, and EN.670.623. Certificate of Advanced Studies in Nanobiotechnology only.
Instructor(s): P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.670.625. NanoBio Tutorials: Special Topics. 1.0 Credit.

This course is to allow INBT training grant fellows the opportunity each week to review and present on special research topics. The papers and discussions will cover the latest developments in various researches. INBT training grant students only. Recommended Course Background: EN.670.615, EN.670.616, EN.670.618, EN.670.619, EN.670.622, and EN.670.623.
Instructor(s): P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.670.628. NanoBio Tutorials II. 1.0 Credit.

As a follow-up to Intro to NanoBio Tutorials, INBT training grant students will conduct extensive article reviews on topics related to the research being conducted in their labs (i.e., nanoparticles synthesis, quantum dots, cancer, etc.). Topics will also be related to nanotechnology applied to biology from scientific literature. Students will present literary reviews,discussions and formal presentations on articles as they relate to research or projects they wish to partake in. Recommended Course Background: EN.670.615/EN.500.615 and EN.670.616/EN.500.616
Instructor(s): P. Searson.

EN.670.642. Lab Course in Nanobiotechnology. 3.0 Credits.

This lab course is a cornerstone of the training that all NTCR fellows acquire. The main objective of the lab course is to reveal the basics of biological systems to engineers in the physical sciences and of physical systems to biologists. This lab course takes place in new state-of-the-art facilities that have been equipped with funding from the HHMI and the NSF. Lab skills learned include: (i) physical and chemical tools to characterize and manipulate the properties of surfaces and nanoparticles; (ii) synthesis, ligand-functionalization, characterization, and targeted cell intake of multi-functional nanoparticles (nanowires and quantum dots); and (iii) atomic force microscopy and quantitative fluorescence microscopy for biological and materials applications. For fellows coming with a physics/engineering background, they learn basics of mammalian cell culture, molecular biology, cell transfection/transformation, and blotting techniques. The course captain is Denis Wirtz (Depts. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Oncology, Pathology and Director of the previously NCI-funded NTCR program and PSOC center). Recommended Course Background: EN.670.620 or EN.670.400
Instructor(s): D. Wirtz
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.670.643. Nanotechnology for Cancer Research Tutorial. 1.0 Credit.

Students in the NTCR training grant program study and present topics in nanotechnology applied to biology from the scientific literature. For NTCR Fellows only.
Instructor(s): D. Wirtz
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.670.695. Animation in Nanotechnology & Medicine. 3.0 Credits.

Instructor(s): M. Rietveld; P. Searson
Area: Engineering, Natural Sciences.

EN.670.697. Animation in Nanotechnology & Medicine. 3.0 Credits.

This course involves the use of animation to visualize scientific processes in nanotechnology and medicine. Animation is becoming an increasingly important tool in both research and education, especially in fields such as nanobiotechnology that involve complex processes and occur at multiple length scales. Understanding of the subject matter is gained through interaction with faculty and graduate students in research groups in the Institute for NanoBioTechnology at Hopkins. The course follows the basic animation pipeline from concept to post production.
Instructor(s): M. Rietveld.

EN.670.800. Independent Study: Global Engineering Innovation. 1.0 - 3.0 Credits.

This independent design course presents students with engineering needs in developing countries. Teams of students will work together to design solutions for the proposed needs that are defined in part with our global partners. Students will have to rigorously research the local community and cultural context of the proposed problems to design solutions. Prototypes will be built and some teams may test prototypes in the local community to optimize solution. Permission of Instructor.
Instructor(s): J. Elisseeff
Area: Engineering.